Media News

Listen to the latest updates, interviews and analysis from the world of media news. Sourced from leading podcasts and talk radio shows.

A highlight from Latest Podcast News and Events #476

New Media Show

07:06 min | Last week

A highlight from Latest Podcast News and Events #476

"Rob, welcome back to the new media show. How you doing, my friend? I'm doing just fine. It's good to be back. I know it does feel like it's been a long time since we've done this show. You know, we skipped a week did a show skipped a week did a show, but it was for a good cause. Oh yeah. It seems like both of us either were getting old or we just had this a stars aligned through a whole bunch of medical stuff. Exactly. Exactly. Sometimes you just need to get a couple things taken care of as they say. Well, I don't know if maybe I can show it on this side, but I can't show it. Maybe I can show it. I can't. I have a big, big. Well, it's a three and a half inch, everyone that's seen has said, holy shit. As because, you know, when I took a picture of it over my shoulder and posted it on Facebook, someone there was some rude comments made, but it didn't look that big. But when I was sitting in the chair and she had the scalpel and I could see from a reflection from the window, what she was doing, I'm like, how much are you taking out? I said. And wow. Yeah, so it's been pretty tender on my back, but they would imagine. About 30 stitches and then glued it and there's a big bump. It slowly going down, but yeah, so I'll know here, they're going to send all the initial pathology, but they're going to reconfirm and let me know in the next couple of weeks. But that's good. And then you've had some medical stuff done too. So you've been on recovery. Yeah. I had a little work done on a hernia, so. Okay, so that's what I had done. So it was actually, you know, I think I mentioned that I had a kidney surgery like two months ago, so yeah, so there's been some stuff, you know. Yeah, come up. So you've been and they are age related to some degree, but they're also both of them are very, very common in men too. So these are all issues that men have to deal with as they get older. I had a belly button hernia probably 15 years ago or something and a little operation for that. But overall, knock on wood, things are pretty good. And, you know, I don't have melanoma, cancer, so I'm not dying. And you know, we had a listener of the show. Listen to my advice. And went and got some spots checked. And his prognosis don't eat meat James krig land was negative. He said it on Facebook publicly, so I'd be able to save it, so James went and actually had a couple of spots checked. And I had him Adam removed. Yeah. So again, if you don't know, I just haven't listened to show. I had a pretty big melanoma scare. So if you have a spot, go get it checked, please. We don't, it's a completely preventable death sentence. So, you know, I guess that's the main thing. But anyway, you know, I was actually in Columbus, Monday and Tuesday. So I did great. It did merry go show and Monday went down there and we had taco Tuesday yesterday to celebrate Thanksgiving, had the team together. We did a little fun trivia thing. So Kenny had a team event yesterday. And I basically got up pretty early this morning and well, I'm not super early, but I drove back and fought some of the pre Halloween pre Thanksgiving traffic to get back here to Michigan, but here we are. Happy podcasting. I know there's been a lot of stuff that's been going on in the medium too. You know, trying to keep up with it all in the face of doing all the things that we've been doing is it can be a little challenging at times, but yeah, I think the last few days the focus has really been around big money coming into podcasting more and more. The Samsung announcement of supporting podcasts in Europe and Spotify has got like $3.5 billion that they want to spend on buying things. Come on down. The price is right, step right up here. We get to, you know, we can, hey, if they bought anchor. For the money that they spent for anchor then that should make you and I were about another zero on the. Million level or two, so come on down. The price is right. I think now they're just probably going to be buying content content, yeah. And supposedly, Joe Rogan was the number two this week over there. So something has happened. In some indications there may be some manipulation of data. I didn't quite understand the piece. Like to have more information on that. But it's interesting. It is interesting. Yeah. But go ahead. Yeah, it's just a lot of stuff that Spotify's doing to push the envelope on things out there. There's no question about that. Coming out saying that they have $3.5 billion that they want to spend on acquisitions is a pretty that's a pretty buzzworthy statement. That's a big, that's a big number. Right. And it's like, really? It does kind of cause you to pause a little bit and say, what was the real purpose of announcing that? They could buy they could buy the entire podcasting space for $3.5 billion. I think they could buy libsyn pod bean blueberry. They could take the top ten players off the field for $3.5 billion. Probably. Yeah. That's probably true. You know, now that's that doesn't get them any content that just gets some service provider, but you know, I don't know, you know? Now, I mean, if for the record, they're not talking with us. So just so everybody knows. Yeah, I mean, if that or anything like that were to happen, I guess you could be concerned a little bit about the open nature of the medium, right? What would happen in that particular scenario? I don't think that any one company can control RSS. I think that's going to be something that maybe some of the some larger companies may think that they can do, but I'm not sure that's going to work or if that's really in there, economic interest, even do that. Well, there's been a few people that are on the dogging end of, you know, they're now dogging our assess again. I've seen a few articles come out. Oh, we only could do this or that,

James Krig Melanoma Facebook Hernia ROB Spotify Kenny Columbus Adam Joe Rogan Cancer James Michigan Samsung Europe
A highlight from How a Political Story Cuts Through

The Media Show

05:51 min | Last week

A highlight from How a Political Story Cuts Through

"Hello, this week, we want to explore what makes a political story matter. And what makes a particular story, however important it feels at the time, soon, be forgotten. We'll talk to the BBC, Steve Rosenberg about his remarkable interview with the president of Belarus, Alexander Lukashenko will consider the change of editor at the daily mail and how much influence he will have over the stories that stay with us, and we need to talk about Peppa pig. I'm sure most of you saw the prime minister's speech at the CBI. It was an eventful affair. Let's begin the program by quickly speaking to Anushka Astana deputy political editor at ITV news, hi Anushka. I assume ITV covered Peppa pig? We certainly did cover I can imagine that my ITV colleague in Northumberland Tom barter who was there was watching as we all were slightly through his hands at that speech, not only a Peppa pig, but at a few things. And of course, he had the opportunity straight after that interview to ask the prime minister some questions in a cool clip. So for all broadcasters, but it was his turn to ask the questions and you will remember that he I think spoke for the nation in a way when he put to the prime minister. Are you okay? And it is kind of amazing, isn't it how that sentiment has carried us through the week in newtons, even up to today with Karev using it in the House of Commons? And some of the headlines along the way, not good for damage rate. Well, we're going to unpack in a little bit more detail later in the program, the consequences of that speech will do so with the help of the pollster Joe twyman, the speech, of course, generated lots of coverage, but Joe's going to help us gauge if it might matter in the long-term two. Before that, also with us today, is Katie razzle my co presenter on the media show. Hi, Katie. Good to see you. Hello, nice to be here. Now, you've been speaking to the new culture secretary Nadine Dory. I wonder what her priorities were when she outlined them to you. Wow, you know, she says how priority is widening access to culture and sport to kids from the kind of department background she comes from, which she claims is now the lens through which the department under her must take every decision. But aside from that, there's a lot in her entry. At the top, our two media related ones, the BBC license fee, what it will be for the next 5 years and whether to privatize channel four, she's in discussions right now with the BBC about that. And that's a head of future discussions on charter renewal and whether the BBC license fee will exist at all in the future. Now, when I met her, I did detect a bit of a change in tone when I, you know, in the sense that she was keen to say she wants the BBC to survive, and that it is the best of British. But of course we all know she's been super critical of the BBC in the past, and indeed in her role for being too posh to left wing as she sees it to woke and it's thought that decision will come soon with reports that the license fee will be frozen for two years. In terms of channel four, her predecessor Oliver dowden seemed to favor privatization much to channel falls alarm. She claims she hasn't decided yet, and that there are 60,000 consultation responses for her to go through, and it would be an abusive power. She had decided without reading those. So, you know, there's no insights for there at the moment. And on top of that, she's overseeing this Bill going through parliament at the moment about safety online. So a lot of her to think about before we talk further about the culture sector. Let's listen to Nadine Dory, telling you about her plans to tackle online harm with a new bill. We are looking at and considering making somebody within an organization, like Facebook or meta or rebranding doesn't work, by the way. Or one of those organizations criminally responsible. That is something we are considering including in this bill. They've had notice they've got fair warning. This bill is coming, abide by your terms and conditions now. Remove your harmful algorithms now. You know, there's 20,000 engineers that you're going to put onto the metaverse, put them on making Facebook a place which is safe for young people to go to. Now. No, of course, Facebook would disagree with the cult of secretaries characterization of its company. It said recently, our technology is having a big impact on reducing how much hate speech people see. And before we speak to Katie again, let's also bring in Chris Williams business editor at the telegraph, Chris, good to have you on the media show. I wonder what you make of the culture secretary's plans to take on companies like Facebook. I mean these laws have been in the works now for a number of years. The UK will be the first country in the world to attempt something like this. And it's fair to say that the regulator of communists taking on these powers is itself unsure about how it's going to work and whether it will work. At the moment, what's proposed amounts to not much more than the power to tell people off. And at the scale of a company like Google or Facebook, a country the size of the UK is going to struggle to have an impact. So there's a big question about how and whether this will work or have any impact, the government seems to bring it up as a response to everything. Every news event where it's got an online element where we've got this unharmed Bill, that's going to solve everything out. You have to be skeptical. Now, as you know, Chris, and of course, Katie knows too, the culture secretary also spoke at the department of culture media and sports select committee. It was a lengthy affair, I wonder what the both of you would pick out as being the most significant moments of it. Perhaps you first. Well, I think it's fair to say that when the dean was appointed, there was some surprise and race eyebrows. And I think her comment she made a comment about channel four, which showed that she got some work to do to get her head around the brief where she said, is taxpayers money to look after channel four over the course of commercially funded. So there's no taxpayers money involved in that situation.

BBC Nadine Dory Steve Rosenberg Anushka Astana Tom Barter ITV Karev Joe Twyman Katie Razzle Alexander Lukashenko Itv News Anushka Oliver Dowden CBI Belarus Katie Northumberland Facebook House Of Commons JOE
A highlight from Nadine Dorries

The Media Show

05:19 min | Last week

A highlight from Nadine Dorries

"Congratulations on your appointment. Fantastic job. Came as a surprise to you, I think. And to lots of people. And I guess it's fair to say, wasn't welcome by everyone in the sector. I was having a look. One comedian said, it's great to have someone who's written more books than they've read. Another called you the most intellectually vapid MP of the modern era. And a crime writer said, the closest you get to cult you get to culture is if you're eating a pot of yogurt. What do you think is going on? Lovely. Friendly. Well yeah. Very friendly and actually it's really interesting because you could I think one of my comments at the time was that you could hear the almond milk latte cups hitting the floor across the BBC. When my job was announced, but, you know, all I take that as is a form of snobbery and it's very much a form of left wing snobbery. And it also kind of highlights a thread of nastiness across politics and the kind of that left wing divide in politics. I think doesn't do as any favor. So I was disappointed, but I think, you know, as many people have said to me, all the right people were angry. So who are the right people? Fine, I've just got on with. Well, those who want to engage in culture wars, which I don't actually. And I think, you know, so that comment that, you know, I've written more books than I've read and, you know, something about being I found this comments quite misogynistic. And I also found them absolutely. It looked at me and looked at my background. They would have known that that wasn't true. So people were making those comments for political attack and nothing else. So, you know, they weren't going to the person who said that I've written more books, has no idea what books I've read. Or what my capabilities are in terms of literature or anything else. So I just found them thoroughly unpleasant. And you know, they're not comments that I would make or I think anybody else has ever made one appointment has been made. And obviously your supporters were saying the opposite, they were saying, she's perfectly cultured secretary because she writes novels amongst other things. But it's a change to have somebody in a role that say, you know, I was a nurse and I was put into the prime minister put me into health, which I could really see that that was a fit and everybody said, no rampaging round hole. And you know, I'm also a novelist who sold to three quarter million books and he put me. I've got one of the things that I'm reading out I wonder quite a lot of people are probably reading your book, you having got this job. I mean, it is really interesting. It's based so much on your life growing up in Liverpool, which probably a lot of our audiences don't know about, that you did come from a very deprived background in that sense, and that's reflected in this book. How do you think it's shaped you? So I come from a background, which is one of the poorest wards in the country. I was born in Breck road in Anfield in Liverpool within the sound of the cop. And it certainly had an influence on my role now. It could cost it shaped me throughout my life. You know, it's hugely contributed to what I write and how I write. Because I almost in a way it's a social documentary on what life was like in the 1950s and 60s in the poorer parts of Liverpool. Which I think people would be amazed now days to know what that was like. You know, did you go hungry? Yeah, absolutely went hungry. You know, one very small fireplace to heat a whole house. You know, payday was on a Thursday. You know, Tuesdays were Tuesdays and Wednesdays were pretty difficult. Having to borrow shoes to go to school. You know, it was very, very tough. And I think people today would be they would step back into my childhood would find it pretty unbelievable what we had to endure in terms of an existence. So that's why I find some of those comments particularly grating. They have no idea about my life. They have no idea about my ring. I spent the first 25 years of my life like that. You know, I'm pretty old now. So I've kind of lived through those days, but it's certainly shaped not just what I've written, which I think is almost a social documentary on those times. But it shaped what I'm doing in this department as the Secretary of State, hugely, and I can't deny that. And one of the reasons why I can't deny it is, it came to me very quickly when I arrived at the department, what it was I wanted to achieve and what I wanted to do. And the reason for that is that in the early 60s, 1960s when I was growing up, if you wanted to be a part of the arts, you could be. So, for example, I was taken from my very first theater experience by a charity to the everyman theater in Liverpool, when I was about ten years old to see us come to be tails. I love shorts as a result. And I love the theater as a result. And I believe that the theater is a place where I'm welcome and where I can be. But I know that many of the kids from who, on the same streets that I grew up in now, I think theaters are not places where people like them go. Let alone places where people like them can work or can contribute to. And so I made it my ethos and the department within 24 hours of arriving. That everything we do in that department,

Liverpool BBC Anfield Everyman Theater
A highlight from Deep on the Steele beat: Erik Wemple & Marcy Wheeler

The Kicker

05:07 min | Last week

A highlight from Deep on the Steele beat: Erik Wemple & Marcy Wheeler

"So the drum beats are getting louder and louder that may force news organizations that took the steel dossier, which was this collection of allegations about Trump and Russia took it seriously. Last week, The Washington Post announced that it was cutting some stories and editors knows on stories about some of their coverage of the basically admitting that they're reporting was flawed that the source that they were light on was unreliable. There are hints of more of these sort of reckonings to come. And it sort of the whole thing raises questions about the media's coverage of Trump of Trump and Russia and the dossier as this kind of symbol of all that was wrong there. It's super complicated. There are a lot of parties. There are a lot of legal actions. There's indictments with investigations, which is why I'm so happy to be joined today by Eric limbo media critic for The Washington Post. And Marcy Wheeler, a writer who writes for a blog empty wheel net, who have both followed this in incredible detail and are going to help us sort through it all. Welcome Eric mercy. I want to start with a question that I tried to sort of frame in a piece that suggested this week, which was, why is it, is it your sense, it's my sense of it's taken a long time for there to be a sort of a broader media sense that this document is fatally flawed and really start holding news organizations to account. Is that your sense as well and why do you think it's taken as long as it has marcie let's start with you. I think for one, because the issue got so polarized, so. For Republicans, the entirety of the Russian investigation is the dossier. For normal people, we have undercover. And as a deliberate way to undercut there's abundant reason to believe that was the entire point of any disinformation in it. Paul Manafort came back from a meeting with Oli da paska deputy and told rent's priebus, we're going to undercut the Russian investigation by talking about the dossier full time. And that is exactly what has happened for four years leading up to the derm investigation, which led up to this indictment. So that's what the Republican Party has been doing relentlessly ever since. And I think it's very unfortunate that there wasn't a place in reporting except for media criticism to say not just we got the dossier wrong, but and this is important because the right has not done this yet. But what do the dossier really do? Where did it come from why was it so bad, what was the tie between Christopher Steele who was working for all of deripaska and Paul Manafort, who was giving campaign information to all the tariff paska, that conversation has not been done at all yet. And I think that, you know, again, partly it's because the discussion about the dossier anywhere outside of the right has been media critics rather than hard journalism. And I mean, I think that's the biggest reason. I have followed along with the right and frankly ahead of the right on a lot of these issues. But I've been very alone in doing that among serious reporters anywhere from the center to the left. Yeah. Which is why it was I'm so excited to talk to you about this. Do you think that the so on the right, it became this sort of totemic thing of like this is the way that we're going to bring down the whole. We're going to address the whole topic. What has been the role of the dossier on the left? Yeah, I mean, look, I think that it is undeniable that Rachel mad was pushing it. It is undeniable that Adam Schiff got over his skis defending it. And still, I mean, his appearances in the last week, where he blames it all on danchenko lying to steal when there's far more evidence that's still was dishonest than that chenko was it's just unlikely that the UK would ever extradite him for an indictment. And so I think, yeah, parts of parts of the last the left. I mean, when I was writing critically about the dossier in 2017, I got so much pushback from people. Even though I was pointing to concrete things in the dossier that were disproven by the public record, particularly on cybersecurity, like there's a report in it that incidentally, the FBI didn't get until December of 2016. It was not handed to them from Christopher Steele.

Paul Manafort Eric Limbo The Washington Post Marcy Wheeler Eric Mercy Russia Oli Da Paska Donald Trump Christopher Steele Deripaska Paska Marcie Republican Party Danchenko Chenko Adam Schiff Rachel UK FBI
ESPN Reporter Allison Williams Steps Down From Role After Refusing Covid-19 Vaccine

Pushing the Odds with Matt Perrault

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

ESPN Reporter Allison Williams Steps Down From Role After Refusing Covid-19 Vaccine

"Allison williams woke at the vaccine. So she's no longer working sideline reporting for. Espn coming up this season. He was on a podcast where she said to say. I'm disappointed is probably a huge understatement. It's not been easy. But there are some things that are precluding me for being out there. And i'm gonna leave it at that. I love you guys when i can probably in a future episode and we can drive into whatever i can reveal as to why so. I'm super bombed. It's going to be a hard weekend for sure this weekend. But i can't wait to watch you to shine on the sidelines of your games. You'll be flipping through channels incessantly all day. I'll probably have to go get a sitter for my son or something. Because he's definitely going to have to get a knock any attention this weekend. Okay

Allison Williams Espn
 Connecting the Dots Between Covid Vaccine Hesitancy and Conservative Media

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

02:25 min | 3 months ago

Connecting the Dots Between Covid Vaccine Hesitancy and Conservative Media

"Here's something that stands out to me. When i consider the conservative media types and the way they regard cove in nineteen. It's just small and medium market host. Who are dying from ovid. Not the big shots. Not the ones with shows on fox. News fox has gone through so many chapters on kobe. Sometimes they seem to back off of the antibac- vaccine stuff or the the downplaying of it kind of thing. Sometimes they go much more in that direction. Early in the pandemic. They parted ways with trish. Reagan from fox business Because she was kind of casting doubt on this and of course early in the pandemic. i think it was reported. That tucker carlson you know went to like mar-a-lago i think it was an urge. Donald trump to like take it seriously and to urge people to take seriously and of course you know most of these house of in broadcasting remotely and fox has all kinds of requirements for their own offices so the there's also this kind of layer of of hypocrisy there of you know it's not what they're saying but if you watch what they're doing i it tells you the they're taking it more seriously on a personal level than what they're urging people to but of course we don't know if any of their big hosts are like tucker. Carlson has been skeptical of the code vaccine and certainly the government message on the kobe vaccine. You know the widespread encouragement for people to get the vaccine but we don't know if he's vaccinated or not and he said that's a personal question. The most ridiculous interview answer. I think i've heard is reporter. Asked him that and he was like well would be like me asking you about your sex life or something like it was some ridiculous comparison about whether the you know that this was personal and he wasn't going to say And so we don't know if any of these people are vaccinated. We don't know what they're doing to take precautions. We we know none of that kind of stuff. None of them have been open about it in a lot of ways. And that's a big difference between other walks of life. The people who are opposed to people have been very boldly. You know saying i'm not doing this. It's been a badge of honor. An you mentioned. Joe rogan as someone who is sort of said. Well if you're young you don't need this and those kinds of things who i think. View it as an admirable practicing what they preach kind of stand but the most of these leading conservative media practitioners have been fairly quiet On this

FOX Tucker Carlson Trish Lago Donald Trump Reagan Carlson Tucker Joe Rogan
ABC News Rocked by Sexual Assault Accusations in Lawsuit

Radio From Hell

00:32 sec | 3 months ago

ABC News Rocked by Sexual Assault Accusations in Lawsuit

"Call Thursday that she has requested an independent investigation into how ABC has handled allegations of sexual assault against the former executive producer of Good Morning America. Comments came a day after a lawsuit was filed that alleged that the producer Michael Corn had sexually assaulted a current ABC News staffer and former staffer in separate incidents. Mm Mr Corn has denied. Any wrongdoing. Utah

Michael Corn ABC Good Morning America Abc News Mr Corn Utah
ESPN Removes Rachel Nichols From NBA Programming, Cancels 'the Jump'

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 3 months ago

ESPN Removes Rachel Nichols From NBA Programming, Cancels 'the Jump'

"Evening. ESPN is pulling Rachel Nichols off its NBA pro Granting. It follows The New York Times report last month. The detailed critical comments the nickels made about another on air personality, Maria Taylor, who is black. Nichols had sat on a hot mic. The Taylor was picked to host NBA finals coverage last year because ESPN quote felt pressure on diversity. Nichols had been an integral part of ESPN's NBA coverage since she returned to the network in 2016.

Rachel Nichols Espn Maria Taylor NBA Nickels Nichols The New York Times Taylor
OnlyFans Will Ban Pornography Starting in October

Mojo In The Morning

01:18 min | 3 months ago

OnlyFans Will Ban Pornography Starting in October

"Are on on only fans or a fan of only fans. This is a story for you. The site is going to be banning pornography this fall. The ban sexually explicit content is going into effect. October october first and quote unquote. Outside pressure is to blame here. So they're making this big chains to get in line with requests from their banking partners and their payout partners payout providers only fan says it all. I hope that the money's a lot because you guys have just lost your fun. I mean i like non non porn. I'm trying to find what else is on there. And i can't find it's mostly nude videos. Does right it's people usually trying to like make extra money right showing their feet and sell. Sounds like they're still going to be a little bit of wiggle room for nude content on only fans. They say that creators will still be allowed to post contact with nudity as long as it's in accordance with their acceptable use policy which i have not read that. I can't tell you in detail what that means but address. There's gonna be a loophole. If all these guys didn't back page do that to one point in the back page changed and then what's the other one page even still around. I don't think. I think i think they tried to clean up their act problems. They were being used for

New Zealand Loses Its Precious 'Rings' Series to Britain

The Briefing

00:21 sec | 3 months ago

New Zealand Loses Its Precious 'Rings' Series to Britain

"And amazon will film. It's one billion dollar. Lord of the rings prequel series in britain of the new zealand. It's been described as a nightmare scenario for the pacific nations tolkien tourism and political blow to the prime minister. Justin the turn read why the online giant will set the twenty year relationship between new zealand. And jr tolkien's middle earth.

Amazon New Zealand Britain Justin Jr Tolkien
HBO Max  14 Months Later

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

01:55 min | 4 months ago

HBO Max 14 Months Later

"We've got kelsey sutton are streaming editor kelsey. Welcome back to the show. What an introduction. Thank you so much for having me. I'm so excited. To be bad. Kills he is such a joy to work with Every single day and also to have on the show and today we've got a really a fun topic a hyper specific content because for those who listen frequently or just pay attention to anything advocate covers or to your life as a modern human being streaming services obviously just exploded Over the past two years it went from just being the same old options of. Oh you got your net flicks in your hulu and your one or two other things. And then all the sudden it's like you have nine hundred options And we have had several episodes devoted to that into this explosion of streaming. And at the time we kind of asked what's to what's gonna settle out you know what are going to be the ones that end up being kind of required Required viewing and that you actually are worth your money each month and i feel like there's some consensus that. Hbo max has become one of those services shannon before we get to the experts What's your what's your take on. Hbo max so h backs hbo. Max set a little bit of a rocky start. But it's become one of the sort of like hubs of like hidden gems like that. You start that superlative net flicks. I felt but when it comes to just really nice nuggets of content. Hbo max has really a ton to offer. And they have you know the benefit of like a really robust ip. it's just nice to find these sort of like one off like romantic comedies and Kind of cringing comedies which tend to like fall pretty middle lane for me.

Kelsey Sutton Kelsey HBO Hulu Shannon MAX Nuggets
South Park Creators Pledge 14 New Films for Paramount+

/Film Daily

01:44 min | 4 months ago

South Park Creators Pledge 14 New Films for Paramount+

"Good news. They're going to be making fourteen new south park movies. Brad tell us breath us. Yeah not only are getting fourteen newsouth part movies. But it's part of this big new overarching deal that trey parker and matt stone the creators of south park just strapped with mtv entertainment studios and viacom. Cbs because they're also Extending south park out through. It's a milestone thirtieth season and then the deal also includes these fourteen director streaming southbound spinoff movies that will be released exclusively on paramount plus. And this is a deal that is going to make parker and stone over nine hundred million dollars which is crazy I mean. I don't even gosh i nine hundred million dollars. I mean even split between the. It's still four hundred fifty million dollars and that's just it's crazy to me. That's a crazy amount of content to commit to the like rpm still like clamoring for south park at this point. I mean south park still has very loyal fans. It's you know there's a reason it's been around for this long. It's a staple of comedy central. It's the recent specials that they've done the vaccination special they did You know a previous special. They had as well. I think it was the holiday special. And so they've proven to be very popular still and it's just to show that stuck around for so long and people continue to watch it so it's you know it's one of those things where it's just a staple now of television essentially and it's gonna keep going as long as you know Viacom keeps ordering new seasons of

South Park Mtv Entertainment Studios Trey Parker Matt Stone Viacom Brad CBS Parker
Maria Taylor Leaves ESPN after NBA Finals

Morning Edition

01:57 min | 4 months ago

Maria Taylor Leaves ESPN after NBA Finals

"Her last assignment on ESPN was Tuesday's NBA Finals when the Milwaukee Bucks won the championship get history in the making history has been made. Taylor's departure comes weeks after the New York Times reported on tensions within the network over a white colleagues recorded comments that suggested Taylor may have gotten a more prominent role because she's black. Contract talks between Taylor and ESPN had also broken down more than once. NPR's media correspondent David Folkenflik joins us to talk more about this, David. So why is Maria Taylor leaving ESPN? Well, you certainly got to say it's because of the money they were millions of dollars apart. She had wanted something like eight million last year, which is in line with some of their highest paid figures. Last year, they offered five And after the pandemic it they really were wiped out for the year asking for major host to give money back to the network This year, they're offering about three million still about tripling of her salary, but not what she wanted. There's important background, though. Rachel Nichols is a notable reporter and host at the network who herself White was caught on the effectively a hot mic a year ago, saying that while she wanted diversity at ESPN, she sure didn't want those gains to come at her expense. And suggested that Taylor was promoted to be an NBA countdown host over nickels because of race. Here's a clip of what she said that was posted by The New York Times would you need To give her more things to do because you're feeling pressure about your like, crappy, long time record university, which, by the way I myself let know personally from the came outside of it like Go for it, just, you know, find it somewhere else, like they're not going to find it with me and taking my family Nichols. They're referring to it as her thing as though somehow Taylor wasn't deserving a lot of folks network think Taylor's tremendous talent. That was circulated within an ESPN last year and caused a real ruckus, particularly among African American colleagues, and then once more rupture when it was reported earlier this summer by The New York Times. How did ESPN handle the fallout? Rachel Nichols remarks

Taylor Espn David Folkenflik Maria Taylor Milwaukee Bucks NBA The New York Times NPR Rachel Nichols David Nickels White Nichols
Video Games Coming to Netflix? Latest Hiring Offers a Clue

Mojo In The Morning

01:16 min | 4 months ago

Video Games Coming to Netflix? Latest Hiring Offers a Clue

"Lastly as new tv and film streaming services pop up left and right those that have been around for a while like netflix are looking for new ways. Different ways to expand soon enough video games might be added to your netflix account. The streaming giant announced this week that they've hired a guy by the name of mike verdoux as its new. Vp of game development as part of a new venture to offer video games on the platform. I think he worked over at. Ea is that the the reports for for a long time I don't know what sort of video games netflix customers will get. Bloomberg is reporting. They are set to debut within the next year. So this is going to happen. And basically what's going to happen is it's all going to appear alongside your current film and tv options as a genre so like you know how you swipe through everything. You'll have a video game option right there. I do this story the other day. I was a tuesday morning about how two-thirds of america is playing video games. And they're saying it. They're not going to be planning on charging any extra for video game content. But what that says to me is. We're all going to have a price increase farm not only to play for your pay for my kids video games. I gotta pay for everybody else's view.

Netflix Mike Verdoux EA Bloomberg America
Video Games Coming to Netflix

Z Morning Zoo

01:10 min | 5 months ago

Video Games Coming to Netflix

"Ready for this? Okay, So Netflix is said to debut video games within the next year. Uh, yeah. Yeah, I know, right? I was gonna put this in Good idea, Betty, but it's such a good idea to even give that chance right. They're going to appear alongside your current film and TV options as a genre, so you'll have movies, TV shows video games and you can swipe through. The same way you do with films documentaries on Netflix Page Right now, they're not planning to charge extra for video game content, So it's not like they're going to throw video games on their go. Well, now Netflix is $20 a month. Yeah, so this I mean, this changes the game for everything. Yeah, 100% of what they they make available, right? Yeah, I think if you they get so like for there's like, Xbox and PlayStation, right, you can pay like monthly passes where you can, like pretty much stream any game. You won right? Um, but you got to be a gamer like, you know, I mean, you gotta be like into it to pay 25 whatever it is mine, but Netflix, it's already included. Or maybe it's just a little add on bonus and you're like, Oh, there's the new mad, And so there is the new call of duty, right makes it super easy. The next guy in time

Netflix Betty
All Universal Films Coming to Peacock Starting in 2022

Daily Tech News Show

00:25 sec | 5 months ago

All Universal Films Coming to Peacock Starting in 2022

"A new multi. Year deal we'll see peacock get movies from universal dreamworks elimination and focus films. No later than four months after their theatrical premiere streaming the films exclusively for the first four months as well as the last four months of the traditional eighteen month pay one window with the film's heading to other services for ten months in between the deal starts in two thousand twenty two and we'll also see universal produce exclusive releases for peacock

ESPN Takes Nichols off NBA Finals Duty After Leaked Comments

Charlie Parker

00:22 sec | 5 months ago

ESPN Takes Nichols off NBA Finals Duty After Leaked Comments

"Sideline reporter won't be covering the NBA Finals. Rachel Nichols was pulled from a B C s coverage after her comments about ESPN and diversity went viral. She said a fellow reporter was getting more assignments because she's black Nichols a sense apologized and was replaced for the series. The Phoenix Suns took Game one last night, beating the Milwaukee Bucks. 1 18 to 1 Oh, five. Game two is

Rachel Nichols NBA Espn Nichols Phoenix Suns Milwaukee Bucks
NBC Seeks Record $6 Million for Super Bowl Commercials

Mojo In The Morning

00:35 sec | 6 months ago

NBC Seeks Record $6 Million for Super Bowl Commercials

"Nbc is talking to potential advertisers about a price tag of six million dollars for a thirty second spot during the next super bowl broadcast. That would set a new record in pricing for super bowl commercials. Six mil thirty seconds. And what's interesting is. Nbc is pressing advertisers for higher prices. Even though the most recent super bowl broadcast had the smallest game in fifteen that was a good super bowl to kansas city vs tampa six million there was a can. There was a pandemic that was keeping people from going

NBC Super Bowl Kansas City Tampa
Summer Movie Season Roars Back, From Action-Packed Blockbusters to Biopics

The 3:59

01:51 min | 6 months ago

Summer Movie Season Roars Back, From Action-Packed Blockbusters to Biopics

"For anyone who lives in an area where theaters are opening up again. Are there actually any big movies out this weekend. Yeah there's not one but two movies in theaters too big blockbuster style temple movies. There's going to be Both of which were delayed multiple times on cruella from disney. It's one of their like live action. Remakes this one of one hundred and one asians that's going to be out. And then also the sequel to a quiet place acquire. Please part two is going to be in theaters as well. So if people are interested in going to the movies during this holiday weekend they actually have things to choose from other signs. That people are actually excited to go back to cinemas again. Yeah we're starting to see some encouraging signs especially in the us as vaccinations have ramped up. We've started to see the box office. Show some signs of life. So i think the biggest hint that people were feeling comfortable and excited about going back. Years was over the easter weekend. When godzilla vs kong came out you know overall that weekend the box office. The us boxoffice did about five hundred million dollars. That's like still half. What did two years ago before the pandemic when it was just a normal easter weekend but it was still really surprising result for this movie especially when you consider that godzilla vs kong was also available to stream the same exact time. It came out the same day as theaters on. Hbo max so long as you had a subscription to it. So i think like. I think that's really started to show that elitist for movies. Where like one of these tentpole movies special effects that going to the theater and seeing it in a darkened cinema with all the southbound and audience. The people are showing signs at the really interested to get back to that feeling.

Disney United States HBO
Amazon to Buy MGM

L.A. Times Morning Briefing

00:43 sec | 6 months ago

Amazon to Buy MGM

"In other news online. Shopping giant amazon is buying film and tv studio mgm with the hopes of filling its video streaming service with more content. Mgm is behind such notable film franchises as james bond rocky the pink panther and legally blonde on the tv side gm's recent productions include reality staples shark tank and the real housewives of beverly hills. Amazon is paying about eight and a half billion dollars for. Mgm making it. The company's second largest acquisition it bought grocery store chain whole foods. Nearly fourteen billion dollars in two thousand seventeen. The deal is the latest in the media. Entertainment industry aimed at boosting streaming services to compete against net flicks and disney

MGM James Bond Rocky The Pink Pant Amazon GM Beverly Hills Disney
Stephen Colbert Says He's Going Back Before Live Audiences

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:41 sec | 6 months ago

Stephen Colbert Says He's Going Back Before Live Audiences

"CBS announcing this morning, The Stephen Colbert's Late Night Show will return to doing live episodes with vaccinated audience in the Ed Sullivan Theater in New York starting June. 14th. The show produced 205 episodes without a live audience in more than a year. Because of the pandemic audience members will be required to show proof of vaccination before they're allowed in face. Mass will be optional. Staff and crew members will be tested before coming back to work and monitored regularly for signs of symptoms. Wilbur did his first remote show march 16th of last year and you might recall he did a monologue tape from his bathtub at home that the show has been done from the offices at his home theater

Late Night Show Ed Sullivan Theater Stephen Colbert CBS New York Wilbur
NBC Will Not Telecast the Golden Globes Next Year

BBC Newsday

02:07 min | 7 months ago

NBC Will Not Telecast the Golden Globes Next Year

"But well, not for the gongs. They're giving out. The American TV network. NBC has announced it won't Broadcast next year's awards On Sunday, the actor Scarlett Johansson called for a form of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. They have the organizer's piney awards. Which has been criticized for lack of diversity there. Second, of course, only to the Oscars. In terms of profile. Let's get an update from K. J. Matthews Entertainment journalist based in Los Angeles. Welcome to the show KJ. So we've had Scott, You're Hanson as saying. We need to reform these awards on now. NBC says it won't broadcast The awards next year. So what reason are they giving? Basically, they're saying that these changes are a long time coming and they're not good enough. I don't feel recall. But right around the time that the Oscars aired in February, there was a major investigative piece that came out that basically stated that look, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association has more than 80 members, and not one of them are black. In addition to that, they pay their members often times to appear in various junkets and other events, and it seems like it. Was coming across is it was allegedly unethical, So there was a lot of things that needed to change and need to be addressed. And the Hollywood Foreign Press Association even acknowledged during the Golden Globes broadcast that they were going to change things. However, what they wanted to do was make those changes over. Ah, year and a half, And when a lot of people heard about that, including the studios, the public relations agencies that represent a lot of these stars, they said, you know, oftentimes. And what happens in Hollywood is when you delay change. That means no change. And so they were very, very concerned about whether or not this organization was taking their concerns very seriously. And so they urge them to do better. And so you had the time's up organization getting involved, saying this isn't good enough. And now you even have Tom Cruise returning three of the Golden Globes that he's won. So I think they get

Hollywood Foreign Press Associ K. J. Matthews NBC Oscars Scarlett Johansson Hanson Los Angeles Scott Golden Globes Hollywood Tom Cruise
Fake News in Digital Journalism

The Kicker

02:09 min | 7 months ago

Fake News in Digital Journalism

"Marcus if i could start with you you wrote after the fact the truth about fake news which is about the circulation of fake news within this environment. Could you talk about that a little bit. Please well. I tried to take a kind of slightly provocative approach to the idea of fake news because the book is motivated by some of the problems i found in the ways that the problems of misinformation and disinformation are talked about and the rather selective way in which we talk about this province which is rather blind to the overall ways in which we can be misinformed by kind of cultural and ideological processes. Well as by much more narrow and specific forms of whether invest into deliberate factual inaccuracy. I suppose part of that is in considering the relationship between journalism and kind of neo liberal tables value in government policy and so forth and the way that that question has not really been engaged with enough so as part of that overall inquiry one of the things i wanted to actually look at the journalism industry which is an inside job involved in preparing graduates to enter for the last twelve thirteen years as as an economic and something. I've worked in as well and throughout that time. That's been i suppose a slight disappointment. Because there's always been this sense of incredible potential and i really believe in the value of what great journalists do and yet as positive to overrule perhaps cultural complacency we have around the kind of slide into neoliberalism has occurred in the last kind of fatty for two years A lot of the things that we say we want journalism to do. Haven't really occurred in in in terms of challenging and trying to arrest or reverse that slide. We started to use a certain point. A word a lot began to trouble me which was content this content creating content over time and i felt that this is emphasizing. The wrong part of what we're doing

Marcus
Apple Leads the Next Chapter of Podcasting With Apple Podcasts Subscriptions

Media Voices

02:01 min | 7 months ago

Apple Leads the Next Chapter of Podcasting With Apple Podcasts Subscriptions

"Apple is launching a new podcast subscriptions seven. It is about an. Is fourteen announcement. It's called the apple. Podcast program has always been named stuff so of Anelka podcast as a tool that the need to create premium subscription cost and sade apple podcasts. And you can have to pay twenty dollars a year fill-up privilege. I have a question that of this because we've spoken about subscribe to only podcast over. Broadcaster are part of a subscription light. New statesman's not cast before. Why is that nurse. Wise not necessarily like a different thing than just a platform. it's the platforms that doing it. I think the point is the the they'll make it easier to do so people who are used to joust uploading their staff stop to apple will ever of no go at this revenue option as part of that process but this this complicates distribution. Doesn't it because if for example we have to locate launching a subscriber. Podcast at the moment. We've got the choices spotify or apple but listeners within half to go to the platform that we should really sat beside on which at the moment our listeners can probably this on a huge variety of platforms whereas it feels like love. The kind of company is a platform play. Where the platforms the safe. Release these tools as apart for podcast is will release their exclusive sits here and people have to have to hot hopscotch. Final results than anywhere. The two things there one the probably don't listen on a range of platforms. They probably have less nuns. Ninety percent of them probably less knows both by oil apple but the other thing is spot. Feis program doesn't mean you have to less known spotify. That's the point.

Apple
Spotify Is Not Going to Kill Podcasting

Sounds Profitable

01:54 min | 7 months ago

Spotify Is Not Going to Kill Podcasting

"I worked at megaphone so full disclosure they are. I left before the deal. So i left in august so twenty twenty And it was really important to me to come to provide my view on it and highlight some of the other people in the space that we're talking about it and i called out j. Richmond of spotify Nick quad hot pod. And ashley carman of the verge with their views on it but specifically nick i really liked for off your lesser spotify pig drawing up butcher pig as spotify and all the different parts of it but i wanted to dig in because you had some really interesting points of view coming from a little bit of a different angle. Now everything i do is add tech focus right a lot of what i'm doing is about the people who are already in the space already working with these tools trying to improve their skill and set to become decision makers or their decision makers and become better informed. And it's very easy for me to forget about the people who are trying to enter the space from the creative side of the production side or the people that that are starting off without getting a paycheck from it. So why don't we dig in a little bit and if you can kinda sum up your view on spotify by megaphone. Maybe we can walk through that and like who. Your view is for right. Okay so i would self identifies sort of mao the pessimist in this space. Because i think there are a lot of people who evangelize podcasts and podcasting and feel like it's going to the next big things you know. We hit that every month. The last fifteen years and i've always been a little bit more depressive. An someone who feels like there is a carnivorous appetite within certain big conglomerates and corporations to take away the magic that is podcasting all the dream. That was podcasting. As i often say

Ashley Carman Richmond Nick
Dr. Jean-Christophe Plantin Discusses Digital Media Infrastructures and Tech Platforms

Social Media & Politics

02:33 min | 7 months ago

Dr. Jean-Christophe Plantin Discusses Digital Media Infrastructures and Tech Platforms

"Let me turn it over to dr zone. Christoph plantain again. He's an associate professor in the department of media and communications at the doctor plantain. Thanks so much for taking the time out and welcome to the social media and politics podcast. Thanks for having me really happy to be here so to start out here. Why don't we break down a few of the key concepts that you've been developing in your research and the first one i'd like to discuss is media infrastructures which draws attention to this interplay between digital platforms. Which is kind of the services that we're all familiar with and the physical infrastructures that make those platforms work. And i think. Maybe we're not all familiar with those. So could you outline the concept of media infrastructures for us and why we should even be thinking about media infrastructures in the first place. Absolutely yeah you allow me to be a little idiosyncratic and just tell me a little bit how. I came to these concept. Maybe that would. That would be helpful just because this is a history that i guess we'll be telling on how we can put these different concepts together. My background is in a media. Medication studies and i worked a lot since my phd. On the concept of blood. I worked lots a studied. Participatory mapping google maps. Open street map and we are here. Yeah mid-2000s is still the whip. Two point zero seeking pretty strong and the type of scholarship at the time. Emphasizes the participatory nature off these pot for allowing people to post more easily to create to engage in activism or creative practices. so that was my standpoint. that's what i really started with A post doctoral fellowship at university of michigan and with my colleagues where i became much more more familiar with the concept of infrastructure. I worked a lot with polite words. Carla goes the christian. Send vague and these folks are much more on the stf side of these topics of the study of technolog- and the where of course talking about and they were talking about large distribution systems. They're put together via standards and gateways in these type of things but what was super interesting when we started working together and focusing more on the facebook and google's of the world. Is that what. I was describing. As platform there were describing as infrastructure.

Dr Zone Christoph Plantain Department Of Media And Commun Google University Of Michigan Carla Facebook
Steve Wilson from QCode Media

New Media Show

02:43 min | 7 months ago

Steve Wilson from QCode Media

"We should do is just let steve tells about q code beginning and then we'll drag him back to premium podcasting topic. So why don't you give us the four one one on what you're doing over your code. What will share. Thanks guys So yeah i code I'm chief strategy. Officer code really specializes in immersive scripted. Fiction podcast so these are fully sound design scripted shows that often have you know amazing stories ayla celebrity talent and are produced in a really high technical level We mix master at dolby. Atmos and do some really cool things in the audio for listeners. Who haven't experienced fiction before these are shows that kind of hearkens back to the old radio days You know war. The world's is an apt analogy to what people are familiar with. But rather than using the sort of old techniques of production coconuts and wash words and those kinds of things. These are producer really high level and an amazing listening experience. Something that really is a great addition to everyone's like diverse podcast listening experience actions in trying to do something a little bit different. You know prior to joining code. I spent a long time at apple. where i did editorial partner relations and marketing on apple podcasts. Before that i actually still worked in podcasts but in apple's education group where i worked on. It jew which was a you know an educational podcasting platform with college courses and lectures and those kinds of things as well. That's all been folded into the apple. Podcasts platform now that the whole educational side. I mean how important i- i'm just curious. How important is the educational side to to apple. As far as working with the universities. I know back then. They're working pretty closely with like stanford and a lot of the big big colleges. Is that still going on you. Know yeah i mean look. I wanted to obviously be really careful and all of our conversation to make it clear like i'm not. I'm not speaking on apple behalf. And so i ask How important is it. It's it's hard for me. Sort of provide that kind of answer. But you know what. I would just say as you know what was exciting about. It you in the project that they had there it was. It was a project that really saw the opportunity and mobile learning the very early days. So this this project started back in two thousand and six. I wanna say it was not too long after podcasting itself really started and it was the result of you know apple and duke university thinking about how the ipod the original ipod could be used in mobile learning.

Apple Steve Duke University
Netflix Finally Rolls out Its Shuffle Play Feature

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:22 sec | 7 months ago

Netflix Finally Rolls out Its Shuffle Play Feature

"A new feature called Play something It will allow you to shuffle through suggested movies and TV shows. Subscribers were shown a film or a show that was picked based on the Netflix algorithm. If it doesn't look interesting, you can click play something else and get a new recommendation. Netflix rolling out the features for TV's first and then we'll start testing for mobile devices.

Netflix
How Capital Invents Staffing Crises to Bust Unions and Depress Wages

Citations Needed

02:00 min | 7 months ago

How Capital Invents Staffing Crises to Bust Unions and Depress Wages

"Every few weeks it seems we hear about some essential industry suffering from a critical quote unquote labor shortage. Nurses truck drivers software engineer teacher. Construction according to corporate trae groups and their media mouthpieces these industries simply can't find trained workers to fill their ranks but a closer examination of claims of worker shortages reveals that there's very rarely an actual labor shortage at all what there is however time and again is a pay shortage. Industry is not wanting to provide adequate compensation or safe work conditions for the available labor force. That is perfectly willing and ready to work instead of a worker shortage. There's a not hyper liquidity in the labor market problem for capital the perfectly capable and trained workers that industries do have easily replaceable. Potentially or already unionized and making demands of capital that those industries simply don't like in an effort to increase the labor pool and thus give capital more leverage over existing workers corporate lobbying groups constantly whine about labor shortages knowing the media. Will mindlessly repeat. These claims without any skepticism are evidence to increase recruiting of new potential employees promote legislation that loosens licensing or health and safety standards and reinforces media. Ready means that. American workers are lazy and greedy. Pr extra capital routinely evoked the spectacle of worker shortages knowing full weather claims will be unquestionably repeated by american media. Who never bothered. Ask why they're reporting on the same suppose labor shortages every year for the past thirty years later on the episode we'll be joined by kevin cashman senior associate at the center for economic and policy research. It's a lot easier denies people and say well you know you should be taking this job instead of taking unemployment you know. We should have unemployment amount. That's adequate for everybody. And then we should have employers that are paying wages that incorporate all the requirements of the

Kevin Cashman Center For Economic And Policy
News Companies $38 Billion Better Off Since Pandemic

Media Voices

01:58 min | 7 months ago

News Companies $38 Billion Better Off Since Pandemic

"The. Us case largest publicly listed news companies are now worth thirty eight billion dollars more than they were before the covid nineteen pandemic. this is golden system research from present. Which found that newscorp new times thompson reuters daily mail polish. The mt and the mirror group owner reach are among those companies have seen that stock market values increase since the end of two thousand nineteen important to know not every media organization has whether this as well include yes they include adver instance i tv which has seen a reduction in its Share price as a result of catastrophic. Drop in tv appetizing. Outspent butts six. They claim will sixteen of the news and information companies examined for the research have recovered from the depths of the corona virus crisis so we have spoken at length about organizations like the f. t. and the mit about why those guys have weathered the pandemic seriously well. Are you surprised that it seems to be assaultive across the board thing for every single one of the companies. They looked up. And this is a thing. The surprise me when i first read that. Actually when you think about it isn't surprising that the ads poice by this massive comeback this year. And you've got all these digital businesses that were re already hit by Got decline over the last like five ten years that ashley suddenly like having all these i think it's like travel alcohol rule these companies that have wasting everything to open over the summer this throwing like a years worth of marketing budget at digital media companies must been spend. I thought my point people may spend money but no one's been responding to advertise in the sense that you will ties to all of the law. How are you going to do Yes it by a car. Well so the traditional arabic ad spend is the. I'll just haven't been able to spend all wanted to spend

Thompson Reuters Outspent United States Ashley
Did the Pandemic Kill the Oscars?

Recode Media

02:25 min | 8 months ago

Did the Pandemic Kill the Oscars?

"There is a lot of pre anguish about. What's going to happen during the academy awards and the conventional wisdom is that the audience will not show up and maybe we'll be half of what was last year. Maybe less than that people are talking about. Ten million people watching. It'd be an time low by fifty percent or more first of all eliza. Are you paying attention to this. Sort of industries. Fears about the telecast itself leaving aside the movies is this something that's on your mind. Yeah i mean it has been for years. The viewership has been dropping for years On all live tv events even the super bowl which typically is the one that pulls in viewers is dropping. So there's been a lot of hand wringing in a lot of attempts to re engineer this the show in ways that will get people to watch it because they're interested like they tried to introduce a best popular picture category. That didn't really get off the ground thinking that people were gonna watch that happy years ago. Right that's back to lord of the rings time no it. Two years ago they expanded the category. That was that was the chance to give laura chance to get an award and it was largely because the dark knight didn't manage to get nominated for best picture so they know they expanded that to give it ten slots that was an attempt to do the same thing in that was ten years ago. So now we're in a position where people still aren't watching. They realized that like host don't really bring people in presenters. Don't really bring people in the movies themselves. Don't really bring people in. And i keep thinking i can't imagine why anyone would watch it live. I don't watch anything live anymore. You can watch the good stuff the next day or just watch it. Go by on twitter and watch whatever it is. You would rather be seeing on netflix or something. So you know this year's awards shows have been really really low in viewership. And i would not be surprised if the oscars are the same way although they are trying to intrigue us to make us feel like this might be different. Maybe it'll be worth watching people also arguably had the chance to watch all the best picture nominees this year in a way that they didn't in the past since they've all been digital so there is a chance that more people might be interested in those movies but i think we'll still see a drop off and in my view if they really are worried about viewership for the oscars they're just going to have to rethink the whole

Academy Awards Eliza Super Bowl Laura Netflix Oscars Twitter
The 80-Year PR Campaign That Killed Universal Healthcare

Citations Needed

01:49 min | 8 months ago

The 80-Year PR Campaign That Killed Universal Healthcare

"Despite the fact that every other wealthy country has some type of universal healthcare system. The united states of america stands alone in the world as the only one that doesn't with over one hundred and seventy million of its citizens left to fend for themselves in a sprawling complex maze of medicare medicaid private insurance tax credits childcare subsidies copays deductibles and cost sharing. Americans have not only the largest uninsured population but also the most expensive system on earth per capita way. Americans don't have a universal. Healthcare system has historically been explained away with the reductions mix of pathologising and circular reasoning. America hates big government. We love choice. Americans distrust anything that reeks of socialism. And while this is true in some limited sense it avoids the bigger question of. Why has america's so-called democracy rejected the numerous proposals to enact a single payer or other forms of universal healthcare now while there may be some innate protestant work ethic rugged individual cultural reasons. There's also been a decades long multimillion dollar campaign funded by big business pharmaceutical and hospital industry interests and the insurance industry to convince the american public to reject universal public healthcare. Indeed if americans were somehow intractable opposed to the notion if they were to reject socialized medicine. These forces would never have had to spend so much money in the first place on today's episode. We went to explore the almost century long campaign by capital to convince you not to support universal health programs how these campaigns have fear mongering against communist immigrants and african americans who benefits from a precarious employer controlled healthcare insurance system and how the propaganda war on the american mind on. This most important of issues is anything but over

America Medicare
MEL Magazine to Stop Publishing After Mass Layoffs From Owner Dollar Shave Club

Media Voices

02:03 min | 8 months ago

MEL Magazine to Stop Publishing After Mass Layoffs From Owner Dollar Shave Club

"The main story which is focused on is the fact that Mal magazine has been funded by ohad rather been funded by dollarshaveclub since its launch in twenty fifteen butts on the twenty or god. When was it now. The announced that she was going to an end turn his sixth of much rights as was result. Tweet wasn't a tweet was was that twenty. Three staff has been left without jobs. So what does this mean. Does this anything about the wind branded content model or is this just a blip in terms of both malam magazine. And how we're gonna fill magazines. What is fundament. What's going here is fundamental to the brand to the brenda content model because the core and not from editor in chief. Just show mayer. He says let me put it this way. I don't think as aggregrate to have a single source of funding. Every every day of the company was praying sustainable. For me we part of the core dollarshaveclub business announce excite with a point. That's why you know. The print magazines that the matches company stopped all of these things. They're the male ceos whose funding will there. They're marketing channel effectively. And you know we've seen a particular last year we've seen so many marketing channels and platforms just kind of get excised from plans so to the point. That magazine was integral to dull shaped walls as a kind of you know obscure marketing channel. The i i didn't notice soon as it turns out. They didn't actually have the opportunity they weren't given the opportunity to fulfil they could have done it monetization cause remember thinking. Pt spoke to josh a couple months ago. And i remember listening to entering. Just thinking does a lot that they could be doing. Hasn't monetization head. The dollar shave dancing to be interested in pushing and that's great menendez's perspective and they got the chance to develop really restore voice without any financial pressure but the end of the let don't shape never gave the chance to really mayton self-sustainable

Mal Magazine Ohad Malam Magazine Mayer Josh Menendez
Deliberation in Practice and Pandemics, With Leva Esnulaityt

Social Media & Politics

02:18 min | 8 months ago

Deliberation in Practice and Pandemics, With Leva Esnulaityt

"Let me turn it over to gave chesney late today again. She's a policy analyst at ocd. gave up. thanks for taking the time out to the social media and politics podcast. Hello thank you for having me so the stage here. Why don't we start out by outlining for the listeners. what types of processes we're talking about here. What exactly are deliberative processes. According to the criteria outlined by the oecd so a representative deliberative process is a type of innovative citizen participation so it usually refers to a randomly selected group of citizens that is broadly representative of the society. Which is gathered for at least several days to learn and deliberate us specific policy issue and then provide collected recommendations to a public authority that has gathered this group or commissioned the process. You've outlined a number of different types of these delivered processes. Which i wanna get into in a second but i When you were making the report there's two hundred eighty nine cases of deliberation that you studied. And i was just curious if we could start out by talking about how you actually went and selected those cases of where they come from indeed. It's quite an interesting database. Offer close to three hundred examples. So i we have identified the three main criteria that we wanted all of the deliberative processes in the database to meet so that they would be government in shaded so meaning that they do have impact in the making there. Were at least one day of face to face meetings and so they were all as well face to face and at that point not online and the way that we went about finding these processes is of course firstly some desk research targeted requests to organizations policy makers and academics studying these processes are working on these processes on designing momentum them as well as outreach to our innovative citizen participation network democracy r d network. And we've also had an open call for cases or examples of representative delivered processes where everybody could submit one if they knew about it

Chesney Oecd
Jelani Cobb on the Murder of Daunte Wright and the Derek Chauvin Trial

The Kicker

02:02 min | 8 months ago

Jelani Cobb on the Murder of Daunte Wright and the Derek Chauvin Trial

"This week coverage of the derek chauvin trial. It's been an amazingly distressing week in terms of the coverage of what's going on in the courtroom minneapolis where derek chauvin is on trial and even as is happening of there was another police shooting this one of dante right also in minneapolis and it requires journalists. Who are doing this to cover all these things at once. What's going on in the courtroom protests in the streets. What's going on with the dante right case and how to put all this together too so it makes sense and how to tell. The wider story is the job of now as we face a critical week next week when a verdict could well come down in the chauvin trial. I'm really happy to be joined by. Johnny cobb new yorker staff writer. Who has a piece about this. This week in the new yorker and has been covering the george floyd murder happened last may welcome gilani. So you've been reporting from minneapolis. For how helen helen we. They're a do days. What does that mean like. What how do you do that so you wanna you wanna keep an eye on what's happening in the courtroom but you also want to keep an eye on what's happening the street. So how did you. How did you go about reporting so these strange times as we already know and The nature of the trial was that only two reporters could be inside the actual courtroom and so they were doing pull reports and in the courtroom the in the courthouse The media were watching the proceedings on a bank of televisions and so the communications person for the courthouse literally fed. It's no different than you watching it in your living

Derek Chauvin Minneapolis Chauvin Johnny Cobb George Floyd Helen Helen Dante Gilani New Yorker