Marketing

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A highlight from Communication That Converts: A 4-Step Framework for Persuasion

Social Media Marketing Podcast

05:39 min | 9 hrs ago

A highlight from Communication That Converts: A 4-Step Framework for Persuasion

"I'm very excited to be joined by pat Quinn. If you don't know who pat is, he's a speaking coach and communication expert, he's the chief product officer at advance your reach. A company that helps businesses grow their impact and their revenue pat welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. It's great to be here. So today, pat and I are going to explore a communication framework that will help you move people to action before we go there. I would love to hear your backstory. How in the world did you get in a marketing star wherever you want to start? Well, by now, most people know me as a presentation coach, but I actually didn't get my start as a professional speaker. I got my start as a professional magician and worked in the field of magic for ten years. After being a magician for ten years or so, I decided I needed to get a real job. And I became a public school teacher and taught high school math for 12 years. Wow. During that time, I picked up an advanced degree in how adults learn. And so I really bring two things to the table when I'm helping improve communication. The first is a little bit of stagecraft from my years of doing magic. But the second is a real understanding of how adults learn how your audience hears learns and remembers anything that you communicate to them. And so I'm hyper focused on your audience because I want the audience to move forward with you to take the next step with you. And I've been fortunate over the last ten years to work with some of the greatest communicators in the world from daymond John from Shark Tank. Tony Robbins and dean Gracie on their KBB project, grant cardone, Michael. Household names that everyone's heard of. But most of the people that I work with are not professional speakers, most of the people that I work with wouldn't even call themselves speakers. Most of the people that I work with are business owners who want to get more clients, have a greater impact, increase their revenue, and there are simple communication strategies that can help you achieve all three of those goals, whether you ever step up on a stage or not. Okay, I've got a couple of questions about the magic side of things. Did you grow up as a kid wanting to be a magician? Was that a childhood thing? That was a childhood thing, except I didn't stop what most kids stop. So when you say you are a professional magician, what does that mean? Very few people in my audience probably know what that actually entails. Tell us just a little bit more. I'm curious. Sometimes when you hear professional magician, you think David Copperfield or Chris angel from Vegas. Right. But 99% of magicians don't work in Vegas. 99% of working magicians are in small towns and cities all over the world, making their living doing birthday parties, doing corporate shows, doing church events. I was a children's magician. So I specialized in birthday parties and church events. Oh, cool. And it's tough way to make a living, especially during a pandemic, but it was a fun way to make a living as well. So after that, when you transitioned into teaching, did you say you were teaching adults? No, I've taught high school, math. Oh, wow, okay. Was there a correlation between math and magic? I'm just curious. There is a correlation between magic and teaching and all communication to persuade people. And that is controlling the attention and controlling what I'll call the second conversation. I'll teach you what that is in just a little bit. Fascinating. So at what point did you transition how many years has it been I lost track, but after you left the teaching profession and you kind of got into the coaching profession, public speaking profession, how many years have you been doing that? 20 years, 20 years wow. What do you doing today specifically? You're not doing magic anymore, but it sounds like you're still teaching people, right? I'm the chief product officer for advance your reach and event to reach. Is a company that helps people get their message out to the world. And increase their number of clients increase their revenue. But most importantly, what we're passionate about at advance you reach is increasing your impact. We believe that the world we live in right now, the messages of fear, the messages of division and the messages of anger are winning. They're controlling the microphones. They're controlling the platforms. One of our goals that advance your reach is to help people with positive messages. Messages of unity, messages of hope. We want those messages to be as good at creating big platforms as the negative messages. Because right now, honestly, I think we're losing. The positive messages are losing right now, and regardless of where you go from radio to television to social media, the people with the negative divisive messages seem to be holding up our top spot and the people with the positive messages can't seem to figure out how to break through. And we're passionate about helping people with positive messages have the impact that they could be having to change the world. Why do you think the negative messages seem to get so much attention? I think sometimes they have better techniques, the things that I talk about today that are they aren't my opinion, their research proven research from Robert cialdini and Daniel pink Scott Adams Neil Strauss Stephen Martin Joseph marks has a Nobel Prize winning economics paper of how people make decisions of what to follow and whatnot to follow. I think the people with the negative messages are doing a better job. And that's why one of our goals is to just really help train educate and really create for the positive people and the people with positive messages, communication that works. Communication, that persuades communication that converts. Love it. So this is called the social media marketing podcast and many of the people listening, whether their business owners or marketers, their job is to try to persuade people to take an action.

Daymond John Dean Gracie PAT Grant Cardone Pat Quinn Chris Angel Shark Tank Tony Robbins Vegas David Copperfield Michael Daniel Pink Scott Adams Stephen Martin Joseph Marks Robert Cialdini Neil Strauss Nobel Prize
A highlight from #413: How To Make Every Word Count When You're Selling & Serving with Roger Love

Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

03:22 min | 11 hrs ago

A highlight from #413: How To Make Every Word Count When You're Selling & Serving with Roger Love

"What we learned from science and psychology is that. All of the fears that we have before we actually turn that camera on and we start speaking, we have great fear. We're so worried about people judging this harshly or not liking us or our content. So that fear is real, but the truth is as soon as you open your mouth and the camera goes on, fear dissipates almost 98% within the first 5 seconds. I made me Porter filled, and this is online marketing made easy. Reese Witherspoon, Bradley Cooper, John Mayer, Selena Gomez, Tony Robbins, and suze orman. What do all of these household names and celebrities have in common? They all work with the same voice coach in speech trainer, roger love. Now, you may be thinking a voice coach in speech trainer, what is that? Roger helps entrepreneurs communicate better and improve their presentation skills and turns actors into singers like Reese Witherspoon from walk the line. Here's an interesting fact that I think we all should be aware of as entrepreneurs. The words we say only count for a very small percentage of whether or not people actually believe us or care to listen to what we have to say. But tonality, on the other hand, is infinitely more important when you're speaking. So if you want people to trust you and listen to what you say, which, if you're an entrepreneur, selling online, you should be saying, heck yes, then you want to pay attention to these things. The good news is that I've got you covered, and this episode is going to give you the tools and know how to improve how you show up and how you present yourself through your words, emotion, and tonality. Your truly getting a lesson from the guy who trains all the stars. In fact, I did a session with him in the biggest takeaway I gained while actually I'm going to share that. Because when I introduce roger, I'm going to share with him why I brought him on the show and it was literally from one specific takeaway from the one on one training that I had with roger. So I'm going to make you wait for that. We're going to talk about the importance of how your voice is perceived by your audience and your ideal community and why emotion is so important. And the strategies for using your voice the right way while selling and how to be more confident, even if you're not competent, how to sound more confident when you're selling. You're going to love this episode and be able to walk away with things that you can actually implement today. Seriously, if you have a Facebook Live scheduled for later today, what you're going to learn on this session can be applied instantly. We've got a lot to cover, and I won't make you wait any longer. Let's bring

Reese Witherspoon Roger Love Bradley Cooper Suze Orman Tony Robbins Selena Gomez John Mayer Porter Roger Facebook
A highlight from Should Your Business Have A Phone Number Listed? #1933

Marketing School

02:20 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Should Your Business Have A Phone Number Listed? #1933

"It, find it, check it out, and it's a great way to improve your load time. Today we are going to talk about if you should have a phone number listed for your business. I'll make this really simple, sadly it'll be a shorter podcast because of it. I've ran a lot of tests on this with hundreds and hundreds of websites. If you're a big business like a Microsoft at Google lambs on whatever, maybe you don't need to list a phone number. If you're not a big business, it improves conversions from what we've seen. For both B2B and B2C, it doesn't have to be front and center on your site, but just having contact information makes people feel more comfortable. The smaller and the newer your business. And if you leave a phone number, we've seen it boost your conversions. But over time as you get bigger, more reviews, people familiar with your product, your brand, your services, phone numbers, not as important. But when you're starting off it is very, very important. So here's a question for you, Neil of the leads that you're getting in right now, what percent of them are actually phone calls? Qualified. Less than two, 3%. Okay, so it's not like a significant chunk for your business right now. And every once in a while, you'll hear people like you need from next to you is saying like 33%. But his business is someone talking to someone about a business solution, right? I feel not even feel I've seen the data in most cases, adding a phone number when you're a small medium business, helps when you're a large corporation, it doesn't help as much. With us, when we've tried adding a phone number, we get too many irrelevant non qualified leads. So that's why we don't end up doing it. So we're the same way, right? We use call real, and we also use next diva as well. And we have a lot of phone calls that come in, but super unqualified, right? And a lot of people are tired kickers or they're trying to sell us stuff. And so it's just been a huge kind of time suck on our side. But that doesn't mean this won't work. I mean, we're just talking about our experiences on both of us having the agencies, right? But it's probably a good idea if you're a smaller business, especially mom and pop type of shop. This is probably a good idea. And again, you can always take it away, right? If you find it's becoming a big waste of time, then just take it away. So that is it for today. If you want more secrets on how to start or grow your dream business, marketing school and the IO slash training and we'll catch you later. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school.

Microsoft Neil Google
A highlight from Tech Skills Gap Facing Marketing Teams -- Lynne Capozzi // Acquia

MarTech Podcast

08:37 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Tech Skills Gap Facing Marketing Teams -- Lynne Capozzi // Acquia

"Business results and achieve career success. Will unearth the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks, they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the martech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to the martech podcast. Today we're going to talk about the technology and process behind improving your company's digital experiences. But before we get to today's interview, we're going to kick off the show with a marketing minute where we invite a friend of the martech podcast to help answer a listener questions in 60 seconds or less. Here for today's marketing minute is Scott declarey, who is the host of the success stories podcast, where Scott sits down with leaders and mentors to unpack experiences and share tactical strategies for business professionals, entrepreneurs and everyone in between. And the success story podcast is also a fellow member of the HubSpot podcast network. And Scott was kind enough to answer a question from Ben Lynn, who was a digital marketing manager at happier. Ben asked, what is the difference in marketing's impact between product lead and sales led growth? All right, here's Scott's answer. Marketing when it's complimenting sales led has to complement a purchase that is only made through a sales lead interaction. So everything has to be supporting what your sales reps are literally going to be saying on the phone in order to complement that conversation. So this traditionally would be large outbound B2B enterprise, even B2C industries have focused on outbound sales. Versus product led where the marketing should be focusing on creating demand on creating a flywheel that will generate awareness that will generate traffic that will turn into free signups that will turn into paid subscribers because with true product led, there isn't any interaction needed to try by expand and then renew versus sales where the purchases always through a sales that interaction. So marketing for sales lead, I don't think that's the way organizations should be going, but it should be focusing on supporting sales, conversations with customers versus marketing, that's product led, that should be focused on creating a demand generation flywheel that's driving people into your funnel to try your product and then eventually buy. Thanks Scott. If you're interested in hearing more from Scott on the success story podcast or any of the other great hosts in the HubSpot podcast network, go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. Okay, on with today's interview. Joining us is Lynn kaposi, who is the chief marketing officer at aquia, which is a company that empowers the world's most ambitious brands to create digital customer experiences that matter. With open-source drupal at its core, the aquia digital experience platform enables marketers developers and IT operations teams have thousands of global organizations to rapidly compose and deploy digital products and services that engage customers enhance conversations and help businesses stand out. So far this week, Lin and I have talked about creating digital experiences for the post pandemic consumer, and yesterday we talked about what CMOs should consider when choosing a CDP. Today we're going to finish our conversation by talking about the tech skills gap facing marketing teams. All right, here's the third part of my conversation with Lynn kaposi, the chief marketing officer at aquia. Let's welcome back to the martek podcast. Thanks Ben. Happy to be there. Excited to wrap up our conversation today. So far this week we've talked about not only how there is a changing in terms of how important our digital experiences are, how personalization is what's helping brands create really unique, compelling experiences, and then yesterday we talked about the functionality and the technical side of getting your data together using a CDP picking the right one. We landed the plane yesterday by talking about what marketing teams need to implement a CDP. And the moral of the story was a technical resource. You need a marketing operator to set up your campaigns and some sort of an analytical resource. That could be one person, it could be multiple to be able to analyze what's actually happening. And I think there's a larger conversation to have here when you think broadly about marketing teams and you have more exposure than most of the people we talk to about what's happening across marketing teams, the need for skills for marketers has changed. We're obviously not in the Mad Men days where drinking tolerance and brand chops were what mattered the most. Now we're talking about how well can you code as a marketer? Talk to me about where companies are struggling to basically fill the gap that they have in terms of their technical skills or what of their skills they need. What I see more and more is CMOs that are hiring their marketing teams with people that are data driven. So we're seeing more of the marketing roles, needing to be very data driven, meaning some analytical capabilities, and people that can make decisions based on that data. And the more we're making the nice combination between the creative skill set and the tech skill set of data, the more we can mirror that together and have both of those skills, I think the better. Sometimes it's in the same people. Sometimes it's not, but I think having both of those sides, what we're seeing now is really, really critical. When you say that marketers and CMOs are looking for people that are data driven, I think everybody that's listening to this podcast is probably either shaking their head or raising their hands saying, I can analyze data, I could look at numbers. Now, are you looking for somebody that's got a data science background? What is data driven? Obviously, we all use data to make decisions. How do you look at that on a resume and be able to say this person is data driven as opposed to that person is not? I think on the team itself is having a combination of people, right? So has someone been in a role where they have access to data and having to analyze data? Have they used a marketing automation system? Had they used other marketing tools in their day job in terms of doing their marketing work? So I think it's have they had exposure to different tool sets, have they had great exposure to Salesforce.com. And to the marketing automation platforms as well, that tells you that there's a little bit of data in that person's background to be able to kind of look at and analyze the data. The other thing that I'm seeing is marketing being, especially the CMOs, being less dependent on IT. So it used to be that as a CMO, you know, I need to get some type of tech work done and I'd throw it over the IT department. I'd wait a while. They throw it back over the wall. I'd say, no, that's not really what I wanted. I threw it back again. And then they'd be a back and forth process that would go between marketing and IT to come up with some systems to support what marketing needed to make marketing decisions. I think that's not happening as much anymore. We know that more of the technology's decisions and control is being held from the CMO. Yes, they need to work really closely with IT. But they also need to make sure they have their teams and marketing that can do a little bit of the data analysis and they can use some of the tech tools. But some of the tools now for marketing are like what we call low code no code tools. You don't have to be a developer. You can pick up tools that are really easy to use to do things like build websites and what pages and demand gen campaigns and use them marketing automation system. And those things are things that are now really, really accessible to the marketers and not needing as much as IT. I feel like ten years ago, the sign of a really effective marketer was, I can code, I can speak SQL, and I can speak English. I understand what I'm marketing campaign looks like. I can go build it because I have the technical chops, and then I also can get direct access to the data. The world has sort of changed and made marketing a little bit more idiot proof for lack of a better term where you don't have to be an engineer and a data scientist to build a product or a campaign and get access to the data. And now it becomes more about your ability to evaluate the campaign's success as it is to actually build and launch them. When you think about the way that marketing is being hired for, you know, we still looking for people that have the technical chops and sort of the data science background or is it just somebody that has a broad background is more attractive experience working with marketo Salesforce HubSpot, whatever the platform is aqueous as well. You know, is it all just experience of the tools and the ability to make sound judgment

Scott Lynn Kaposi Aquia Benjamin Shapiro Scott Declarey Ben Lynn BEN LIN Salesforce CMO
A highlight from The Economics of Buying Another Business Versus Building #1932

Marketing School

04:04 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from The Economics of Buying Another Business Versus Building #1932

"To optimize your site for low time. And one easy way to do it is use the host that Eric and I use dream host to just go to dream host or Google it, find it, check it out, and it's a great way to improve your low time. Today we are going to talk about the economics of buying another business versus building one. Yeah, sure. So when you think about buying a business, whether it is another add on, so something that you don't do to expand your business or something that does the same thing like Eric bought more ad agencies so you can combine and create a bigger ad agency. There's no right or wrong approach. It's expensive, but it could cause more growth and you can end up making one plus one eco two. And it doesn't always have to be expensive. There's actually unique ways to structure deals. So I'll take that back because I think Eric is a lot of this stuff from Roland Frazier's course, right? When it comes to buying businesses to get the costs down? Yeah, no. Or you can just end up funny enough building it. I don't buy as many as Eric. I focus more on the building side versus the buying. But there's no right or wrong way. We just want to discuss both. Yep. I think it's perspective. It's good to understand both sides. Neil understands both sides really well. And then I've done my share of studying. And so single grain actually, the first agency was an acquisition, but it was a turnaround. So it's important to keep that in mind. If you're going to buy a business, do not ever buy a turnaround. Let me just put it that way. Because you're going to actually end up putting more work and it's actually harder. If a business is down 50%, you have to grow up by a 100% to get it to break even, right? So keep it on them. You got to think about it as a stock investment, right? And so if you're buying a business, you do not want to be buying a job and a turnaround is a job, right? So what I would say is Neil mentioned one plus one equals two. I would prefer scenario where one plus one equals three or 5, right? And so what that means is you have to be thinking about, hey, if I add this business in, in agency world, it's known as a roll up, where you're buying any type of business, right? So what you can do, let's say your business is doing a $1 million a year in profit. If you roll up a couple agencies and maybe all of a sudden, now you're doing 5 or $6 million a year in profit. You're multiple goes higher. So instead of telling your business for one times four equals $4 million, that's multiple. Maybe it's 5 times ten, $50 million, right? So you're kind of arbitraging in a sense, plus, you're also buying a pleasure by other capabilities, plus you're also buying other logos, right? So there's no right or wrong answer here. But what I would say is from the people that I know that are actively buying businesses, they prefer to do that more because it's less work. And to me at least, it's more fun. So what we're trying to do next year is, by the way, just open announcement to everyone. If you have an agency or a martech SaaS business doing one to $10 million a year, I am interested. So hit me up. And if you want to get started doing this stuff, I really recommend rolling frasers, of course, our mutual friend. It's called epic. So EPIC. So just type in role and Fraser business course or something. There's that one. There is a book called Biden build. That's a great one too. And a third one would be from Harvard Business review called buying a small business, but nothing is going to replace the actual experience of going through it. But again, there's no right way right or wrong way you can build or you can buy. And typically to make the economics work really well, you got to use debt, whether it is bank loans, caps, SBA loans, it's going to vary from country to country. But buying really works out when you use debt when you don't use debt and you're paying for it out of your pocket, economics aren't as great in most cases. Yep. So there's a lot of different creative ways to do it. And so anyway, just the one question I would say to always keep in mind is just ask yourself, if you're talking to someone, do I feel like I'm buying a job if the answer is, yes, then you run the other direction, okay? So that is it for today, but a marketing school that IO slash training. If you want more secrets like this around starting or growing your dream business, marking school to iOS slash training and we'll catch you later. We appreciate you joining us for this session

Eric Roland Frazier Neil Google Harvard Business Review Biden Fraser SBA
A highlight from What CMOs Should Consider When Choosing A CDP -- Lynne Capozzi // Acquia

MarTech Podcast

04:18 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from What CMOs Should Consider When Choosing A CDP -- Lynne Capozzi // Acquia

"Welcome to the martek podcast. Today we're going to talk about the technology and process behind improving your company's digital experiences. But before we get to today's interview, we're going to kick off the show with a marketing minute, where we invite a friend of the martech podcast to help us answer listener questions in 60 seconds or less. Here for today's marketing minute is John chance, who's the founder and president at duct tape marketing consultant and he's also the host of the duct tape marketing podcast. Where John interviews authors, experts and thought leaders who share business and marketing tips, tactics and resources for small businesses. And the duct tape marketing podcast is also a fellow member of the HubSpot podcast network. And John has been kind enough to answer a question from G two meta, who is the director of Marta and client success at intelligence bank and G two asks what automations have organizations implemented in their middle and back office teams to better serve their end users. All right, here's John's answer. You know, automation can be a great way to create a better backend office experience and serve your customers, your end users better. Obviously, the most basic things like a CRM, like a help desk. Those kinds of tools certainly make the communication make the record keeping of communicating even easier. But I find that one of the best tools to automate is to also create a hub so that your project management, your help desk, your CRM, or all talking through a hub, the hub that we use that I find is really powerful for this is slack. Slack keeps us out of email so that we're not firing back and forth as we try to serve clients, but it also has so many integrations now that allow us to keep conversations separate and keep everybody on the same page, really for as much time as we need, we can keep those threads going. Thanks, John. If you're interested in hearing more of John Gantz on the duct tape marketing podcast or any of the other great hosts from the HubSpot podcast network, you can go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. All right, on with today's interview. Joining us is lyn kaposi, who is the chief marketing officer at aquia, which is a company that empowers the world's most ambitious brands to create digital customer experiences that matter. With open-source drupal at its core, the aquia digital experience platform enables marketers developers and IT operations teams and thousands of global organizations to rapidly compose and deploy digital products and services that engage customers enhanced conversations and help businesses stand out. Yesterday, Lin and I talked about creating digital experiences for the post pandemic consumer. And today we're going to continue the conversation talking about what CMOs should consider when choosing a CDP. Time for a one minute break to hear from our presenting sponsor HubSpot. So what does it mean to be customer centric? Building relationships and growing sustainable customer relationships, maintaining unique customer needs, personalizing the customer experience. That's what being customer centric means to me. And so HubSpot wanted to talk a little bit about how they can help you be customer centric. You see their CRM platform is designed to help build, maintain and personalize your customer experiences into something remarkable. Sure, you know that they've got all sorts of event based tracking, someone can come onto your website and you can change your copy or do marketing automations and send emails to the right person, the right place at the right time, but they've also launched some new features that our customer centric. They've got some game changing payment tools like native payment links and reoccurring payments that you can directly embed into HubSpot's quoting tools and emails for easily delivery and collection to help you build a seamless payment experience with your customers. And they've also built in some customer feedback surveys that make it easy for you to capture information that is unique to your business, share insights with your team and grow your understanding of what's really happening with your customers. So if it's time for you to be more customer centric, you can learn more about how the HubSpot CRM can help build maintain and grow your customer relationships and HubSpot dot com.

John Chance John Intelligence Bank John Gantz Lyn Kaposi Aquia Hubspot Marta Meta LIN
A highlight from No More Half Measures in TV Measurement, With VideoAmp CEO Ross McCray

AdExchanger Talks

05:39 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from No More Half Measures in TV Measurement, With VideoAmp CEO Ross McCray

"There, it's Alison Schiff, and this is ad exchanger talks. This week, we've got Ross mccray on the podcast, the very energetic CEO and founder of video amp, which is the audience measurement company that's, well, choose your imagery. It's angling for a slice of Nielsen's market share. It's looking to wear the measurement crown. It's aiming to knock Nielsen off its legacy perch. Advertisers and broadcasters need to meet the challenges posed by changes in the way people consume media and content. And video M founded not that long ago in 2014 wants to be the company that helps them do that in Ross's view. It's time for a new currency. But what does it actually mean to take on a Titan like Nielsen? Let's find out. Ross welcome to the podcast. Thanks for having me. So I want to start out by looking to the past for a little bit because you left UCLA to be an entrepreneur, which you are, so you did it. But you studied astrophysics while you were there, which that usually would be like a fun fact that I would start out the podcast would be like, hey, fun fact, guys. But you can learn that about you just from looking at your LinkedIn page. So I want something else. I want something about Ross mccray that might surprise people. Sure. What about video aunt being my 43rd business? How's that? How is there enough time in the years you've lived on earth to have done that? Yeah. There are fortunately is, you know, I was doing, I was always trying things I get frustrated by problems really easily and my natural responses. I got to solve this. And so over the years, I just kept getting frustrated by things and kept trying to solve things. And needed to make money a lot of on my own and didn't really have any way to make money. So try to figure it out. I was we went by and here we are, 43 companies later. I mean, I need a few examples of some of these companies. Okay. Let's see, we did, I did Christmas lights, installation. I made a product from China and put it in The Home Depot and loads for weatherproofing, electrical outdoor, I did an email mobile app. I had an environmental business and events company, party bus frontal business, a hosing business, trucking business, air-b-n-b arbitrage, parking lot business. I made a pan. We made a pan. And the cookie fan was like, you can put your spoon rest in the handle out and suck. I made a thing called a beach caddy, which was like a bag take to the beach with all your shit in it. So yeah, I mean, I can go on and on. We had a lot of stuff that I tried and some were just completely catastrophically failures that I went to market and everyone's like, this is the worst thing I've ever seen. No one cares about this. Others had some legs, but just weren't big enough. So it just kept trying to find the right one. I babysat for our next door neighbor's kids. When I was in high school, that was pretty much my only brush with entrepreneurship. So that's off. So I read an article about you, doing a little research for a recording. It was a November 2017 article from ink. And it makes this passing reference to the fact that you don't really watch a lot of TV, which I thought was kind of interesting, considering video measures, TV audiences, and I know also lost all audiences. Digital audiences. Do you like watch anything these days? I mean, it is the golden age of content. So just curious. Yeah. No, no, I can't stand it. I can't sit still. There's just no way. It's like the worst thing ever to just sit down and just do nothing in veg on a personal level. But I understand that people love doing that and that drives happiness and entertainment for them. So I'm very inspired by our mission to be able to support that golden age of TV and part of the reason why we started the company was to enable that everyone in the world could have access to that. And we saw stats that high majority of people can't pay for. Subscription streaming or any of those extra fees. So we wanted to support the advertising ecosystem for that buyers advertisers and media owners and consumers can all have a healthy through a value exchange, so people that do enjoy that can have access to the content at scale on a global level. So even though I don't like personally do it, I kind of like, you know, some problems being out there being active working out. I want to make sure that we can increase happiness for people. And that's a key way. So you wouldn't watch something well on a peloton. For example, or is that a time for like Zoom meetings? Yeah, well, I've had my fair share of working out and taking meetings, but not really. I work out with the team a lot. So usually when I'm working out, it's with clients or a colleague. So we're usually working out and shit talking to each other and pushing each other in lots of yelling and screaming. I'm not sure we can do business because my resolution is to exercise more. But kudos. So let's talk a little bit about video amps technology and approach.

Ross Mccray Alison Schiff Video Amp Nielsen Ross Ucla Linkedin China
A highlight from #412: My Live Video Secrets For Feeling Confident & Calm (Even When You're Not)

Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

05:17 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from #412: My Live Video Secrets For Feeling Confident & Calm (Even When You're Not)

"I'm coming at you to talk about live video. Specifically, if you need to do more live video. Like you just know. I need to do more live video than this is the episode for you. One of the reasons you're likely not doing more live video or just really video in general is because when you do video, it's complicated. Let me set the scene. Years and years ago, for me to do video, it meant that I had to go find a tripod and I didn't know where the heck it was. I had to find the right lighting. Was it natural lighting or was it too bright? Did I need to go find a ring light and at the time I didn't even have a ring light? So I had like a fake ring light and was that going to work? It never worked as well. How am I going to set up the lighting? What is my background going to be? Am I going to use my laptop or I'm going to do it for my iPhone or what am I going to do in terms of getting this all to work? And it just was always a pain in the butt. Doing video for me was a pain, and so I didn't do it often. Now, if any of you are shaking your head, yes, I get it, then this is the episode for you because in order to do more video, which if you think about it, Instagram, not too long ago, came out and said, we are not an image platform. We're not all about the pictures. We are a video platform. They came out and said, we are prioritizing video, and we already know that Facebook prioritizes video LinkedIn has live video now. I mean, video is definitely where it's at. And coming from a girl that you all know, I don't love doing tons and tons of video, but I do it because I do love connecting with my audience. I do love being able to deliver a message in a way that really lands and makes an impact. And I know that that is video beyond just like a static post with an image and some text and all that good stuff. I know that videos where it's at. And I want to stay in the game. I want to keep driving the business forward. I want to keep growing a bigger audience connecting with the audience I have serving at a big level. And video is necessary for that. So instead of me hating it and making it a big issue every time, I've just made it easier. And that's what I want to talk to you about today. Now, if you know me, then you know at my home in Nashville, I have a room that's just for video. That is not what we're talking about today. You do not need that. I'm 13 years in. I've been able and feel very lucky to have a room in my house just to record video. You do not need that. For years and years I did not have this and I was still doing video. Like when I started doing it more consistently, I didn't have a room in my house just for video. Okay? So you don't need that. But here's what you do need. Number one, you need an easy setup. Something that you set up and you always can just go to the same place to do video. Whether it be at your desk in your home office or at the kitchen table or wherever you want to do it, have a place that just always works. So that means that you can't just rely on natural light, right? Having a place in front of a window is awesome, if the lighting is right during the day, if it's really bright, it's not going to work. If it's starting to get dark, it's not going to work. So I would rather you find a place in your house that you're using a ring light, and it just works no matter what time of day. And you flip on the ring light and you sit at the desk and it's just gonna be a good setup. The background doesn't need to be fancy. You don't need a fancy microphone. If you're using your iPhone, you could just use the microphone from that, or you're using your laptop, just use the microphone for that. Or if you want a fancy mic, you can. I've never used a fancy mic for video like that. Like live video. If I'm doing it from my iPhone, it's just the mic and my iPhone. If I'm using my laptop, it's just the camera and mic from my laptop. But the thing is, you just need a space that just works every time. That will make this a whole lot easier. And then again, keep all the equipment really easy. The more complicated you make the equipment, the less likely you are to do it consistently. Am I right? So if you want to use E cam or StreamYard, go on with your bad self, but if you use those different types of software, learn it, know how to use it. Get really comfortable with it. Spend a day just saying, okay, I'm gonna figure this out. I'm gonna know everything I need to know. I'm not gonna add a lot of bells and whistles, but I'm just gonna figure it out, so I always know it. So know your software if you're going to use it, have the equipment you need, but nothing fancy and have a space in your house that just always works. It's a game changer. And here's another thing to make sure that you actually do video is to do it consistently.

Instagram Linkedin Nashville Facebook
A highlight from How to Profit Off Your Blog Without Selling Out #1931

Marketing School

04:34 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from How to Profit Off Your Blog Without Selling Out #1931

"Optimize your site for low time. And one easy way to do it is use the host that Eric and I use dream host to just go to dream host or Google it, find it, check it out, and it's a great way to improve your low time. Today we are going to talk about how to profit off your blog without selling out. So the big thing is is everyone's just like, ah, you know, can't push much on my blog. I can't end up promoting anything. It's not great. People aren't going to be happy. And the list goes on and on and on and on. But here's the thing that we've ended up learning over the years. If you're adding something of value, people won't have issues of you, quote unquote selling out. Because it really isn't selling out. If you're pushing something and people don't like it, what I mean by that is you're pushing something that doesn't really provide value or anything like that. Yeah, you're going to have issues. But the key is, how can you end up selling something that provides value? Because if you provide value, it's actually a disservice to not let people know about it. If you have a solution, let's say Eric on the same organ blog has something that can double people's traffic and it's only a $100 and it can make a huge impact for a small businesses and big businesses. And it works 99% of the time. If he didn't tell people about it, it's actually a disservice on his end. So it's like the big thing is is you'll feel like a solid if you're selling crap. If you sell something that's really good in house people, you won't feel like a sellout. Actually, I mean, Neil, I think this is a good time for you to experience share, too, because back in the day, you didn't like pushing that much. Do you want to talk about that? Because when you had quick sprout. Yeah, so when my older blog, I used to push ebooks and info products and I stopped selling. And no matter how much time and energy I spent creating these products, even if I thought they were amazing, I felt like a sellout. And the reason I felt like a sellout was when I was pushing them, I would get majority of the people to take the course and never use information they learn. So it doesn't matter how great of a product I created if people never really used it. I felt bad because then people are spending money on wasting it. So I figured out other things to sell, such as agency services, where we just do it for you, and then we can provide the results. Then I don't feel bad because yes, it costs you more money, but at least everyone who's paying. We're doing the work. They don't have to worry about it. And you go from there. Or you create a tool like Uber suggests. And when I created the tool, I'm like, cool. Cheap, talking to a lot of this stuff. They don't have to read the content. Great. So even then not everyone uses it, but I didn't feel as bad because a much higher percentage of people ended up using it. So for me, it wasn't just about the quality of the product or if they could provide results. Can you actually get people to use it and provide benefits to them? Yeah, I think one big mistake both Neil and I made early days. So we have a decently sized list just training your audience to understand that you have something that you're going to push something every now and then most of the time, maybe the value to aspiration, maybe it's for every three to four emails where you're sending value, you might have one ask for it. But there are going to be times where you launch something and it's worthy of launching, right? And so that's what I would say Internet marketers or email marketers have done really well. They've kind of trained their list to buy. Whereas we've kind of been a little more gun shy in the past, right? But not so much anymore. Our mindset is gradually shifted on that one. So that part's actually important. It's important not just as a marketer, but as a business person to be invaluable. And what that means is understanding that for every decision that you make, there's probably some percentage of error in there, right? And the second part of that means that because that you know that you might have some element of error in whatever decision that you make, you're open to changing your mind quite a bit. Which is what Neil have done over the years around this. We've kind of adjusted our mindset here. And look, by the way, if you want to profit off your blog without selling out to, if you got a big blog with a couple 100,000 or a couple million visits a month, you probably have multiple things to sell. And so using a personalization tool like mutiny headquarters, that's a tool that we talked about in the last episode. That level of personalization on let's say on your blog where maybe you have a courses section. Maybe you have a marketing case study section where you're selling services, right? If your company is getting bigger and bigger and you have different stuff to sell, it's worthy of you to think about maybe how you can personalize. Maybe you can use a tool like me to headquarters or you can use something else. Neil, anything else? That's it. All right, marking school the iOS slash training. If you want a couple secrets that we've got for you on how to start or grow your dream of business, again, marketing school in the iOS slash training and we'll catch you later. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school.

Eric Neil Google
A highlight from Creating Digital Experiences For The Post-Pandemic Consumer -- Lynne Capozzi // Acquia

MarTech Podcast

07:27 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Creating Digital Experiences For The Post-Pandemic Consumer -- Lynne Capozzi // Acquia

"We're going to talk about the technology and process behind improving your company's digital experiences. Joining us is Lynn kaposi, who is the chief marketing officer at aquia, which is a company that empowers the world's most ambitious brands to create digital customer experiences that matter. With open-source drupal at its core, the aquia digital experience platform enables marketers developers and IT operations teams at thousands of global organizations to rapidly compose and deploy digital products and services that engage customers enhanced conversations and help businesses stand out. And today, Lin and I are going to talk about creating digital experiences for the post pandemic consumer. But before we hear from today's guest, I'd like to take a moment to thank blue shift for sponsoring this interview. We all know that marketing and the technology that supports it is rapidly evolving. Last year it was GDPR, this year its third party cookies, and who knows how the landscape is going to change next year. The fact is, traditional marketing platforms are struggling to keep pace with the needs of today's marketers because they're built to focus on channel execution and not a 360° view of customer behaviors. And that's why you need blue shifts, smart hub CDP. You see blue shift both improves customer engagement and drives meaningful results by unifying your customers data so you can deliver relevant and personalized omnichannel experiences to the prospects and customers that matter the most. So if you're ready to drive better customer engagement increased loyalty, our friends at blueshift have created a guide to successful CDP RFPs that will help you make the right martech decision for your business. To download blue shifts, CDP RFP guide go to blue shift dot com slash martel that's BLUE, SHI FT dot com slash mar tech. Blue shift, omnichannel marketing for data driven marketers. All right, here's the first part of my conversation with Lynn kaposi, the chief marketing officer at aquia. Lyn welcome to the podcast. Thank you, great to be here. I'm excited to have you on the show excited to talk a little bit about the post pandemic marketing world. You work with a lot of different companies that are doing unique and innovative things specifically centered around creating digital experiences. Let's start off, what do you consider to be a digital experience and how has that changed in the post pandemic world? Well, I think a great digital experience is one that engages the consumer and has the consumer engage with the brand. So, you know, a digital experience is everything from what is the interaction look like online between a consumer and the brand. And I think there are lots of things going on right now, especially kind of post pandemic around building a great customer experience. The bar I think has been raised for all of us in terms of what that interaction looks like. We're all addicted to Netflix, and we're all used to that kind of interaction. So I think a couple of things have changed in the world of digital experiences and we know that a couple of things have to occur in order for a brand to have a great experience with their customers. So let me give you a couple of examples of what I think has changed in the past. Fire away. First of all, I think what's been very clear as the world has switched to digital. It's very clear that brands have to have cross channels. So there needs to be a nice connection between an in person experience, maybe it's a storefront. Maybe it's retail, and you're going to a Lululemon store. One of my face. So I think there needs to be great interaction between and consistency between what an in person experience is like and what an online experience is like. And the best way to make those connections, I think. And the brands that are really doing a great job are the ones that are adding value to the digital experience. The ones that are inviting people to come back and visit. They're giving them some value. If you're a Lululemon, maybe you're providing an online yoga class. You're providing some additional value add online. So that's first and foremost. Are you providing enough value online for your customers? Are you providing enough value online for your customers going? And I think the second is making sure that his marketers and his brand ambassadors, if you will, are you using the right technology? So as a marketer, are using the right technology to help that customer experience be even greater. And there's lots of different tech tools to help with that. Obviously, we provide some of those. But that's kind of the second thing to think about is do you have the right technology to help you to build that great customer experience? And the third is really kind of Liz, I talked about having a great cross channel experience. So somehow merging together that in person and the online experience. So again, so that there's consistency so that there's value. And so that someone feels like they're still engaging with the same brand, whether that be digitally or in person. It's interesting. You mentioned a couple times the notion of cross channel experience when I think of brands that are doing a great job with their digital experiences. It is not just simply they have a website that is easy to navigate. It starts before that it is everything from your advertising, maybe you're pushing out through social media channels, all of the sort of marketing advertising, anything that your brand shows as a representation of itself that leads to then that web experience and often it moves through the website into things like text messaging and other mediums where brands are able to communicate with their customers. When you think about how that has changed, you mentioned, well, offline and online, you want those experiences to match up. What specifically did the pandemic do to the user behavior where obviously focused more on digital experiences now than ever, how have those experiences matured over the last year and a half two years? Well, I think it's changed in several ways. One is that people are expecting more. Like your expectations are much higher than they've ever been, right? So if you're interacting with a brand online, you expect that brand to know something about you. So don't feed me a message that doesn't apply to me, especially if I've dealt with that brand before. So one is consumer expectation that we know a lot more about you. Second is giving the consumer and giving that person a chance to kind of make the decision themselves. So sign up to get more data or sign up to get better offers or that choice belongs in the hand of the consumer now. So that, I think, has changed a lot over the past year and a half, especially with the whole cookies and first and third party data. So I think there's a lot of brands that are now looking at, how do I make that interaction even better? And again, I think the power is in the hands of the consumer that way. So the consumer's expectation is that you're able to recognize who they are and provide a valuable relevant experience that's specifically tailored to them. You mentioned that the third party cookie data going away. You know, as we have less access to data, what are some of the ways that brands are still creating those great experiences without being able to rely on other data sources outside of their first party data? This is where the value comes into play. Because the brands don't think are doing it well, are the ones that are able to capture customer information, consumer information, because they're adding some value. They're providing some value in return. In my example of Lululemon could be an online yoga class if you were King Arthur baking. What's a great way to involve your consumers? Well, you provide recipes. This is what they do online. They provide recipes. They even provide a hotline for baking. So if you have a baking crisis, you can contact them immediately and get support and get help. Wait, but we gotta ask a baking crisis. Is this like I lit the kitchen on

Lynn Kaposi Aquia Lululemon Store LIN LYN Lululemon Netflix LIZ King Arthur
A highlight from 79. Urgency VS Scarcity

Purposeful Social Selling

04:56 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from 79. Urgency VS Scarcity

"I hope you really just took the time to enjoy everyone and everything around you. So before we get into today into today's topic because it's going to be it's going to really pack a punch. And I think it's going to clear some things up for a lot of you that might have some questions or might be confused around how to show up in your business. And how to actually meet your goals from a healthy sense of urgency. But before we get there, I have an exciting announcement. Our three day year end event is officially open for registration. It's in the link in our show notes. And it's a sustainable success, two for 2022. So if you joined the sustainable success last year, we're making it better and bigger this year. I've completely revamped the material revamped the content I'm bringing you fresh, new content. It's going to feel like you were drinking from a fire hose of value. Your hands are going to be tired from all the notes you're going to take, your team chats are going to explode with a ha moments and breakthroughs and it's going to give you extremely tangible things for you to take away and take action on. It is going to be the event of the year. So you're going to want to get your teams, your sidelines, your Friends, your buddies, your chats, whether you're besties in the same company as you are not, you're going to want to be in this together because there's going to be a lot of accountability that's available for you as you're going through the event. So the details, it's December 27th, 28th, 29th, it's going to be held in a private Facebook group and listen. This is what happens every time we've run an event. Usually people are waiting. They're like, oh, I'll wait, I'll wait I'll wait, and then we usually get like 2000 people after the first live on the first day rushing to get to get in the group. It's insane. So this year we are actually closing registration. You will not be able to buy a ticket or have access to the Facebook group after midnight on the 28th. We're closing it down. And we're doing this because we want everybody to have ample time to watch the replays and to not feel like they have to rush through the material. We are keeping the replays up in the Facebook group through New Year's Day at midnight. You're going to want to be there. I am going to be delivering so much value to you. I always make the promise that you're going to get way more than what you pay for. It's a $9 event. Just skip a peppermint mocha, skip breakfast at Starbucks and you can absolutely afford to be at this event. And I'm going to blow your mind with how much value I give you. You're going to pay $9 and you're going to feel like you spent $200. It's going to feel like $200 of value coming back to you. We're going to be clearing up so many things. I'm going to be actually telling you about where social selling is headed, the projections and trends for marketing for the next couple of years and what we are seeing and where things are going because you don't want to be behind in the marketing curve. You want to be ahead, you want to be at the helm. You want to know exactly what's going on. And you want to be a part of the future of marketing. You don't want to be a part of old yesteryear marketing because marketing is a rapidly evolving game changing thing. It has a life of its own. And I make it my job to know where the industry is going, particularly how our audience responds to marketing, what's working with audiences now, you're going to want to be a part of that. So go to the show notes and register and when you early when you register early, you're getting awesome pre work from me, you're getting a worksheet that you do before the event. You're getting a workbook for the event. You're actually getting a welcome video when you join as well. We are really thinking about the overall experience from the moment you register to the moment that the group closes. So you want to be there, tell your people, tell your Friends don't let anybody procrastinate, but there's always the last minute people that are like, I don't know, I'll think about it later. You don't want to do that. And if you're like, well, Kristen, and it's going to be at noon central time every day, the training is going to last roughly an hour. If you're like, I have things going on. I have family. We keep the replays in the group. If you are a student of mine, if you're in the academy, yes, you're going to have access to the live event and your member portal after the first of the year. But if you want to be a part of the live training, if you want to do this with your Friends and your team and you want to be a part of the live experience because there is something about being a part of it live, then watching a recording, you want to be a part of the energy you want to be a part of what we're doing. It's $9 if you want to be a part of it live. Otherwise, if you want to wait, it'll be in your report portal, but I'm gonna highly encourage you to be at the live event. And as always, I always make it worth your time. I always make it worth your money because I know there's a lot competing for your time and your attention and your energy in today's world. And I always

Facebook Starbucks Kristen
A highlight from 287: B2B Campaigns in a B2C World

The Paid Search Podcast

04:15 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from 287: B2B Campaigns in a B2C World

"Is Jason rothman, as always, I'm here with the truly great great Chris schaefer for Chris. How was your Thanksgiving? Did you have a good time? Great Thanksgiving, yes, happy post Thanksgiving, Jason. It's a great year in the U.S., very thankful time. You know, I like to go around and ask everyone to say, you know, like, what do you think for? You know? It basically is pretty monotonous just over it like everybody's like family. Family, family, you know, my wife, my husband and family. It's just over and over. That's what everyone always says. So, you know, that's a really good thing to be thankful for. And, you know, health, family, you know, and I know you're growing yours, Jason, so I know you're very thankful for yours as well. Growing family man? Do you look at me? Are we family yet? I mean, we gotta be something different from business partners because the conversations we have before the show. Oh, yeah. They got nothing to do with business. We don't treat each other like that. You can't really be business partners 'cause we're we don't do business together, technically. We don't really have a, you know, we're very independent, but I wouldn't say we're family yet, because I've yet to even shake your hand or give you a hug. So, no, somewhere between friends and family. Definitely not family. I have to give you like, I guess we're like X's that are still friends. We spend a lot of time together. Yeah. We're not gonna part ways. We're not technically still family. We share we share custody of the kids. We have the podcast. We never physically touch, but we're still very a part of each other's lives. We can only do two hours a week. That's it. Yeah. But that's what we can manage. Yeah. Okay. That's it. Divorcee fathers. I didn't mean to go down this road, Chris. I was just trying to say I'm thankful for you. We didn't come out the right way. Since we're here. Jason, what are you thankful for this post Thanksgiving? Well, I mean, do you want serious stuff like family and all that? Or do you want something a little more practical? Because I can give you practical. Everybody knows of the serious stuff. Family family, health, you know, okay. Okay, go practical. You're looking at me right now. Yeah. I'm going to golf shirt. That's all I wear these days. They're cooler, they're lighter. Literally that's all I wear during the work day now. It's called shirts. And I don't wear anything. Not literally. I know. I thought how juvenile people would take that and you took it that way. So yeah, I wear pants and all that, of course, too. And as far as shirts go, this is all I wear these days is golf shirts, two reasons one. They're super comfortable, super lightweight, super cool, which I need because I run hot even in the winter. Number two, it builds a kinship with people who are into golf, and they come up to me and they say things to me about the brand or whatever. Really? Yeah. And then for people that play golf with maybe I'm selling and I'm doing business and I don't play golf, but they think I play golf and now we have something in common and they like me more. I've noticed that people like me more when I wear a golf shirt. Really? I don't play golf, I wish I did, but I don't, and I've noticed people like me more. I don't know if it's I look familiar now all of a sudden, but it's not just people that are into golf. So I don't know if I look like a clown. People are like, why does this guy walking around looking like Tiger Woods every day? But this is what I wear now, so. I'm thankful for these shirts 'cause I don't know what else I wear. The Ned's got a little too hot. I don't like a tie and I don't want to know what to do. Yeah, that's that's good answer. I mean, avoiding all the typical stuff, you know, family, health, all that stuff, jumping to practical like you. Jason, I'm thankful for hobbies. I love gotta have hobbies. I love huh. I'm realizing that now is a man with responsibilities. Gotta have hobbies. Because if you didn't have something to look forward to in that like 30 minutes or an hour or maybe two hours of time that you get, you know, to yourself, at the very end of the day right before you crash, it's like, that's like. That's why is this what you do on your Zoom calls? You just remind me what's going on. Come on, Chris. I'm ready, go here, man. Okay, okay.

Jason Rothman Chris Schaefer Golf Jason Chris U.S.
A highlight from 7 Marketing Tools We're Excited About for 2022 #1930

Marketing School

04:30 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from 7 Marketing Tools We're Excited About for 2022 #1930

"To optimize your site for low time. And one easy way to do it is use the host that Eric and I use dream host to just go to dream host or Google it, find it, check it out and it's a great way to improve your low time. Today we are going to talk about 7 marketing tools that we're excited about for 2022 and beyond. So I'll go first. Number one, mutiny, HQ. So mutiny HQ. So it's like the pirate like mutiny. The mutiny HQ, what they do is their tagline is turn your website into your number one revenue channel. So I like this because you add a snippet of JavaScript to your site and they help with personalization on your site. And they show you, it's kind of a marketer's tool for personalization. So there's a lot of personalization tools that are out there. But this one will help you identify the type of visitors that are hitting your site and they'll kind of personalize for you. And you don't need to have code to do it, so you can just do it on your own as a marketer. Don't even help you write headlines. And then they'll show you the impact of different tests that you're running. And they have different playbooks, by the way on their site too. So if you don't want to pay for the tool, they've got some playbooks that you can use from top marketers that are out there, just check out their site, but they've been great. And we just started using them. And number two, Jarvis AI. So, you know, there's not enough time in the day for marketing. There's too many people out there that have tons of money for marketing. So how do you compete when you don't have as a resource, especially on the continent, use tools like Jarvis AI that are right half your content for you through AI and then you can have humans go in there and adjust it. So that way you have great content, but you spend half the time and half the money creating it. Number three, grain dot CO. So I like this tool. It kind of reminds me of gone, but it's not quite gone, right? So what it does is let's say Neil and what we're having a conversation here. And what we can do is grain will transcribe the conversation and we can highlight bits that we really liked. And we can share that link with other people where Neil and I are having that conversation. So let's say I'm interviewing Neil as he's a customer. And I'm trying to get feedback. I can share that feedback with my team, or maybe he shared a really nice snip. I can maybe share that in social media, right? So grain is great for customer development, which then helps with marketing, or you can take little snippets like little wins that you've had as a team. You can help motivate people or you can share stuff to the public, right? So there's a lot of different use cases here. So grain dot CO worth checking out. Another one is supermetrics. I love supermetrics because it helps bring all your data into things like Google data studio from your Facebook insights, to Shopify Google ads, et cetera so that way you have one place to slice and dice and do the data which allows you to make better business decisions. Number 5, so number 5 is descript. So descript is great for podcasting purposes because they will take out the filler words. And they will automatically transcribe your content. And it's just a great tool to manage your podcast or manage audio in general. So it was created by one of the former cofounders of groupon. And so we're checking out. Cool. And number 6. So there's a tool that ended up coming out. I'm trying to come up with the name we use it all the time. It has a bird commercials on CNBC. What's the automation tool is for workflow automation? It's not for marketing. UI path. So I think they have like a $30 billion market cap as a Romania company. But we actually use UI path believe it or not, a lot of the type of process automation. And people don't really look at it as marketing. But a marketing you have a lot of tedious processes and what you want to use UI path for is automating them. So you don't need as much headcount and then be what we found is by automating a lot of the boring processes, your marketing employees become much, much hap because they don't have to deal with the boring stuff. Yep. I think UI path might have a cheap version of it, correct? Yes, not that expensive to start off with. Got it. You can use UI path an alternative as we've been using zapier for years, but UI path. There are enterprise, they're publicly traded now. So might have more resources for you. Number 7, last but not least is predict leads. So predict leads dot com shows you when a new CMO is joining the company or X company has raised money in a certain niche. So what you can do here is if you're taking an ABM or account based marketing approach, this is definitely a tool that you might consider adding to the tool stack. So that is it for today. If you've got a really cool tool, by the way, just tweet at me at Erik osu. Neil and I might be keen at taking a look at it by the way. And so that is it for today, marking school on the iOS last training. If you want to start or grow your dream business, we got a free training for you in there, that will get a couple of secrets for you. And we'll catch you later. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school. Be sure to

Neil Jarvis Ai Grain Dot Co. Google Jarvis Eric Groupon Cnbc Facebook Romania Erik Osu
A highlight from Technology Supported Agile Marketing  -- Andrea Fryrear // Agile Sherpas

MarTech Podcast

08:03 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from Technology Supported Agile Marketing -- Andrea Fryrear // Agile Sherpas

"The mar tech podcast is a proud member of the HubSpot podcast network to find great business podcasts like this one, visit HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. From advertising to software as a service, to data. Across all of our programs and clients, we've seen a 55 to 65% open rate. Getting brands authentically integrated into content performs better than TV advertising. Typical lifespan of an article is about 24 to 36 hours. We're reaching out to the right person with the right message and a clear call that action that it's just a matter of timing. Welcome to the martech podcast, a band Jeff LLC production. In this podcast, you'll hear the stories of world class marketers that use technology to drive business results and achieve career success. Will unearth the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks, they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the martech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome back to the martech podcast. Today we're going to continue our discussion about how to market more efficiently. But before we get to today's interview, we're going to kick off the show with a marketing minute, where we invite a friend of the martech podcast to help us answer listener questions in 60 seconds or less. Here for today's marketing minute is John chance who's the founder and president at duct tape marketing consultant and he's also the host of the duct tape marketing podcast. Where John interviews authors experts and thought leaders who share business and marketing tips, tactics and resources for small businesses. And the duct tape marketing podcast is also a fellow member of the HubSpot podcast network. And John has been kind enough to answer a question from G two meta, who is the director of Marta and client success at intelligence bank. And G two asks what automations have organizations implemented in their middle and back office teams to better serve their end users. All right, here's John's answer. You know, automation can be a great way to create a better backend office experience and serve your customers, your end users better. Obviously, the most basic things like a CRM, like a help desk. Those kinds of tools certainly make the communication make the record keeping of communicating even easier. But I find that one of the best tools to automate is to also create a hub so that your project management, your help desk, your CRM, or all talking through a hub, the hub that we use that I find is really powerful for this is slack. Slack keeps us out of email so that we're not firing back and forth as we try to serve clients, but it also has so many integrations now that allow us to keep conversations separate and keep everybody on the same page really for as much time as we need. We can keep those threads going. Thanks, John. If you're interested in hearing more of John Gantz on the duct tape marketing podcast or any of the other great hosts from the HubSpot podcast network, you can go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. All right, on with today's interview. Joining us again is Andrea freire, who is the cofounder of agile sherpas, which is a firm that consults trains and educates world leaders on agile marketing. As early converts of agile marketing, Andrea and her team know that agile teams do better work in less time with less stress and they love nothing more than seeing a team evolved from chaos to high performance. And yesterday, Andrea told us about how to do higher quality work faster and with less stress. And today we're going to continue the discussion and talk about the technology that supports agile marketing. But before we hear from today's guest, I'd like to take a moment to thank blue shift for sponsoring this interview. We all know that marketing and the technology that supports it is rapidly evolving. Last year it was GDPR. This year it's third party cookies, and who knows how the landscape is going to change next year. The fact is, traditional marketing platforms are struggling to keep pace with the needs of today's marketers because they're built to focus on channel execution and not a 360° view of customer behaviors. And that's why you need blue shifts, smart hub CDP. You see blue shift both improves customer engagement and drives meaningful results by unifying your customers data so you can deliver relevant and personalized omnichannel experiences to the prospects and customers that matter the most. So if you're ready to drive better customer engagement increased loyalty, our friends at blueshift have created a guide to successful CDP RFPs that will help you make the right martech decision for your business. To download blue shifts, CDP RFP guide go to blue shift dot com slash mar tech that's BLUE SHI FT dot com slash Marta. Blue shift, omnichannel marketing for data driven marketers. Okay, here's the rest of my conversation with Andrea fry rear, cofounder of agile sherpas. Andrea, welcome back to the martech podcast. Thank you so much. I'm excited to get into the tools bit. Pleasure to have you back on the show yesterday we talked a lot about what agile marketing was. For anybody that didn't listen to that episode, shame on you. But to give you a quick recap, Andrea walked us through the notion of setting your limits, capping the number of projects you have that are works in process and having your team focus on doing the work that matters the most in real time and then setting up some evaluation to understand how effective it was. And today we're going to talk a little bit more about how to build technology to help visualize and optimize the agile strategies. Let's start off. I'm sure that there's a million tools that are out there that can be used, is there an agile dot com basic framework that we should be using? What are the sort of most commonly used technology products and are there ones for small companies, ones for big companies, lots to cover? Let's go over some of the basic frameworks. I definitely want to talk about actual digital pieces of technology. But for those folks who are brand new to using agile, if you can get away with nothing more high-tech than post it notes and sharpies start there, put your visual board up on a wall somewhere and run it for a little while because then you're going to know a lot more about what kind of tool you actually need. You'll be a smarter buyer of software. If you've fiddled with your physical board for a little while, so that's obviously easiest if most of your team is in the same building. If you're distributed at all, it can be challenging to ping people on slack and ask them to move sticky notes for you. People get tired of that pretty quickly, but it's an option to start. The first step up from there, I would say is Trello, which you mentioned last time then. It's a great entry point to simple visualization. It's super low barrier to entry. It's so easy to understand. It looks and acts a lot like sticky notes on a wall. So you could start as lo fi as you want. You don't even need sticky notes. You can just have paper and tape if you need to. That's right. Maybe a crayon. The concept behind agility and building your boards and understanding what stages what projects are you on, do not require technology. Anybody listening to this podcast probably is a fan of technology and it's going to be at least be aware of some of the tools that are out there. Trello relatively inexpensive tool that can help you set up your own boards. What are some of the other options? I'll preface this with we use a sauna here at the Marta podcast. We have a CRM, which does a lot of basically the same thing moving people from stages that's more relationship driven. I honestly feel like we use 15 different tools that try to have a task list for my personal stuff. At some point

John Jeff Llc Benjamin Shapiro Andrea Intelligence Bank John Gantz Andrea Freire Agile Sherpas Hubspot Marta Andrea Fry Meta
A highlight from Why Organic Traffic Is A Balance of Amazing Content and SEO #1929

Marketing School

03:07 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Why Organic Traffic Is A Balance of Amazing Content and SEO #1929

"To optimize your site for low time. And one easy way to do it is use the host that Eric and I use dream host to just go to dream host or Google it, find it, check it out, and it's a great way to improve your low time. Today we are going to talk about why organic traffic is a balance of amazing content and SEO. Okay, so when you're thinking about organic traffic, a lot of people look at organic traffic and just being like, I want that traffic. And I want that traffic and I'm going to end up creating content around it so I can get that traffic or landing pages. And what we say it's about amazing content is it's actually not that hard to get quote unquote traffic. The issue that you're going to find is the SEO traffic doesn't convert. Amazing content isn't content that just gets traffic. It's content that converts people into customers or leads. And that's the tricky part when it comes to quote unquote generating a lot of SEO traffic from content. You'll find that over time you get a lot of traffic, but the traffic doesn't really convert into leads. You're like, all right, triple my traffic, or I increased my 30%. One to your sales and leads. Didn't really go up. Well, all right, well, then you got traffic. It doesn't matter if you don't have to relevant if it doesn't convert it doesn't matter. And amazing content is about converting those visitors into customers or leads and not just quote unquote getting traffic. And you know who I think does a really good job of this. Let's do some practical examples here. So our mutual friend Brian dean also known as back Lincoln. He writes really data driven long form pieces of content that you don't see elsewhere. And his goal is to try to convert more email subscribers. And he drives a good amount of traffic to his SEO only blog, right? And he decided to start an SEO blog when it was already a very crowded space. So he understood that, hey, to make amazing content in this space, I have to go ten X or I have to create power content. And in order to do that, maybe I have to collaborate with other people, like you did a collaboration with click flow. And they got unique data out there. And that's how you've been able to stand out and build a very strong business for himself. And so that's one example. Another example of this, we've talked about growing convert in the past. If you type in pain point SEO, that's a good example of how you could create amazing content and drive either more leads for your business or just more emails in general because you're more so focused on creating bottom the funnel or the middle of the funnel content, right? Where targeting a high intention keywords, like reviews or alternatives. And then maybe the page that you create on top software reviews for a particular industry. It's the best one that's out there, right? And that's going to drive a lot of conversions, right? So typically what happens is if you're able to ten X or you have unique data, then you're going to be able to create that amazing content and at least make sure that you have those critical call to actions because a lot of people forget about that stuff. Yeah, no, totally. And when they end up forgetting about their stuff, they're just really ends up crushing them in the long run. So, you know, just keep that in mind when you're creating the content trying to generate the traffic. All right, marketing school that IO slash training if you want to start or grow your dream business. We've got a couple of secrets in there for you. And we'll catch you later. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school.

Brian Dean Eric Google Lincoln
A highlight from Higher Quality & Faster Work With Less Stress -- Andrea Fryrear // Agile Sherpas

MarTech Podcast

01:13 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Higher Quality & Faster Work With Less Stress -- Andrea Fryrear // Agile Sherpas

"Answer. Marketing when it's complementing sales led has to complement a purchase that is only made through a sales led interaction. So everything has to be supporting what your sales reps are literally going to be saying on the phone in order to complement that conversation. So this traditionally would be large outbound B2B enterprise, even B2C industries have focused on outbound sales. Versus product led where the marketing should be focusing on creating demand on creating a flywheel that will generate awareness that will generate traffic that will turn into free signups that will turn into pay subscribers because with true product led. There isn't any interaction needed to try by expand and then renew versus sales where the purchases always through a sales that interaction. So marketing for sales led, I don't think that's the way organizations should be going, but it should be focusing on supporting sales, conversations with customers versus marketing that's product led. That should be focused on creating a demand generation flywheel that's driving people into your funnel to try your product and then eventually buy.

A highlight from How to Incentivize Marketers The Right Way #1928

Marketing School

04:10 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from How to Incentivize Marketers The Right Way #1928

"To optimize your site for low time. And one easy way to do it is use the host that Eric and I use dream host to just go to dream host or Google it, find it, check it out, and it's a great way to improve your low time. Today we are going to talk about how to incentivize marketers the right way. But first and foremost, Neil, why is it important to even think about incentivizing people? A lot of people whether it's sales, whether it's marketers, whether it is project managers or designers, and a lot of organizations, people have bonus structures, people want higher titles, promotions, all this kind of stuff. The best way to incentivize others is to really go out there and give them something that is very tangible. See what marketing is a little bit different because you can see it based off of traffic or conversions or sales, at least if it's self service or leads. And if you figure out a metric, you'll get them to push hard towards it. And that means your business is going to go faster. Yeah, so the Charlie Munger quote, I always use is Latin Neal. I don't know what they're saying. Show me the incentive and I'll show you the outcome. So if you think about, let's say I'm working with Neil, I have to think about what's in it for Neil, right? So if I think about because everyone's selfish, what's in it for them first and then maybe we can figure out what's in it for us together. Then that's creating an incentive, right? That makes sense. You want to create something that motivates people. And when you think about incentives in the early days, for me, at least, I'm talking about for a second. I used to make it so complex. You got to hit these three or four different things. Ideally, you make it very simple and to the point. So if you're able to lift conversion rate by a 100% or so, maybe you get 20% of the profits on that. Or let's say you're an agency and you're managing ad spend for a client. Maybe you're collecting 10% of ad spend on a client paying a hundred grand, right? So that you get $10,000. Maybe you give ten or 20% of that. So $2000 to your paid media manager. And that way you're incentivizing them accordingly, right? So there's a lot of different ways to do this, but the ideal when you think about incentives try to keep it very simple, try to keep it very understandable and try to keep it very objective because you don't want people pushing back and making it like a big argument because once you start adding an incentive, it will become an expectation for people. Yeah. And what I like doing is I like giving each marketer one incentive. So if they're in charge of content, all right, well, how much do you traffic to the blog at versus what it was at versus 12 months from now or 6 months from now? Whatever your milestone is. But keep your metric really simple. If someone's doing paid advertising, you know, it could end up being. They had to hit a minimum threshold in spend. And it is cost per conversion. So in essence, can they end up scaling it so getting to a certain spin and hit a specific cost per conversion or under that? And if they do you're good to go if not then don't give them the bone. It's like making it black and white just makes it so much easier in marketing and it's very doable. It was very possible to do that. Here's a question Neil. Does everybody get an incentive? It depends. It's harder for the marketing associates and stuff like that. It's easier for your VPs or people who are running division or someone who's in charge of specific channel. Yeah, so and the reason I asked that is because there's a very idealistic way of looking at where everyone should get an incentive, and that's how I thought in the early days. But as I gained more experience, you know, the last couple of years realizing that, hey, it probably makes sense to give it to the people that are probably your top performers out there because what ends up the quotes here also is salaries what keeps butts and seats. Incentives drive outcomes, right? Instead of drive the performance that you're looking for at the end of the day. And when I try to give everyone an incentive in some experiments that I've tested in the past, not everyone has that motivation, not everyone has that motivation to push and perform. But your top performers, your a players, right? I hate to say ABCD players, right? Or F players, but your 8 players are very motivated, and they want to be compensated accordingly. And they want to be rewarded accordingly. If they find out that everyone's getting incentive and not everyone's driving it, they're going to become demotivated. So you want to keep them motivated and incentives again drive outcomes. So that is it for today.

Neil Latin Neal Charlie Munger Eric Google Abcd
A highlight from Why CRM, DSP, & Automation Is Only 75-80% Effective -- Quimby Melton // Confection

MarTech Podcast

19:36 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Why CRM, DSP, & Automation Is Only 75-80% Effective -- Quimby Melton // Confection

"Tape marketing podcast is also a fellow member of the HubSpot podcast network. And John has been kind enough to answer a question from Eric on C van Putin, who's the VP of marketing at dynamic web. Eric asked, how do you surprise or make your customers excited? All right, here's John's answer. There are two great ways to get your customers really amped up to do business with you and to surprise them. The first one is, well, it's to surprise them. So if you have promised X deliver X plus. Remember one time I ordered some shoes from a company and online shoe store and I got socks and an energy bar with the running shoes that I had ordered. And that little bit of surprise made me want to go out and talk about them. And that's the key to this surprise is it triggers talking. The second thing that you can do to get people really excited is to set the proper expectations and then communicate and exceed those expectations. Communication is probably the place where we let people down the most. Tell them exactly what's going to happen next. And next, who they need to talk to in your organization, tell them about the results they're getting over communicate. Those are a couple great ways to get this done. Thanks, John. If you're interested in hearing more of John janse on the duct tape marketing podcast or any of the other great hosts from the HubSpot podcast network, you can go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. All right, on with today's interview joining us is quinby Melton, who is the CEO and cofounder of confection, which collects stores and distributes data in a way that's unaffected by client side disruptions involving cookies, cross domain scripts and device IDs. It's also compliant with global privacy laws. So, hey, it's good for people too. Yesterday, quinby and I talked about how to avoid the third party cookie graveyard, and today we're going to continue the conversation talking about why CRM DSPs and automation is only 75, maybe 80% effective. But before we hear from today's guest, I'd like to take a moment to thank blue shift for sponsoring this interview. We all know that marketing and the technology that supports it is rapidly evolving. Last year it was GDPR. This year it's third party cookies and who knows how the landscape is going to change next year. The fact is, traditional marketing platforms are struggling to keep pace with the needs of today's marketers because they're built to focus on channel execution and not a 360° view of customer behaviors. And that's why you need blue shifts, smart hub CDP. You see blue shift both improves customer engagement and drives meaningful results by unifying your customer's data so you can deliver relevant and personalized omnichannel experiences to the prospects and customers that matter the most. So if you're ready to drive better customer engagement increased loyalty, our friends at blueshift have created a guide to successful CDP RFPs that will help you make the right martech decision for your business. To download blue shifts, CDP RFP guide could a blue shift dot com slash martel that's BLUE, SHI FT dot com slash mar tech. Blue shift, omnichannel marketing for data driven marketers. All right, here's the second part of my conversation with quinby mountain, the CEO and cofounder of confection. Welcome back to the mar tech podcast. Thanks so much Ben. I'm glad to be here. Excited to have you back on the show. Glad to continue our conversation. So yesterday we talked about the changes in how data is being passed. I think hopefully all marketers are aware of third party cookies and the passing of third party data is basically going away. Got about a year to get ready for it. And so that means that there's more of a reliance on first party data is where your company confection comes in, helping companies gather as much first party data as they can, so they're not reliant on vendors to do enrichment of the data that they already have. There's a lot of different tools that plug third party data in or just data in general. The CRMs of the world, DSPs, marketing automation tools. You have a theory that these tools aren't as effective as marketers might think. Talk to me about why you think CRM's DSP is an automation. It's only 75 or 80% effective. You know, it's funny, I can't actually leave with some of the other numbers we have because no one believes me. So we've done some case studies and we see it substantially higher than that. But the big picture is I think a lot of people we talk about this issue just in terms of tags and cookies and cross the main scripts and things. But it's a lot more than that. It's a lot more about just than who access this data and who possesses and controls it. It's really about the way the end of the way that marketers and developers have gathered and used online data for three decades. So we're really moving from one paradigm into another one. And it's pretty scary. I think from a marketing perspective, but it's also a really great opportunity to rethink the way that data moves around on the web and build a better more compliance system. So as far as the why, why are these disruptions happening when safari and Firefox phase out support for third party cookies in 2017? That immediately impacted 20 to 25% of web users. Because that's about the percentage of people who browse the web and use safari and Firefox. Obviously, chrome is 75% plus. Poor Internet Explorer. You used to be so dominant. I know, foreign Internet Explorer and opera. You know, these kind of fringy browsers now. It is pretty remarkable what happened with the Internet Explorer. But so really, if you look at a system where your scripts are being blocked by 20 to 25% of people who are browsing the web using safari and Firefox, you're talking about information that can't flow into your CRM for just to keep using that as an example. And that obviously is a problem. It's a pretty substantial amount of waste. And the problem is, obviously, when chrome flips the switch, now you're talking about 75, 80% of people. And it's pretty amazing looking back and thinking about how much waste that is compounding every day for four years, 20 to 25% it adds up to big numbers. So there's the idea that you're not getting accurate data over the whole population because already we're seeing some browsers aren't using third party data. Is that why the systems that we're relying on aren't a wholly accurate? So really what it is, Scripps get blocked in the most basic reason is that a browser like brave again, which actually small user base. But Firefox and chrome can be set to work exactly like brave and be just as privacy focused. So what happens is if these browsers under certain conditions block a script because they know that information that passes between you and the site is going to go off to a third party, then that event just goes nowhere. So it winds up happening is that script is blocked the event goes nowhere and for a page view, for example, or a button click or whatever kind of event that you're tracking on the site. And that's really the problem. And I think it's also important to scale up and think about how fragile the frontend data collection and distribution models are where it's really a Rube Goldberg machine. It involves cross domain scripts. It involves cook these sinks at DSPs. And the system is very complex and very fragile. And it's not entirely unsurprising that a small thing like blocking one script. It's an important script would cause disruptive ripples all the way down through the ecosystem. So I would say at a high level, that's really what we see the most impact as event tracking, being interrupted as a result of blocked scripts because they share information with third parties when they're executed. All right, so if I understand correctly, I want to pull data into my CRM and the browsers are blocking some of those scripts. So I'm not getting a 100% of the data. So I'm really not getting the entire population of people that I want to gather data from already. That's right. And then I'm taking the data that's in my CRM and I'm trying to advertise to those people. I'm running it through a DSP, and again some people are blocking the cookies from DSPs. So the output to marketing isn't necessarily a 100% effective. Talk to me about automation. Why is automation not necessarily always effective? I think the use case matters in that context. So if you are collecting information that's spotty and then you send information out in the form of an email blast or something like that, the email will still make it to your person's inbox, but if the information that you've used to compose that message or organize the audience that it goes out to will lack the kind of context that you probably would like it to have an expected to have inside your CRM or your marketing automation platform wherever you send it from. I mean, I guess that's just a quality of product coming out of the marketing automation system if the data in your CRM is great. The marketing automation output isn't great as well. And then it's just not as effective messaging. I think that's right. So if you get spotty information, you know, garbage in garbage hours. If you have spotty less contextually driven information coming in and then you try to use that to organize an audience segment or something like that. Obviously, the output is going to be far less reliable than it would be if the inputs were better. Time to take a one minute break to hear from our sponsor HubSpot. The holiday season is upon us and it's time to think about what matters most in life. Real connections. And your personal life that's probably means spending and hopefully enjoying some extra time with your spouse kids, Friends, extended family, and at work, it's also a great time to think about making connections. Sure, it's not all Turkey and stuffing around the office, but there's always room for connections with your customers your team and of course your martech stack. And that's why the HubSpot CRM is ready to connect the dots for your business. And just like how I'm always tinkering with my recipe for mashed potatoes, HubSpot is always adding new ingredients for marketers, like their forecasting tool that gives a bird's eye view of your entire pipeline or their custom report builder that connects and converts your data into real-time reporting. If you're ready to learn how the HubSpot CRM platform can connect the dots for your business, go to HubSpot dot com. All right, here's the rest of today's interview. All right, so we're already seeing that fair amount of the data that we're collecting and who are reaching out to isn't reaching the whole population because of this third party data passage issue, safari Firefox being blocked for the marketers that are listening to this conversation. Should they be sitting there saying, oh, well, there's 25% of the people that I thought I was targeting, but I'm not my business is just doing what it is. So that's just table stakes, or is there something they can do to effectively market to that other 25% of market share that they're missing? There are different schools of thought on this, obviously. You know, a lot of the markers that speak with. And these are people that I admire very much. They really do see this return to a sort of monolithic audience model where you know they would say, well, you know, account level and individual level information is less important. I just want to make sure that people who are interested in sports see this. Or people who are interested in a particular type of technology see this. So I take the adventure to get a word that they're delivering these ads out to the right audience segment and that's enough for me. And in some cases that may be true. I would be skeptical of how accurate some of those audience groupings are, especially with the more independent ad networks. Nevertheless, if that works for you, it works for you. From my point of view, it really is when you're deep in the funnel doing the kind of work that marketers do really, really well in terms of audience segmentations internally with your first party data. That can become somewhat problematic if you're lacking the right contextual information. Another thing that I talk about a lot is the value of aggregate data being just as valuable as personally identifying information. And so honestly, when I think about it for confection and other projects that's done in the past, we probably rely on aggregate data at least as much as personally and in a fine information. So when I get concerned about the future that we're entering, I really think about what's happening. What am I not seeing with respect to trends? What am I not saying in terms of events? So when I go look at a report and I see a certain type of flow through a certain pipeline channel on my website, if information is missing from that aggregate view because the event hasn't been imported. To me, honestly, that's even more consequential than not knowing that John Doe is an Austin Texas or Jane Doe's in New York City. So for me, it's really about the loss that we get on the aggregate level so that we can go out and build accurate trends models and make better decisions about how customers are entering our pipeline, how people are discovering us and the channels they're coming in from. The question I have for is do you think this is a bigger problem for B2B or B2C businesses? I think that personalization and sort of contextual marketing probably matters when you're only looking for a handful of customers as opposed to when you're B2C, you can kind of broadly target you don't necessarily think about who the individual customers you're not ABM and you're not tailoring your marketing efforts specifically for them. I think that's a really important point is the division on this and B2B and B2C. So we set out with confection. We thought we were building a B2B tool. And it still is a B2B tool. But some of our most engaged users are ecommerce companies. These are small makeup companies, for example, who sell on the web. And for them, collecting as much information as they can about their consumers that they can feed into clavier, for example, that is mission critical for them. So confection really plugs in and says, okay, we're going to be the arbiter of truth and we're going to make sure that all the information makes it into Shopify or who commerce and also out to clavius so that I can do better segmentation down the road. So the B2C use case was very interesting for us. And honestly, I've only really worked in B2B so I've learned a lot about B2C over the years. Still think again, from the B2B perspective when generally you probably are working more on a trend analysis level where you're really interested in pipeline health. How are people finding your site? So you can spend more on high performing channels. The individual information is important, especially if you're doing like you said, an ABM approach. But at the same time, the thing that really concerns me from a B2B perspective is making sure I have actionable accurate aggregate data that tells me stories about trends. So I guess there's a use case for both B2B and B2C in terms of confection specifically, and then more generally to your question, I think the issues that each camp's gonna face are different but equally important. So I think it's good to draw a distinction between the B2C use case and experience in the B2B one. My takeaway from this conversation in yesterday's conversation is that there's no getting around that marketers are going to move more towards aggregate marketing than discrete personalization. Yes, we're going to take our first party data, but it's hard to come by and try to do as much personalization as we can. We're just going to have less volumes of data. So that means that we're going to be marketing more broadly. You know, and I think of how we do our paid media bias to promote the martech podcast. There's always this debate of do we retarget a lookalike audience based on the people that are listening to the show to try to find very specific audiences that are interested in martech and podcast. Or do we just buy audio ads for people that are interested in business and know that we're capturing this broad podcast audience and we'll get the marketers in that larger audience. At the end of the day, my perspective is that it really comes down to the media cost. If I can aggregately buy the marketing podcast audience knowing I'm getting the marketing segment within that for low price. Great. I'm happy to advertise to people that are not super, super, super, super duper targeted because I might just catch a couple fish by accident. As opposed to if I'm looking for people that are not necessarily podcast listeners, but I know our marketers, it has to be very targeted because I still have this big hurdle of what type of media do they consume? Is this the type of problem that other marketers are going through? Almost certainly, yes. And I think yours is a really interesting use case because correct me if I'm wrong. Give me a little bit of latitude here and correct me if I'm wrong. But you're an interesting position because success for you is a larger audience. And then you can use that larger audience to leverage increasingly large pad customers. Is that accurate from your lips to hopefully my checkbook? Okay, so what's interesting about that is it's fairly unique if you're talking about something like a sas or really any kind of product very different because you win as long as you increase your audience among irrelevant demographic. And in some level you're exactly right. You're relative demographic as people interested in business. So I think you've set yourself up a nice pathway to success. That might be less true again if you're someone a very specific niche product, in which case you really have to work from the bottom of the funnel up in some ways rather than from the top down. So I think again, these kinds of questions are important. And I think one of the reasons they can be difficult to solve is because they're so specific to a given enterprise, right? So your goal is very different from a SaaS product, a niche SaaS product or something. And they're different from the company down the road that's trying to flip houses or something like that. So I think it's important as this fragmentation starts happening. In terms of marketing, every business and obviously this is on the CMOs plate and anyone who's engaged in marketing the enterprise is to have these very specific internal discussions and come up with the strategy that works for you in particular for your business. We can probably come with 5 other examples of companies that work in very unique ways and have very, very unique results as outcomes. At the end of the day, next year is going to be a reshuffling of the deck. The deprecation of the passing of third party data is going to have a massive effect on marketers. And for some of them positively, maybe the effects media rates in a way that benefits people that are great at collecting first party data. And in some businesses where they're reliant on third party data and have a difficult time collecting first party data they're going to be in trouble. At the center of it, there's also going to be the guy selling the shovels who are going to be very successful quinby. It looks like you're well positioned to be in that space. Those are the guys that got rich during the gold rush. I hope this ends up being confections gold rush as well. That's very kind. I would say our goal at a high level is to ensure that three camps are happy. Sometimes I'll say that confection exists in a negative space form by three positive pressures. They're top down pressures from policymakers like GDPR, bottom up pressures from audience everyday web users who want more privacy and the businesses are squeezed in the middle. So really we try to push out and make sure that each one of those camps is happy. And that's our goal. That's what we work out every day. Well, you're definitely in the center of a hotbed of marketing activity and I appreciate you spending your time telling us about it. Thanks for coming on and being my guest. Thanks very much Ben. All right, that wraps up this episode of the mar tech podcast. Thanks to quinby mountain, the CEO and cofounder of confection for joining us. If you'd like to get in touch with quimby, you can find a link to his LinkedIn profile on our show notes. You can contact him on Twitter, his handle is oq M4 that's O Q M the number four, or you could visit his company's website, which is confection dot IO. And a special thanks to HubSpot for sponsoring this podcast. If you're ready to make more meaningful connections in your business this holiday season, check out HubSpot's new forecasting and report building tools to connect and convert your data into real-time reporting. To learn more about how the HubSpot CRM platform can help you connect the dots in your business, go to HubSpot dot com. And a special thanks to blue shift for sponsoring this podcast. If you're interested in learning how to turn your data into personalized customer experiences, head over to blue shift dot com slash Marta to a guide to their successful CDP evaluations. That's blue shift dot com slash Marta to download blue shifts, CDP RFP guide. Blue shift. Omnichannel marketing for data driven marketers. Just one more link in our show notes I'd like to tell you about, if you didn't have a chance to take notes while you were listening to this podcast, head over to Marta pod dot com where we have summaries of all of our episodes and contact information for our guests. You can also subscribe to our weekly newsletter and you can even send us your topics suggestions or your marketing questions, which will answer live on our show. Of course, you can always reach out on social media our handle is martech pod MAR TCH POD on LinkedIn Twitter Instagram and Facebook, or you can contact me directly my handle is Ben J shap B and J SH AP. And if you haven't subscribed yet and you want a daily stream of marketing and technology knowledge in your podcast feed,

Quinby Van Putin Quinby Mountain John Janse Quinby Melton John Eric Hubspot Scripps CRM BEN Jane Doe John Doe Turkey New York City Austin
A highlight from How to Find Your Marketing Focus #1927

Marketing School

03:08 min | Last week

A highlight from How to Find Your Marketing Focus #1927

"To optimize your site for low time. And one easy way to do it is use the host that Eric and I use dream host to just go to dream host or Google it, find it, check it out, and it's a great way to improve your low time. Today we are going to talk about how to find your marketing focus. So marketing focus is all about there's so many channels out there when you think about the omnichannel perspective. But how do you focus? Because it doesn't matter what size company or when you're really getting into market and you're trying to grow or trying to scale. It's hard to do all the channels first. And this may not be the way you think about marketing focus, but the easiest way to figure out your focus is actually treat marking like spaghetti. When you cook spaghetti, you know, when I was a little kid, they told me you throw it against the wall, whatever when it sticks, you know, it's ready and it's good to go. I never thought my spaghetti against the wall. Me neither. That's what they told me. So with your marketing, I want you to think about a spaghetti. There's a handful of tactics that you can try. Take these handful of tactics, triumph a few days a week among max, throw it against the wall. At the end of the mantra at the end of a few weeks, whatever the period is, you'll figure out which one sticks. Some a few of them may stick, but one probably sticks better than the rest. That one that sticks better than the rest is usually the one that is performing better and has the most potential. That's your focus. Once you do really well with it, then expand to the other areas, but start off with the one that sticks the best. Yeah, so resources are constrained in early days or really for any business, especially in the early days when your time is constrained, your money is constraint. You really don't have the luxury of trying to focus on different channels. And take this from me. When I first took over a single ring, I tried to do a bunch of different things at once. I tried to do SEO, tried to do podcasts. Try to do YouTube. These things all eventually worked out, but it took a lot longer. And so business is very, let's say it's very fragile in the early days, right? And so you have so many things that are going against you and things can just fall apart easily. So if you can just focus on one first, so I remember when I worked at a startup, we focused all our efforts on one channel. I bet the entire company on one channel, YouTube ads. And I put most of my effort after single day after I tried too many different things when I first took over, I was like, wow, you know, Estee was actually starting to work. I should go all in on SEO. So I went all in on SEO, then I started to get the other channels up going more because again, if I'm going to try to do YouTube, SEO, all the stuff I'm diluting all my efforts and things are just going to grow a lot more slowly. And I'm not going to get the results that I'm looking for. So focus on one that's working initially. If you see one that's working, double down, triple down. What ends up happening is people, especially me in the beginning, I was like, one started working. It was stupid. I tried to do other channels too. Once I was like, oh, this one's working. Why don't I try three other channels? If you don't feel like you've maxed out one yet, then you still have a long way to go. So look, that's it for this episode. Sweet, check out marketing school dot IO slash. Training, training. See you guys. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school.

Eric Youtube Google Estee
A highlight from Avoiding The 3rd Party Cookie Graveyard -- Quimby Melton // Confection

MarTech Podcast

01:33 min | Last week

A highlight from Avoiding The 3rd Party Cookie Graveyard -- Quimby Melton // Confection

"Hub so that your project management, your help desk, your CRM, or all talking through a hub, the hub that we use that I find is really powerful for this is slack. Slack keeps us out of email so that we're not firing back and forth as we try to serve clients, but it also has so many integrations now that allow us to keep conversations separate and keep everybody on the same page really for out as much time as we need. We can keep those threads going. Thanks, John. If you're interested in hearing more of John Gantz on the duct tape marketing podcast or any of the other great hosts from the HubSpot podcast network, you can go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. All right, on with today's interview. Joining us is quinby Melton, who is the CEO and cofounder of confection, which collects stores and distributes data in a way that's unaffected by client side disruptions involving cookies, cross domain scripts and device IDs that's also compliant with global privacy laws. So, hey, it's good for people too. And today, Columbia and I are going to discuss avoiding the third party cookie graveyard. But before we hear from today's guest, I'd like to take a moment to thank blue shift for sponsoring this interview. We all know that marketing and the technology that supports it is rapidly evolving. Last year it was GDPR, this year its third party cookies, and who knows how the landscape is going to change next year. The fact is, traditional marketing platforms are struggling to keep pace with the needs of today's marketers because they're built to focus on channel execution

John Gantz Quinby Melton John Columbia
A highlight from How to Develop an Instagram Strategy That Works

Social Media Marketing Podcast

05:15 min | Last week

A highlight from How to Develop an Instagram Strategy That Works

"Today I'm very excited to be joined by Millie Adrian. If you don't know who Amelia is, she's an Instagram strategist, coach, and founder of its modern Millie, a company that helps aspiring influencers and entrepreneurs grow on Instagram. Her course is called the modern influencer and our YouTube channel is called its modern Millie. Millie welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me. You make me sound so professional. I love it. 'cause you are a professional. I'm really stoked to have you and today million I are going to explore how to develop an Instagram strategy. But before we go there, I would love to hear your story how did you get into Instagram, start wherever you want to start? Let's hear it. I'm excited to hear it. Well, how much time do you have? My story, I feel like it expands over years and years because there's so many elements that go into it, but I'll try to give the bullet point version. After graduating high school, I was one of those people who went to college because I thought that was the thing to do. I thought I needed to go to college. That was the rule to follow. And I'm one of 5 kids in my family. And I'm number four, a 5. So for me to be the first child to attend college was like a big deal or attend a university. For me, it was a big deal. That's cool. And yeah, so going to college was like, wow, I'm in college. I was pursuing a career as a teacher, so I wanted to teach any topic. I was leaning towards either music or a special needs, and that was what I was going for. A year into college at the university I was at, I just craved dancing. I used to dance on high school. It wasn't anything I took seriously, but my body needed to move and the college I was at didn't have any sort of dance program. So I had to make a hard decision, leave university to dance or stay at university pursuing something that I felt I had to, not because I craved to. I ended up pursuing dance and I went to a community college in my area on scholarship, able to take as many dance classes to be a dance teacher. But unfortunately, you're into that, I got a pretty bad injury where I lost my scholarship. I had to drop out of all of the dance classes I was in, which made me lose my scholarship, forcing me to drop out of college and my doctor was like, yo, you need to get a big girl job. You got to get a desk job. You're going to be on crutches for at least the next 9 months. And you got to do something else. Career change. Again, so found myself in corporate. I was incorporate for about 5 years and I loved it. I happened to find the best job in the world in San Diego and working with the best company that really taught me everything I needed to with business. I started as a sales rep, and slowly worked my way up the ladder to the project manager. But during my time there, again, I was craving that creativity. I couldn't really dance anymore, but I needed another creative outlet, which led me to Instagram. And I just was taking pictures for fun, trying to find ways I could incorporate dance to create images to share with people and also teaching what I learned from corporate to other people and just trying to tie everything into one page to help other people and inspire other people. Eventually, I found my niche, which became Instagram and teaching people how to utilize Instagram to grow, especially how to utilize Instagram to grow your passions or grow with your passion, grow your business, grow your brand, specifically those elements. Well, I've got more questions on this story. What year would you say it was when you decided that you were going to really use Instagram to I mean, when did you start exploring Instagram and when did you decide to go all in on it? So I started posting to Instagram for fun in 2015. That was kind of the rise of travel bloggers, fashion bloggers, and I thought, oh, in order to be successful, you have to be a fashion blogger. So I was trying to be a fashion blogger. And then the next two years was kind of me figuring out what the heck I wanted to do. If I wanted to grow it as a business, do I want to be an influencer what the heck do I want to do on Instagram? So then I feel like more so 2018, 2000 19 is when it really clicked. And I was like, ah, I'm going to post consistently and do this. So I'm going to teach people how to grown Instagram and organize their business for long-term success. And that's when I started to take it more seriously in 2018, 19. And when did you start up the YouTube channel? Tell us a little bit about that story. With YouTube, I've actually been on YouTube for 12 years, not this channel. My other channel I had was with my little brother for ten years.

Instagram Millie Adrian Millie Amelia Youtube San Diego
A highlight from 3 Brutal Truths About Why You're Failing at SEO #1926

Marketing School

02:31 min | Last week

A highlight from 3 Brutal Truths About Why You're Failing at SEO #1926

"To optimize your site for low time. And one easy way to do it is use the host that Eric and I use dream host to just go to dream host or Google it, find it, check it out, and it's a great way to improve your low time. Today we are going to talk about three of brutal truths why you're failing at SEO. So I'll start first. Number one simple, this one's very simple. Oh my God, you're not patient. So you're going to say that. Yeah. This is like the most dust statement out there because most people I remember when I was working full-time at a company. And they're like, what are the results? Like checking in on me weekly. What are the results? What are the results? This is not paid media. Like this stuff takes time. And most people just aren't willing to wait for this stuff because we've talked about the time to value on this podcast before. The time to value with SEO could be 6 months. Could be 12 months. Could be 24 months. Could be even longer than that, right? And people don't want to put resources into something where they're not seeing the ROI. But if you actually understand SEO, you're going to have to unfair advantage over other people because you actually understand how it works. So patience is number one. Number two, you think about SEO and just one region. And what I mean by that is not just the United States. You're not just UK, specifically any region that is English. And that's what most people do, or they focus on any region that is Portuguese because they may speak Portuguese and have a Portuguese business to do well in marketing and SEO specifically, yet I think global businesses aren't a U.S. company or UK company, Australia company or Chinese company, their global companies. You need to focus on global SEO. If you don't, you're going to have a hard time doing well, you're going to cap out on traffic. You're going to have competitors eventually copying you or you're going to be copying them. You've got to go global. It's a quickest way to generate a lot of traffic and generate sales in all the regions out there and you need to start doing that from day one. Number three, SEO is not no one size fits all strategy. So even though Neil and I might say, hey, the top two things that matter are content and links, yes, content, and links are very important. But what are you optimizing for exactly? Are you optimizing for local if you're doing local it's a different game? Are you doing App Store optimization on Apple? That's a different game. Are you doing mobile? Okay, a lot of this stuff is different, right? It depends. Are you optimizing for Amazon as well? So you have to understand the nuances of what channel you're hitting because there's so many different ways to do it. And there's different kind of strategies and tactics for each of these different. I don't want to call them channels, but different areas that

Eric United States Google UK Australia Neil Apple Amazon
A highlight from Are Streaming Games A New Advertising Gate? -- Anna McMichael // Partnership Director

MarTech Podcast

08:05 min | Last week

A highlight from Are Streaming Games A New Advertising Gate? -- Anna McMichael // Partnership Director

"Welcome to the martech podcast. Today we're going to talk about advertising mechanics across new media channels. But before we get to today's interview, we're going to kick off the show with a marketing minute, where we invite a friend of the martech podcast to help us answer listener questions in 60 seconds or less. Here for today's marketing minute is John chance, who's the founder and president at duct tape marketing consultant and he's also the host of the duct tape marketing podcast. Where John interviews authors, experts and thought leaders who share business and marketing tips, tactics and resources for small businesses. And the duct tape marketing podcast is also a fellow member of the HubSpot podcast network. And John has been kind enough to answer a question from G two meta, who is the director of Marta and client success at intelligence bank and G two asks what automations have organizations implemented in their middle and back office teams to better serve their end users. All right, here's John's answer. You know, automation can be a great way to create a better backend office experience and serve your customers your end users better. Obviously, the most basic things like a CRM, like a help desk. Those kinds of tools certainly make the communication make the record keeping of communicating even easier. But I find that one of the best tools to automate is to also create a hub so that your project management, your help desk, your CRM, or all talking through a hub, the hub that we use that I find is really powerful for this is slack. Slack keeps us out of email so that we're not firing back and forth as we try to serve clients, but it also has so many integrations now that allow us to keep conversations separate and keep everybody on the same page, really for as much time as we need, we can keep those threads going. Thanks, John. If you're interested in hearing more of John Gantz on the duct tape marketing podcast or any of the other great hosts from the HubSpot podcast network, you can go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. All right, on with today's interview. Joining us is Anna mcmichaels, who is the partnership's director at vlog box, which is a global video content distribution and monetization company delivering precisely targeted video ads to OTT and CTV audiences and bringing monetization yields to content creators, striving to perfect their suite of content distribution services, vlog boxes, video, monetization platform covers hosting and coding and the streaming of video content combined with a custom app development for their clients and above all efficient ad monetization. So far this week Anna and I have talked about how the OTT industry is surviving the cookie less era. And yesterday we talked about which publishers are winning in the OTT competition. Today we're going to wrap up our conversation talking about whether streaming games are the new advertising gait. But before we hear from today's guest, I'd like to take a moment to thank blue shift for sponsoring this interview. We all know that marketing and the technology that supports it is rapidly evolving. Last year it was GDPR. This year it's third party cookies, and who knows how the landscape is going to change next year. The fact is, traditional marketing platforms are struggling to keep pace with the needs of today's marketers because they're built to focus on channel execution and not a 360° view of customer behaviors. And that's why you need blue shifts, smart hubs, CDP. You see blue shift both improves customer engagement and drives meaningful results by unifying your customers data so you can deliver relevant and personalized omnichannel experiences to the prospects and customers that matter the most. So if you're ready to drive better customer engagement increased loyalty, our friends at blue shift have created a guide to successful CDP RFPs that will help you make the right martech decision for your business. To download blue shifts, CDP RFP guide go to blue shift dot com slash Marta that's BLUE SHI FT dot com slash martech. Blue shift, omnichannel marketing for data driven marketers. All right, here's the last part of my conversation with Anna mcmichaels, the partnership director of vlog box. And welcome back to the mar tech podcast. At Benjamin, nice to talk to you again. Pleasure to have you back on the show and wrap up our conversation here. So far this week we talked about how the OTT and CTV industry is able to survive the cookie less era because there's so much granular contextual targeting. People could target specific channels specific shows, and that there is this sort of phenomenon of publishers moving from being creators on things like YouTube into CTV and there's a sense of acquisition possibilities that we're seeing, the creators really get gobbled up by larger competitions. And so that's why they're winning in this space. We talked about my favorite creator blippy, who my kids love, getting acquired by moon bug for, you know, a $100 million or something ridiculous like that. There's also a new phenomenon happening in this OTT space, which is advertising and streaming games talk to me a little bit about what's happening in the streaming game space. So I guess number one news right now that Netflix is about to launch their first game that has already planned to be impaired in their platform. So that's kind of a big thing because I've been reading a lot about this and I had a feeling that Netflix really don't see their competitor of other streaming services, but they're looking at some of the companies that they have higher user engagement. And it's not necessarily entertainment. It's mostly gaming. Like it was just look at a couple of those big CTV platforms. So Amazon and Apple TV, they have about 1722% of game in apps. Out of all of the apps that they have 1722% is gaming. So I think it tell us something. And then Roku, they have 2% gaming apps, but the second place of usage for Roku is actually gaming. So it's highly engaging content. It's highly engaging and entertaining product that people in and towards do. And since it's very popular, it's highly engaging, of course, it's open a huge gate for advertisers to use. Okay, so there's a new opportunity, but there's also large new players coming into this space. You know, I don't think advertising in games is necessarily a new phenomenon, is it? It's not, but specifically on CTV, it's a little bit different because they have highly engaged and kind of like easy games to play because you played it on the remote. Okay, so basically what we're talking about here is the idea of playing essentially iTunes games on the larger TV. So the apple has their arcade, you're playing with the remote, you're not playing like on a PS3. It's a different type of fidelity in a different type of experience. So talk to me about why Netflix is getting into this space. And what's the opportunity for advertisers to take advantage? So speaking of opportunities, generally across the board, really gaming, tend to be more ad supported. So that's always been there. So I think that's why it's really placed for advertising. And then when it comes to the TV, and we're talking about ads on TV, those ask going to have better placements and really high quality. So it will look a lot better on the bigger screen. So it seems like this is a departure from Netflix's normal business model, which is they're a SaaS model. You're paying a reoccurring fee a monthly fee to be able to get access to the content Netflix generally hasn't put advertising in any of their content. Why are they doing it in the gaming space? I think the reason why they do it in a game in space is because they made a huge shift with a House of Cards that was like their biggest shift of the company of their content strategy. And this is just the second step for them to be different to be first. We can provide

Anna Mcmichaels CTV John Chance OTT John Intelligence Bank John Gantz Vlog Box Marta Netflix Meta Roku Anna Benjamin Youtube Apple Amazon
A highlight from #411: A Day-by-Day Sneak Peek Into My Work Week

Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

00:54 sec | Last week

A highlight from #411: A Day-by-Day Sneak Peek Into My Work Week

"Well, hey there, it's been a while since I've invited you into my day to today life. And so I thought it was high time we do that again. Because things have changed in a big way and things look a lot different than they did in my life in my business, even just like three years ago. And what I want you to think about throughout this episode is how much has changed for you in the course of your life, both professionally and personally, but more importantly, in just the last few years because it's an important way to take note of how you're moving forward. So in today's episode, I'm going to pop in for a short mourning and evening recap throughout the entire week. And I'm going to be personal. I'm going to share some lessons I've learned along the way, some tips that have helped me. Honestly, just like the good bad and ugly of the entire week. So buckle up and let's kick

A highlight from 7 Critical Marketing Roles For 2022 #1925

Marketing School

04:11 min | Last week

A highlight from 7 Critical Marketing Roles For 2022 #1925

"It, find it, check it out, and it's a great way to improve your low time. Today we are going to talk about 7 critical marketing roles for 2022. So Neil, what is number one? Number one is you need to have someone who is a data scientist with ads increasing in cost, marketing taking longer to get, you need someone who can give you data on things like LTV because you have to optimize for the long game, optimizing for the short game and marketing doesn't work as well as it used to two, three years ago. Even a year or two ago, especially after COVID, prices for advertising just skyrocketed. So you need a data scientist person to just really help you optimize for your long game. And to do that, you need to know your numbers really well because the last thing you want to do is make marketing decisions off bad data. All right, number two, blog content repurpose. So if you're trying to drive more SEO traffic and if you're let's say content on this podcast or you're creating content on YouTube, that's fine, but can you go out there and go to a site like pro blogger net, go to their job board and hire a great blog writer that can help you create 1500 to 2000 word blog posts. And then you can start to drive some SEO traffic, depending on what you're talking about. The content's got to be pretty good though, but it does end up working out for the long term and blog content repurposing is becoming more and more of a full-time role. Number three, international translation. So you need to start hiring people who focus in different regions. One of the best ways to grow your traffic is internationally. Majority of the people in this world do not speak English as the most competitive in English. Folks on some of the other languages, even if the GDP is not as high in some of those regions, there's tons of money to be made. Number four, community manager. So community management, I really recommend reading the book by David spinks. It's called the business of belonging. And he actually helps run a company called bevy. He's actually VP of community over there. But the whole idea around community management, it's basically how I see social media as a role in 2010. Community is going to be a mechanism for driving engagement, driving more customer acquisition and driving more retention. So there's going to be a lot packed in there and probably more. So community management is going to be huge. And I think we're going to see a big influx of chief community officers long-term. Number 5, creativity. So if your marketers aren't creative, you're not going to do as well, you need to hire at least one marketer who's super creative and think outside of the box. The reason for this is, a lot of the numbers may not make sense on add estimations, how long it takes to get SEO results and what I mean at estimation I'm talking about cost. So you want someone who can think outside the box to help you generate that ROI and get either results faster because the status quo is not acceptable. All right, number 6, last one from my side is content creator. So I really recommend going to type in VaynerMedia, content creator, job description, and you will find a job description where they go very broad with the content creators are looking for. So what that really means is are you good at maybe snap? Are you good at TikTok? Are you good at YouTube? Are you good at Twitter? Are you good at Instagram? Because what happens is you can't expect one social media person to be good at everything natively. You're really looking for specialists at this point, right? So what they're doing is they're just saying, hey look, if you're good at one of these channels or if you're good at a channel that we don't know about, reach out to us, show us your work, okay? And then we'll think about hiring you and maybe it's going to be like a three month test, and then maybe we'll hire you full time after that. So there's a lot of people that are really good at these channels. And I think the new way of doing this again is looking for specialists. Last but not least, number 7, conversion optimization, even though it's not a sexy topic. And we know this because every time we create podcasts around conversion optimization or blog post, they don't do as well from a view count perspective. It's important with rising costs. You got to optimize for conversions. Make sure you have that in your arsenal or within your team. All right, if you want more stuff around growing your marketing or growing your business starting or growing your business, we got some secrets for you, marking school, the IO slash training. It's a free training for you and we'll catch you later. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school.

David Spinks LTV Neil Youtube Instagram Twitter
A highlight from Which Publishers Are Winning The OTT Competition -- Anna McMichael // Partnership Director

MarTech Podcast

08:09 min | Last week

A highlight from Which Publishers Are Winning The OTT Competition -- Anna McMichael // Partnership Director

"Going to talk about advertising mechanics across new media channels. But before we get to today's interview, we're going to kick off the show with a marketing minute, where we invite a friend of the martech podcast to help us answer listener questions in 60 seconds or less. Here for today's marketing minute is John chance, who's the founder and president at duct tape marketing consultant and he's also the host of the duct tape marketing podcast. Where John interviews authors, experts and thought leaders who share business and marketing tips, tactics and resources for small businesses. And the duct tape marketing podcast is also a fellow member of the HubSpot podcast network. And John has been kind enough to answer a question from G two meta, who is the director of Marta and client success at intelligence bank and G two asks what automations have organizations implemented in their middle and back office teams to better serve their end users. All right, here's John's answer. You know, automation can be a great way to create a better backend office experience and serve your customers your end users better. Obviously, the most basic things like a CRM, like a help desk. Those kinds of tools certainly make the communication make the record keeping of communicating even easier. But I find that one of the best tools to automate is to also create a hub so that your project management, your help desk, your CRM, or all talking through a hub, the hub that we use that I find is really powerful for this is slack. Slack keeps us out of email so that we're not firing back and forth as we try to serve clients, but it also has so many integrations now that allow us to keep conversations separate and keep everybody on the same page, really for as much time as we need, we can keep those threads going. Thanks, John. If you're interested in hearing more of John Gantz on the duct tape marketing podcast or any of the other great hosts from the HubSpot podcast network, you can go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. All right, on with today's interview. Joining us is Anna mcmichaels, who is the partnership's director at vlog box, which is a global video content distribution and monetization company delivering precisely targeted video ads to OTT and CTV audiences and bringing monetization yields to content creators, striving to perfect their suite of content distribution services, vlog boxes, video, monetization platform covers hosting and coding and the streaming of video content combined with a custom app development for their clients and above all efficient ad monetization. Yesterday, Anna and I talked about how the OTT and CTV industries are surviving in the cookie less era. And today we're going to continue the conversation talking about which publishers are winning the OTT competition. But before we hear from today's guest, I'd like to take a moment to thank blue shift for sponsoring this interview. We all know that marketing and the technology that supports it is rapidly evolving. Last year it was GDPR. This year its third party cookies, and who knows how the landscape is going to change next year. The fact is, traditional marketing platforms are struggling to keep pace with the needs of today's marketers because they're built to focus on channel execution and not a 360° view of customer behaviors. And that's why you need blue shifts, smart hub CDP. You see blue shift both improves customer engagement and drives meaningful results by unifying your customers data so you can deliver relevant and personalized omnichannel experiences to the prospects and customers that matter the most. So if you're ready to drive better customer engagement and increased loyalty, our friends at blueshift have created a guide to successful CDP RFPs that will help you make the right martech decision for your business. To download blue shifts, CDP RFP guide could a blue shift dot com slash martech that's BLUE SHI FT dot com slash martech. Blue shift, omnichannel marketing for data driven marketers. All right, here's the second part of my conversation with Anna mcmichael, the partnership's director at vlog box. And I welcome back to the mar tech podcast. Thank you. Excited to have you back and to continue our conversation. For anybody that didn't listen yesterday, Anna and I started off talking about what is happening in terms of targeting in the video advertising space, the OTT and CTV spaces, and my takeaway from that conversation is the video advertising industry, which is kind of replicating what has been done in traditional TV advertising might actually not be as impacted by the decrease in third party cookies because there is so much granular contextual targeting, really what I'm saying is you don't just have to follow your consumers around every show. They're watching. You could actually get really granular by targeting people based on what channels they're watching and specifically what shows their interested in. So even though we're not retargeting consumers, you could still reach very targeted consumers with this methodology. That said, Anna, I want to talk to you a little bit about an update in what's actually happening in OTT today. You know, who's winning the OTT competition? What are some of the brands publishers and media partners that are really taking advantage of this space? Yeah, I think there is really, really many players who are trying to get into the space and when I talk about this, the first thing to come to mind is a lot of YouTubers that essentially has a lot of media inventory and they just approach into CTV space. And a lot of them already have their content and on svod model or avod and they really take advantage of the space. So I would say it really, the publishers who are winning this game is those who understand that CTV and OTT is truly a new ecosystem for them. And the ecosystem has so many opportunities for growth and is still going to be growing and evolving with ecommerce implementation and things like that. So really companies who understand that it's time to consider and have their content and promote their content on CTV is definitely going to win that game. And are you familiar with the video star blippy? Of course. Okay. You say, of course, I've had children for 5 years. Blippy was new to me. Everything that I had heard was keep your kids off YouTube because if they're watching YouTube, you're always like three clicks away from Hitler. Yeah. You could be watching a video with Elmo, and then there's all sorts of content that is not healthy for children. And so we downloaded the YouTube kids app in the first video that came up was blippy and for anybody that doesn't have kids blippy is an X military officer. I think he was in the army or the navy turned kids video star. He walks around with orange suspenders a blue shirt and an orange hat and big glasses, and he tores all sorts of kids events and parks and things that kids are interested in. And he's just a goofy kind of wild guy. And my first reaction, nothing personal blip. Was this guy? Looks like the modern day peewee Herman. Moral of the story, I have learned that blippy is harmless and wonderfully entertaining for children and we found blippy on YouTube, but now we know that blippy is on Amazon and all sorts of other streaming channels. So is this the model that you're talking about where there are the creator communities on the youtubes of the world or whatever channels are sort of digitally native, starting to move towards a more traditional television model? That was actually who I was talking about. And blip is a perfect example because you're right. A lot of kids content is definitely a three clicks away from Hitler and personally from my kids, when I give him a YouTube, I really don't want to do that because it's the phone. He can click to different shows and who knows what he's watching in another three minutes where on the TV, you can kind of regulate it and has better quality. It's on the big screen. And that's definitely, I think it's better experience and I see a lot of kids

Vlog Box CTV John Chance John Intelligence Bank John Gantz Anna Mcmichaels OTT Ctv Industries Anna Anna Mcmichael Marta Meta Youtube Blippy Hitler Navy Herman Army Amazon
A highlight from Should You Aim For An Exit? #1924

Marketing School

03:11 min | Last week

A highlight from Should You Aim For An Exit? #1924

"It, find it, check it out, and it's a great way to improve your low time. Today we are going to talk about if you should aim for an exit. So in this context, an exit means a business exit means selling your business, right? So Neil and I want to talk about different ways to think about this because a lot of people that we end up talking to, they keep focusing on that exit, right? So the question is, if that's even a worthy goal of aiming for. So Neil, what do you think? I look at exits as it's too hard to plan a sale if your business is doing really, really well and you're growing fast and your economics are there. Sure, you can do it, but that's not most of us just being quite Frank. And when you're starting a business to starting from scratch, it's tough to plan for exit. But you know it's not tough to plan for creating amazing product or amazing service, building amazing business, Harry and great people. You know, focusing on marketing and sales. I believe if you focus on the business fundamentals, you'll eventually be led down a pathway you can get an exit. But on the flip side, if you focus your energy on the exit instead of building a business, a lot of times, things just don't happen. You end up taking your eye off the ball and things don't work out the way you want. Yeah, I think it was Mark Cuban that said something about planning for an exit is basically a pair of phrasing here. It's kind of planning to fail because you're not really thinking about the long-term. And there's constantly that exit goal in mind. And if you give that goal to everyone on your team, it's also not very motivating because also what's in it for them. And we're building for an exit. What are we building for at the end of the day, right? So you should definitely structure and build your company for an exit because what that means is building a great company culture, having a strong management team, planning out quarterly or annual goals. That type of stuff matters. So building that type of foundation matters. But if you're able to do that someone might come hit you up and they'll give you some crazy number and maybe you take it at the end of the day. But I think look if your eyes on the price for the long game, it's a much better thing. It's much more inspiring for people to play for. And if you look at the Warren Buffett's or the Charlie Munger's of the world, largely, if it's a good business, they're buying and holding, right? And so they've held these candies for the longest time. They've held Geico for the longest time. They'll cook for the longest time. They're not necessarily trying to exit these companies unless it's an industry that's falling down like newspapers. They sold out of newspapers, right? So it's a good thing to look at the top entrepreneurs out there to top investors that are out there and look at how they're thinking about things. But overall what ends up working, what I believe is you're going to get the best outcomes at the tail end, which is way out there. And so it's better off, you're better off building for the long term. Yeah, and as long as you follow that, you'll be fine. Don't worry about it exit. Again, as Eric and I mentioned, it's too hard to plan for, but don't take our word, take Mark Cuban's word. And generally speaking, just go out there and build amazing business. Most people who have sold their company for millions of dollars, like hundreds of millions of dollars, if not billions of dollars, they didn't plan for exit, they just solved the problem and tried to build a really amazing company. That's the key. Solve people's problem as efficiently as possible. And ideally as cheap as possible as well. All right,

Neil Mark Cuban Frank Harry Charlie Munger Warren Buffett Geico Eric
A highlight from How To survive A Cookieless Era? -- Anna McMichael // Partnership Director

MarTech Podcast

07:12 min | Last week

A highlight from How To survive A Cookieless Era? -- Anna McMichael // Partnership Director

"The mar tech podcast is a proud member of the HubSpot podcast network to find great business podcasts like this one, visit HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. From advertising to software as a service, to data. Across all of our programs and clients, we've seen a 55 to 65% open rate. Getting brands authentically integrated into content performs better than TV advertising. Typical lifespan of an article is about 24 to 36 hours. We're reaching out to the right person. With the right message and a clear call to action, that it's just a matter of timing. Welcome to the martech podcast, a Ben Jeff LLC production. In this podcast, you'll hear the stories of world class marketers that use technology to drive business results and achieve career success. Will on earth, the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks, they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the martech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to the martech podcast. Today we're going to talk about advertising mechanics across new media channels. But before we get to today's interview, we're going to kick off the show with a marketing minute, where we invite a friend of the martech podcast to help us answer listener questions in 60 seconds or less. Here for today's marketing minute is John chance who's the founder and president at duct tape marketing consultant and he's also the host of the duct tape marketing podcast. Where John interviews authors experts and thought leaders who share business and marketing tips, tactics and resources for small businesses. And the duct tape marketing podcast is also a fellow member of the HubSpot podcast network. And John has been kind enough to answer a question from G two meta, who is the director of Marta and client success at intelligence bank. And G two asks what automations have organizations implemented in their middle and back office teams to better serve their end users. All right, here's John's answer. You know, automation can be a great way to create a better backend office experience and serve your customers, your end users better. Obviously, the most basic things like a CRM, like a help desk. Those kinds of tools certainly make the communication make the record keeping of communicating even easier. But I find that one of the best tools to automate is to also create a hub so that your project management, your help desk, your CRM, or all talking through a hub, the hub that we use that I find is really powerful for this is slack. Slack keeps us out of email so that we're not firing back and forth as we try to serve clients, but it also has so many integrations now that allow us to keep conversations separate and keep everybody on the same page, really for as much time as we need, we can keep those threads going. Thanks, John. If you're interested in hearing more of John Gantz on the duct tape marketing podcast or any of the other great hosts from the HubSpot podcast network, you can go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. All right, on with today's interview. Joining us is Anna mcmichaels, who is the partnership's director at vlog box, which is a global video content distribution and monetization company delivering precisely targeted video ads to OTT and CTV audiences and bringing monetization yields to content creators, striving to perfect their suite of content distribution services, vlog boxes, video, monetization platform covers hosting and coding and the streaming of video content combined with a custom app development for their clients and above all efficient ad monetization. And today, Anna and I are going to discuss how to survive in the cookie less era. But before we hear from today's guest, I'd like to take a moment to thank blue shift for sponsoring this interview. We all know that marketing and the technology that supports it is rapidly evolving. Last year it was GDPR. This year its third party cookies and who knows how the landscape is going to change next year. The fact is, traditional marketing platforms are struggling to keep pace with the needs of today's marketers because they're built to focus on channel execution and not a 360° view of customer behaviors. And that's why you need blue shifts, smart hub CDP. You see blue shift both improves customer engagement and drives meaningful results by unifying your customer's data so you can deliver relevant and personalized omnichannel experiences to the prospects and customers that matter the most. So if you're ready to drive better customer engagement increased loyalty, our friends at blueshift have created a guide to successful CDP RFPs that will help you make the right martech decision for your business. To download blue shifts, CDP RFP guide go to blue shift dot com slash martel that's BLUE, SHI FT dot com slash Marta. Blue shift, omnichannel marketing for data driven marketers. All right, here's the first part of my conversation with Anna mcmichael, the partnerships director at vlog box. And I'll welcome to the mar tech podcast. Hi Benjamin. Thank you so much for having me. I'm excited to have you as my guest excited to talk about what is a growing channel in not only advertising, but really in the way that we consume content. You're on the forefront of the video, CTV OTT, all sorts of different ways to talk about how we consume media and content. Let's start off with kind of a broad advertising question in general, not just with our Facebook or Google or display ads. We're seeing the sort of demise of cookie and tracking affect all media channels was the impact of going cookie list having the video space. This is something that everyone is a little bit concerned about and thinking there are ways, you know, workarounds. And as far as everyone knows, so by 2022, we're no longer going to be supporting third party cookies. So that's put us into the situation where we really have to think about how publishers are going to be moving forward. When it comes to advertising, it has a lot of huddles. I put it that way. So we really need to put I'd say more effort into the quality and targeting and how we can scale it and really focus on the basic aspects of buying and selling inventory. So really, we are at the point where we're really close to 2022 and this is something that we really have to think about. What are we going to do with forward? Not only in CTV space, but specifically in whole digital space. Yeah, I mean, it seems like the value of first party data must be skyrocketing because the distribution of third party data is essentially, I don't know if it's getting completely destroyed, but obviously it's going to be harder to find data sources without cookies. Talk to me about the use of the third party data how important

John Ben Jeff Llc Benjamin Shapiro Vlog Box Intelligence Bank John Gantz Hubspot Anna Mcmichaels CTV Marta Meta Anna Mcmichael Hi Benjamin Anna Facebook Google
A highlight from Searching For Privacy Online With Mozillas CMO, Lindsey Shepard

AdExchanger Talks

02:40 min | Last week

A highlight from Searching For Privacy Online With Mozillas CMO, Lindsey Shepard

"Show. Although Google's planned phase out of third party cookies in chrome now set for late 2023, has driven the ad industry into a veritable frenzy. The fact is, third party cookies are already long dead on safari and on Firefox. Firefox has blocked all third party tracking cookies by default since 2019 through its enhanced tracking protection technology. It's technologies like ETP and the focus on privacy preserving tech at Mozilla, the maker of Firefox that attracted Lindsay shepherd, or Shep, as she's known to most, over to Mozilla in 2019 from Facebook, where she's now the chief marketing officer. Mozilla makes its revenue from advertising, but it's on a mission to strike a balance between building privacy focused solutions and supporting the business of online advertising. Hey chef. Welcome to the podcast. Hey, Alison, thank you. So I have a totally random question to start us off. If you could have any superpower, what would it be and why? And I asked because I had this silly thought when I was preparing. I'm like, oh, maybe it's the power of invisibility online. Oh man, superpowers and it depends on what's going on in my life that day. I think this week, I would love the ability to seamlessly communicate with teenagers. I think that would be interesting to speak that language right now. I think the superpower that I do have is not helpful. I have this ability to remember every song lyric of every song I've ever heard and sometimes I wish I could sort of exercise some of that from my brain so I could remember things like my husband's phone number, but maybe if it was a song, maybe if you saying. That's a good pro tip. Like it. It's I feel like my superpower, I would love is to be able to speak any language and understand any language in the entire world like to have a babble fish that you can put in your ear. But for that to just be my brain and have everything come out in the right accent because I'm very good with English. That's pretty much all I got. Yeah. That's kind of where I was going to be on the speak to my teenagers in a way that made sense with the right accent the rate slang all around the same cage. So I'd love to talk about your background for a bit because you've been at Mozilla for nearly three years, but your job before that was

Mozilla Lindsay Shepherd Shep Google Alison Facebook
A highlight from #410: What Happens When A Launch Doesnt Go As Planned

Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

05:23 min | Last week

A highlight from #410: What Happens When A Launch Doesnt Go As Planned

"The online marketing made easy podcast. Today we are doing a shorty episode, and we're specifically talking about what happens when a launch isn't going as planned. Like during the actual launch. And how do you keep it together? And what do you do during that time? And two things. It's been a long time since I've had a launch that didn't do well. Until March of 2021, so this year I had a launch where I was not hitting my goals and I didn't hit my goals. And we'll talk about that. I've talked about it a little on the podcast, but we'll get into that in a minute. But the reason why I wanted to talk to you about that is because I have, I don't know what else to call it. I'm going to call it a character trait. This is just it's a way my mind thinks that does not serve me. And it's something that I absolutely want to change. I was just on a walk with hobie this morning and I told him babe. This is a part of my personality that I want to change drastically. And I'm on a mission to do so. But I'm recording this episode at a time where I haven't changed it, but I'm going to start talking about it. And as I change it, and as it starts to serve me to change this, I'll talk about that as well. So what the heck am I talking about? I have an all or nothing mentality. I have had it since I was really young. And sure, it might help me in some ways. And I'm not going to focus on the ways that it can help me. I'm very clear how it does not serve me. So in all or nothing mentality, how it does not serve me is that I can quickly look at how something is going wrong or not working and in my head kind of freak out and think, oh my gosh, I'm not doing this right. I'm not going to hit my goal. This isn't going to work out. The minute I see it not working, I can quickly jump in that direction, go on the dark side. And also, so it doesn't serve me well things aren't working out as planned, but it also doesn't serve me to actually get started. So here's the point that I wanted to make or the story I wanted to tell in order to make the point. So I decided to do this thing called 29 29. I don't even know if that's the right way to say it. And it's this climb that you do. And if you climb this mountain 17 times, you will have climbed Everest. And you have something like 36 hours to do it. I actually talked about it on the podcast over a year ago. Hobie and I signed up for it. It was expensive, so we put down some cold hard cash to do it. And Amy and stew McLaren are dear Friends were doing it with us. So the four of us were going to do it. And hobie and I started training for it. I kind of hated the training for it. It was like we would go on these long walks up tons of hills for like three hours at a time. I'm like, I don't even enjoy this. But I said I was going to do it. And then COVID hit. And they contacted us let us know the climbs have been canceled this year. You can postpone till next year or get most of your money back. And my first thought was, oh, I'm getting most of my money back. I didn't even care that they weren't going to give it all back because in my mind, I thought, I don't think I can make 17 climbs. I don't think I could actually do this. And so I don't want to be a failure. So this is my way out. I'm embarrassed that I'm telling you this, but I'm telling you. So I was like, oh, I'm out. So I told her, I'm like, you cool, if we get out of this, COVID, they're giving us our money back. He's like, yeah, let's do it. I don't even like the training for it. So we got out of it. So I call up stew and Amy and I was like, oh my God are you guys so excited? Canceled. And they're like, no, we postpone till next year. I'm like, what? They're like, you postponed, right? No. I was so excited to get out of it. I've been so nervous about this climb. I don't think I can make 17. This I got in over my head. This is too much, I can't do it. And they just laughed at me. Well, fast forward a year later, and Amy and stew if you follow them to McLaren is the creator of tribe in the membership program. They did it this weekend. And I was texting them, like, nonstop, because I was really excited for them. And Amy, Sue's wife went into it like, I'm gonna do my very best. I wanna hit 17 climbs, but even if I don't, I'm gonna show it for the experience. It's gonna be fun. There's live music. There's tons of people. It's just an experience you can never get anywhere else. I'm just gonna show up for that. And Stu's like, yeah, my goal is to hit 17 for sure, but let's just see what we can do. And I watched them before they even went on the climb and I thought I want that mentality. I want the mentality of I'm just going to do my best. I'm going to train. I'm going to do what I can. I'm not going to obsess over it. I'm not going to make this mean something that it doesn't need to mean. That's another thing. How many times do we don't accomplish something? And we make it mean something that it doesn't need to mean, right? And so anyway, fast forward in both of them hit the climb 17. They did it. They absolutely did it. They said it was the hardest thing they've ever done. Amy mentioned that she cried a few times, which I absolutely would cry a few times, but they did it. And they both said, hardest thing they've ever done.

Hobie Stew Mclaren AMY Mclaren SUE STU
A highlight from 78. Holidays Without Hustle

Purposeful Social Selling

02:48 min | Last week

A highlight from 78. Holidays Without Hustle

"Let me show you the new way. Hey bosses, welcome to another week of the podcast. This week, it is Thanksgiving week here in the U.S.. This is my favorite holiday. I think it's because it's the holiday with the least amount of hustle and bustle and preparation you don't need to do the gifts or the parties or the company parties or there's just less stress around Thanksgiving. I mean, the most stress you're feeling is if you're traveling, goodness, we did that for a couple of things giving and, you know, I told my husband, I was like, I never want to fly around. Thanksgiving ever again. So if you're flying, my hats off to you, but for me, the most stress I want to feel around, you know, Thanksgiving is choosing between apple pie and pumpkin pie, to be honest with you. So I am just so excited to be celebrating that with my family. Something I'm super grateful for personally is that just my parents just moved locally to me within 30 minute driving distance, which I have been waiting almost a decade for and we are just so delighted to have a set of grandparents in town where my kids get to see my parents. I'm just, I get teary eyed just thinking about it. They actually just got here. So we're going to be celebrating our first Thanksgiving with my parents living locally to us. How amazing is that? I'm so thankful. And if you were not in the U.S. and you were an international listener and you're not celebrating Thanksgiving, I just want to give a special shout out to our international listeners. Thank you for tuning in week after week and sharing. We have a great number of international listeners and I just want to give an extra special word of thanks to you for tuning in week after week. And then I'd also love to say a huge thank you to you, the listener. Thank you so much for tuning in week after week. Thank you for the reviews. Thank you for sharing with your teammates, your upline, your Friends. I think we also have a bunch of people that just aren't in social sign and they love coming to this podcast and just learning about a different approach to just entrepreneurship because there is so many similarities. There's a lot of common threads between social selling and other online businesses and I feel so grateful that I get to come on this podcast week after week and serve you and give you encouragement and give you tangible things to take in your day to today life. And in your business. So thank you for that. Thank you for making this podcast. So wonderful. Thank you for being just a great, great audience. I really am so blessed that I get to speak to you week after week. So thank you again. So I, for this episode, it's gonna be kind of casual. I really want to talk about how to hustle proof your holidays.

U.S. Apple
A highlight from 286: Google Ads Q&A With Some Awesome Questions

The Paid Search Podcast

03:09 min | Last week

A highlight from 286: Google Ads Q&A With Some Awesome Questions

"Hey everyone, yes, welcome back to the paid search podcast. My name is Jason rothman, as always, I'm joined by the great Chris schaefer, Chris. How's he going today? I am well. I am well, Jason, you look, you look great. You look rested. Ready to dispense with a phenomenal amount of wealth and value on the show and we have some questions to go through. And I think as people will see in these questions, it's proof that this is phenomenally good advice because almost every one of them praise us extensively, which is really a requirement to get on the show. But it helps. It helps. Yeah. It does it does help. So, yeah, I know, I know you don't need it. When you're the number one Google ads manager in the world why do you need praise? Yeah, never hurt so. So Chris, yeah, we got some interesting questions people change it around their bids, people having problems with high cost per click industries, people thinking about those other search terms that they could no longer see and wondering what they can do about it. So a lot of interesting things we're going to be looking at here today. And if you have a question, paid search podcast dot com, go to the contact page and send in your question, and then when we do one of these Q&A episodes every few weeks, we will try to answer it. And at the very top of the show, we're even going to get into probably a pretty heated topic. We're going to talk about manual bid versus automated bid, which is really nowadays it's on the top of everybody's mind. You can't run a campaign on Google ads nowadays without a notification or recommendation popping up somewhere saying, hey, don't you want to try automate it? Or don't you want to try this or that? So we're going to talk about that, which is really important stuff. But first, I want to remind our listeners that if you are not using optio you're missing out on an amazing tool that can help you get more done in Google ads. There's always a disconnect between the data that you're getting in Google ads. And either your understanding of what that data means or even your way of communicating that data to your boss or to your client. And that's really important. And optio does both of those things. The way that it communicates data from Google ads to you is that it provides you with a dashboard of results that you can see. And respond to and make changes in this dashboard. Wonderful. Speeds things up phenomenally. And the number two, it helps you to communicate that with a wonderful reporting system or even just taking a screenshot of what you see in showing that because this is an interface that goes beyond what you just see in Google ads. So it's a whole nother layer of data that's redistributed and reorganized in ways that can really help you see things in

Jason Rothman Chris Schaefer Google Chris Jason
A highlight from How to Write High-Ranking Headlines #1923

Marketing School

06:28 min | Last week

A highlight from How to Write High-Ranking Headlines #1923

"Welcome to marketing school, the only podcast that provides daily top level marketing tips and strategies from entrepreneurs that practice what they preach and live what they teach. Let's start leveling up your marketing knowledge with your instructors, Neil Patel and Eric Sue. All right guys, before we start, we got a special message from our sponsor. If you want to rank higher on Google, you got to look at your page speed time. The faster your website loads, the better off you are. With Google's core vital update that makes it super, super important to optimize your site for low time. And one easy way to do it is use the host that Eric and I use dream host to just go to dream host or Google it, find it, check it out, and it's a great way to improve your low time. Today we are going to talk about how to write high ranking headlines. But first, Neil, what do we mean by high ranking headlines? So when you try to rank on Google, you got your title. And your title a lot of times is a headline of the page. Your title tech. Underneath your title whenever you do a search on Google, you'll see the title and then you see a description. That's a meta description. So how do you write high ranking titles or headlines, whatever you want to end up calling them? And the Tula wanted to end up discussing this will be more of an interview format will be click flow. So Eric has a tool, which we've discussed many times in past episodes. And his tool just helps you quote unquote high ranking headlines. Because here's the thing. Forget back links for on page SC and all those factors for a minute. If everyone does a Google search for a keyword, such as cars, and they click on the number two listing and then set it to number one listing. What does that tell Google? It tells Google that, hey, everyone finds number two more relevant than number one. So maybe you should actually put number two number one and put number two number or put number one number two. In other words, flip the results. So if you're number two or number 6 or number 7 or even on page three or four, and if you're starting to get more clicks than other people in a better click through rate, Google eventually starts pushing you up. So even if you don't have more back lanes or the best on page SEO, compared to some people, if you have high click through headlines or titles, you start increasing and ranking. So Eric, you have a lot of stats and data on this. Do you want to just start rattling off what people can do with the headlines to increase click through? Because I know you guys did a study with Brian dean, a long time ago. Yeah, so a couple of things, let me think about this real quick. So when we think about one of the biggest things that this is obvious, but if you want a 50 to a 100% increase in your click through rate, sometimes it's just adding the year. So sometimes it's maybe you might not have the year. And so you might be talking about the top marketing trends. That's a key word that we were ranked for. So every single year we update it before just marking trends without the year. And then once we started adding the year to click the rate shot up 50%. And then it's just obvious every single year that we need to be updating it. So that's one of the things that you could be doing from a headline perspective. So the other thing is that we're able to do is you're able to actually test your headlines. So what I mean by that is I highly recommend looking at the Serbs and testing yourself because we can say a bunch of we can write off a bunch of stats over here. But if you're actually not looking at the serves and looking at people that are maybe ranking higher than you and seeing if they have something that sticks out, that maybe you can draw inspiration from, or maybe you have a swipe file of headlines that you can pull from from Instagram or Facebook now known as meta, then you're going to be kind of shooting in a dark if you're not testing. So you've got to create that swipe file. Look at what's going on with the search result pages. And then you have to methodically. You can use a tool like click flow, or you can use a tool like search console for free. But that's going to be able to show you over time how your numbers are panning out. Because again, it doesn't matter what numbers I give you at a high level. I just know the gear thing works, but the other stuff it's really your mileage may vary. But sometimes adding the keywords from a tactical perspective you can say, hey, how to do SEO, right? So instead of just doing how to do SEO, think about what would be more enticing for people. How to do SEO, the right way, right? Or the modern way of doing SEO, right? So make it a little spicier for people, make it a little more interesting. And again, all you have to do is search for that keyword, look at the syrup. And just think about how you can write a headline that's ten X better and you're probably gonna get a click the rate that's much higher than that. So those are just a couple of things you can do. Yeah, and look, just make these simple tweaks, or you can use click flow to start a B testing. And you can try out other variations or out of the headline formats, even stuff that Eric didn't talk about that you may have ideas for. And it'll just show you within 30 days what's converting better from the click perspective. And then you'll have an answer of how to write high converting headlines because you'll start noticing trends within your space, plus you can use some of the stuff there mentioned as well. By the way, Neil wanted me to write off some stats. I'm going to write it off from this study over here from the backlink of CTR study. So we did a collab with him. So I was able to pull it up. So ten takeaways here, the first takeaway and keep in mind this came two years ago, but take it with the relevant works. I still use a lot of it. The number one result in Google search results has an average CTR of 31.7%. But again, your mileage may vary depending on mostly mobile, or if you have local results and all that. So keep that in mind. Number two, the number one organic result is ten X more likely to receive a click compared to page in the number ten spot, right? So this is why you have to focus on one of the lowest hanging fruit things you can do is improving that headline, right? Number three, organic CTR for position 7 to ten is virtually the same. Number four, on average moving at one spot in the search results will increase CTR by 30.8%. But this depends on where you're moving from. So moving from position three to two will be a big boost, but moving from ten to 9, not so much. Number 5 title tags that contain a question have a 14.1% higher CTR. Number 6, title tags between 15 to 40 characters have the highest CTR. So about 8.6% higher and working towards wrapping up here. URLs that contain the keyword have a 45% higher click the rate compared to URLs that don't contain a keyword. There's one for you. Number 8, adding power words to your title technique, decrease your CTR. So you're going to have to Google what that means. Titles with power words had a 13.9% lower CTR, emotional titles may improve your CTR by approximately 7% negative or positive. And finally, last but not least, writing meta descriptions for your pages may result in higher CTR. Pages with the meta description get 5.8% more clicks versus those without a description. And that is it for today. Click flow dot com slash Black Friday if you want to learn about that because I just realized my team shot me that link. So that is it for today.

Google Eric Eric Sue Brian Dean Neil Patel Neil Instagram Facebook
A highlight from The In-House Marketer's Guide to a Data Roadmap -- Howard Luks // Eyeota

MarTech Podcast

08:15 min | Last week

A highlight from The In-House Marketer's Guide to a Data Roadmap -- Howard Luks // Eyeota

"The mar tech podcast is a proud member of the HubSpot podcast network to find great business podcasts like this one, visit HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. From advertising to software as a service, to data. Across all of our programs and clients, we've seen a 55 to 65% open rate. Getting brands authentically integrated into content performs better than TV advertising. Typical lifespan of an article is about 24 to 36 hours. We're reaching out to the right person with the right message and a clear call that action that it's just a matter of timing. Welcome to the martech podcast, a band Jeff LLC production. In this podcast, you'll hear the stories of world class marketers that use technology to drive business results and achieve career success. Will unearth the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks, they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the martech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome back to the martech podcast. Today we're going to continue our discussion about the challenges and opportunities of using data. But before we get to today's interview, we're going to kick off the show with a marketing minute, where we invite a friend of the martech podcast to help us answer listener questions in 60 seconds or less. Here for today's marketing minute is John chance, who's the founder and president at duct tape marketing consultant and he's also the host of the duct tape marketing podcast. Where John interviews authors, experts and thought leaders who share business and marketing tips, tactics and resources for small businesses. And the duct tape marketing podcast is also a fellow member of the HubSpot podcast network. And John has been kind enough to answer a question from G two meta, who is the director of Marta and client success at intelligence bank and G two asks what automations have organizations implemented in their middle and back office teams to better serve their end users. All right, here's John's answer. You know, automation can be a great way to create a better backend office experience and serve your customers, your end users better. Obviously, the most basic things like a CRM, like a help desk. Those kinds of tools certainly make the communication make the record keeping of communicating even easier. But I find that one of the best tools to automate is to also create a hub so that your project management, your help desk, your CRM, or all talking through a hub, the hub that we use that I find is really powerful for this is slack. Slack keeps us out of email so that we're not firing back and forth as we try to serve clients, but it also has so many integrations now that allow us to keep conversations separate and keep everybody on the same page, really for as much time as we need, we can keep those threads going. Thanks, John. If you're interested in hearing more of John Gantz on the duct tape marketing podcast or any of the other great hosts from the HubSpot podcast network, you can go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. All right, on with today's interview. Joining us again is Howard Lux, who is the managing director at iota, which is an audience technology platform that enables the intelligent use of data. The iota team helps marketers data owners and research companies to provide distinct comprehensive and qualified audience data using a technology platform that transforms audience data to enable organizations to make smarter business decisions, understand their customers and enrich their marketing strategies. And yesterday, Howard and I talk through the view of the publisher's data challenge and opportunities. And today we're going to discuss the in-house marketers guide to building a data road map. But before we hear from today's guest, I'd like to take a moment to thank blue shift for sponsoring this interview. We all know that marketing and the technology that supports it is rapidly evolving. Last year it was GDPR. This year it's third party cookies and who knows how the landscape is going to change next year. The fact is, traditional marketing platforms are struggling to keep pace with the needs of today's marketers because they're built to focus on channel execution and not a 360° view of customer behaviors. And that's why you need blue shifts, smart hub CDP. You see blue shift both improves customer engagement and drives meaningful results by unifying your customers data so you can deliver relevant and personalized omnichannel experiences to the prospects and customers that matter the most. So if you're ready to drive better customer engagement increased loyalty, our friends at blueshift have created a guide to successful CDP RFPs that will help you make the right martech decision for your business. To download blue shifts, CDP RFP guide go to blue shift dot com slash mar tech that's BLUE SHI FT dot com slash Marta. Blue shift, omnichannel marketing for data driven marketers. Okay, here's the rest of my conversation with Howard Lux managing director at iota. Howard welcome back to the martech podcast. Thanks for having me back Ben. I'm excited to have you here. Yesterday we talked a little bit about what life is like as a publisher about how marrying third party and first party data together can provide some really interesting results and not only understanding who your customers are, serving up great experience when new people get to your websites and also helping you with your advertising strategies. Today we're going to talk a little bit about building a road map for data. Talk to me about what you consider to be a data road map. So playing back on my data management platform hat from many years ago and I worked at blue Kai for a marketer, I think, first and foremost, it's understanding what elements of your customer engagement at least online and offline are important to you for driving effective marketing. In my world today in terms of building out a data marketplace, it's similar. It's understanding what's important to our marketing partners when they're trying to prospect for new customers. And so from where I sit in the world, it's trying to make sure that we bring in data elements that cover every aspect of the purchase funnel from showing intent to wanting to buy a product through to having bought a product or even affinity to a specific brand. So that when we go to a market or we can kind of bring them solutions in every part of the purchasing funnel. So the data collection is only part of the battle. There's also just like a good marketer building things out into your funnel and understanding the potential usage of that data. You mentioned somebody that's in the market for a purchase, high propensity to buy, talk me through some of the funnel that you think about as a data aggregator and syndicator. And when you're collecting all of your data and your aggregate, how do you figure out how to bucket it? I think of it in a few ways. So if we go to the top of the funnel and intent data, I try to think about where are the places that consumers go to start doing research on products or pricing out products or configuring products. So I try to go to sources like online travel agents, heart configuration sites, price comparison sites, more intensive consumer review and rating sites. So we will try to strengthen partners with those sites, get them to put our JavaScript tag, working with consultative lead to define the elements that are important such as rat parents to my example on a travel site. And then we will normalize those into a taxonomic. So that's interesting. You're working with websites essentially that are at the top of the funnel and dropping a pixel on their side to say, okay, I know that this person's likely going to be buying a car soon because they're showing up on car gurus and they're looking at research on multiple cars. They're showing an indication of interest in the category, even if they're not down

Howard Lux Jeff Llc Benjamin Shapiro John Chance John Intelligence Bank John Gantz Hubspot Marta Howard Meta Iota BEN
A highlight from Chasing ROAS - Finding Winning Strategies in SEO #1922

Marketing School

05:52 min | Last week

A highlight from Chasing ROAS - Finding Winning Strategies in SEO #1922

"Welcome to marketing school, the only podcast that provides daily top level marketing tips and strategies from entrepreneurs that practice what they preach and live what they teach. Let's start leveling up your marketing knowledge with your instructors, Neil Patel and Eric Sue. Today we are going to talk about chasing roas, finding winning strategies in SEO but first, let's define what roas means. So realize in ads, you might be wondering, what are you even talking about? Rose is like ad term. Realize means return on ad spend. So Neil, go ahead and kick it off. Yeah, so a lot of you guys are chasing roas. How do you get that return on ad spend? And it's great. You should do that. If you can make advertising profitable, skill it up as much as possible and it works for a lot of industries. You just gotta keep tweaking and testing to get it right. But what you should also be doing that a lot of people are neglecting is finding winning strategies on SEO. SEO may not be able to scale as much as paper click and as quickly. But with SEO, the return on investment is much bigger in the long run. So Eric and I today wanted to cover some winning SEO strategies that we know that just work that people should implement. And we wanted to start it off by just giving you 5 winning SEO strategies that work for pretty much any industry. And just use them and you get more traffic and you'll make more revenue as well. So do you want to kick it off Eric or do you want me to? Yeah, I'll kick it off. So if you're starting out, you don't need to put all the pressure on yourself to have to go for these head terms. And what I mean by that is, let's say you have an ecommerce site where you sell shoes. Trying to rank for the word shoes is probably not a good move because you have a lot of these big sites that already rain for it. Plus, it's not super targeted for you, right? So let's say I'm a SaaS company. Instead of trying to rank for business intelligence software, maybe what I can rank for, let's say I'm trying to convert compete with Salesforce. I'm going to go for more bottom on the funnel keywords. And this is known as pain point SEO. So I would Google pain point SEO, I believe it was growing convert that coined that term. And what that means is you're going for let's say if you're competing with Salesforce, maybe it's Eric's tool versus Salesforce or Salesforce alternatives, right? You're trying to go for more high intent keywords where people are more likely to convert. And those keywords are also not that competitive. So you can go for alternatives. You can go to versus keywords. You can go for different reviews or whatever or top tools or whatever, which actual will probably be a little more competitive. But you're going to find more of a blue ocean there versus trying to go red ocean and high volume. Yeah. Second tactic for you is just go and expand internationally. It's a great way to get more traffic. There's tons of sales to be made all around the world. So transit your content, you can find people on upwork and sites like that who will translate your content, use href Lang so that way Google knows what pages to show for which regions. Even if you don't have tons of links in these regions, what you'll find is you can get a ton of traffic really quickly. Don't use auto translations. And you're looking at your Google Analytics to see what regions are getting you the most traffic outside the ones that you sell in. And those are the ones that you should translate for first. Number three, repurpose. And this is something we don't do well with this podcast, but Neil that we talk about a lot of this stuff. There's 30 new episodes a month, right? So imagine if we had someone that's taking maybe our top performing ten episodes per month or something. And the repurposing it into longer form content. That's actually what we're planning to do right now. I shouldn't tell Neil this. But I'm testing out a new service right now where it's pretty cost effective and it's pretty good long form 1500 to 2000 word stuff. But repurposing gives us more bang for our buck out of the podcast work that we're doing or any let's say Neil and I would crank on our respective YouTube channels as well. Just hiring someone to fit just a content repurpose. That's a very real role. HubSpot does that and Neil still, I don't know how many employees you have Neil that just focused on repurposing now if you want to tell that number to people. No. He doesn't know anymore. He used to have three, but now he doesn't know. It must be nice. But anyway, Neil number four. Number four, SEO, a lot of it is brand related. Did you know that more people search for Nike in the United States than they'd shirts for the term shoes? I think the last time I checked is roughly a difference by 6 X, literally 6 X. Now it can change month to month, depending on what shoes Nike is releasing. But either way, by multitude, more people search for the brand Nike than the word shoes. The point I'm trying to make here is if you want to win an SEO and it's one of the biggest factors next head of web spam cuts and the ex CEO Eric Schmidt both talked about how brands are important in Google's eyes. You need to create a brand. That means good product good service. You may not think about that related to SEO. But if you want to win in the long run, you got to create a good product or service because that's a great brand. And it'll actually create more searches for the brand more than you just running advertising. So you gotta make sure that you're creating a really solid partner service that creates a brand queries, which helps lift up all your rankings for all the terms. Number 5, last but not least, power pages. So this is coined from our mutual friend Brian dean, also known as back Lincoln. So just type in power pages, back lingo, you should be able to find it. But the whole idea with these power pages is that you create one, let's say I want to rank for conversion rate optimization. So I have one page that talks about a high level overview of conversion rate optimization. And I'll have different chapters, maybe ten different chapters, and they're all interlinking to each other. This is you can call them hub pages, you can call them power pages. But these are in the eyes of a search engine. It's a more comprehensive resource. And Neil's actually done a lot of this in the past with these old blog quick sprout with a lot of these different guides. And he would rank number one for keywords like conversion rate optimization or I think affiliate SEO or something like that, right? So numberphile would be power pages. And that is it for today, go to marketing school that iOS last training if you want to learn how to start or grow your dream business. We've got a couple of secret for you in there. And we'll catch you later. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school.

Salesforce Neil Eric Sue Eric Neil Patel Google Href Lang Nike Brian Dean Eric Schmidt Youtube United States Lincoln