Media News

Listen to the latest updates, interviews and analysis from the world of media news. Sourced from leading podcasts and talk radio shows.

A highlight from Bark and Bite

On The Media

08:01 min | 16 hrs ago

A highlight from Bark and Bite

"From WNYC in New York, this is on the media. I'm Brooke gladstone. Happy Thanksgiving. Even in the worst of times, there's something to be thankful for. I learned this years ago in my large family initiated a family tradition suggested by my niece. Go around the table and say what you're thankful for. At first I was pretty snarky, not so much anymore. Every year we suffer losses. But when you don't focus on what's good, you can forget what to cherish and what to protect. The New York Times noted there'd be lots of empty seats around holiday tables this year. In part because this was a bad year. A bad month for mass shootings. This Thanksgiving, the community in Chesapeake, Virginia, is still grappling with the loss of 6 lives inside a Walmart Tuesday night. 6 people were shot and killed inside of that store, police say the suspected gunman was also an employee at the store and then turned the gun on himself. In Virginia, the suspect accused of killing three UVA football players and injuring two other students was arraigned in court today. It's one of those issues where reality is so unfathomably divorced from the political rhetoric. It's hard to breathe. Fact, guns and hate are killing the soul of the nation, take less Saturday. But we begin this hour with the latest on the mass shooting at a gay club in Colorado Springs. A 22 year old suspect in custody today after police say he opened fire with a semi-automatic rifle in an LGBTQ nightclub. Robert fierro, who served three tours in Iraq and one in Afghanistan, was at club Q with friends and family to watch his daughter's friend perform. He dragged the gunman down, pistol whipping, with the assassin's gun, and then called for medics, reliving the nightmare of combat. This whole thing was a lot. My daughter, wife, should have never experienced combat, you can't write a springs, and everybody in that building experienced combat that night, not to their own accord. But because they were forced to, they had to live with this now to whatever the it's a lot for any human, man. Tucker Carlson, on Fox News. So the most obvious question is, why did Anderson Lee Aldrich shoot 30 people? And the truth is we don't know. We do know he was clearly a troubled person. Troubled enough, we learned to threaten their own mother with a homemade bomb last summer. Someone whose parents dabbled in drugs and crime, someone who, according to their lawyers, used they them pronouns now. Someone who spoke disparagingly of gays, like their father. So with all that, for the love of God, say the right wing pundits. Don't let the wokest dishonor the memory of the 5 victims by speculating on why they were singled out for murder. These were human beings. They were Americans. They were not props in a larger ideological war and to reduce them to that is wrong. That's exactly what many politicians are doing right now. Carlson again, three minutes after scolding others for politicizing the dead. Children's hospital in Boston, one of the most famous hospitals in the world, has admitted performing double mastectomies on children for no medical reason at all. There is no scientific justification for sexually mutilating kids. Is pointing that out an attack on gay people, of course it is not an attack on gay people. Period. Let's just say that he didn't know that trans affirming surgeries are not performed on minors with very rare exceptions. Let's assume he was somehow ignorant of the alarmingly high rates of suicide, especially among trans use. Rates that increase if they lack the support of their families and communities. Take a breath and assume Tucker doesn't hate gays. He just really cares about the children. The focus of right-wing politicians and media on hospitals offering gender affirming healthcare has compelled the children's hospital of Boston, the children's hospital of Philadelphia, the children's national hospital in Washington, D.C., the university of Pittsburgh medical center, and the Vanderbilt university medical center. To beef up security in the wake of rising threats of violence, a bomb scares and attacks on clinicians and staff. Fox News the Democrats message going into the midterms is let's neuter your son. He's going through a phase, so cut it off. It's wrong not to, but drag shows sex changes and 45 pronouns are now a part of American foreign policy. There is a sort of far left LGBT activist contingent that will stop over the blood of these dead bodies in order to push their agenda. Whether it is a gun control agenda, whether it is an agenda to bully and shame the people that are speaking up against drag queen story hour against a sexualization and grooming of children that is coming from these far left elves. Why do they do this? I mean, why do they play this game? Well, because they know that they can't defend their positions, otherwise. They want the kids at the drag shows. They want them in the sex change clinics, but they dare not defend either stands out loud. They can't. So instead they resort to the worst kind of emotional manipulation. Apparently, Matt Walsh is emotionally manipulated by the sight of blood. But even before club Q was sprayed with bullets in Colorado Springs, the intensity and volume and vehemence of the rhetoric left some in the LGBTQ community reporters included reflecting on a previous tragedy in 2016, the massacre at pulse, a gay nightclub in downtown Orlando. That mass shooting leaves 50 people dead, 53 others wounded. And they were just waiting for another violent inflection point. So my colleagues and I have talked about when is the next pulse going to happen. Joe your cava is a reporter for NBC out the LGBTQ+ section of NBC News. When I was talking to people in Colorado Springs, for example, Parker gray, who's a trans man who's lived there for about 5 years, he said something that really struck me, he said, when you have a community that is constantly vilified, that experiences violence, you can feel when a tragedy is coming. He told me that the climate there has just been getting increasingly hostile for LGBTQ+ people in part due to things that are being said at school boards related to any topic that touches on the LGBTQ+ community or just using the correct pronouns for transgender students, but it's also due to the national climate where we've seen more than 200 anti LGBTQ bills filed this year and a wave of them over the past two years and the majority of those targeting trans people in towns like Colorado Springs because it's also next to a military base. It's already more conservative. And so then when you have this national rhetoric coming and influencing that, he said it made him feel less safe going out to a place like club cue. And he wasn't the only one. No, he's not the only one. I've spoken with a number of people there now who say that they felt the same. I spoke to a trans woman named Elizabeth, who said that she had eggs thrown at her. She was attacked after the Yuval day shooting when there was a false conspiracy theory going around on the Internet that the shooter in that case was a trans woman. But she said, you know, she feels similarly that Colorado Springs isn't very safe and for her the case is particularly troubling because she actually moved to Colorado from Texas, hoping to find a more accepting environment. Let's dig into the nature of Colorado in Colorado Springs for a minute. Lauren boebert's one of Colorado's congressional representatives. She's been way out in the extreme over her disdain

Robert Fierro Colorado Springs Anderson Lee Aldrich Brooke Gladstone Children's Hospital Wnyc Virginia Fox News Children's Hospital Of Philade Children's National Hospital Washington, D.C. Tucker Carlson Chesapeake Walmart The New York Times Boston Vanderbilt University Medical University Of Pittsburgh Medic Afghanistan Carlson
A highlight from Podcasting by the Numbers #522

New Media Show

08:07 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Podcasting by the Numbers #522

"Oh yeah. Oh yeah, here we are in the new media show. Happy Thanksgiving rob. Yeah, Happy Thanksgiving to you and everybody that's listening this weather they're listening today or after Thanksgiving. I hope you had a good Thanksgiving. If you're watching this after? Yep, absolutely. And I hope you don't spend too much on the Friday on the Friday big Friday shopping day. So we're in live if everything worked out right. I don't know. We'll see. It hasn't worked too much so far, but we did get some boost in from the last show. Apparently, it's always great to see that. Apparently there was some liquidity issues. And I do not understand this at all. And the issue that crypto has some liquidity issues right now. My node had some liquidity issues. Temporarily, right? Well, it's plenty of crypto in there. There's plenty of nothing here to cover. But temporarily, we are on get albie. We're using the get out system to be able to get our boost in, but we did have some come in on the old system before it flipped over and we had again some boost that came in and I do want to give a shout out to those. 1948 sass from Brian and listen and said, I'm listening live. That must mean that pod ping ping. So that was 5 days ago. So very cool on that. We got 1948 stats again from Brian. He says, last week, boots are failing. Hopefully this one makes it through the series of tubes to you. Yes, we did get it, Brian. 36,000 sats from Dave Jones, here's a 36 year curmudgeon boost, some must be in reference to our 18 plus 18 years in podcasting, we got 21,112 stats again from Dave Jones. You say, Todd, we had to open new channel to you. Looks like your existing channel with us was tapped out, getting real close on the pod ping dot cloud lit now tag. So again, maybe I'm yet to pay for some cult thing to understand what this liquidity thing is. Yeah, I'm not sure. And maybe that is because Adam said, damn, I just opened a 2 million channel to you and then Todd switches to get albie and I'm like, well, payments aren't coming true. That's not good, but apparently when they open the liquidity channel, all that money came in, but we did get some boost as well. We got a boost. Now this is the new system. Saturn, it's not, Saturn says it's from papa PhD. He said, I've been a listener for a while and I love how much you guys have taught me about the history of podcasting, but also what you're constant teaching me about its future. Thanks Todd, thanks, rob. And that was a 49 thousand extra 50,000 boost. So actually papa, you can send me an email to my normal email address that I'm the 50,000 booster and we'll send you a sticker pack. So thanks for that. I got to get Adams out too. I've got two I have to ship. Or maybe some more. I don't know. I'm behind him. I'm behind administrative and a bunch of stuff. And I'm ready for a four day off, rob. Yeah. I get it, yeah. So I want to talk a little bit about when I got two things. Dave came through, he heard our motion and our second on two shows ago. And the board of directors of podcasting two implemented a much of what we asked them to do within the stat system, primarily dated. And we now have some data which we can start tracking to be able to see what's going on in the podcasting space. Now, currently it's a JSON output file. And if anyone wants to donate any time to kick this into a web page, hey, I've got a great domain for it. Where we could start having some of this stuff. He's going to add more. But I want to make sure that let's hear it. I'm going to lose track of things. So let's cover this first. And then we can come back to if that's okay with you. Yeah. So feeds with new episodes in the past 7 days, 209,907. Feeds with new episodes in the last 14 days, 287,000 O 29. Feeds with new episodes in the last 30 days, 360 five, two 25. 60 days, four 37 5 23. Feeds with new episode in 90 days, four 89 7 O one, but this is where it gets interesting. He's also given me the number of new episodes. So we should actually write this down and I'll do a screen capture here. So on this machine, make sure that we have this so we can compare this going forward because what would be really cool, someone builds a graph thing. We can see this over time. What's happening? So, okay, so feeds with new episodes in the last 7 days again, 209,000. New episodes published in the last 7 days, 481,000. Todd, just stop compare that to the ten day number off of the podcast index, and it's 254,000 shows. So what I'm trying to 40,000. So I'm trying to keep 7, 14, 30. So we have some increments here. So at the 7 day Mark 209,000 at the 14 day two 87. So let's two O 9 two 87. That's one week two week. And then if we look at one week two week in a episodes created, new episodes and 7 days was four 81. So that's a ratio of two point one 2.12 .2 episodes per 7 days. And then if we look at the 14 day where there's been 287,000 shows that have updated and the number of episodes and 14 days was 968, just shy of a million. So what that really is again is about a three something ratio there. So it tells me if we're at 14 days with 287,000 shows, updating every 14, every 14 days we have 968,000 new episodes coming out. So shows with new episodes. The total new episodes. Just new episodes. Total new episodes in the last 14 days was 968,825. Got it. New shows with new episodes and 14 days was two 87. As compared to, again, 7 days to O 9 9 O 7, where new episodes in that time frame four 81. So it looks to me and again, it's pretty obvious here that we have most shows are doing two episodes a week and some are doing one. And at least in this

Albie Dave Jones Todd Brian ROB Sass Saturn Adam Adams Dave
A highlight from Prism newsroom benefits from 4-day work week

It's All Journalism

05:00 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Prism newsroom benefits from 4-day work week

"Thanks, and enjoy the episode. We did a survey of the staff to see how the shift to a four day work week had kind of impacted their well-being, and it was really just a resounding success across the board. So, you know, with that data, we decided to just kind of let it ride. The 24 hour news cycle makes it difficult for a reporter or editor to have anything resembling a reasonable work life balance. As many journalists reassess the demands they operate under, some newsrooms have begun to explore the idea of a four day workweek. I'm Michael O'Connell. Welcome to its all journalism. We get pitched a lot of guests and when someone said they knew what journalist who was shaking up the traditional news model and had adopted a four day work week in their newsroom, I said yes, please. Ashton Lattimore is the editor in chief of prism, a nonprofit independent newsroom led 100% by journalists of color. Prism delivers in depth thought provoking journalism. Ashton, welcome to its all journalism. Thank you for having me. So start off with tell me a little bit about yourself. What got you into journalism? How did you end up at prison? I got into journalism as an undergraduate actually. I was an opinion columnist and my campus. I had a lot of strong feelings about a lot of things. So that's how I ended up in journalism initially just working my way from a columnist eventually to an editor at the school newspaper. I attended journalism school after that and got my master's. And then took a brief detour actually and went to law school and practiced law for four or 5 years before I realized ultimately that I wanted to return to the fold. That shift happened sort of in the aftermath of 2016 and everything that happened that year. And just feeling sort of apart from current events, like I really wanted to kind of come back to the fray. And that's what journalism felt like for me. So when the managing editor position at prism opened up, I went for it, and I got it, and I am going to prism is managing editor in 2019 and took over as editor in chief in 2020. She got back into journalism during interesting times for sure. To say the least. But, you know, you showed the spirit you wanted to be in on the fight, which I think is a great thing to do. I knew that we did have Tina Vasquez on our podcast back in 2020. She was a senior reporter at prism, covering immigration issues. I think she's still there. story or her byline, not too long ago. Yeah, she's a Twitter at large. She's reporter at large. So anyway, I know a little bit about prison, just to sort of bring everybody up to speed. You could just sort of describe prisms mission, you know, how it's structured and what you're doing. Sure. So prism is an independent nonprofit newsroom. We're led by journalists of color. We focus on telling stories from the ground up, centering on communities most impacted by injustice and how those communities are working towards a better future. So our journalism is pretty grassroots at its core. And we cover a range of issues and we focus a lot on the intersections between them, really intentional focus on social movements, the intention is for the impact of our work to be informing movements for social justice animating them and critically evaluating them. Ultimately with the aim of a really shifting narratives about communities of color, in terms of what we cover, it really runs the gamut. We cover gender justice, workers rights, economic justice, crime, reform, and abolition. We cover politics and democracy. So it's really wide ranging in scope, and we're national, so we cover the entire United states and U.S. territories. I know some people would hear that, you know, what you're focused on and the types of stories that you're doing and would wonder if you're sort of an advocacy publication. But I think actually, you know, you're just a journalism outlet that's recognizing that there are different stories to tell. Anyway, I shouldn't answer that question pretty much said. Is that sort of along that line? That's exactly right. Yeah, we are fundamentally journalists at heart, our work is rigorous and fact based. And you know, carefully fact checked and it's not based in advocacy or our opinions or our feelings about anything. It's journalism. We're reporting the news, but we do recognize fundamentally that there have been so many stories and so many communities that have been overlooked by much of the rest of the media. And if not overlooked, covered in ways that are harmful or inaccurate. So we're just being really intentional about the way that we focused our attention on communities of color in particular and other marginalized groups. Can you give me sort of an example maybe of a recent story or an investigation that you might have done that kind of bears out this philosophy that your approach to journalism? Sure. So we had a recent story just within the last month or so. I'm focused on California, telling this story of incarcerated firefighters, particularly formerly incarcerated firefighters and looking at reforms that have been put in place after a lot of grassroots organizing and effort in efforts by the legislature reforms that ensure that

Ashton Lattimore Michael O'connell Tina Vasquez Prism Ashton U.S. Twitter California Legislature
A highlight from Gary Lineker: 'We were sportswashed'

The Media Show

05:19 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Gary Lineker: 'We were sportswashed'

"Was BBC sports opening Montage as its coverage began. The tone was quite different to World Cup's gone by, as it was, in Gary Lineker's opening monologue. From accusations of corruption in the bidding process to the treatment of migrant workers, homosexuality is illegal here. Women's rights and freedom of expression are in the spotlight. Stick to football safe FIFA, well, we will. For a couple of minutes at least. What followed was an hour of build up featuring discussion of the football, but also Jeremy Bowen from BBC News and explain it from me on the controversies around Qatar as host, and the pundits talking about these issues. And while you could watch the opening ceremony on iPlayer, it wasn't shown on the BBC One coverage. Q an awful lot of discussion about whether this was the right thing to do. About where news fits into sport, one daily mail headline read, fans fury as BBC and ITV failed to show World Cup opening ceremony. They were accusations of hypocrisy, inconsistency, sour grapes at the tournament being in the Arab world, and requests for the BBC to stick to football. Well, in a minute, we'll hear from a man who's been head of BBC TV news and head of BBC sport, plus we'll hear from New York from an MSNBC host, who has issues with western media's coverage of Qatar. But first of all, let's hear from the man in the middle of this. I've been talking at length to Gary Lineker. The golden Sherman is never been shown in a football tournament on BBC One. It's never been a thing because then they're not like the Olympic opening ceremonies, which are big things where all the athletes are introduced. The only so many kind of just a little bit of an addition traditionally. It only goes on for 15, 20 minutes. What happened with this one, though, was that it was actually moved in the timings a little bit earlier than it was going to be shown. Originally, I've changed many things, and this World Cup already we've seen that. And we came on air just at the very end of the ceremony but it was available on BBC I plan. That was made clear. It was available on the red button. It was available on the BBC website. We weren't blanking the ugly ceremony. It's just that custom that we don't show it. We're trying to save people from about this. But there was an editorial decision, wasn't there to not just talk about the sport, you ran a report by me, you also featured my BBC News colleague, Jeremy Bowen. That presumably was a plan from some distance out, bring in a news dimension to the coverage. Yes, very much so. We felt it was the right thing to do. Given the nature of the World Cup. And now, obviously, I'm very accustomed to doing world cups in countries where there are problems and you end up talking about things that are away from the football, quite frequently. But I can remember, obviously, doing the same in Russia, prior to that tournament, that invaded Crimea a few years before, I think Brazil, we constantly talking about the riots there by the people on the streets because they were complaining that the money shouldn't have been spent on stadiums. It should have been spent on social care. I wasn't around in the 1934 World Cup, but that was used as a vehicle really to push fascism by Mussolini when it was held in Italy. So we all kind of accustomed to these sorts of things. I think we were sport washed four years ago. And when it was in Russia, we're all going how great it was, and this amount, and the other, and that's how sport washing works. We didn't talk perhaps enough about the other issues. So it was deemed the right thing to do. That's interesting. Do you think that the approach the BBC took on Sunday to talking about the broader issues around Qatar was in some ways a reaction to how you covered it four years ago in Russia? Yes. I think we learned from what we probably felt was a mistake. I think it was, you know, the World Cup the streets were sanitized. Everything was different, which seemed what Putin's done subsequently, but he'd done it before. I think looking back now in hindsight, I think we should probably have spoken out more. I don't have any feeling of mistake about this one at the moment because what we've done. But I do look back four years and going feel slightly uncomfortable. You were though presumably aware and I don't just mean you personally, but as a team where with the monologue that you delivered with the fact you had an explainer from me and my BBC News colleagues with the fact that you had Jeremy Bowen too that that would be seen as being a statement that the BBC was doing something different to what it had done with previous sporting events. Well, I think what we were trying to do was do a factual account. And I think that's very important.

BBC Jeremy Bowen Football Gary Lineker World Cup Qatar Bbc News Fifa ITV Msnbc Russia Sherman Olympic Crimea New York Mussolini Brazil Italy Putin
A highlight from The Guardians David Smith: Covering a new chapter of Trump

The Kicker

04:41 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from The Guardians David Smith: Covering a new chapter of Trump

"Hi, welcome to the kicker. I'm Kyle Pope, editor and publisher of the Columbia journalism review. Today we're talking about what we at CJR felt like we had to talk about, which is Donald Trump's recently announced bid for the presidency. We like most journalists, I know a very complicated feelings about this. On the one hand, we don't want to pay too much attention to Trump because this is somebody who has gotten excessive amounts of attention and knows expertly how to manipulate the press. On the other hand, he's running for president. He's a former president. He right now is the FrontRunner for the Republican Party, or at least one of the frontrunners. So how do we think about covering Trump going forward? Knowing what we know about his record knowing what we know about how he uses the press, knowing what we know about how the press in a lot of ways fail in earlier coverage of him. So as we were thinking about how do we tackle this, we began to think it would really be nice to have a somewhat outsiders perspective on this. So we found someone in David Smith, the Washington bureau chief for The Guardian, David, took that job in 2015 as Trump was starting his first run and is covered throughout. Earlier this month, he was at Mar-a-Lago when Trump announced his candidacy. And I'm thrilled to be joined by him. Thanks again, David for coming on. Thank you. There's so much to talk about here about Trump, about Twitter. But let's start. You wrote a fantastic sketch piece out of Mar-a-Lago the day of Trump's announcement. Can you just recap what the vibe was there and what that sort of looked like to you? Yes. Mar-a-Lago is very grand. So we were all in a white and gold ballroom, very elaborate over the top gold leaf ceiling. And I think I counted about 16 crystal chandeliers. There were about 33 American national flags, I think. And guests poured in and there are kind of Florida nouveau riche sets, I would say, lots of sun tans and jewelry, older crowd. Yes. Most older, although a few of that younger Trump set to imagine being hustlers on Wall Street or whatever. But different from the crowd that comes to a Trump rally of which I've been to many, that's for sure. And so the atmosphere built over time as that crowd came in and everyone was chatting. There were some maga hats, the people posing for photos. And of course, as at the rallies, there was Mike lindell, the MyPillow chief executive crowning the room, berating reporters for not writing more about voting machines in meltdown and spreading his conspiracy theories. But after all of that, when Donald Trump himself took the stage just after 9 p.m. and delivered his speech, I would say some of the energy sanked. It was like a deflating balloon. He was pretty low key, low energy, lethargic as far as we're used to seeing with Trump. There was no trundle down the escalator at Trump Tower this time. No bellicose rally style speech. He almost stumbled out his declaration that he was running for president and of course everyone cheered and applauded, but yeah, it was yet another strange evening and you could not really use the word electrifying to describe it. And the crowd was sort of similarly muted or do they try to rally? It was a bit of both. I mean, I would say at the moment Trump announced his candidacy, sure, there was a lot of whistling and cheering and forest of camera phones in the air sort of snapping the picture for posterity and yeah, it was not a sort of complete dance Squibb of atmosphere, but at the same time as the speech rambled on for more than an hour aligned in form of people trying to get out. They'd had enough. And later that night, in a bar nearby, I talked to some Trump supporters, and even the people who absolutely adore him and will vote for him, admitted it was a bit lower energy than they would have liked and they blamed his advisers for trying to persuade him to be quote presidential close quote and not scare the horses. You wrote the Trump who took the stage seemed an aging champ returning to center court, only to find these holding a wooden bracket.

Donald Trump Kyle Pope Lago Columbia Journalism Review David Smith Mike Lindell Mypillow David Republican Party The Guardian Washington Twitter Trump Tower Florida Squibb
A highlight from The Divided Dial: Episode 2 - From Pulpit to Politics

On The Media

02:39 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from The Divided Dial: Episode 2 - From Pulpit to Politics

"5 part series about the power of talk radio and of one company in particular, Salem media. A little known but highly influential network whose hosts trade and right-wing conspiracies and election denial. In this episode, host Katie Thornton is going to unpack how the company came to be movers and shakers in the political world. But honestly, you're going to want to go back and listen to the first one. If this is the first you're hearing about the series. Enjoy. Hi, Katie. Hi, Adam. How are you? I called up reporter Adam piore last fall, and I happened to catch him just as a storm was slamming his home state of Connecticut. Good, although my power just went out, so my oh no. I'm using the personal hotspot on my I wanted to learn more about Salem, and Adam, who has written several lengthy articles about the company, is a good guy to ask. The way that I found out about Salem was I was looking at major campaign donors to both Democrats and Republicans. At the time for George Bush, I kept seeing Salem communications. This was in 2004 when George W. Bush was running for reelection. This will be the beginning of a new term to make America a safer place. I knew who many of the donors were, the major Republican donors, but I'd never heard of Salem, so I began poking around to see what Salem was. What Adam found when he was poking around was that Salem, though not the largest radio network in the country and lacking the name recognition of Fox News or breitbart, is nevertheless a powerhouse political influencer. I'm Katie Thornton, and this is the divided dial. A 5 part podcast series from on the media about how one side of the political spectrum came to dominate talk radio and how one company is using the airwaves to launch a right-wing media empire. In this episode, we're going to dig into Salem's 50 year backstory from their scrappy start to where they are today. It's a history that paralleled the growth of the national religious rights, and led to the company's long-standing involvement in a secretive group of powerful evangelical leaders, big donors, and mainstays of both the Republican Party and

Salem Media Katie Thornton Salem Adam Piore Adam George Bush Katie Connecticut Republicans Breitbart Fox News America Republican Party
A highlight from Flipping The Bird

On The Media

08:05 min | Last week

A highlight from Flipping The Bird

"In what he'd have called a low energy hour if he hadn't been delivering it. Our country is being destroyed before your very eyes. This on the heels of a weeklong to fenestration of magazine and its leader by the press. 14 candidates endorsed by Trump to once said that with him in charge would all get tired of winning, lost, leading to the best midterm result for its president in decades. Since then, the pundits have been asking is trumpism over. I mean, the donors are running away. The murder media are moving away. Donald Trump's moment has come and gone that window has closed. This is a deeply damaged ex-president like I haven't seen. Now we're talking about him being a mixture of Warren Harding, Andrew Johnson. Trump is a joke. He's lost the house, the Senate, and The White House, he's lost the popular vote twice. I'd like to think that the Republican Party is ready to move on from somebody who's been for this party a three time loser. But if the GOP is ready to move on from Trump, it'll be tougher to move on from trumpism. Tom Scott wrote this week in The New York Times that it's difficult to quote declare defeat for a movement that is built around refusing to accept defeat. He said that though some may call Trump a loser, they haven't yet gathered up the courage to find another less trumpy way to win. Even so, trumpism is over is the dominant post midterm political narrative. Of course, political reporters were singing a different tune prior to the vote, something about an inevitable red wave and a democratic climate that could be described only as bleak and I mean only. The economy now a top issue in the midterm elections less than 6 months away with Democrats chances looking increasingly bleak. A new poll from ABC News in The Washington Post explains why the midterm landscape is so bleak for Democrats. A final CNN snapshot of the midterm climate and it is beyond bleak for the Democrats. As the president and the Democrats remain in complete disarray ahead of the. Oh. I forgot about Dems and disarray. That was very popular. You have to view The New York Times as the outstanding news organization of our era. That is why is with enormous respect for its influence that I've noted the things where in politics. It has seemed to consistently steer U.S. media discussion in an unfortunate direction. James fallows has been writing about the jarring gap between reality and the predictions of political reporters for 40 years. He also writes the substack newsletter, breaking the news. As soon as the very first results came in on election day, which were from those gerrymandered districts in Florida that Ron DeSantis had set up and that flip Republican, The New York Times put out an early edition whose banner headline was GOP collects early wins in pivotal vote and the two above the fold stories one was an explainer saying allies wonder why America can't fix itself. And the other one was saying Democrats faced intense national headwinds. They were so spring loaded to interpret what was going on that even on election evening, as people were voting, in fact, for the best incumbent results in 50 years. In midterm elections, they were prepared to interpret this as why can't America fix itself. As you noted, what happened in reality appeared to be entirely at odds with what the political reporter cadre across the media had been preparing the public for. So how did the coverage of these midterms compare to prior election cycles? There are two standards of comparison that I find interesting and one is an admittedly unfair standard, which is how this is going to look in quote history unquote because it seems already clear that some of the fundamentals of this election, for example, a very strong vote for women based on the Supreme Court's Dobbs ruling and the changed abortion landscape, and a sense that on economics it wasn't strictly the price of gasoline, which we heard about ad infinitum, but also the job market, which was very strong. Joe Biden's speeches about democracy, which were widely ridiculed by the press actually seemed to have gotten some traction, and almost all of the election deniers and sort of Trump weirdos if I can use that category for a lot of the candidates, they lost. Leading up to the election, it was all prices of the pomp, Biden is unpopular, hangover from Afghanistan, which remember a year and a half ago was going to be the end of his presidency. There was a really fundamental mismatch between what seems to have been going on there and what our experts were telling us. I'm wondering where these narratives come from. I would enumerate three streams. One is whatever has happened to political polling. It seems as if all the fallibilities of polling, whether it's not reaching enough young people, not getting enough answers overall. People not answering honestly. They seem to have accumulated in a number of really large scale errors. There seems also to be a sort of self sustaining narrative within a number of the political press corps that my good friend Timothy Krause wrote about 50 years ago in this seminal book the boys on the bus. This was actually the election of 1972 and Tim crow wrote the boys in the bus about the way a narrative would evolve. And I think back then, a guy named Walter mirrors was the AP correspondent, people would say, okay, what do you think the narrative is after a speech by mcgovern or Nixon or whatever? And you'd say, yeah, the speech was X and that became kind of the narrative, and we have the modern era of that, I think, where certain narratives Biden is unpopular. It's all about prices in the pump. Trump is unstoppable. They became the modern version of the boys on the bus. That single word analysis has prevailed in all the ensuing elections. Al Gore was a liar. George W. Bush was a dummy. Hillary Clinton was an emasculating, as unlikeable. And also her emails. Oh, and her emails. That was a narrative that the times made great use of, and I mark that down to fairness, bias. It's a kind of both sides ism and it's because the legacy press is still upset about being labeled liberal, starting with Richard Nixon, all those years ago, still trying to overcompensate to report two issues as if they're equal when they aren't and never were. It's just a matter of observed fact that more people who go into the press as their career are politically liberal than not. Why do you go in this line of work and not become a financier? And out of self consciousness of that reality and also because of relentless criticism from the right of all your liberal bias, a lot of mainstream organizations want to make sure they have on Marjorie Taylor Greene along with Jamie Raskin as if these were people of comparable weight in what they're saying, and I think that was especially the case in the 2016 election where seemed so quote certain unquote that Hillary Clinton would win that mainstream outlets wanted to show that they were fearless and criticizing her, thus her emails. Now I'm curious about the narratives that are emerging post midterms in The New York Times. I saw a really good opinion piece by Tom Scott, who described the temptation by some reporters to declare that the strength of the maga forces is ebbing at last, the calendar leaf is turning over on the Trump era. I have heard so many times. This is the thing that'll sink it. That's the thing that'll get

Donald Trump The New York Times Ron Desantis GOP Warren Harding Tom Scott Andrew Johnson U.S. James Fallows Republican Party Abc News The Washington Post White House Timothy Krause Senate Biden CNN Tim Crow Walter Mirrors
A highlight from Lazy Podcast Advertising Rep #521

New Media Show

03:34 min | Last week

A highlight from Lazy Podcast Advertising Rep #521

"Odd in the afternoon. With Todd and rob. Oh yeah. Oh yeah, and I was a little slow on the trigger there. I didn't hit the other pad fast enough, but no, I'm not gonna edit in copy. Don't worry. Everybody. No, no, no, not at all. Hey everybody, welcome to the new media show. Hope everyone's doing good. We are lit in live. I think I don't know. We sent the pod ping. So, you know, I think we are. So how are you? I'm doing terrific, Todd, it's great to be back doing the show. It seems like the weeks just keep rolling by, you know? Things keep moving forward. So it's good. You know, it's a crazy world out there right now. Generally, but other than that, I've been literally, I can't show my calendar because someone will copy it and be talking about it and know who I'm talking to. But I'm looking at just tell you how crazy it's been. Ten hours I had an hour and a half downtime. Tuesday. I worked all the way from 90 M to 8 p.m. with two hours break. Yesterday. I only worked 9 hours yesterday with one hour of break. Today, I've been at it since 8 a.m. with about 75 minutes of break. It's busy. I'm busy. And in matter of fact, I worked Sunday because I didn't get everything done I needed to get done last week, and I actually were half a day Sunday. In one instance, it's a lot of it's because stuff we're doing, but other instances I'm talking to a lot of people. And we're also in a role of hiring someone right now and looking at a different firm, heard some doing some stuff. And I'm like, I'm just before we started the show, I was doing our sprint retrospective with the production team. And I was like, good lord, is it Friday yet? Only Tuesday. It's Wednesday. But it's like, so yeah, crazy, crazy stuff. And you know, I've had some interesting conversations. I'll talk a little bit around what I've talked about. Before we start the show, but first off, Brian was value for value. If you support this show, you go over to new podcast apps dot com and you pick up a new podcast app and you can boost boost the show. I've got the boost boost mechanism ready. We should hear if a boost comes in today. But we got one, two, three, four sats from Dave. And he did test boost because there was people were sitting there trying to send me boost. They couldn't send them. We got 25,000 sats from Matt. Thank you. I don't know, maybe that was from leftover love listening to show. I think that was left over. We didn't get a lot of boost this time. So people are listening to the show, are not using any of these new podcasting apps or not using pod verse, cast Maddie, fountain, where you have the ability to contribute by the minute when you

Todd ROB Sprint Brian Dave Matt
A highlight from Does the media report climate protests responsibly?

The Media Show

04:23 min | Last week

A highlight from Does the media report climate protests responsibly?

"The infinite monkey cage series 25 is very nearly here. We're dealing with a mystery of the universe, the miracle of the human body is awesome spectacle of the natural world. What are you doing? This is the promo that's been written for us. A fabulous fusion of science comedy and regular confusion. See, all I saw when you said string theorist was a man being tangled up in his own marionette. I assumed that was what string theory was. The new series of the infinite monkey cage, wherever you can download podcasts, not where you can't download podcasts because you won't be able to download it, would you? BBC sounds, music, radio, podcasts. Hi, I'm Katie razzle, and this is the media show from BBC Radio four. How should journalists cover climate protests? The climate conference cop 27 ends this week, but you might have seen more about the activists who threw oil on a Gustav Klimt painting in Vienna yesterday, or the protesters who brought the M 25 to a standstill last week. In an era of apparently increasing direct action, what's the media's role, and by giving the latest pub stunt publicity? Is it fanning the flames? I'm joined by Cameron Ford, who's a Carpenter and a spokesperson for insulate Britain, and rich foul gate, a documentary maker who was arrested last week while filming at a just stop oil protest. Also here, Wolfgang blau, who left his top job at Conde nast and cofounded the Oxford climate journalism network, Danny Shaw, who used to be a BBC home affairs correspondent and is now free to say what he really thinks. And Fiona Harvey, the guardian's environment correspondent who is at cop 27 in Egypt and has just left the session to get on the phone to us. Fiona, thank you for coming on. What's the mood among journalist? Have your stories been cutting through to the front pages this week? Well, the mood is pretty grim here, actually. Last week, we had the more leaders arrived at this great fanfare, you know, they had great things to say. It was all hugely interesting. What's happening that it's a lot of manuscripts gathered in a windowless rooms just pouring over pages of text deciding what to do about a cynical mom here and a fridge there. It's just a grind now, these negotiations. And what does it mean for whether the stories are getting out then? Well, for The Guardian, we have a commitment to put the climate crisis on a three to our website every day. And we also cover it very deeply in print. So we're still covering it. We're still here in Washington a lot, but I think for my colleagues in other newspapers, it's very very difficult. Okay, well, we'll come back to you in a bit Fiona, but let's talk first about what happened last week with the arrests of three members of the media alongside protesters by Hertfordshire police on the M 25, the media three were later released without charge. Yesterday the national union of journalists joined civil rights groups to call for an independent review into policing powers and the public order Bill, which is currently going through parliament. Rich fellgate, you were one of those arrested from the media. What's the latest have the police apologize to you? I'm still waiting for an apology. Okay. Are you expecting one? We'll see. We will see, just to recap. So you were filming on a footbridge, opposite the gantry where the protesters were. What happened? Why were you arrested? Yeah, so I was filming on a public space away from where the protest was actually happening on the gantry and as soon as police arrived and closed the road, then I heard them point up to the bridge and say, detain them directed to me and another press photographer that was there and straight away they came up to us and just put handcuffs on us. No interaction or discussion about what we were doing, they weren't interested in seeing press cards, just straight away, trying to get us out of the area and to stop what we were doing. And how long were you held? About 13 hours? Okay. And then released without charge as I said. How did you know to be on that foot bridge at the time? I mean, had you been tipped off at this protest was going to happen? Yeah, so journalists have sources, otherwise we wouldn't know about these protests. And just upload it publicly said that there would be protesting on the M 25, it had been quite a big road then. You have to know

BBC Katie Razzle Cameron Ford Wolfgang Blau Conde Nast Oxford Climate Journalism Netw Danny Shaw Fiona Harvey Gustav Klimt Fiona Hertfordshire Police Confusion Vienna Carpenter Britain Egypt National Union Of Journalists The Guardian Washington Parliament
A highlight from Mastodon: The Platform Taking Twitter's Worn and Weary

On The Media

07:28 min | Last week

A highlight from Mastodon: The Platform Taking Twitter's Worn and Weary

"Result, millions of Twitter users are exploring another little known platform called Mastodon, Mastodon, originally created by a German programmer named eugen rachko in 20 16. While the two platforms share a general resemblance, the similarities merely skin deep. For example, what we think of as a tweet button on Mastodon is called a toot, although as of this week, toot has been retired being too easily employed and double entendres, so the button now just says publish. And also what you post can be a lot longer. And to join Mastodon means joining a group that acts as your home base that group is called a server or an instance. There's no universal group with all users. Plus, mastodons original source code is publicly available and changeable. All this because Mastodon just doesn't want to be like Twitter. But why I hear you cry? Does any of this matter to those of us who really couldn't care less about Twitter, much less Mastodon? Clive Thompson is a tech journalist whose work appears in The New York Times Magazine wired and Smithsonian. His most recent book is coders, the making of a new tribe and the remaking of the world. He's offered a kind of explainer in a recent medium piece, and he says that Mastodon. Some of the stuff is very similar when you make a little post, yes, it's typically called a toot because mastodons symbol, which is, you know, a Mastodon, has elephant like note. And so the idea is that you're tooting. Of course, because toot has these really terrible other implications that the creator was not aware of in English. Many people running mastered on software will voluntarily sort of change the code. On their server to say, yeah, this is a publish button. This is not a tooth. But it's basically the same thing as a tweet. Often people install it, so there's kind of a longer length. The one that I'm on, you can write like 500 characters, which is like, you know, almost twice as much as a tweet. That starts to kind of become almost like a blog post, which is kind of nice. And then there's a button, if you see something awesome, kind of like retweeting on Twitter, you can hit that button and it's called boosting. So it will take what someone else said and show it to everyone who's following me. We're going to get back to all of that, but sticking to the vocabulary for a second, a particular server, like I'm on the journal server. Yeah, you're on journal host, right? Is that the one you're on? Yeah. Yeah, so basically what's a little different is when you join Twitter, you just go to Twitter. But the way that Mastodon works is it's what they call a Federated bunch of Mastodon servers, sometimes also called Mastodon, instances, just to make it even more complicated. The point being, someone can set up their own match it on server, a friend of mine did it, and he said, hey Claire do you want to join mine? I said, sure. And so there's like 50 of us, and he's running it. And there are thousands and thousands and thousands of these servers. You're on one that's run by a bunch of journalists. And there's like 2000 or so journalists there. This is one of the first kind of weird things, right? Like we're accustomed to a social network being just one site that you go to. And this is not like that. These are all thousands of sites that are quote unquote, Federated. They can kind of talk to each other. Anyone on any server can generally more or less talk to people on other servers. The other piece of lingo is they call this the fed averse, the Federated universe. There's actually a bunch of things out there in this Federated universe, macedon is only kind of one piece of software, but because it's so much like Twitter, it's kind of the one that's taken off recently. The federation aspect of this is one of the big differences, as you've said. And the default is that all the various servers are instances can see other ones, but that's just the default each server or instance makes its own rules. And it can also just decide to block another server if they find it too toxic. Make it so that you can't see it, and it can't see you. You're exactly right. There are servers, you know, that I've been on. And I've been on different mastered on servers for years now. And they'll each set up rules saying, hey, guys, here is what we consider to be good behavior and allowed behavior on our server. You can't be a racist idiot. You can't say stuff that we consider to be misogynist by the people on this community. If you do that, we have the right to kick you off the server. And there are other servers that are like, yeah, we don't have any rules. You can kind of say whatever you want. So it's almost like belonging to a neighborhood, where there's neighborhood rules, right? And if the neighbors decide, you know, you're being a terrible neighbor. They could say, you know, you're not allowed to be on this neighborhood anymore. But the really interesting thing is that if someone comes to me and starts harassing me in DMs or in replies to me, I can mute or block just that one person. And I can also decide, hey, you know, the server that person is on is filled with dirt bags. So I'm going to block that whole server. I don't want to see anything they do. I don't want them saying what I say. And that's great. That's actually very useful. But there's this extra layer where an entire server, like my entire server, my 50 people on it could decide, there's a bunch of other servers over there that are just filled with terrible people who are harassing us. So let's put a block from our entire neighborhood to theirs. Our entire server to theirs. So nothing that anyone does on our server can be seen by them. Little sort of Federated nation states like early medieval Europe. It's really interesting and you wrote an article recently on medium, explaining that Mastodon is compared to not just Twitter, but almost all other social media sites. It's explicitly anti viral. It prioritizes friction. And there's a number of ways in which it does that. I mean, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, TikTok, they want big viral surges. They're designed that way to push things to get more popular. How does Mastodon push against virality and why? There are two ways in which Mastodon software and the people who've been using it, push against virality. The first one is that the level of kind of the code, like the way that Mastodon software is designed. There's a couple of things in there that are very different from the way things work on Twitter. Because if you think about Twitter, a lot of the way it's architected is designed to sort of encourage massive joint attention of millions of people on some hot meme or joke or person that has just blowing up right now. Trending, it's trending. It's trending, exactly. It's like, we're all looking at it. We're all talking about it. The way that Twitter does that is that it has a couple of tools to encourage virality. It has an algorithm that says, well, if a tweet is starting to take off, then let's amplify it further. Let's push it to the top of other people's algorithms. Other people's feeds so that it's a rich get richer phenomenon, right? And there's other things like the quote tweet button. That basically allows me to go, someone just said this thing, here's what I think about it. That's another thing that often you see whenever you see a big viral surge, it's often based around these quote tweets, right? Now neither of those things exist in the traditional Mastodon software. For example, the feed, it's just ranked in reverse chronology. So whatever you're looking at is just what happened at this moment and it goes backwards in time downwards. And there's no universal search. You can search your own posts, you can search your home server for maybe opposed to want to get back to. On Twitter, if you want to search Clive Thompson, you can search all of Twitter for those words, Mastodon doesn't do that.

Twitter Eugen Rachko Federated Clive Thompson The New York Times Magazine Claire FED Instagram Europe Youtube
A highlight from The Divided Dial: Episode 1 - The True Believers

On The Media

03:44 min | Last week

A highlight from The Divided Dial: Episode 1 - The True Believers

"Listen to the midnight miracle on the luminary channel on Apple podcasts or by downloading the luminary app. I'm Kay Wright on the next note from America, a listener exit poll. Abortion rights, democracy, what really motivated voters in these midterms. And what can we expect from the new political order? Listen now, wherever you get your podcasts. Listener supported WNYC studios. Thursday, mostly focused people. For more of her stores and refreshes you. You will be able to provide for others as the lord provides for you. A few weeks after the 2020 election, radio host Eric metaxas had one of his frequent guests back on the air. Colonel Doug mastriano. This man is an American hero. Doug mastriano, freshman Pennsylvania state senator and recently defeated 2022 Republican nominee for governor, was at the Vanguard, promoting allegations of widespread fraud right after the 2020 election. And so was conservative Christian talk show host Eric metaxas, so this was familiar fare to his listeners. What happens if these people don't join you in this? You could kiss fair and free elections goodbye. Mastriano had a plan to get the state's General Assembly to intervene in the election results. It was a legal long shot or more accurately and impossibility, even the plans creator, Trump lawyer John eastman, said it wouldn't hold up in court. But metaxas and mastriano begged listeners to get their senators on board. I just want to say to my audience, if you live in Pennsylvania and you don't do this, when things go to hell, which they will, I want you to know your responsible. But right before this interview with mastriano, something unexpected happened. Something that Eric metaxas called divine intervention. Mastriano got a call. Hey sir, I'm here with the Eric metaxas. He wants to know if you want any message to go out on this show today. From lame duck president Donald Trump, seeing how the attempt to change the Pennsylvania election results was going. And Trump was happy to get on speakerphone with metaxas. Can you hear him? Yes, I can hear the president. Mister president, I want to know what can I do? Your whole show and your whole deal is great. So just keep it up. We're making a lot of progress, actually. With a cleanly parted shock of salt and pepper hair, sports coats over button down shirts, and bookish round glasses, metaxas styles suggest more Manhattan dandy than would be crusader. But when it came to defending Trump's seat against a supposedly stolen election, metaxas was ready for battle. I'd be happy to die in this fight. This is a fight for everything. God is with us. Thank you, mister president. God bless you. Yep. If they stole an election, but we're not going to we're just not going to no we're not. A fight for everything with God on our side. A fight worth dying for. It's a sentiment that money on the right became convinced of, and that some took to the U.S. capitol. On January 6th,

Eric Metaxas Metaxas Mastriano Kay Wright Wnyc Studios Colonel Doug Mastriano Doug Mastriano Pennsylvania John Eastman Apple General Assembly America Donald Trump Manhattan U.S.
A highlight from What alternate social media  platforms mean for journalism

It's All Journalism

04:14 min | Last week

A highlight from What alternate social media platforms mean for journalism

"Is pretty clear overall that's most of the people who use these sites for news are pretty happy and have pretty positive attitudes about that experience. Mention social media and most people would think of Facebook or Twitter or maybe Instagram, TikTok, Reddit, or even SnapChat. But there are other social media platforms out there that are giving their particular audience information they want, as well as a sense of community. I'm Michael O'Connell. Welcome to tell journalism. Galen stocking is a senior computational social scientist on the journalism research team at the Pew Research Center. He's also one of the lead authors of pew's recent report, the role of alternatives, social media in the news and information environment. Galen, welcome to cell journalism. Hi, thank you for having me. First of all, you're the first computational social scientist I've met. Tell me about that. What is that, what your focus, what are you studying? How do you do it? That's a great question. I think a computational social scientist is kind of a mouthful of a term. Probably a longer term than it really needs to be. I think people don't necessarily know what it is. But really what it means is people who are enrolled like mine want to bring a wide range of tools to answer any kind of research question. So for instance, on this project, we use python scripts to collect data from each of these individual sites. We use algorithmic tools to determine what the hosts were about on each of these sites. And in the past, myself or others have used other kinds of machine learning or other kinds of tools to try to analyze data that we have. So it's really about bringing in data beyond survey data to understand important questions about what the public thinks and their attitudes toward very stimuli. Okay, so what led you to this career and how did you end up at Pew Research Center? I had taken a very winding and storied role, I think. I was always interested in journalism. I was always reading the newspaper as a kid, and I was on the school newspaper in high school. I even started a an underground newspaper in high school. So I was that kind of person, right? But then when I went to college, I didn't really continue that. My undergrad was in computer science. And toward the end of my college career, I this is right after 9 11. I switched to international relations. I finished my undergrad and I got masters in international relations. And as I was working kind of in that realm, it became more and more apparent to me that and I think to a lot of people, that how people organize was changing and how and the use of the Internet and social media was a key role in that and I wanted to say that I wanted to learn more. So I went to graduate school got my PhD in political science and in that role I looked at how the public influences what the news media covers and how what the news media covers influences what the public thinks is important and that there's this cyclical and interactive relationship between the two groups. Basically, as I finish my dissertation, I just happen to be really lucky and see a job as opening up a pew and apply immediately and get hired. And I've been here for 7 and a half years now. I've done work on topics like this where we're looking at social media sites. I've done similar work looking at YouTube. We've also done work looking at what the news media how the news media covers new administrations, looking at how people's behavior is when they're looking at websites with news articles. So a wide range of topics pulling in different kinds of tools. That's a really fascinating area of journalism, digital data journalism, for sure. You know, I find this report about alternative social media really kind of fascinating. In the past, we've had some people on the podcast who were talking about things like Gamergate and QAnon and sort of the things that were sort of going on in the background of political science at the beginning of this century, I guess. Or at least the last decade.

Galen Stocking Pew Research Center Michael O'connell Instagram Reddit Galen PEW Twitter Facebook Youtube
ESPN Reporter Allison Williams Steps Down From Role After Refusing Covid-19 Vaccine

Pushing the Odds with Matt Perrault

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

ESPN Reporter Allison Williams Steps Down From Role After Refusing Covid-19 Vaccine

"Allison williams woke at the vaccine. So she's no longer working sideline reporting for. Espn coming up this season. He was on a podcast where she said to say. I'm disappointed is probably a huge understatement. It's not been easy. But there are some things that are precluding me for being out there. And i'm gonna leave it at that. I love you guys when i can probably in a future episode and we can drive into whatever i can reveal as to why so. I'm super bombed. It's going to be a hard weekend for sure this weekend. But i can't wait to watch you to shine on the sidelines of your games. You'll be flipping through channels incessantly all day. I'll probably have to go get a sitter for my son or something. Because he's definitely going to have to get a knock any attention this weekend. Okay

Allison Williams Espn
 Connecting the Dots Between Covid Vaccine Hesitancy and Conservative Media

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

02:25 min | 1 year ago

Connecting the Dots Between Covid Vaccine Hesitancy and Conservative Media

"Here's something that stands out to me. When i consider the conservative media types and the way they regard cove in nineteen. It's just small and medium market host. Who are dying from ovid. Not the big shots. Not the ones with shows on fox. News fox has gone through so many chapters on kobe. Sometimes they seem to back off of the antibac- vaccine stuff or the the downplaying of it kind of thing. Sometimes they go much more in that direction. Early in the pandemic. They parted ways with trish. Reagan from fox business Because she was kind of casting doubt on this and of course early in the pandemic. i think it was reported. That tucker carlson you know went to like mar-a-lago i think it was an urge. Donald trump to like take it seriously and to urge people to take seriously and of course you know most of these house of in broadcasting remotely and fox has all kinds of requirements for their own offices so the there's also this kind of layer of of hypocrisy there of you know it's not what they're saying but if you watch what they're doing i it tells you the they're taking it more seriously on a personal level than what they're urging people to but of course we don't know if any of their big hosts are like tucker. Carlson has been skeptical of the code vaccine and certainly the government message on the kobe vaccine. You know the widespread encouragement for people to get the vaccine but we don't know if he's vaccinated or not and he said that's a personal question. The most ridiculous interview answer. I think i've heard is reporter. Asked him that and he was like well would be like me asking you about your sex life or something like it was some ridiculous comparison about whether the you know that this was personal and he wasn't going to say And so we don't know if any of these people are vaccinated. We don't know what they're doing to take precautions. We we know none of that kind of stuff. None of them have been open about it in a lot of ways. And that's a big difference between other walks of life. The people who are opposed to people have been very boldly. You know saying i'm not doing this. It's been a badge of honor. An you mentioned. Joe rogan as someone who is sort of said. Well if you're young you don't need this and those kinds of things who i think. View it as an admirable practicing what they preach kind of stand but the most of these leading conservative media practitioners have been fairly quiet On this

FOX Tucker Carlson Trish Lago Donald Trump Reagan Carlson Tucker Joe Rogan
ABC News Rocked by Sexual Assault Accusations in Lawsuit

Radio From Hell

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

ABC News Rocked by Sexual Assault Accusations in Lawsuit

"Call Thursday that she has requested an independent investigation into how ABC has handled allegations of sexual assault against the former executive producer of Good Morning America. Comments came a day after a lawsuit was filed that alleged that the producer Michael Corn had sexually assaulted a current ABC News staffer and former staffer in separate incidents. Mm Mr Corn has denied. Any wrongdoing. Utah

Michael Corn ABC Good Morning America Abc News Mr Corn Utah
ESPN Removes Rachel Nichols From NBA Programming, Cancels 'the Jump'

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

ESPN Removes Rachel Nichols From NBA Programming, Cancels 'the Jump'

"Evening. ESPN is pulling Rachel Nichols off its NBA pro Granting. It follows The New York Times report last month. The detailed critical comments the nickels made about another on air personality, Maria Taylor, who is black. Nichols had sat on a hot mic. The Taylor was picked to host NBA finals coverage last year because ESPN quote felt pressure on diversity. Nichols had been an integral part of ESPN's NBA coverage since she returned to the network in 2016.

Rachel Nichols Espn Maria Taylor NBA Nickels Nichols The New York Times Taylor
OnlyFans Will Ban Pornography Starting in October

Mojo In The Morning

01:18 min | 1 year ago

OnlyFans Will Ban Pornography Starting in October

"Are on on only fans or a fan of only fans. This is a story for you. The site is going to be banning pornography this fall. The ban sexually explicit content is going into effect. October october first and quote unquote. Outside pressure is to blame here. So they're making this big chains to get in line with requests from their banking partners and their payout partners payout providers only fan says it all. I hope that the money's a lot because you guys have just lost your fun. I mean i like non non porn. I'm trying to find what else is on there. And i can't find it's mostly nude videos. Does right it's people usually trying to like make extra money right showing their feet and sell. Sounds like they're still going to be a little bit of wiggle room for nude content on only fans. They say that creators will still be allowed to post contact with nudity as long as it's in accordance with their acceptable use policy which i have not read that. I can't tell you in detail what that means but address. There's gonna be a loophole. If all these guys didn't back page do that to one point in the back page changed and then what's the other one page even still around. I don't think. I think i think they tried to clean up their act problems. They were being used for

New Zealand Loses Its Precious 'Rings' Series to Britain

The Briefing

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

New Zealand Loses Its Precious 'Rings' Series to Britain

"And amazon will film. It's one billion dollar. Lord of the rings prequel series in britain of the new zealand. It's been described as a nightmare scenario for the pacific nations tolkien tourism and political blow to the prime minister. Justin the turn read why the online giant will set the twenty year relationship between new zealand. And jr tolkien's middle earth.

Amazon New Zealand Britain Justin Jr Tolkien
HBO Max  14 Months Later

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

01:55 min | 1 year ago

HBO Max 14 Months Later

"We've got kelsey sutton are streaming editor kelsey. Welcome back to the show. What an introduction. Thank you so much for having me. I'm so excited. To be bad. Kills he is such a joy to work with Every single day and also to have on the show and today we've got a really a fun topic a hyper specific content because for those who listen frequently or just pay attention to anything advocate covers or to your life as a modern human being streaming services obviously just exploded Over the past two years it went from just being the same old options of. Oh you got your net flicks in your hulu and your one or two other things. And then all the sudden it's like you have nine hundred options And we have had several episodes devoted to that into this explosion of streaming. And at the time we kind of asked what's to what's gonna settle out you know what are going to be the ones that end up being kind of required Required viewing and that you actually are worth your money each month and i feel like there's some consensus that. Hbo max has become one of those services shannon before we get to the experts What's your what's your take on. Hbo max so h backs hbo. Max set a little bit of a rocky start. But it's become one of the sort of like hubs of like hidden gems like that. You start that superlative net flicks. I felt but when it comes to just really nice nuggets of content. Hbo max has really a ton to offer. And they have you know the benefit of like a really robust ip. it's just nice to find these sort of like one off like romantic comedies and Kind of cringing comedies which tend to like fall pretty middle lane for me.

Kelsey Sutton Kelsey HBO Hulu Shannon MAX Nuggets
South Park Creators Pledge 14 New Films for Paramount+

/Film Daily

01:44 min | 1 year ago

South Park Creators Pledge 14 New Films for Paramount+

"Good news. They're going to be making fourteen new south park movies. Brad tell us breath us. Yeah not only are getting fourteen newsouth part movies. But it's part of this big new overarching deal that trey parker and matt stone the creators of south park just strapped with mtv entertainment studios and viacom. Cbs because they're also Extending south park out through. It's a milestone thirtieth season and then the deal also includes these fourteen director streaming southbound spinoff movies that will be released exclusively on paramount plus. And this is a deal that is going to make parker and stone over nine hundred million dollars which is crazy I mean. I don't even gosh i nine hundred million dollars. I mean even split between the. It's still four hundred fifty million dollars and that's just it's crazy to me. That's a crazy amount of content to commit to the like rpm still like clamoring for south park at this point. I mean south park still has very loyal fans. It's you know there's a reason it's been around for this long. It's a staple of comedy central. It's the recent specials that they've done the vaccination special they did You know a previous special. They had as well. I think it was the holiday special. And so they've proven to be very popular still and it's just to show that stuck around for so long and people continue to watch it so it's you know it's one of those things where it's just a staple now of television essentially and it's gonna keep going as long as you know Viacom keeps ordering new seasons of

South Park Mtv Entertainment Studios Trey Parker Matt Stone Viacom Brad CBS Parker
Maria Taylor Leaves ESPN after NBA Finals

Morning Edition

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Maria Taylor Leaves ESPN after NBA Finals

"Her last assignment on ESPN was Tuesday's NBA Finals when the Milwaukee Bucks won the championship get history in the making history has been made. Taylor's departure comes weeks after the New York Times reported on tensions within the network over a white colleagues recorded comments that suggested Taylor may have gotten a more prominent role because she's black. Contract talks between Taylor and ESPN had also broken down more than once. NPR's media correspondent David Folkenflik joins us to talk more about this, David. So why is Maria Taylor leaving ESPN? Well, you certainly got to say it's because of the money they were millions of dollars apart. She had wanted something like eight million last year, which is in line with some of their highest paid figures. Last year, they offered five And after the pandemic it they really were wiped out for the year asking for major host to give money back to the network This year, they're offering about three million still about tripling of her salary, but not what she wanted. There's important background, though. Rachel Nichols is a notable reporter and host at the network who herself White was caught on the effectively a hot mic a year ago, saying that while she wanted diversity at ESPN, she sure didn't want those gains to come at her expense. And suggested that Taylor was promoted to be an NBA countdown host over nickels because of race. Here's a clip of what she said that was posted by The New York Times would you need To give her more things to do because you're feeling pressure about your like, crappy, long time record university, which, by the way I myself let know personally from the came outside of it like Go for it, just, you know, find it somewhere else, like they're not going to find it with me and taking my family Nichols. They're referring to it as her thing as though somehow Taylor wasn't deserving a lot of folks network think Taylor's tremendous talent. That was circulated within an ESPN last year and caused a real ruckus, particularly among African American colleagues, and then once more rupture when it was reported earlier this summer by The New York Times. How did ESPN handle the fallout? Rachel Nichols remarks

Taylor Espn David Folkenflik Maria Taylor Milwaukee Bucks NBA The New York Times NPR Rachel Nichols David Nickels White Nichols
Video Games Coming to Netflix? Latest Hiring Offers a Clue

Mojo In The Morning

01:16 min | 1 year ago

Video Games Coming to Netflix? Latest Hiring Offers a Clue

"Lastly as new tv and film streaming services pop up left and right those that have been around for a while like netflix are looking for new ways. Different ways to expand soon enough video games might be added to your netflix account. The streaming giant announced this week that they've hired a guy by the name of mike verdoux as its new. Vp of game development as part of a new venture to offer video games on the platform. I think he worked over at. Ea is that the the reports for for a long time I don't know what sort of video games netflix customers will get. Bloomberg is reporting. They are set to debut within the next year. So this is going to happen. And basically what's going to happen is it's all going to appear alongside your current film and tv options as a genre so like you know how you swipe through everything. You'll have a video game option right there. I do this story the other day. I was a tuesday morning about how two-thirds of america is playing video games. And they're saying it. They're not going to be planning on charging any extra for video game content. But what that says to me is. We're all going to have a price increase farm not only to play for your pay for my kids video games. I gotta pay for everybody else's view.

Netflix Mike Verdoux EA Bloomberg America
Video Games Coming to Netflix

Z Morning Zoo

01:10 min | 1 year ago

Video Games Coming to Netflix

"Ready for this? Okay, So Netflix is said to debut video games within the next year. Uh, yeah. Yeah, I know, right? I was gonna put this in Good idea, Betty, but it's such a good idea to even give that chance right. They're going to appear alongside your current film and TV options as a genre, so you'll have movies, TV shows video games and you can swipe through. The same way you do with films documentaries on Netflix Page Right now, they're not planning to charge extra for video game content, So it's not like they're going to throw video games on their go. Well, now Netflix is $20 a month. Yeah, so this I mean, this changes the game for everything. Yeah, 100% of what they they make available, right? Yeah, I think if you they get so like for there's like, Xbox and PlayStation, right, you can pay like monthly passes where you can, like pretty much stream any game. You won right? Um, but you got to be a gamer like, you know, I mean, you gotta be like into it to pay 25 whatever it is mine, but Netflix, it's already included. Or maybe it's just a little add on bonus and you're like, Oh, there's the new mad, And so there is the new call of duty, right makes it super easy. The next guy in time

Netflix Betty
All Universal Films Coming to Peacock Starting in 2022

Daily Tech News Show

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

All Universal Films Coming to Peacock Starting in 2022

"A new multi. Year deal we'll see peacock get movies from universal dreamworks elimination and focus films. No later than four months after their theatrical premiere streaming the films exclusively for the first four months as well as the last four months of the traditional eighteen month pay one window with the film's heading to other services for ten months in between the deal starts in two thousand twenty two and we'll also see universal produce exclusive releases for peacock

ESPN Takes Nichols off NBA Finals Duty After Leaked Comments

Charlie Parker

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

ESPN Takes Nichols off NBA Finals Duty After Leaked Comments

"Sideline reporter won't be covering the NBA Finals. Rachel Nichols was pulled from a B C s coverage after her comments about ESPN and diversity went viral. She said a fellow reporter was getting more assignments because she's black Nichols a sense apologized and was replaced for the series. The Phoenix Suns took Game one last night, beating the Milwaukee Bucks. 1 18 to 1 Oh, five. Game two is

Rachel Nichols NBA Espn Nichols Phoenix Suns Milwaukee Bucks