Mental Health

Whether you're struggling with your mental health or trying to support someone who is, we've got you covered. Listen to the latest tips, strategies, and practical advice from a series of honest and lively conversations. Aired from leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

A highlight from Session 236: Healing Through Sound Meditation & Breathwork

Therapy for Black Girls

06:53 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Session 236: Healing Through Sound Meditation & Breathwork

"We had new routines, our gyms closed, our stress increased, and sadly, many people who are struggling with weight gain and weight regain are afraid to talk with their physicians in fear of being humiliated or talk down to. Despite what you might hear, weight itself is actually about so much more than diet and exercise. There's also science behind weight loss that may be making weight maintenance a challenge. So if you're struggling right now, we encourage you to work with the healthcare provider who can help develop a weight management plan that works for you. Watch HBO Max's new comedy series, the sex lives of college girls, now streaming. Get ready for another comedy series from Mindy Kaling, full of books, butts, boys, and four females who are a bundle of contradictions and hormones. These hilarious women stumble toward adulthood as they dive into new experiences, neck and parties, air rushed abs and caution tape dresses, refusing to be shamed for any of it. No rules, no regrets. Watch the sex lives of college girls now streaming only on HBO Max. It's important to note that healing looks different for all of us, and that each of us might find different things helpful. Joining us to chat about how he link can happen through sound meditation and breath work is linnaeus Smith Crawford. Linnea is a licensed marriage and family therapist. Holistic healer, wellness expert and entrepreneur. She earned her bachelor's degree in psychology from spelman college and her masters in marriage and family therapy with a certification in trauma therapy. In addition to her degrees, she's an advanced certified yoga breathwork and meditation guide, sound healer. International teacher and speaker. She specializes in holistic mental health and healing, which she defies as the return to wholeness through the blending of practices of the mind, body and spirit. Linnea and I chatted about the definition of holistic healing, how things like sound meditation and breath work and support healing, how to find someone appropriately trained to offer these services and she shares a special sound bath just for our community. If there is something that resonates with you while enjoying our conversation, please share it with us on social media using the hashtag TB G in session. Here's our conversation. What are we talking about when we talk about holistic healing, especially when it comes to mental health? Yes, so I have started to use holistic healing and holistic mental health interchangeably, but essentially what it means is that we are tuning into all aspects of ourselves. We are honoring that we are multifaceted and that in order for us to truly heal, we have to be able to integrate all layers of self. So our physical, our emotional, our energetic, our thoughts and our spiritual aspects to create this safe container for healing. Got it. And so some of the things that you use as a part of your practice are both breath work and sound healing. Can you tell us a little bit about how you have developed these wellness practices as a part of your life and how they've been beneficial to you? Yeah, absolutely. So I have always loved things like meditation and yoga and breath work. And I've always understood how necessary they were for healing and for our mental health. So much so that I completed my yoga and meditation teacher certification while I was finishing up my masters. While I was in grad school, I think, you know, you can also maybe relate to this, graduate school is probably one of the most stressful times in a professional's life. And so I really was able to lean into the power of breath work and yoga and meditation and ultimately sound feeling while I was going through that really stressful period. And I started to notice my colleagues and my peers were on the verge of straight burnout, right? And I had a sense of calmness about me. And it was at that point I really realized that things like breath work and yoga and sound feeling are really necessary for us, particularly in the most stressful times. And so with that realization from my personal practice, I wanted to integrate it with my work as a therapist. And so I definitely try to do it on my own or I tried to ask my supervisors for guidance as far as integration goes. And back then, it really wasn't like it was forever ago. It was almost 5 years ago, right? But we've seen how much this whole concept of holistic mental health and holistic healing has really taken off in the last I would say 5 years. My supervisors looked at me like huh, like girl just refer them out to a meditation teacher, just refer them out. We don't do that as therapists. And so that was ultimately the beginning of my journey of integrating these practices into the therapy room and in the mental health space. You know, I really appreciate you sharing that because I do feel like the people who are training now and in the future will have a very different experience of gray school than it sounds like we both had because it feels like we have learned so much more about how all of these things are integrated, but our training isn't typically integrated in that way, right? And so a lot of people have the same kind of story like you around like going back to get certified in yoga and meditation to supplement or compliment what they do in the therapy room. And so can you talk about how you have brought both of those things together and how things like breathwork and sound healing can actually complement traditional therapy. Yes, this is one of my favorite things to talk about. And to your point, we don't get this training in our master's program and still now it's not really a part of the curriculum. And so that's one of the reasons I created the holistic therapist academy, which is essentially to teach therapists and mental health professionals how to ethically integrate and confidently facilitate trauma and from yoga, breathwork and sound healing to help clients heal from anxiety depression and trauma. And so when you think about the major diagnoses, anxiety depression and trauma are really the top three that many of our clients face and a lot of society goes through. And so breathwork and sound healing is so beneficial for those diagnoses and just like stress overall. And so when we talk about this feeling of stress, when we talk about being in our fight, flight or freeze, right? Breathwork and sound meditation and sound healing ultimately help us to calm our nervous system. So in our nervous system, we have our parasympathetic and our sympathetic our sympathetic and I know you know this, but for the audience, the sympathetic nervous system is our seat of fight flight freeze and there's many other responses, but that's essentially our bodies knowing that we're in danger. That is when the bear comes out in the forest and we have to freeze or we're in danger. We're experiencing

Linnea Smith Crawford HBO Mindy Kaling Spelman College MAX Anxiety Depression Trauma
A highlight from Meet Amanda

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

07:03 min | Last week

A highlight from Meet Amanda

"I do a lot of arts and crafts. I have three cats who I adore. I do a lot of cooking, I'm a big swing dancer. That's not something that everyone knows, but I love Lindy hop. I also love to sing and one of my secret goals or not so secret goals is I would love to be a voice actor. I would love to do cartoons because I love silliness and I think that I would be good at it. If I could actually break into that world. I'm Norma mcnerney, and that was today's guest answering a hard hitting question. How would she describe herself to someone who knew nothing about her? And aside from swing dancing and singing and cross stitch, she revealed something deeply disturbing. She doesn't like sweets. She just doesn't care for them. She eats her oatmeal savory. And that's why you come to terrible things for asking, you come for the hard hitting stories. There's a reason why I asked Amanda to describe herself to a person who knows nothing about her. And that's because it hardly ever happens. It probably hasn't happened for over a decade, because as soon as people hear her full name, they already have an opinion about her. Today's guest is Amanda Knox. And as an experiment, I went on the terrible things for asking Instagram account and I asked if you had heard of a man denox, and what you knew about her story. And the answers really ran the gamut. Hearing just that name, without any other context, listeners said that Amanda Knox was framed for murder, guilty of murder. Weird ban innocent. Makes me never want to travel abroad, victim, villain, innocent, guilty. If you've never heard of Amanda Knox, she is so thrilled to hear that. And if you have heard of mandan Knox, you probably already have some predetermined opinion of her of her character of her innocence, and she's used to that. We're not going to get into the minutia of the crime that Amanda was wrongfully convicted and later fully exonerated for because there are literally tens of thousands of articles and documentaries and podcasts about it, and you can easily find those anywhere on the Internet. One of those documentaries was released on Netflix in 2016 and is one that Amanda actively participated in. But here are the key points you need to know just for the sake of this episode. In November 2007, Amanda was a college student, studying abroad in Italy. Her roommate Meredith was murdered in the apartment that she and Amanda shared with two other women. Italian law enforcement immediately pointed fingers at Amanda and the Italian man she'd recently started dating, despite there being zero evidence linking Amanda to Meredith's murder. We really got harp on this point, even without any evidence implicating Amanda she was convicted for Meredith's murder and spent the next four years in an Italian prison. In 2008, a man named Rudy guide was convicted of Meredith's murder in 2011, Amanda was acquitted of the crime and released from prison following a complicated appeals process that were not even going to try to explain. Amanda was then completely exonerated by the Italian government in 2015. All of this is Google able all of it comes up when you Google Amanda Knox. This is considered her story. First of all, the Amanda Knox saga when people think of that, what they're often thinking about is not even my own saga, because what they're thinking about is the murder of my roommate by this burglar named Rudy gaday. So Meredith kercher's murder by Rudy gaday is often what people think of when they think of the Amanda Knox saga. And that is not my story. I actually have nothing to do. I'm like a peripheral person in that story. And so there's that first sort of obstacle as I encounter the world where when I talk about my story, what people think I'm talking about is the murder of Meredith kercher by this other person named Rudy gay, when in fact, my story is tangential to that story, but it is not that story. My story is, I was a peripheral person to this story, but I got sucked into it as someone who shouldn't have been there in the first place and whose life was then defined by this other thing that I had nothing to do with. And I spent time in prison because of that. And I was mercilessly slut shamed in character assassinated in the media because of it, and my ongoing journey to reestablish myself in the real world is constantly encountering these obstacles because of that misappropriation of my identity in regards to this other story completely. So that is one of the key problems is it's like, what we are even talking about is not the same thing. Yes, yes. Because if things had unspooled differently, your Google results would be whatever you decided they are. It would be a story that you told to maybe a couple people in my roommate was killed when I studied abroad. It was really horrible. It would not be the headline for anybody who met you. And it wouldn't be Meredith's headline. Like, that's the other thing. It's like Meredith was a real person who was really murdered by this other real person, and people conflate her tragedy with my tragedy, and then the problem becomes, well, if there's a victim in this story, who is the victim we have to choose. And it's like, no, we don't, because what happened to Meredith was this deeply traumatic, horrible, horrible tragedy, and she was the victim of that tragedy. And then, after that happened, then something tragic happened to me as a consequence of that, but it's not like we have to choose. Like Meredith is no less of a victim because I also ended up becoming a victim of something different of someone else's bad decision making. There are lots of ways that people process their own traumas. And one of the difficulties that I have found is that in processing my own trauma in talking to people about it or even doing something like making jokes about it, I am constantly accused of being callous towards the true victim of this tragedy. And it's like, look, I have never made a joke about Meredith being murdered by Rudy gay. I would never do something like that. If I'm going to be making any jokes at anyone's expense, it's probably the Italian authorities who fucked me over. That is the kind of processing that I'm doing of my own experience.

Amanda Amanda Knox Meredith Norma Mcnerney Rudy Gaday Meredith Kercher Mandan Knox Italian Government Google Netflix Rudy Gay Rudy Italy
A highlight from Podcast 338: 8 Ways to befriend your inner critic and use it to your advantage

CLEANING UP THE MENTAL MESS with Dr. Caroline Leaf

07:57 min | Last week

A highlight from Podcast 338: 8 Ways to befriend your inner critic and use it to your advantage

"Today we're going to be talking about the inner critic. There is so much art there in social media, I should say on social media and in books about or in a critic, which is that voice that we speak when we speak to ourselves judging ourselves in our harsh with ourselves. So I'm going to talk about that today and how we can manage that and the difference between that and intrusive thoughts and all kinds of stuff. But before we begin, I want to remind you about my annual mental health retreat that's running the second to the 4th of December in Dallas Texas, it's going to be phenomenal. It's only a few places left so you need to get in the enregister, we've actually opened up some more space so that we can get more people in because it's been such a wonderful response, and the reason why is that we all need help with our mental health, and this is going to be a very, very hands on conference. We are really going to spend a lot of time helping you deal with things like the inner critic and intrusive thoughts and what are they and what can we do. We're going to do exercises together practical to help you and your loved ones manage your mental health. You're really going to get a handle on self regulation and mind management. Another thing is that these podcasts of educational purposes are not really cool. You need medical advice, please contact the appropriate medical professional. And just before we begin, I also want to say wherever you want to help me with these podcasts to be able to bring more to you and for those of you that are already doing this I want to thank you, what you can do is subscribe to our podcast wherever you listen to podcasts, actually subscribe. It'll be amazing and also follow me on YouTube and subscribe there and leave a review at whatever you can even leave me a 5 star review even better. Also, send us your questions, I'm going to be doing a lot around answering questions. And in fact, this podcast on the inner critic is a post-op putting up the other day and we had lots and lots of questions and lots and lots of people saying, please do a podcast on this. So that's why I'm here doing this so on to today's podcast about the inner critic. Okay, so we all know what the inner critic is. I don't really have to define that for you, but just very quickly, it's that voice. It's us speaking to ourselves and kind of running ourselves down. Critic means critical that it's kind of putting you in a place, you put yourself in a negative place because you're speaking negatively to yourself. Now you just have to go and Google in a critic and you will get so many great graphics to help you with this process to help you understand it and help you to reword the inner critic. There's not a shortage of advice out there, and when you read these great graphics and these little social media posts of this is what we sang to ourselves and this is what we should be saying to ourselves. I mean, it's such a ton of great advice on the issue is that when you read them and you just read them, they just become knowledge that goes in one year after year. It quite literally becomes a memory that is going to just denature or disappear, become heat energy within 2040 to 48 hours and you're not going to actually plant in your cell in yourself so you read the great post, you love the great information, but then you don't actually find yourself applying it. So we've got to spend the time really deconstructing and reconstructing how we're going to manage the inner voice, which is what the inner critic, which is what we're going to do, and we also have to recognize that what a lot of us do, and I've done this before until I don't do anymore because I've trained myself not to is but if you resist that inner voice. If you think others are so bad, I'm just gonna shove it down. And I'm just gonna push it out of my mind. I'm just gonna distract myself. But whatever you don't deal with, is actually when you shove it down and you shove it out of your consciousness, you're pushing it back into a non conscious mind, which is the most intelligent part of you with every experience that you've ever had is built into in the form of physical trees in your brain changes in your gene code in your cells and the gravitational field of your mind. So it's there. And you can shove it down as many times as you like. It's going to come back because it's kind of volcanic in nature. So until you deal with the in it, the inner critic, it's going to keep coming back and probably worse than before and more extensive than before. Whatever you resist will persist. So you need to rewire the networks and you need to get what you know to be true in alignment with what you actually doing. One of the main questions that people used to ask me in therapy and that they still ask me and then I've even asked myself is that I know what I should be saying to myself. But I'm not saying it. This is what I am saying. And these this huge gap between Casimir or huge big think of two sides of a huge big like a cousin. One side of the mountain and you're also on the other side. And this side is that inner critic and that side is the true you and your identity saying, no, that's not true but this chasm. So you know that's the truth, but you live in here, because this is more of your reality. So we want to bring that together and we want to get the inner critic changed into or listening to the truth, the wise mind. So the critic mind is part of a mess that I always talk about. And I always say it's okay to be Missy. So therefore it's okay to have this inner voice. This inner critic and not to be scared of it. It's basically just a, it's a type of intrusive sort. If you resist it, it will persist and get worse. But if you embrace it, if you start building that bridge between what you really know about yourself and what you actually saying about yourself, if you do that, you actually then go into manage it. You're gonna be able to deconstruct it. And that takes time. It's going to take you at least 9 weeks. At least 63 days of working at this deliberately and intentionally in a very sequential way. And that's where the neuro cycle comes in. That's what the neuropil is. It is the system for how we get these kinds of things under control. How we get these intrusive thoughts to enter today, we specifically talking about the inner critic in a speaking to ourselves, that specifically how we get that under control. So the neuropil is the system for how you can close that gap between the what you know to be true. So why is mind and the May seem like what you should be saying to yourself and what you know is a truth about yourself and what you actually saying to yourself. Is this something interfering with your happiness, always preventing you from achieving your goals? I know this happens to me, even though I work in the field of mental health, and I find it incredibly helpful to talk to someone I trust when I find myself in the stuck place. Indeed, one of the best things about our society today is that we can access professional help at the click of a button. If we need to talk to someone about what we are going through, we don't even have to leave the house. This is why I love and recommend better hope to everyone that asks me. They are an amazing company that can assess your needs and met you with your own licensed professional therapist, so that you can start communicating in under 48 hours. Better help is not a crisis line. It's not self help. It is professional counseling and securely online. It also have a broad range of expertise available, which may not be locally available in many areas, and the services are available for clients worldwide. Visit better help dot com forward slash doctor leaf that's better HELP and join the over 1 million people who have taken charge of their mental health with the help of an experienced professional. In fact so many people have been using better hope that they are recruiting additional counselors in all 50 states. I am proud to say that this part cost is sponsored by better help, and cleaning up the mental missed listeners get 10% off their first month at better help dot com forward slash doctor leaf. The link and offer details are in the

Dallas Texas Youtube Casimir Google Missy United States
A highlight from Skin Picking

Mentally Yours

07:45 min | Last week

A highlight from Skin Picking

"And today we're talking to Lauren Brown. Warren's offers from dermatillomania, which is essentially the name for compulsive skin picking. She's written a book called about it called hands and anxious mind unpicked out in January. We'll be talking with her about that today. I think we'll just dive straight in and just say, you've written a book about your mental health and specifically about skin picking. Can you talk to us about how that started for you? When did you begin picking? And then when did you realize that that had become a kind of a real life affecting issue? Well, thanks for having me, first of all, it's really lovely to be here. Yeah, so it started, I think about three or four years ago. That's when it started kind of becoming a life affected thing for me. I'd just left university and I've moved straight to London. So I had my last exam on a Friday and I moved to London on the Monday. So it was very quick. And I moved in with, you know, it was classic spare room set off like with strangers. And I think at the time, I was kind of in survival mode you thinking I want this to work. I want to make this work, you know, London is the kind of dream. So I think I was putting a lot of pressure on myself when really, as the weeks went by. I was feeling quite lonely. I was feeling quite isolated. And I think it was those kind of pressures that made me turn to skin picking. It's funny because it happens so gradually, I couldn't pinpoint an exact moment. Just one of those behaviors that you kind of do when your teenager, you know, like people pick their spots and you don't really think too much of it. And it was kind of a similar thing where they just started off as like just, you know, you're just picking your spots when they come up to becoming more like forecasting compulsive, I guess, where it would get to the point where I was picking when there wasn't anything there. I was just picking the skin, you know? So it's almost like it just went out of control, basically. And yeah, so about three years ago, is when it got really, really bad. So how do you experience kind of anxiety before? And did you have other coping mechanisms but other ways of showing that you were experiencing anxiety? Yeah, so I've had anxiety and depression for pretty much as long as I can remember really. Like, since I was a teenager, just certainly. But I was just had like little weird quirks, I get used to kind of a scarp in different ways, you know? And I think it was only on reflecting about my picking because it's just one of those behaviors where you're like, where on earth is that come from? Like, never would have predicted that this would become such an enormous part of my life. But it was kind of unreflecting about the picking that all of these others kind of small behaviors that I didn't really necessarily think much of at the time started kind of taking on a new light. I started realizing like wait a minute. There's a bit of a trend through the years here. So, you know, I've always, for example, like, bitten my nails, like right down to the quick, like ever since I was little like I would do that. You know, I had this thing with my teeth where I'd force myself to press down on my T three hard as if like, I don't even know what that one was about, really? But just like little things like that way, you just like, you look back and you think that is a very strange thing to do. But I think looking back, it's like almost like a self soothing thing. I thought if I do it now, then it won't hurt later. So I had issues with my teeth because I drank too much fizzy pop when I was little. And so if I had like a sawtooth, I'd like press down really hard to make it hurt now. That'll be ready for when it hurts later. You know what I mean? So it's almost like preemptive like the eventuality that I was worried about. So lots of little things like that, which I go into in the book where it's just this kind of maze of strange behaviors, which like all taken together like things start to make a bit more sense, you know? So what prompted the kind of period where you went? Okay, let me actually look into this a bit more and made you kind of reflect back on what was happening. So I was in like I said, I was in London for that year and during that time I started having therapy with this law called charity. I was really lucky, I think somebody must have dropped out because you know when you told the way it enlist is going to be so long. Whereas actually I heard from them, like within a couple of months. So I started seeing this really amusing therapist. And all of a sudden one week when I was about to leave my session, I was like, do you mind if I just take 5 minutes just to calm down? Because down the little hallway, it was only in a little community center like this little rundown building. Down the hallway from the room where I had the therapy, there's like a little toilet, just like an individual cubicle. And there was a little mirror like really tattered a little mirror like you could barely see in it. It was so cloudy above the toilet. And I'd started after the sessions, instead of going straight and getting my train had like almost compulsively going to that little bathroom and just spend like 20 minutes, just like looking in the mirror picking up my face. And I was like, where is this come from? I hadn't recognized the behavior at home, even though I had been doing at home. And I just thought, this is so weird and I said to, I said, I was just like, I can't leave yet. Because I know I'm going to go down the corridor and just lock myself in that bathroom for however long. Like, do you mind if I stay in calm down a bit? And I think that was the first time I realized like, huh. Like, this has become this weird habit that I'm using to kind of escape. My emotions are using to kind of zord out for a bit. I think the sessions have been so intense, obviously, like after the hour, it was almost like a way of just completely zoning out and like numbing out. And that's kind of what it became, essentially, like over the ensuing months I realized it was an issue. How did the therapist respond did they kind of immediately go like, oh, that's dermatillomania. Not necessarily. She didn't, I mean, it's funny because I'd kind of been Googling at this stage. Like thinking, you know, typing in like skin picking self help or how to stop picking my skin. So I was already kind of familiar with the word. I don't know if I was like in denial. I just don't like that. It's not that bad. You know, it's not to that extent. So that word was kind of already in my, I don't know, I guess like background vocabulary, but I wasn't really thinking about it. But she the therapist kind of said, yeah, I've noticed that, you know, as we've been talking, you've been running your fingers along your face and your shoulders and at very often have to like, you know, you know, in therapy, like rooms, they often have like a really beautiful toy box full of fiddly things. That always be like squeeze in something or destroying something with my hands through the whole session. She was like, yeah, you do see me like a bit restless, which was probably a bit of an understatement, but she was very kind about it and she just said, yeah, of course, we can take 5 minutes to just calm down. And then over the weeks, we started talking about it more explicitly, which kind of brought it home to me that this is actually a problem. I can't keep pretending that it's, you know, I'm in control and it's all fine. Like it was getting to the point where I was having to leave my desk where I was working at the time to go into the bathroom and do it. I would be sitting at my desk in the urge would just take over and I'd have to go and just have a bathroom break and just sit in the work toilets doing it. So yeah, it was around that time really that I started realizing like some things

Lauren Brown London Warren Depression
A highlight from Liberty Accelerator Program with Jarrod H. Smith

Veteran on the Move

05:40 min | Last week

A highlight from Liberty Accelerator Program with Jarrod H. Smith

"Military families to the military transition, tabs Lee, Jared, we've had you on the show once before talking about commission officers guide and transition in general. You've been adding and still going with what most of us like to refer as the military transition, but you're going to have a little bit different twist to that. But before we get to talking about it, remind us what you did in the navy. How's your thing, Joe? We'll do. So maybe kept me busy for the last 19 years as a U.S. Navy supply core officer. And I've got the good fortune of serving in the submarine force that is still with naval aviation on aircraft carrier at a Norfolk. And then a quick extent with the naval expeditionary forces as well as with the army in against and so they kept me away from a wife and four kids for a lot of that time. And we were whining it down now. I've got 11 months left. On active duty. And I recognize as I was entering what I'm working now is my military transition battle window that we had planning for that eventuality that being all of us get out of service one day. We had the planning all backwards. So I'll try to solve that problem. So talk a little bit about I mean, you're still in the process of your transition if you allow you to use that word. It is. So you're 11 months out before you're done at 20. What's some of the initial what are some of the things you've run across some of the obstacles you've encountered in the process of looking at your transition out of the military? Yeah, thanks, Joe. That is the, that is the question to answer, right? I believe the most important obstacle that a lot of us aren't aware of is the time factor. We've got this mindset in the military service that transition against a couple of years out or when told that you're no longer eligible to serve or you have a promoted kicked out. Simply not in a time. It's simply is not enough time. My own personal experience and unfortunate I'm one of the fortunate few. But I recognized about a decade ago that I would leave one day, but there was no structure for me to really lay in on to really intentionally and informatively plan for that eventuality, right? So whenever I finally attended the DoD tap about a year ago, actually, I was like, wow, you know, a lot of this stuff I should have known about ten years ago And nothing kept me from requesting to go attend to the odac course. I could have I could have taken leave and taking it, you know, under the curtain or I could have requested to go TDY for three days to go take it. But I didn't. And a lot of the information that they give in there, we need yesterday no matter our time in service, but we don't think that way. We're all thinking about being fully mission capable for deploying that range. Our families are ready for us to deploy down range through God's work. And I think that's the I think that's a subpar approach. Yeah, you know, take it back about be personally I actually, from being even when I was still going through initial schools and stuff, I was always kind of thinking outside the Marine Corps when I was in. If nothing else just out of my own curiosity, but there was no structured plan in place really. It was just kind of on my own toying with different things, mostly in the entrepreneurship realm. I'm not necessarily what's my job. What kind of job am I going to get when I get out? But you kind of have to wait. Sometimes in the military almost made you feel guilty about preparing yourself for what you're going to do when you get out. And really, in the military, military is one of those few things where you go into it, you know you're leaving at some point. Whether it's after four year enlistment or 30 year retirement, you know you're leaving, so transitions always discussed, especially if you're leadership where you get to be really careful tactful about how you go about talking about getting out or even prepared about getting out. Usually some of the big things like I'm going to get that degree I never had, or I'm going to get that higher level degree than I've always wanted to get. Those kind of things are usually fairly well accepted. But running a business or doing other things or going to other customized specialized type transition classes usually is very well accepted. So ironic, too. Yeah. The military puts a lot of money into these tamp tap transition assistance classes that are out there and have been there for many for decades now. They're getting better, but they're still kind of a one size fits all. And they do have some customized approaches and things like that here and there and some optional tracks you can do. But. What is the main reason for the military putting so much money into the transition process?

U.S. Navy Supply Core JOE Jared Norfolk Navy LEE Army DOD Marine Corps
A highlight from Episode 280: Low Libido & Relationships Cause Sadness

The Hardcore Self Help Podcast with Duff the Psych

04:30 min | Last week

A highlight from Episode 280: Low Libido & Relationships Cause Sadness

"I know some people like to sort of like a number, like what's your sex number? So if you had like a zero to ten, how important is sex to you? And if you wrote it down in your partner wrote it down independently, what do you think it would be? That's something to consider. You know, if you're at like a three or four, and she's at like an 8 or 9 or ten, then that's obviously going to be a source of some not necessarily conflict, but it's going to be something that requires attention requires working out in the relationship. Hey everybody, before we start the show, I want to make a couple disclaimers. This show does cover a wide variety of topics related to mental health and life in general, and some of those could be sensitive for you. I want to simultaneously encourage you to be brave and consuming difficult content, but also respect and recognize your limitations. So please use your best judgment. I will never be offended if you need to skip a question or an episode entirely, but feel free to feel it out, check out the episode and just see what happens. If you need a skip, that's okay. But you know, feel free to give it a shot first. I also need to say that while I am a psychologist, I'm not your psychologist, and I'm not your therapist. This is not intended to be direct medical advice and you should not use this as a substitute for professional help. So with those said, let's go ahead and get into the show. All right, hello, friends of all variety. This is the hardcore self help podcast, episode two 80. I'm your host doctor Robert Duff, AKA Duff the psych. I'm a mental health content for real people, just like you. And today I have a question and answer episode. If you're listening to this at the release time, it's coming to you a little bit late because of the holiday. So yeah I'm recording this. It's about 9 noms 9 30 on Friday night. It's been a really good time. We kept things really small. Just, you know, had a nice dinner with the family. Family meeting me and my wife and our kids. And focused on relaxation, gratitude, all that kind of stuff. It was really nice and peaceful. And today, which is a Friday after I had another session on my tattoo sleeve that I'm working on. Covering up an old tattoo actually, just some script that was old and kind of mushy, so I figured why not. And it came out really well. I'm super excited. You can check that out on my Instagram if you if you want to actually see it. But yeah, that's exciting going on in my life. Things are going relatively well. I continue to be extremely busy, a little bit more busy than I'd like, but I'm always working toward a better balance there. I was very excited this week because a pre order of audiobook finally came out and I like listening to audiobooks while I get my tattoos done. I usually sit for like three, three, four hour sessions for them and today was like three and a half or four hours I forget. But I like getting lost in the audiobook. And so the most recent audiobook by Andrew roe, who writes three different series here at the arcane Ascension series, the weapons and wielder series and the war broken mirrors series, all extremely good, basically progression fantasy. So if anybody's into swords and sorcery stuff, but with like progression where you kind of working your way up through the ranks and getting new access to new spells and building new items and all sorts of stuff like that, not quite like a video game, but kind of very close to that style. You'd really like it. And in this book in particular, there's a relationship that I really enjoy, which is actually between the main character and one of his swords. He has a it's called a sacred sword. It's sentient. It has a personality and stuff. And so he has a mark on him that represents his bond to that sword, and they have really good banter. And they share sort of energy resources power awareness back and forth in the way that they kind of save each other and help each other out is really sweet and also very funny at times and super bad asset times. So definitely if you're interested in that, check out the weapons and Wheeler series by Andrew roe. But anyway, that's enough of the stuff that I'm excited about. Why don't we go ahead and get into the questions. Here's the first one. All right, so here's the first one. It reads hi Doc. I was recently diagnosed

Robert Duff Aka Duff Andrew Roe Wheeler
A highlight from 567 Bipolar Twins Maria & Anna Duke

Mental Illness Happy Hour

06:15 min | Last week

A highlight from 567 Bipolar Twins Maria & Anna Duke

"Never trust myself to pick a healthy partner and therefore, I will either continue to choose abusers adding to my PTSD or I will avoid people altogether and die wishing I was lovable. Wow. That is deep and I think so universal. Even people who are in relationships, I think. I think so many people are in loveless relationships, and you just stay in because, you know, you don't want to rock the boat, maybe you got kids, maybe you're afraid that you'll never find someone better or afraid you're gonna hurt them. I thank you for that. This is also from this fear of survey. By arbitrary Mary up. I am a big fan of your work arbitrary Mary. She writes, I fear that the people I truly care about don't know how important they are to me despite my explicit, explicit statements, and that because of my inability to convey my sincere appreciation of our relationship, they will eventually talk here of me and unceremoniously ghost me with a zero explanation leaving me to endlessly obsess over every minuscule interaction we ever had, and an attempt to learn from my failure as a friend. That is fantastic. I hope excuse me. I really hope that first of all, that this isn't true and it sounds. It sounds definitely like a catastrophizing part of your brain, but I think it's awesome that you express that you love them. I don't think you can ever go wrong with that. This is from the asks, ask Paul anything survey filled out by LEGO is okay and she writes hey Paul, so after you've screwed up our carefully written surveys and thrown them in the trash can, do you also set it on fire? No, I don't. I take them to a nuclear plant. And I wrap the surveys around the rods that have the the expended fissile material because that more thoroughly make sure that these are wiped off the face of the earth. And honestly, I love handling rods. Any kind of rod, but especially one that's packed with explorer to uranium. Also, are you working on a book including some surveys? I remember a while back you matched it. That is kind of on hold. It's one of the reasons why I took I think I'm gonna crunch that paper a little louder. Took the surveys being able to read them off of the website because I keep putting off doing this. I want people to be able to if they choose to put their email address on the surveys so that if I do include them in a book, I could contact them if I have any questions. But I have not gotten around to that. It's on my it's how my to do list which is experiencing a beautiful anniversary. This is from the fear survey filled up by you're a good man Bobby. And she writes, I fear life. I fear living. I'm terrified of occupying space and being seen. I'm scared that one day I'll disappear and no one will notice. I made a living ghost. Wow. Wow. I can kind of relate to that one because for a lot of my life, I had a fear that my life will be forgettable. And I when I got into a support group and started doing some work, I saw how that fear was at the core of everything that I thought my safety in life would depend on me being regarded as exceptional. And then I wondered why I felt so separate and lonely. As I was actively trying to distance myself from other people, stand out. Who knew that the place to be is one of many. This is from the fears survey filled out by one cool cat and she writes my biggest fear is being raped. Gas station bathrooms in particular feel unsafe to me and I try to avoid them as much as possible. I have a recurring fear almost more like an OCD thought that I've had for years that when I opened the stall in a public restroom, there will be a dead body in there and God forbid it will still be sitting up straight with its eyes open, so it will look like it's looking at me. Wow. That is so specific. I'm also afraid of bodies of water with the exception of bathtubs and swimming pools. I worry I'll either drown or that some creepy creature will pull me down under the water. I've had nightmares about being murdered by giant squid, not sure where my fear of water comes from. Thank you for the most. Yeah, I definitely relate to the when I'm in a body of water. More the fear that I'm gonna step on something that's gonna grab me or hurt me. Is from the fear survey filled up by Chloe. She writes, I fear that we are going to go into a famine, the government is already controlling our supply chain. I fear that when we do go and do famine slash desperate times my child will suffer. I often think of the best way to kill me and my

Mary Ptsd Paul Lego Bobby OCD Swimming Chloe
A highlight from Podcast 337: Why arent we talking about mens mental health enough? + ways to de-stigmatize mens mental struggles

CLEANING UP THE MENTAL MESS with Dr. Caroline Leaf

06:46 min | Last week

A highlight from Podcast 337: Why arent we talking about mens mental health enough? + ways to de-stigmatize mens mental struggles

"If you haven't heard about anchor, it's the easiest way to make a podcast. This is how I make my podcasts. Let me explain. It's free. These creation tools that allow you to record and edit your podcast right from your phone or computer, ankle will distribute your podcast for you, so it can be heard on Spotify, Apple podcast and many more. You can make money from your podcast with no minimum listenership. It's everything you need to make a podcast in one place. Download the free anchor app or go to anchor if aim to get started. The link to the anchor app will be in the show notes. Hi, and welcome to my podcast cleaning up the mental mess. I'm your host doctor Caroline leaf, and today I'm going to be talking to you about male mental health. So important. Not spoken about enough and that's why we need to talk about this. But before we begin, if you enjoy my podcast and want to help me keep making them free and accessible to everyone, please consider subscribing wherever you listen to your podcasts and giving me a 5 story review and sharing the podcast with brains family and on social media. It would mean so much to me. And just before we begin as well, this podcast is for educational purposes and is not medical advice. If you need medical help please contact the appropriate medical professional. And now back to today's podcast. Mental health affects men and women and every gender all of us humans, mental health is a human issue. But it's very commonly overlooked in men. Many males will often hide it more than females. Men will also generally seek mental help at much lower rates than women and therefore a lot of main struggles will go untreated. One of the biggest reasons why mental health may not be talked about as much or that males seek less mental help is due to the high levels of stigma associated with male suffering from any mental health issues. With this being said, they are a few shocking statistics surrounding the effect that the stigma on male mental health is having. I will put the link from the statistics into the show notes and it will also be in the blog, which if you subscribe to doctor leaf dot com, you'll be able to get the blog which is a note basically of the podcast. So here are the statistics. Three times as many men as woman die by suicide. Men report lower levels of life satisfaction than women according to the government's national well-being survey. May not least likely to exceed psychological therapies than women only 36% of referrals to the national health NHS talking therapies are for men, the national institute on alcohol abuse and alcoholism trusted source puts the annual number of main dying due to alcohol related causes at 62,000 compared to 26,000 women may not also two to three times more likely from the more likely trusted source to misuse drugs than women, depression and suicide or rank as leading causes of death amongst men, and yet they still far less likely to seek mental health treatment than women. These statistics show that they need to be a better way to handle stigma regarding male mental health. I think it's really important to understand what mental health stigma is to break down the issue of wadi such a problem today when we address male mental health. And just remember that mental health is something that affects us all as humans with a human or female, that we've got to be addressing the fact that males are not addressing their mental health as much as they should, and every human needs to address their mental health, and a lot of the stigma comes down to the fact that in general, we are pegging mental health as a brain disease and that you're inferior and not as good and is something wrong with you as a person and your value and identity is lost if you say that you're betting. And that's a massively negative toxic view of mental health. We have be battled with mental health because of issues that we've gone through in life, not because we have a brain. It's not a brain disease. It's not something sitting in your brain waiting to be triggered by an environmental factor. It is an issue of life. They'd be processed through our mind into our brain that cause changes in our brain, body and mind, and if they toxic and may see that will affect our health, which is a result of it not the cause. And then there's a feedback loop that set up. So if you have this adverse experience that's affecting how you're feeling and functioning mentally and that is the infecting your physical and mental health, your physical brain and body health that can then manifest over time as diseases that need to be addressed. And in that your body's broken and or diseased or you've got something going wrong, then that feeds back into the mind and in this negative feedback loop is set up that we need to move away a lot of the stick number will be removed, we need to level the playing fields in recognize it as humans we all are battling with our mental health at certain points in our life, it's worse and at other points it's slightly better. When it comes to my mental self care regimen, exercise is an essential part of what I do every day to keep my mind and body healthy. But occasionally, I get into the zone and work out a little too hard, which can lead to some pretty stressful aches and pains. Thankfully, this has changed since I discovered home medics. They've got a whole line of message products from a message gun with built in hot and cold technology to a message cushion that lets you lie down or sit up depending on your therapeutic needs to a three in one foot massager with a vibration so powerful it loosens the muscles in your legs and lower back. The moral of the story is that hermetics has massages that address your pain points from head to toe. I love a travel friendly double barreled total body massager and it's amazing. I truly feel like I recover from a workout much better now, even when I'm away for work. It has become an essential part of my daily routine. Whether you're dealing with chronic pain or just looking to help your muscles recover from a workout, we've got good news right now. If you go to homemade dot com slash doctor leaf and use the promo code doctor leaf, you'll receive a free portable phone sanitizer when you buy a $100 or more in message products. That's a $60 value that's HOME ICA dot com slash doctor leaf and use the promo code doctor Lee for your free portable phone sanitizer with a $100 message of purchase. The

Caroline Leaf National Health Nhs National Institute On Alcohol Spotify Apple Brain Disease Depression Government LEE
A highlight from Becoming Jolie

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

07:00 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Becoming Jolie

"And if you haven't joined Instagram, I am so proud of you. Or if Instagram just isn't your thing, do you remember joining Twitter or Facebook or Pinterest or tumblr or Reddit or AOL chat rooms back in the 90s? Do you remember this is the real question? Do you remember what it was like to find connection and identity and validation from complete strangers? I do. I remember setting aim away messages designed to make me seem more enticing or mysterious, do you mind oblivious crushes who definitely weren't wondering if the lyrics to wonder while we're about them, and how could they be, I did not know what that song was about and truly even to this day do not. Don't know what it's about. I remember writing blog posts and installing a hit counter and wondering, who were those ten people who were reading my words? I believe it was just me, honestly, all ten hits were me. I remember making real-life friends out of tumblr followers. And I remember signing up for Instagram and posting my first photo, which I think got possibly three likes. But I asked today's guest, Jolie, that same question. Do you remember joining Instagram? I do. It was 2012. I was a little bit late to the game. I remember because I was late to the smartphone game, but I remember that it was 2012 because I remember that I was pregnant with my oldest. It kind of felt the way that blogging felt in the beginning where it was like, hey, I'm new here. Hey, check out this account. Like everything was really friendly and people were really interested in finding new people to connect with. I remember that my account was public when I first made it. And at that point, I was still a teacher. I was not on Instagram with the intent of let me make a public account and try to get an audience that was not on my radar. The intent was more like this is a fun new place to meet people and it was sort of a bridge at that point in my life. I had Ben blogging personally for a while and I had made connections with people all across the country through my blog, not a ton, but like I had made some friendships. And so reconnecting with those people in a new platform was like fun and exciting. Jolie's account was called becoming Jolie. She was young. She was newly married and she was becoming whoever she was going to be. In February of 2013, I had just had my first child. I was married. I'm to my current husband, Sean, who, at the time, was in residency for medicine. So he was really busy. We lived in a little townhouse near downtown Columbus, and I decided shortly after having my daughter that I was going to stay home just for the sake of sanity for our whole family because Sean was working like 80 hours a week. I probably made like 40 grand a year or something. And so like, a third of my paycheck or more was going to go to child care if I stayed in teaching. So I just decided to stay home. So I spent the majority of 2013 at home with a newborn who was a terrible sleeper and that was the same year that I also was like, oh shit, I don't actually want to be a stay at home mom, but I just quit this job that was like the only job I'm licensed to do. And so that's when I started doing the very beginning of brim papery and social media was really the crux of all of that. That was the only avenue I really knew how to maneuver to sell something. Jolie made calendars, mugs, cards, all created with her handwritten calligraphy. I found her through a mug that said girl you are one boss bitch, which arrived as a gift. So then I followed brim papery and eventually becoming Jolie because I figured if I like this work, I'll like the woman who made it. And I was right, Jolie was witty and she was clever and she was funny and beautiful like her work. And I never thought about if it was weird for me to follow her personal account. And it didn't feel weird. I definitely got to a point where I noticed people following my personal account, which definitely was intertwined with my business account. I mean, I didn't hide the fact that I had a personal account. I would often share on my brim papery account like hi, my name's Jolie, I own and operate this business. Here's my personal account if you want to follow along. But I guess, in my mind, there's a real specific imagery for me of influencer and I never. I had very sparse partnerships with brands that were like exceptions for me. I think I probably did at the most maybe like half a dozen things where someone either paid me or I did a lot of women who owned small businesses would ask to like, can I send you my stuff and could you share it? And I always did that because to me, that was like paying it forward. But as far as like me trying to like, I don't know, like write a blog post that had all affiliate links or get a brand to give me a Vitamix so I could then put hashtag ad in my videos and stuff. That was never really my goal. This is going to sound really really ridiculous, but if anything, I enjoyed comedy. I enjoyed making people laugh and being funny and snarky and this isn't to say that I was trying to be a stand up comedian because I don't think that highly of my own humor, but that's kind of the angle I was coming at with my Instagram and my public account for a lot of the time. I did kind of go through phases, though, where, you know, there were times where people started to treat me like an influencer, and then as a way to sort of handle the influx of requests of like, where's your shirt from? Where's your lipstick from? I would start to do affiliate links because I would be trying to problem solve. Okay, every time I do a story or put a post up, people want to know every single thing in the picture. So maybe I should put up affiliate links if I'm going to be doing all of this labor of typing to all these comments where every single thing is from. Anyway, to me an influencer in my mind is someone who specifically is aiming to monetize their account. And for me, monetizing my account was sort of like a reactive well I guess if I'm going to be spending time sourcing these things for

Jolie Tumblr Pinterest Reddit Sean AOL Twitter Facebook BEN Columbus
How To Help Someone At Risk Of Suicide

Short Wave

01:43 min | 2 months ago

How To Help Someone At Risk Of Suicide

"We're going to talk about how you may be able to help someone who is suicidal now. My mom is a suicide attempt survivor. And this topic is really meaningful for both of us. Because there's so much shame and stigma that can make people who are suffering unable to safely talk about suicidal thoughts and feelings but as a society these days retu- we seem more open to talking about it. Certainly i mean we have a long way to go but yes we are becoming more open to talking about it. Yeah let's talk first about how prevalent suicide is right now. Well it's the tenth leading cause of death in the united states in two thousand and that's the most recent here we have data for About forty seven thousand people died by suicide and according to the american foundation for suicide prevention. About one point four million people attempted suicide that yet. But here's the thing about suicide. Research shows that suicide is preventable. Yes and there are things that friends and family can do that are genuinely helpful to someone who is struggling with suicidal thoughts. A lot of times folks feel like suicide. Prevention is only something that professionals can do. That's decay quincy lassine. He's a psychologist and has struggled with thoughts of suicide himself and he chairs that lived experience. Division of the american association of suicide allergy and lean says that suddenly getting help from a mental health professional is a very important part of preventing suicide but there are things that each one of us can do when a loved. One is in despair and feeling hopeless. Often it is that simple stuff of showing that you care but in showing up for somebody and being there for them

American Foundation For Suicid Division Of The American Assoc United States
In 'We're Not Broken,' Author Eric Garcia Takes On Myths About Autism

Parenting: Difficult Conversations

02:32 min | 2 months ago

In 'We're Not Broken,' Author Eric Garcia Takes On Myths About Autism

"In the beginning of your book. You mentioned that the writing began in part out of frustration and frustration specifically fueled by how media covers autism. What frustrated you about that. And what were you hoping to do about it in this book so i feel like the frustration i had about the way we talk about autism was that any conversation about autism began and ended with discussion about vaccines. I should say the completely false idea that vaccines caused autism. There is no evidence whatsoever about it and then there was the other part. Which is that if we want to get. We wind up getting past discussing vaccines. There's just a lot of discussion. about curing. autistic people are curing autism or combating autism or fixing autistic people and almost never. Was there any discussion about well. What is it that autistic people need right now. Even if you believe that there should be a cure which i really articulate that. I don't think that there should be cure that there can be a cure for autism. That's something that's a long way down the road and that doesn't really serve autistic people now and i also was frustrated that i felt like almost every discussion about autism focused mostly on white male adolescent boys and i felt like that was a very incomplete. Discussion about autism was a very incomplete excluded. Plenty of autistic people who. Don't that that categorization right right so it. Just it sounds like there's just a lot of myths that get perpetuated through the media which is all too common right and that this in part this was to dispel some of those that have been so pervasive precisely. I think that one of the things that i wanted to do was again to ball from the title of my book. Change the autism conversation to include as many people as possible. Because i felt that there were. There are a lot of pernicious ideas. About what the idea about whether autistic people can live independently or even even if they can't live independently live and they deserve to live in the community rather than institutions or the idea that autistic people can either not work or only work in a very specific sector of science technology engineering mathematics. And i also thought that there were a lot of misconceptions about whether people can have families or have legitimate relationships or legitimate

Autism
Is There a Link Between Certain Diets and Depression? With Dr. Neal Barnard

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

01:43 min | 2 months ago

Is There a Link Between Certain Diets and Depression? With Dr. Neal Barnard

"Barr thank you very much for joining us to be with you. You ready for question number one. You bet all right this one comes to us from each four and a tour rights is a junk food diet more likely to cause depression. Well it's a great question. And and historically people have drawn a division whatever's below the neck. That's where i could have an effect but above above the neck no couldn't have any effect. Well the that foods might affect depression impressed in a favorable way through the right foods came to our attention as an accident. We were doing research study with geico insurance and the reason the reason we did this study and check you and i talked about this before the geiko national headquarters is about three or four blocks from her office and so they were really interested in the possibility that a plant based i might help them where they had employee wants to lose weight or get diabetes under better control so we instituted a program at geiko of a vegan diet both in the cafeteria and a weekly class for anybody who wanted to actually jump in and so although the purpose of it was to look at way changes and to see how he does. Diabetes might improve. We saw something else and that was depression. Started to lift. And you can do this subjectively where where you have. Individuals fill out a paper and soul questionnaire of specific symptoms. Are you sleeping. How's your mood. How's your appetite a whole bunch of indicators of depression and what we saw is that quite steadily. They were improving over the course of his site.

Depression Geico Insurance Geiko National Headquarters Barr Diabetes
Dr. Michael Greger: How to Naturally Boost Brain BDNF Levels to Fight Depression

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

02:14 min | 2 months ago

Dr. Michael Greger: How to Naturally Boost Brain BDNF Levels to Fight Depression

"Welcome to nutrition facts. I'm your host. Dr michael gregor today. We look at ways to mitigate a serious mental health disorder. Depression there's accumulating evidence in brain derived neurotrophic fact may be playing a role in human depression beady. Nf controls the growth of new nerve cells so low levels may explain the atrophy of specific brain areas. You see among depressed patients that maybe one of the reasons exercises so good for our brains. Starting our day exercise regimen within three months you can get a quadrupling obedient. F- reliefs from your brain. This makes sense. I mean anytime. We were desperate to catch prey or desperate not to become prey ourselves. We needed to be cognitively sharp. And so when we're fasting or exercising or an negative calorie balance. Our brain starts churning out. Bvd nf to make sure we're firing on all cylinders. So of course. Big farm as eager to create drugs to mimic this effect. But is there any way to boost enough naturally. Yes i just said it. Fasting and exercise. Okay okay but is there anything we can add to our diet to boost obedient. Well hiring takes dietary flavonoids appear to be protectively associated with symptoms of depression. The harvard nurses study followed tens of thousands of women for years and found that those who are eating the most to appeared to reduce the risk of coming down with depression. Flavonoids occur naturally implants. So there's a statue mountain variety of healthy foods. But how do we know. The benefits are from the flavonoids and not just from eating healthier in general. You don't know until you put it to the test. See some fruits and vegetables have more than others. Apples have more than apricots plums. More than peaches red cabbage. More than white kale. More than cucumbers. So if you randomize people into one of three groups more high flavonoids fruits and vegetables. More low flavonoids fruits and vegetables or no extra fruits and vegetables at all after eighteen weeks. Only the high flavonoids group got a significant boost and obedient f- levels which corresponded to an improvement in cognitive

Dr Michael Gregor Depression Harvard
Healthcare Reporter Dylan Scott on the Controversial Alzheimer’s Treatment, Aduhelm

Unexplainable

02:06 min | 2 months ago

Healthcare Reporter Dylan Scott on the Controversial Alzheimer’s Treatment, Aduhelm

"Here with dylan scott. Healthcare reporter at vox high in the first half of the show we were talking about this single minded focus on amyloid hypothesis which has sort of prevented these other ideas about how to treat alzheimer's from taking hold so i guess we're thinking about nowadays. What are the consequences of this type of attachment to a hypothesis. That hasn't really made a lot of progress. I mean first and foremost The record of alzheimer's drug development over the past few decades has been one of failure between one thousand nine hundred ninety. Eight and twenty fourteen about one hundred and thirty drugs. Went through clinical trials trying to treat alzheimer's disease and almost all of them have failed. But now we just got this brand new. Alzheimer's drug approved right first time in a while. Yeah this summer. The fda approved a drug. Finally the first drug in nearly twenty years for alzheimer's disease called cana mab and it has been developed by biogen one of the major pharma manufacturers in the world and they really got started testing this drug back in two thousand fifteen and what they found was there did seem to be an effect on the amyloid plaques but in terms of cognitive functioning patients did not really seem to be seeing benefit so this drug has done what other amyloid drugs have done in the past right. It does what it's supposed to do it removes the amyloid but patients aren't getting better. Yeah it seems so clear that in march of two thousand nineteen biogen announced. Like this isn't working. We're going to help these trials. This was another dead end in the pursuit of an alzheimer's trip. Okay same stories. Same result but they came back in october of two thousand nineteen with a surprise. They said that like after some of these patients had had been allowed to finish the treatment. They went back in two trials going simultaneously and they actually found that in one of those trials. According to their read the data there was a subset of patients who had actually seen a cognitive benefit from the disease.

Alzheimer's Dylan Scott Alzheimer's Drug Biogen FDA
Are You a Dieter or Disordered Eater?

Diet Culture Rebel Podcast

01:45 min | 2 months ago

Are You a Dieter or Disordered Eater?

"We're going to look at. How dieting and disordered eating are similar. We're gonna look at what disordered eating looks like. And then we're also going to talk about what you can do to heal from disordered eating how you can start to take action if this is something that you struggle with. So we'll start by talking about what disordered eating actually is. And then i'll share with you. How dieting is very similar to disordered eating so when we look at the definition of disordered. Eating it's really used to describe a range of irregular eating behaviors. And it's important to know that this is just a description. It is not a diagnosis. So disordered eating is not a diagnosis. But it doesn't mean that it's not a valid struggle which will talk about a little bit. Everyone who struggles with an eating disorder has disordered eating. But not everyone who has disordered eating struggle with an eating disorder. So i think that's a really important distinction here An eating disorder must fit a very specific narrow criteria in order to be diagnosed and disordered. Eating doesn't have to fit that particular narrow definition And also it's not a diagnosis. But here's the thing. I really don't want you to get caught up in the fact that there is no official diagnosis for disordered eating. Because that doesn't mean that your struggles aren't real. It doesn't mean that they aren't valid. You do not need a diagnosis in order to get support in order to ask for help in order to know that what you are going through is really

Robin Williams' Son, Zak Williams, on Mental Health

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

02:03 min | 2 months ago

Robin Williams' Son, Zak Williams, on Mental Health

"This. Jump right into this week's conversation with zach williams zach alario michael. I'm great. i just got back from a road trip. And i'm feeling energized and excited about about the remainder of the year in what's become so thank you for spending time with us in your passion interest around mental health and how it fits into the modern workplace is something that feels like a tongue and groove for. We're trying to do as well. So can we start where it started for you and so let's go back. Why mental health and help paint the picture. And you're obviously. Your dad is going to be a major part of your story but why mental health for you. Well mental health for me started or at least thinking about mental health by my personal well-being started very early. On in my life. I had very obsessive traits as a child A lot of thinking involving symmetry and and repetition and That manifested through my teens and early adult life in terms of anxiety and trying to manage obsessive thinking and and that really came to a head After my dad by because i was diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder and was using things like alcohol. Self medicate to quiet my thoughts to quiet my mind in. That's wasn't tenable in the longer term for me. How old were you when you were diagnosed with. Ptsd thirty three which was to about two years after my dad died by suicide

Zach Williams Zach Alario Michael
Biopsychologist, Prof. Marion Hetherington, on the Effect of Psychology and Physiology on Appetite

Sigma Nutrition Radio

02:05 min | 3 months ago

Biopsychologist, Prof. Marion Hetherington, on the Effect of Psychology and Physiology on Appetite

"Professor. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks for having me like i said. I'm very excited to dive into a lot of these topics. And i think something that might set the stage for people early on is when we think about this psycho biological approach to human appetite. You've written really excellently. In some of your work abou the mistake we might make if we were to consider appetite solely on the basis of physiology or psychology particularly when we think around what drives food intake and that they are inextricably linked wondering. Could you just frame that. For people of what is a the most accurate way we can think of that. Overlap between physiology and psychology when it comes to appetite unless a behavioral scientist. I'm very interested in human behavior. But you just can't get away from the fact that human behavior is driven by really strong physiological needs however food and in our society as everyone is aware is very much shaped by our culture by our cuisine by our environments and to great extent what we eat is powerful identity so when we think about psycho biology appetite. We're thinking about the behaviors that we express and we think about what drives those behaviors and in particular. I'm very interested in genetics. I'm interested in the genetics of obesity. For example and the way. I understand that is to think about the risk factors for obesity being highly heritable. And then ho. That's expressed in terms of behavior and i'm not saying that genes our destiny. I'm simply saying that. The genes are really important and as a psychologist. I need to understand a little bit about the heritage ability of some of these eighteen treats and risk factors for overweight obesity so that i can understand the behaviors

Obesity
The Ongoing Health Costs Associated With 9/11

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

01:58 min | 3 months ago

The Ongoing Health Costs Associated With 9/11

"To federal funds established after the attacks of september eleven. Two thousand and one have paid around twelve billion dollars over the years. The money went to first responders. The families of those who died or people have gotten sick as a result of the terrorist carnage. Medical claims have been increasing in recent years. Many from people with cancer marketplace's samantha fields reports on the ongoing health costs connected to that day twenty years ago this weekend. Michael o'connell responded to the world trade center as a firefighter on nine eleven and spent the next few weeks working at ground zero five years later he got sick. I know the exact date. It was december thirty first. Two thousand six new year's eve. He went to bed that night filling healthy but when he woke up the next morning i literally had swollen limbs swollen ankles all my joints were inflamed by body kind of blew up to like twice the size. It was a pulmonologist figured out that he had a rare autoimmune disease called sarcoidosis that was attacking his skin and joints and told him he'd gotten it from breathing in toxins. The material that responders and survivors were exposed to when the towers collapsed was quite toxic. Dr michael crane treats a lot of nine eleven first responders through the world trade center health program clinic at mount sinai so huge huge burning buildings collapsing. Everything inside is burning and it collapses down into a pile and then an enormous. Dust cloud a lot of firefighters. Police officers and others at ground zero started getting sick almost immediately. I with what they called the world trade center cough then. Ptsd and depression. And eventually years later cancers this exposure has a really really long tail anyone who develops any kind of illness linked to nine eleven can get free healthcare through the world trade center health program but michael bearish a lawyer for nine eleven survivors says there are likely a lot of people dealing with nine eleven related health problems. Who don't know they're

Samantha Fields Michael O Connell Dr Michael Crane World Trade Center Health Prog World Trade Center Cancer Sarcoidosis Mount Sinai Ptsd Michael Bearish Depression
How to Be Happy With Marriage Therapist Tony Overbay

The Virtual Couch

01:31 min | 3 months ago

How to Be Happy With Marriage Therapist Tony Overbay

"Look at these things where it says. Here's how to be happy any article. That is something this. And i often apply it as a therapist who has now been seen clients for fifteen plus years and who has done a dramatic shift in my own therapy model from cognitive behavioral therapy of just change your thought and be happy to then realizing that that maybe doesn't work for a lot of people and a better way in my opinion is this acceptance and commitment therapy way or more like you're having thoughts and feelings and emotions because you're human being and so it's normal to have those thoughts and feelings and emotions now. What do you do with them in often. One of the biggest challenges for happiness in my opinion is we're going after the wrong mark too often were doing these socially compliant versions of happiness. Where we say no. I should be happy and therefore i should do these things that everyone else does. That makes them happy or at least it looks like it makes them happy on social media. Instagram facebook take all those kinds of wonderful things and if they look happy than i should be happy doing those things as but too often again. A socially compliant goal is something that we do because we were supposed to or we think that. If we don't do it we're gonna let somebody else talking. Let somebody down from spouse to apparent to even even god and so a socially compliant goal is really deep concept. Embrace it can be so liberating to say. Why am i doing these things. Why am i doing something that that i think will make me happy. If i really feel that my core is not something that really matters to me.

Facebook
Using 'Tiny Habits' to Enhance Your Life and Relationships

Nighttime Conversations With Steve and Freja

01:47 min | 3 months ago

Using 'Tiny Habits' to Enhance Your Life and Relationships

"I like about was a metaphor. Dr fog uses a lot is a behavior is like a plant. You take a little seed in the clinton in space and you care for it and it starts to grow and probably the place is not good and it doesn't grow as well as you'd expect it so you can take it out and planted in different spot and then keep caring for what i like about this whole philosophy. If you will is that there are no mistakes It's it's a free flow chart so you can always go somewhere. You're stuck so if something doesn't you go and tweak a little bit and then you experiment and you find a way to implement behaving wanting permanent so it. Every behavior has basically a prompt so something that reminds us to do an ability so we can do physically mentally or however and the motivation. We want to do it. And if we have huge motivation we can do hard things. If we have lower tuition we can only do like easy things or we'll just skip doing. If we don't have a prompt we will not remember. It's just like we can have a few huge mitigation inside and we can do it but we don't have a prompt and we'll just like not doing not most probably so this is an we see that in the millions of times that people say oh i you know i should he exercising or i should do more exercise or i should eat better or i should be working on my project or i know a yeah. I should make date night more by priority. But i'm tired

Dr Fog Clinton
Bestselling Author Gretchen Rubin: Can We Be a Tiny Bit Happier?

Everything Happens with Kate Bowler

02:29 min | 3 months ago

Bestselling Author Gretchen Rubin: Can We Be a Tiny Bit Happier?

"I feel like it is. It's just so easy to get swept up in the urgency of the to do list and and and not think about the bigger questions like Is this what i really want. Anyway or my or my neglecting more transcendent values. Because i'm just sort of taking care of the day to day so nice people think. Oh it's not good to think about your happiness all the time. And i'm like well i to at least for me i never thought about it Because i just never step back to say like. Is there any way that i could be. Is there any low hanging fruit. is there any. Yeah just stuck within my easy reach. That i could do. Yeah 'cause i just i can't ross myself back west. I think it was maybe in the an angela. Duckworth book on grit that. I remember thinking about that question of feeling like propelled. Because i was always may be over propelled through the world and i lived in kind of like middle distance where it was always. It was always someday wasn't today wasn't quite tomorrow and and it wasn't honestly till i was so sick that i couldn't i just physics. I physically couldn't do that. That i started thinking about. Some of the questions you're describing. It was some of that. Like how do i get it. Those bigger will i have. I'm not sure. I'll have all the time in the world to get to those big questions but now that i'm a bit humbled by circumstances and you know now that i'm taking part is there a person may be. I'm supposed to that. I should be instead because not entirely sure how to live. If i'm not just doing everything that's in front of me. But i think that's why there's so much value in your work. Kate is because you've sort of been forced to think about those big questions and you can kind of take us through your thinking and your experience and then. I think that helps us to think about doing it ourselves. Yeah certainly did not want to volunteer. Unfortunately but But you but you are so good at at helping other people think through those costume. Thanks gretchen get a lot of messages from people who are just kind of simul. Were also kind of undone. Like they've lost somebody that they love or they get they lose their job. They lose a dream or there or even just like they're on a relationship ends or their kids move out and this world that they loved no longer exists and then there are so many of us are forced into a kind of reevaluation that we don't even necessarily have time

Duckworth Angela Ross Kate Gretchen
There’s a Mismatch Between the Expectation and Reality of Happiness

Hidden Brain

01:55 min | 3 months ago

There’s a Mismatch Between the Expectation and Reality of Happiness

"All know what it's like to want something that will make us happy. Maybe it's a dream vacation or getting a great job on meeting a soulmate. But all too often when we get what we want. Reality turns out to be very different than we expected at. The university of california riverside psychologists sonia loop amir ski explores the mismatch between what we expect will make us happy and what actually makes us happy. We began by talking about a moment when she felt this mismatch in her own life. She was in her thirties about leszek surgery to improve her ice up until then i had really poor vision. I was almost blind. I hated my glasses. And i hated my contact lenses and so i have the surgery. It takes like thirty seconds and then you go from being almost blind to twenty twenty vision. That's really miraculous right. And it was amazing. And i could see my toes in the shower. When i woke up in the morning i could see the alarm clock without searching for my glasses and when of walking the streets you know i could read the street signs. That was amazing to me but it took me about two weeks to get completely used to minute. Twenty twenty vision and then i started taking for granted and it became the new normal for me. I've worn glasses for for many years myself. Sonia and as you're talking about the wonders of of jury. I imagine the moment when i can take off my glasses and be able to see perfectly and of course. That's what i focus on when i think about getting surgery like you did. I'm not thinking of what happens. Two weeks after that exactly and whenever we think about sort of changes in our lives positive and negative. We often think about that moment. It's that moment that i call the news when you when you learned that. Oh my vision is perfect in a or you get that new job. You win the lottery but we don't sort of think about what happens you say and then two weeks to months two after

Sonia Loop Amir Ski Leszek University Of California Sonia
Is Social Media Placing More Pressure on the Younger Generations?

The Chalene Show

02:21 min | 3 months ago

Is Social Media Placing More Pressure on the Younger Generations?

"Everyone who has a kid that age or even if you are that age like maybe you are john e or you are a millennial you can relate to what they are going through. It's just the same. It's incredible social. Scrutiny that just didn't exist. When i was a kid that didn't exist when many of us were kids unless you grew up in the social media ehrlich and when i say grew up meeting social media existed when you're in middle school you're saying then you don't even understand the level of pressure and the incredible increase of stress anxiety and self imposed pressure that social media places on these generations. He's younger generations. jen's e the. I guess they called the alpha generation and then the millennials like they are struggle with things that we just didn't even have to. We'd have to worry about what millions of strangers are tens of thousands or even a hundred or even forty strangers might think of kids. Today they think about everything their image i mean. Were you thinking about your image. You thinking about what strangers thought of you that you didn't know and other states i mean i wasn't. I mean sure. I was worried about what the kids at my school thought of me and kids today. They have all of that. Plus having to worry about like what the world thinks of them. And i know what you're thinking. Well but they don't have to post what they feel like they have to. It's crazy the amount of pressure and stress. That kids feel because of frigging social media. And you know it's not going away and it creates us again. Social comparison and social scrutiny. Where kids when. I'm saying kids. I hope you guys know them talking. Like millennials gen z. And really anyone who was born before two thousand and ten just to make things simple. I'm going to refer to those age. Groups says kids. Even though i know you might be listening right now. Your millennial your you know jen's and you're like wait a second. I'm an adult. I know but i'm just going to refer to like this whole big group as kids so this group kids which you may be a member of. It's a lot. It's so much more stress. Then what i think. People my generation had to deal

Ehrlich JEN John
U.S. Judge Approves Deal Dissolving Purdue Pharma in Opioid Saga

the NewsWorthy

01:07 min | 3 months ago

U.S. Judge Approves Deal Dissolving Purdue Pharma in Opioid Saga

"Drugmaker behind the highly addictive prescription. Painkiller oxycontin is formerly shutting down. We're talking about purdue pharma. Instead of selling opioids the company's resources will be put toward addressing the opioid epidemic mainly with addiction treatment and prevention programs. It will also compensate people and families who have been hurt by purdue products that was just one of the terms laid out in a wide ranging bankruptcy settlement. Judge approved this week. It also says the company's owners the sackler family will have to pay four and a half billion dollars to settle thousands of opioid related lawsuits. Without though this actors will be immune from any more lawsuits about opioids. And they'll still be one of the richest families in the world. They're worth about eleven billion dollars. A lot of states support. This plan saying it's the best way to help pay for a problem. That's only gotten worse. During the pandemic but others like connecticut. In washington planned to appeal saying the settlement shields. The sackler is too much from liability. They say the sackler is downplayed. How addictive opioids are while they aggressively marketed. Those drugs purdue pharma as a company has pleaded guilty twice for that but the sackler is have not been charged with crimes. At least not yet and they say they did nothing illegal or

Purdue Pharma Drugmaker Sackler Connecticut Washington
How to Deal With Anxiety and Perfectionism

Relationship Advice

02:30 min | 3 months ago

How to Deal With Anxiety and Perfectionism

"Today. We're going to talk about something. That i can definitely relate to. I'm sure a lot of our listeners can relate to and that's a couple of things one of them being perfectionism and the other being anxiety. And i'd like to start with perfectionism and why understanding these things in the root of them is so important how they show themselves in our relationships in how we can do them better. So let's dive right in and maybe you can tell us what perfectionism is and we can go from there sir. So i'm so glad you're asking about these topics. Think they're important and the ven diagram of these two things anxiety perfectionism have so much overlap. So they're very very close cousins. The definition of what i guess. The lay definition of perfectionism is not necessarily or counter intuitively striving for perfection. But really it manifests as a sense of never been good. Enough and people don't often identify as perfectionist because not perfectionist. Stick in all of our life domains. I've had many people say to me. Well unclearly not a perfectionist. Because look at my house. It's a mess or i'm not a perfectionist. Because like i i don't plan ahead. I'm not super organized. But really any domain of our life whether that the productivity or appearance or you know cases it certainly could be cleanliness or you know the appearance of our house or could be work achievement or how good you perceive apparent you are any of these domains if we have this chronic a sense of never being good enough and striving striving for this that really taps perfectionism and the ultimate is. You know you're a perfectionist if you base your self esteem on striving achievement in a particular area so students might base their self esteem on their grades or somebody might base their self esteem on how much. They're accomplishing in their career. You could move to any domain of life and if you are what you do that taps into perfectionism.