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A highlight from How Identity Resolution is Changing -- Adam Robinson // GetEmails

MarTech Podcast

08:10 min | 3 hrs ago

A highlight from How Identity Resolution is Changing -- Adam Robinson // GetEmails

"The martech podcast is a proud member of the HubSpot podcast network to find great business podcasts like this one, visit HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. From advertising to software as a service, to data. Across all of our programs and clients, we've seen a 55 to 65% open rate getting brands authentically integrated into content, performs better than TV advertising. Typical lifespan of an article is about 24 to 36 hours for reaching out to the right person with the right message and a clear call to action that it's just a matter of timing. Welcome to the mar tech podcast, a Ben J chap LLC production. In this podcast, you'll hear the stories of world class marketers that use technology to drive business results and achieve career success. Will on earth the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the mar tech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to the mar tech podcast. Today we're going to discuss changes in how marketers can identify their customers. Joining us is Adam Robinson, who is the founder of get emails, which is the world's first ever email based retargeting software. Get emails identifies up to 35% of your anonymous traffic and then sends their contact records directly to your email marketing app so you can follow up with what were previously lost leads. And today, Adam and I are going to discuss how identity resolution is changing. Today's interview is brought to you by E webinar. Webinars are great for awareness and they're great for nurture and they're also great for lead gen. But there's just one massive problem with scaling your webinar program. Someone always has to be there to run them. But what if you could run your highest converting webinar a hundred times every month? Well, now you can. With the webinar, the leading webinar automation platform that turns any video into a delightful, interactive webinar. With E webinar, you can run hundreds of webinars every month without actually being in front of a camera. Just create a video, set a recurring schedule and sit back while your prospects engage. And yes, you can still interact with warm leads in real time or later through email. That means you can do webinars 24/7 and never miss a lead. Visit E webinar dot com to see how it works and start automating your webinar strategy today. And one last thing I'll add before we get to today's interview, since you're into marketing podcasts, check out the marketing against the grain podcast. Join kit bonnar and Kieran flanagan, the CMO and SVP of HubSpot's marketing department as they share their experience and the unfiltered truth about marketing that no one else knows about. You can listen to the marketing against the grand podcast wherever you get your podcasts or go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. All right, here's the first part of my conversation with Adam Robinson, founder of get emails. Adam, welcome back to the martek podcast. Thank you very much. These topics are very near and dear to my heart that we're talking about. I'm excited to have you back on the show. It's probably been a little over a year that we first connected and you told us a little bit about get emails, which is essentially the ability for a marketer to be able to capture email records just by somebody visiting your website, no express can send, no opt in boxes, no crazy forms. Somebody goes to your website, you can collect their emails, you're still doing this and we talked a lot about the privacy concerns back over a year ago, just quickly before we get into identity resolution, talk to me about what's happening at get emails. So at get emails, probably somewhat unsurprisingly, the product that you described is incredibly marketable. If you tell someone they can get ten times the amount of email addresses that they would get from form fills, they're listening, especially ecommerce people. So that's been great. We've just launched another product, which is sort of similar in terms of improving the efficiency of our customers, emailing programs, where in order to make get emails work, we're buying a bunch of open and click data. And what we do is we don't give our customers a record unless we've got an activity from that email, somewhere in our network in the last 14 days. So we decided to productize that and people can give us their dormant email list that they've stopped contacting because they're unengaged emails. And we listen for signals on that dormant list and we pass an event to somebody in real time when that subscriber clicks an email somewhere else besides their newsletter and they send a reengagement email out to that customer and allows them to recapture and start dripping marketing to people who they've stopped stripping to because that's good practices for email and get them back in their funnel and contact them. So that's long story of what's been going on in our company. But what this episode is about is what's been changing in identity resolution, what's the future? What all marketers have been paying attention to who have anything to do with what we're doing right now? Identity resolution and marketing in general is this third party cookie issue. It's the backbone of our technology and how it works. The last time we talked, I was terrified because it was going to end in what would be four months from now and probably a year from then. We figured out a way to do it without cookies. I mean, this is a compliment. I think of you as an Internet marketing cowboy. Flattering. And by that, I mean, it's the wild west, always in Internet marketing, and you are taking all the things that marketers want to do in productizing them, but I think a lot of marketers would say, well, there's a moral issue with collecting contact information from people that didn't give it to me. Or there is a legal concern about capturing data that wasn't expressly given to a marketer. And we all think about GDPR and CCPA and all of the privacy and identity rules and regulations that are coming into play. First off, let's get into the weeds here a little bit and talk about what identity resolution is first and foremost and then let's talk about what's changing. So what's your take on what identity resolution is? I think that it means different things depending on the application. The original application of it was taking your offline data and connecting it to online digital identifiers to market to people through display. When live ramp started as an identity resolution company, that was what they did. I consider what we're doing identity resolution because we're doing it backwards. We're taking anonymous digital identifiers and we're connecting them to real profiles and delivering that to the customer. That to me is still taking something that is not an identity of someone converting it to an identity. And giving it to a customer for marketing purposes. So connecting bits to people connecting unidentifiable identifiers. Exactly. Or the other way around, it's all about how you're doing it. And there's a bunch going on with the wall gardens and technology and stuff that touches all of it. It touches us, it touches what live ramp is doing right now. It touches everything. So yeah, that's my definition of what identity resolution is. And it's easy to sit, you mostly in a podcast chair to sit on my high horse and say, well, you shouldn't be capturing data from people that aren't expressly consenting and giving it to you and in reality we do this. We look for lead lists. We capture email addresses from people that we want to target and we're getting data and reaching out through cold emails. And this is no different than going and finding someone's email address and reaching out to them, except they've already visited your website. So honestly, I'm at a moral crossroads with, should I be collecting email addresses from people that haven't given me their emails because I can, or is this no different than I'm just going on to LinkedIn and following somebody and connecting their email and reaching out to them. It's up to everybody to decide where they stand morally. There are some changes to identity resolution. You mentioned the third party cookie and what's happening there. How is identity

Adam Robinson Hubspot Ben J Chap Llc Benjamin Shapiro Kit Bonnar Kieran Flanagan Adam Linkedin
A highlight from Podcast Advertising Best Practices -- Todd Cochrane // Blubrry Podcasting

MarTech Podcast

07:49 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Podcast Advertising Best Practices -- Todd Cochrane // Blubrry Podcasting

"Call to action that it's just a matter of timing. Welcome to the mar tech podcast, and I hear everything production. In this podcast, you'll hear the stories of world class marketers that use technology to drive business results and achieve career success. Will on earth the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks, they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the mar tech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to the mar tech podcast. I'm your host, Benjamin Shapiro, and today we're gonna discuss podcast secrets that you need to know. Joining us is Todd Cochran, who's the CEO of blueberry podcasting, which is a full service hosting provider with over a 100,000 podcasts in their umbrella. So far this week, Todd and I have talked about his podcast growth secrets and yesterday we talked about how to use a podcast to help your business. Today we're going to wrap up our conversation talking about podcast advertising best practices. Today's interview is brought to you by fetch rewards. Look we're all data geeks here at the mar tech podcast. In a world where data access is being restricted, sometimes you need to get creative to understand your customers behavior. And if you're a marketer at a CPG retailer restaurant brand, fetch rewards is the answer to your customer data access problems. Fetch rewards a mobile shopping platform that rewards shoppers for buying the brands they love. It's the easiest way for consumers to save on everyday purchases simply by scanning their receipts. From that transaction data, fetch has created a powerful engagement platform for marketers, with more than 17 million active users who have submitted more than 2 billion receipts, the fetch app gives consumers the easiest way to save on everyday purchases and gives brands an unprecedented 360° view of customer behavior. Billions of purchases, millions of users, one platform that will transform how you connect with your consumers. To better understand your consumer data, go to partners dot fetch rewards dot com. That's partners dot fetch rewards dot com. Rewards dot com. And one last thing I'll add before we get to today's interview, since you're in the marketing podcast, check out the marketing against the grain podcast. Join kit bonar and Kieran flanagan, the CMO and SVP of HubSpot's marketing department as they share their experience and the unfiltered truth about marketing that no one else knows about. You can listen to the marketing against the grand podcast wherever you get your podcasts or go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. All right, here's the last part of my conversation with Todd Cochran, the CEO of blueberry podcasting. Todd, welcome back to the Marta podcast. Thanks for having me back. Oh, it was a pleasure to have you here. I feel like we're graced with podcast royalty. I know that you're working a lot with multiple podcasts, hundreds of thousands of podcasts, and not only helping them grow their businesses, but also there's an advertising component into why people are podcasting. So let's talk a little bit about the advertising medium. Why is podcast advertising such a powerful tool and what are some of the best ways to leverage it? The thing about podcast advertising, it makes it very unique is the listener has number one opted in to listen to that content. They just aren't randomly being subjected to it like you are on the radio. Number two, the host generally drives the authentication of the content that host endorsement of the advertisement. So what we find is that podcast advertising often delivers many multiple times higher performance than any other type of advertising media. So when a company is thinking about advertising in podcasts, I always tell them the first thing they should do is go after the shows that they already listened to, the ones that they love, the ones that they trust and use those as maybe the initial marketing test ground. But I also leave some cautions in that advertising and podcasting is not like radio, radio, you're getting maybe three or four spots an hour during in the design time that you bought and podcasts, you may be getting one episode a week. So what it takes to generate a lead off a podcast ad is a little more involved than what it is going to come potentially from radio, but there is a completely different strategy in that you can tell a story about a company. You can build upon the advertising message episode after episode by altered copy that makes the advertisement grow, basically that company story grow over time. I'm kind of unique in the space that I believe if you're going to do an advertising buying a podcast, you should buy about 90 days worth of that content. And what you'll normally see when you buy an ad in podcasting is the first two weeks you're going to kind of be like, oh my goodness, did we spend some money in waste money? Whereas in that third week you see performance coming on on that ad with referrals, going all the way out through week 12, 13, 14, and even into 15 after the campaign has already ended because of the way podcasts are listed on demand, not necessary at the exact time that they're released. So you have to build repetition and getting enough cycles of that ad in that derivatives of that ad being heard along with a good call to action. How do you ask advertising if you have the budget to buy on a wider scale and drive significant volume to your website? But I always tell companies are getting involved in podcasts advertising, start with a handful of shows that you already love and trust. What I'm hearing from you is a couple of different things. First off, when you think about podcast advertising, consider the medium, right? Consider the format of the advertising. It's spoken word and generally you're getting 30 to 60 seconds of an advertisement. 30 to 60 seconds might sound like it's not a lot of time, but think about how long it takes for you to consume and advertisement on Facebook. Is it a tenth of a second? You're thumbing through and maybe you're seeing a brand impression. Well, there's a big difference between that experience and between listening to a 30 to 62nd ad, whether it's on the radio or in a podcast. Audio advertising is proven to be an incredibly powerful medium for delivering not only a great impression, but also a complex story. You can actually tell a story in narrative fashion. Now, I think one of the things that gets complicated for people that are experimenting in podcasting is how much media do I need to buy, how many impressions do I need? What's the reach? What's the frequency for me to start seeing business results? You mentioned your strategy of buying a show for 90 days. You're running a three month campaign in a podcast. Does that mean that all podcasts are created equal and there's no difference between a million impressions and 10,000 oppressions from smaller to bigger shows? How do you think about finding the shows based on not only how long the duration is but the size and impressions you need? Oftentimes we see shows that have a more medium sized audience have higher performance than shows that have a bigger audience. And the reason for that is the shows that have a medium or smaller sized audience. They're more intimate with that audience. And those listeners are more than more likely to act upon the ad. If you think about your show being advertised and let's say Joe Rogan, you're going to get this huge, massive, massive reach of a lot of people. But how effective is that ad going to be? I always think that you need again to be decisive in the shows that you pick and make sure that that show is reaching the demographic of audience that you want. Podcasters are pretty good now if they've done their homework and knowing who their audience persona is. So you should be able to ask a podcaster who is the makeup of

Benjamin Shapiro Todd Cochran Blueberry Podcasting Kit Bonar Kieran Flanagan Todd Hubspot Facebook Joe Rogan
A highlight from Business Podcasting Strategies -- Todd Cochrane // Blubrry Podcasting

MarTech Podcast

07:30 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Business Podcasting Strategies -- Todd Cochrane // Blubrry Podcasting

"Shapiro, and today we're gonna discuss podcast secrets that you need to know. Joining us is Todd Cochran, who's the CEO of blueberry podcasting, which is a full service hosting provider with over a 100,000 podcasts in their umbrella. Yesterday, Todd and I talked about his podcast growth secrets and today we're going to continue the conversation talking about business, podcast strategies. Today's interview is brought to you by E webinar. Webinars are great for awareness and they're great for nurture and they're also great for lead gen. But there's just one massive problem with scaling your webinar program. Someone always has to be there to run them. But what if you could run your highest converting webinar a hundred times every month? Well, now you can. With the webinar, the leading webinar automation platform that turns any video into a delightful, interactive webinar. With E webinar, you can run hundreds of webinars every month without actually being in front of a camera. Just create a video, set a recurring schedule and sit back while your prospects engage. And yes, you can still interact with warm leads in real time or later through email. That means you can do webinars 24/7 and never miss a lead. Visit E webinar dot com to see how it works and start automating your webinar strategy today. And one last thing I'll add before we get to today's interview, since you're into marketing podcasts, check out the marketing against the grain podcast. Join kit bonar and Kieran flanagan, the CMO and SVP of HubSpot's marketing department as they share their experience and the unfiltered truth about marketing that no one else knows about. You can listen to the marketing against the grand podcast wherever you get your podcasts or go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. All right, here's the second part of my conversation with Todd Cochran, the CEO of blueberry podcasting. Todd, welcome back to the mar tech podcast. Thanks for having me. Excited to have you back on the show and to continue our conversation. You know, yesterday we talked about audience growth. Some of the ways that you can start a podcast, build your audience and a lot of that has to do with leveraging the assets and the knowledge that you have about your existing audience. I know who my customers are. I have relationships with some of them. I'm going to present them with the option to listen to my podcast and then I'm going to go find other places where they hang out and I'm going to put my podcast there to start crawling my audience. So wonderful. We consistently publish content, people are starting to listen their following our show, we're getting impressions we've got a valuable podcast, but it's not that simple. You actually have to derive value out of the podcast. So let's talk a little bit about the B2B side of podcasting and what businesses are doing to make their podcast a valuable asset. Once you've grown your audience, how do you extract value out of the content you're producing? It really boils down to, again, that value you're going to deliver to the audience and what you expect from it. In every case scenario is different if you are a lawyer. Obviously, you're going to be talking about your firm, what you're doing, maybe a quick overview, some of the cases that you're running, some experience you've had past successes and really the ultimate goal is, what is that call to action? And every show is going to be a little bit different. But again, it goes back to the goal. So we talked about originally is the goal again for leads is the goal for someone to walk in the door. Oftentimes businesses will get discouraged because they say, well, I'm not getting a lot of value out of this podcast. But I often find is I'll ask them how is the results been? And they said, well, we don't know how the results of the podcast have been. And I said, how come? Because oftentimes, businesses will not even ask a new client, how did you hear about me? They just go into the sales. It's mind boggling to me that you would spend money on marketing and doing a podcast doing the other social components that you probably already active in. And then not ask the client that's walked in the door. How did you hear about it? It was a reference, was it a newspaper ad, whatever it was. And I hear this a lot in a kind of shocks me. Also, at the same time, there isn't a lot of records being kept by businesses on the actual value of the new customer. If the customer comes in and you've derived that they have found you because of the podcast, is that lister a $1 million client or are they a $100,000 client? So what is the value of the client that you're getting from the content or maybe the overall equal sphere? So I think it's really important that you not only know what to go is, but you measure your ROI on the backside to see what kind of results you're getting. There's a couple of different things that go into the podcast attribution problem. And I guess it depends on what your approach is and the reason, you know, which department in your marketing team, your podcast lives in. When I worked at eBay, a million years ago. There was a brand department. There was a performance marketing department brand was awareness. All we're doing is looking at our people aware of our products, our services, we're doing surveys, trying to understand unaided brand awareness. To just people know who we are. Podcasting is incredible for that. But awareness isn't necessarily a business driver in the short term, right? Awareness over time lowers your cost per acquisition. The more people are aware, the more thought leadership, the more comfortable, the more likely to buy, the more likely to make a larger investment. But that's really hard to track. How are brands actually associate the value that they get from the podcast from a direct response perspective, you mentioned, well, you got to figure out who your customer is, is it all post purchase surveys or what are some of the tools and solutions that businesses can use to try to figure out what the true impact on their business is from podcasting. If you're a digital business and you are doing online sales and that's relatively easy to promo code, a direct landing page is just sending them to it's maybe off the beaten path, maybe it's your company dot com slash podcast, maybe where you're doing marketing on Facebook, it's your company dot com slash Facebook, basically where you're directing the folks that are getting exposure to your business where you're sending them to in that measurement from a code utilization has been used since the beginning of time. Obviously, to measure, there's obviously the ability then if it's a brick and mortar when people are coming in, find again simply asking how you found out about the business or the referral. Again, I think it's all in that call to action and how you're going to determine where that customer came from. It can be complicated because sometimes it could be a referral from someone that listened to the podcast too. So I think you have to take in all those scenarios because I oftentimes hear about something and I'll have a friend they're looking for something. So I heard about this business over here on this particular show, as you go check this company out. So when they talk to them, they're like, well, I heard about you from Todd. Well, who's Todd? Well, Todd listen to your podcast. Well, then that gives you an idea. It was an indirect referral. But again, I think it's really about asking that new client if you have that face to face, where it's come from. There's obviously attribution tools you can use as well just to see if someone's landing on your page, a lot of content creators are not using that particular service because it can add costs to a podcast, but it is one way to definitely measure to see a bit if someone is actually listening if they've actually come to your website. It's time for one minute break to hear from our presenting sponsor HubSpot. Creating great customer experiences starts with having a full picture. And having a full picture starts with having teams that are connected. HubSpot helps your team feel so connected that can finish each other's

Todd Cochran Blueberry Podcasting Kit Bonar Todd Kieran Flanagan Shapiro Hubspot Lister Ebay Facebook
A highlight from Google Performance Max: What Marketers Need to Know

Social Media Marketing Podcast

00:58 sec | 2 d ago

A highlight from Google Performance Max: What Marketers Need to Know

"For marketers and business owners who want to know what works with social media. Today I'm going to be joined by Brett curry and we're going to explore Google performance max. Wait, Google what Google, what are you talking about? Yeah, Google. Believe it or not, this is an incredibly simple solution for those of you that are advertising on Facebook and Instagram and want to go over to Google and want to have it kind of be autopilot. And for those of you that are already doing Google ads, you may not be familiar with the powerful possibilities of Google performance max. So you're going to want to definitely pay attention to today's interview. By the way, I'm at stelzner on Instagram and at Mike stelzner on Twitter. And if you're new to this show, be sure to follow us so you don't miss any of our future content. I don't think I've ever shared this story. Our conference social media marketing world has no speaker application process. It never has. Instead, it's 100% recruitment. And there's never a guarantee

Google Brett Curry Instagram Mike Stelzner Facebook Twitter
A highlight from #519: The Gratitude Series: Anthony Trucks

Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

01:05 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from #519: The Gratitude Series: Anthony Trucks

"I've never discounted a course, much less given one away for free. But to celebrate the season of giving, when you enroll in list builder society by this Friday, you'll get my signature program systems that scale free of charge. These two programs are two halves of a pair when it comes to setting up the foundations of your online business so you can start earning revenue in the new year. So here's some things that you're going to learn. You are going to learn how to create a lead magnet that stands out online. And automated nurture plan that feels really personal to your community, the knowledge of how to predict revenue so that you know how much money you're going to earn in 2023. And guidance from concept to creation as you add a brand new offer to your business, even if you've never offered anything before. So I'm going to dive deep into everything you need to know to create and grow an email list, but also with the extra course, you're going to learn how to

A highlight from Thanksgiving Episode: Talking Turkey With IAB CEO David Cohen

AdExchanger Talks

05:08 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Thanksgiving Episode: Talking Turkey With IAB CEO David Cohen

"Hello. Thank you for having me. Nice to be here. So I want to start out with you sharing a little something about yourself that not a lot of other people know that that's a way that I've been starting the podcast ever since I took over about a year ago, but in your case, it has to be a good one because when Tony cats are the CEO of IV tech lab. As you know, but just in case anyone who's listening doesn't know when he came on the podcast in April, he shared that at one point in his life he fought in white collar fight clubs. So I need you I need you to top that I got it. So this is a competition. That's good. We have all played the kind of icebreaker kind of stuff before. So I hope that these are some new ones. I did hear that Tony and I did. I was taken aback. That was a good one. I'm going to over index and give you two if that's okay. The first one is, I was a, I would say professional calligrapher. I actually got paid for it. When I was in high school, which is not a very common thing to do. But I love to calligraphy and I don't do it very much any longer, but I was doing, you know, invitations for weddings and bar mitzvahs and all that kind of fun stuff. So that's not many people know that. And then number two, which is entirely different. Is I was for my fraternity. I was the pledge whip for Delta at Cornell in 1988. And that was an absolute blast. So those are two maybe unknown. I don't know what a pledge quip is. Pledge whip. So it's the guy who is in or or gal for if you're a sorority that is in charge of getting the pledges educated prior to becoming fraternity brothers. And it was, you know, back in those days and it was slightly different than it is today. So there were some great stories perhaps over a cocktail one day you could talk about some of them. All right. Well, I read on your LinkedIn that you also wanted to become a doctor, but obviously your life took you in another direction clearly. I mean, would you have been able to be a doctor with such good penmanship? That's a great question. Yeah, organic chemistry was the end of my doctorate dreams, I think. And I think I was trying I was interested in being a doctor for probably all the wrong reasons. You know, the nice Jewish boy from Brooklyn being the doctor and it wasn't what it was cut out to be from my perspective. And I think I did all right at the end of the day. Yeah, no, I think you're not doing too shabby. So I want to talk about Twitter a little bit if we could. It is kind of crazy over there, but I want to zero in on one aspect of the craziness, which is Elon Musk's take on advertising and advertisers. And on November 9th, you participated in that kind of infamous Twitter spaces Q&A about advertising and the future where it was Elon, Robin Wheeler, whose twitters now former head of ad sales and you'll Roth, Twitter is now former head of trust and safety, a 2.7 million people tuned into that. And you had the opportunity to ask Elon a handful of questions as a sort of representative of the ad industry, like you were the U.S. about differentiating between truth and news because he had made that distinction at one point. You know, whether brands are going to have to pay for that blue check mark, although that whole verification thing is kind of up in the air right now. What are Twitter's priorities? So yeah, I mean, first of all, what was it like being there as part of that Q&A? It's kind of wild that you were on the line. Under the really, I feel like the day before it all went a little more kablooey than it already had gone. Yeah, I would say wild is a pretty apt description. That space is episode for me. Anyway, it came together very quickly. And we had been obviously getting lots of inbounds from our members, whether they're brands or agencies or publisher partners. And all I hoped to do in a reasonably short amount of time was to channel some of the questions that we were getting. You know, there's Elon Musk, my first question, I think, was the one that I hear all the time. There's Elon Musk as a person and as a brand. And then there's Twitter as a product and service and a brand.

Tony Cats Twitter Robin Wheeler Cornell Tony Elon Musk Linkedin Elon Brooklyn Roth U.S.
A highlight from Podcast Growth Secrets -- Todd Cochrane // Blubrry Podcasting

MarTech Podcast

08:26 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Podcast Growth Secrets -- Todd Cochrane // Blubrry Podcasting

"The martech podcast is a proud member of the HubSpot podcast network to find great business podcasts like this one, visit HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. From advertising to software as a service to data. Across all of our programs and clients, we've seen a 55 to 65% open rate. Getting brands authentically integrated into content performs better than TV advertising. Typical life span of an article is about 24 to 36 hours. We're reaching out to the right person with the right message and a clear call to action that it's just a matter of timing. Welcome to the mar tech podcast, and I hear everything production. In this podcast, you'll hear the stories of world class marketers that use technology to drive business results and achieve career success. Will on earth the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks, they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the mar tech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to the martek podcast. I'm your host, Benjamin Shapiro, and today we're gonna discuss podcast secrets that you need to know. Joining us is Todd Cochran, who's the CEO of blueberry podcasting, which is a full service hosting provider with over a 100,000 podcasts in their umbrella, and today Todd and I are going to discuss his podcast growth secrets. Today's interview is brought to you by E webinar. Webinars are great for awareness and they're great for nurture and they're also great for lead gen. But there's just one massive problem with scaling your webinar program. Someone always has to be there to run them. But what if you could run your highest converting webinar a hundred times every month? Well, now you can. With the webinar, the leading webinar automation platform that turns any video into a delightful, interactive webinar. With E webinar, you can run hundreds of webinars every month without actually being in front of a camera. Just create a video, set a recurring schedule and sit back while your prospects engage. And yes, you can still interact with warm leads in real time or later through email. That means you can do webinars 24/7 and never miss a lead. Visit E webinar dot com to see how it works and start automating your webinar strategy today. And one last thing I'll add before we get to today's interview, since you're into marketing podcasts, check out the marketing against the grain podcast. Join kit bonar and Kieran flanagan, the CMO and SVP of HubSpot's marketing department as they share their experience and the unfiltered truth about marketing that no one else knows about. You can listen to the marketing against the grand podcast wherever you get your podcasts or go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. All right, here's the first part of my conversation with Todd Cochran, the CEO of blueberry podcasting. Todd, welcome to the bar tech podcast. Hey, thanks for having me, Benjamin. Excited to finally have you on the show and we've danced around for a little while and I appreciate your patience and waiting and joining us. I'm excited to talk a little bit about a marketing medium that's near and dear to my heart. It's what we're doing right now. Let's talk a little podcasting. I think one of the biggest topics that marketers are thinking about is I've created my own show and I'm really struggling to actually get an audience to listen to me to grow the audience. What are some of the best practices for growing a podcast? I think it really goes back to the beginning to a lot of times when folks are getting ready to create a show, they don't not often set the goal. So the key is, as long as you have a goal for the podcast, whether it be lead generation, getting new clients, getting authority, business building, branding, whatever it may be. First of all, you have to look at the goals. So is the goal really billing this massive audience, the goal really to reach the folks exactly want to reach. So I always tell content creators, number one, what's the goal of your show? It's to build authority, then you put out content that is going to help build authority in the space. If it's lead generation, then you're going to want to put out content that's going to help with lead generation. So growth is really one of those tricky words that is really totally dependent upon what the goal is now if the goal is monetization, well then obviously we got to have a strategy to build a big audience or have a super niche audience. So there's not a one answer fits all solution here, but one thing is for sure, regardless if you're going to be creating a show to build authority or creating a show to build it the monetization level that ongoing consistent sustained superior content is really the number one key thing to do. And of course, the second thing is making sure that you are providing value to your audience and not wasting their time. I think those three things alone, a lot of podcasters overlook. The words you used were consistent superior content. And I think that that's an important starting point. You also kind of went into the definition of what growth is. And I'm thinking growth, audience size. And I think that that's probably a distinction that most marketers need to come to grips with first as it is not just about the audience size when you're creating any sort of organic content marketing channel, it is the value of the audience. And how are you going to monetize that or how you can extract value from the content you're creating? Let's walk through a couple different stages here because at first you have to build it for them to come. You have to publish great content, but there's also some content marketing that has to go into creating the audience, whether it is a niche of a niche of a niche, or whether you're mass market and trying to grow a big audience. So what are some of the strategies that you've seen people in your hosting platform use that has made them successful in capturing that first bit of audience and then thinking about scaling it? If you're starting out and you are already established, you've got a leg up. If you have a business already with some sort of social marketing presence, you have a leg up to drive people into that content. But if you are someone that's brand new, that just starting at the very base level. And you really don't have a presence anywhere. I firmly believe the combination of building a brand on your own, the content that you're creating to be discovered, not at a show name level, but in an episode level, is one of the things you have to focus on. Obviously, word of mouth and your friends and family and business associates sharing the show with people they know and them sharing the show is going to be your number one way to grow an audience, but really when you're getting started, you got to have that long-term goal in effect knowing that you've got to build traffic to the show and one of those strategies I think is very successful for a lot of content creators that they overlook is their current brand or the current dot com. And what I like to always say is you need to be found in a way that your competition's not and how is that done. It's really very simple. You record for your audience, you write for Google. So when you're writing your show notes, you write titles such that are going to track that something searching for, whether it be how to, whether it be a theory or someone that you've interviewed, you need to write that episode title and then back it up with the first paragraph of content that is going to give Google indication that this is what this shows about when people are searching for this show. They will be able to find that specific episode. And from there, you're going to gain listeners. Now, that's just like two things, right? You have spreading the show by friends and family and business associates and that 7° of separation, doing the Google piece, but then you tie in all the other social marketing that you have to do just like anything else, Facebook, LinkedIn, got to find out where your audience is hanging out and make sure that you're also writing social media posts that match the content, discoverability that you're looking to you want that content to be discovered. And no one's just going to send people over there. You've got to do that Ryan. You got to do that work yourself. So one of the strategies that we have always told content creators is you don't build your castle on rented land. In other words, you don't put your podcasts and be the source of origin over on some third

Benjamin Shapiro Todd Cochran Blueberry Podcasting Hubspot Kit Bonar Kieran Flanagan Todd Benjamin Google Linkedin Facebook Ryan
A highlight from #518: Sweeten the Deal: How To Create a Bonus Package That Gets Your Audience to Buy

Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

01:05 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from #518: Sweeten the Deal: How To Create a Bonus Package That Gets Your Audience to Buy

"I've never discounted a course, much less given one away for free. But to celebrate the season of giving, when you enroll in list builder society by this Friday, you'll get my signature program systems that scale free of charge. These two programs are two halves of a pair when it comes to setting up the foundations of your online business so you can start earning revenue in the new year. So here's some things that you're going to learn. You are going to learn how to create a lead magnet that stands out online. And automated nurture plan that feels really personal to your community, the knowledge of how to predict revenue so that you know how much money you're going to earn in 2023. And guidance from concept to creation as you add a brand new offer to your business, even if you've never offered anything before. So I'm going to dive deep into everything you need to know to create and grow an email list, but also with the extra course, you're going to learn how to

A highlight from Community-Driven Outcomes  -- Ike Nwabah // Higher Logic

MarTech Podcast

07:53 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from Community-Driven Outcomes -- Ike Nwabah // Higher Logic

"The Mart podcast. Yesterday Ike and I walked through the marketer's guide to community and today we're going to talk a little bit more about community driven outcomes. All right, here's the second part of my conversation with eike waba, the senior director of marketing at higher logic. Ike welcome back to the Marta podcast. Hey, thanks for having me again. I'm excited to have the conversation with you. I'm excited to have you back here. I know that we did your first podcast yesterday. So we went through this marketer's guide to community and one thing I feel like we may have missed is where do you get started? So let's talk a little bit about getting started with community before we get into the outcomes, the beginning of the road map for community goes like what? So we have a concept we call cargo and cargo it's just a 5 step framework that helps you develop the specifics of your community. And so there's 5 pieces to it. So it's the concept is who are the members of the community? Why did they visit the community so who in the what is a foundation of how you build your community and then the second thing is the acquisition. So how does your target audience become members of the community, being able to really understand the steps it takes for them to come on board and become a member of that community and engage day to today, then the retention, of course, which is the R in the cargo framework is how do you retain that members? Because you have to actively engage your members to retain them. So then having that retention strategy and mine is critical as well. How often are they visiting how often do you want to keep them coming back? What's the life cycle management? So to keep them active, et cetera. Now, the second to last is goals. So the principal goals of your community within your internal stakeholders, what's their care about and what do they want to get out of it? What do your community users also care about and what do they want to get out of it and being able to track it and then finally it's the outcome. So what is the outcomes of desired outcomes for the community? So milestone and three months milestone in 6 months, milestones in a year. What the success looks like for your team and for the community and the purpose that you've established. All in all, as you take a look at, how do you start with building community, think of cargo as that framework that you use to be able to establish what you need to do. Okay, so basically there's this cargo acronym and who are you targeting? What do you want the outcome to be? I want to focus today on the goals and the outcomes. Yesterday we went through the whole process of how to get a community propped up and started. Great. I've now got a community. Hopefully I'm using higher logic, maybe I'm not maybe I have a slack channel, maybe I'm even on Facebook. Don't judge me. No, just right here. But look, I still have to figure out what my goals are and what the outcomes are. So help me think through how to get community driven outcomes. If I have an aggregation of people that are interested in my brand, my association, my products, my services, how do I figure out what the goal should be and how do I drive towards those outcomes? So just at a very high level, it's being able to work with your internal stakeholders and their care about most. So depending on where community rolls up into the status 28% of communities today roll up into the market and function. But then of course there's other groups as well. So whether it's customer success, whether it's support, whether it's community as a stand-alone department within your team, ultimately community, intersects all the different groups. And so ensuring that there's alignment with the different stakeholders, the more folks that are engaged with the community that you've built out, the more sticky it is in the long term. But it also, what do you feel users care about? What do they want to see? Is it that they want their questions answered? Is it that they are looking for peers to network with to find more effective way. So just being able to really define that goal is critical. And then also what's the metrics that you're looking for for yourself as a community leader or your stakeholders within the department as well. So being able to clearly define those goals are very critical for you. Yesterday you had a great acronym. So I want to go back to that, I believe it was spanned, which was the four different types of community. Walk me through that again because I think as we think about goals and outcomes, the probably pretty dictated based on the type of community you have, what was spam. Span the S stands for support. Community members are asking for support. They're offering to help others. It's where the company can step in and provide official support with their support teams or success teams as well. Today would you both. There's product, which is the peak portion of the span is based around the product given ideas sharing feedback, talking about the value of the product and the ways that you can use a more effectively and efficiently. So knowledge base being able to provide that feedback to enhance the capabilities of the product. Now there's the ambassador community that's focused on a small set of users that are highly valuable influential or active. And so it's really being able to draw that out and grow that. And then finally, it's just a network community. So it's based on people linked because of, say, work, cause, mission, passion, circumstances. So it could vary, but ultimately it's similar to our game grower retained DGR or more tech podcast. That's done network community. So I'm assuming that each one of those different types of communities have pretty predictable goals. So I want to walk through them one at a time. The S is a support community. When I hear where creating a support community, that to me screams, okay, customer service is overwhelmed, and we want the people that are using our products, our ambassadors, even some of our team to be able to create a forum to produce content, so we don't have to deal with our customers on a one on one basis as much. They can basically start to self support. Am I thinking about this correctly? Yeah, you are. And of course, as a company, you do want your customers to engage with you, but you want to make sure that your teams are support teams that are using are being used and high value fashion, right? So whether it's reactive or those high cases, not the repeat questions, but with the support community to your point is that you want those questions being answered within the community and ultimately it's taken a look at mean time to respond. You can measure that with them community. You can take a look at those advocate pools, people that are actually answering the questions. You can take a look at the number of tickets that are handled within community. So there's a lot of metrics that you can take a look at as a whole. But yes, those are things to consider as well. Maybe I'm stating it at a callous fashion where you said something that makes sense. Of course, you want your customers to interact with you. I'm like, well, no, I want my customers to get their questions answered with as few touch points as humanly possible. And I think that that's really the purpose of the support community is you can have your customers have their questions answered without having to answer their questions. Somebody else will do the work for you. The second part of span is a product community. Now, to me, this sounds pretty similar to a support community while product community is how to use a product. So help me understand what you think that the typical goals are and for that type of community and how do you try to drive those outcomes? You want to understand what your customers want, right? So innovation so that you can be a market leader within your space. Having a way to gather that information gather that feedback out of that insight. Are my customer satisfied with the products that I'm and the solution and the service as a whole that I'm providing to them. So ways that you can be able to collect that in an efficient manner. I used to be a product manager in the past. And so it was difficult to get a pool of folks that could be able to test the solution and provide the feedback of how the solution is working. I also was difficult to engage with my customers to be able to get insights in general of, hey, what can we be doing? How can we do it well? Sometimes what you'll see is that folks are in an echo chamber, creating their own ideas. I think this is what my customers want versus actually going out to gather that directly from your customers. And so with the product community, that's a good way, really awesome way to actually

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A highlight from #517: When To Give Up Or See It Through When Something Fails In Your Business

Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

08:09 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from #517: When To Give Up Or See It Through When Something Fails In Your Business

"If you are committed to doing something, if you said you're going to do it and you said you're going to try it for a certain amount of time, let's just take the option off the table to not show up and let's just say like that's not even part of the conversation. It's funny not too long ago I did an episode about the fact that it is absolutely okay to quit. And I believe that I do believe that. But I also, this is why I wanted to create this episode. I also believe that you've got to stick it out long enough to see if the magic is going to happen. So you can quit if it's no longer serving you if your heart's not into it. If you know it's not right for you and it's not bringing you any joy, I had talked about this in that other episode, you can absolutely quit. But don't quit and I talked about this also. Don't quit if you're just fearful of looking silly. I'm Amy porterfield, ex corporate girl turned CEO of a multi 7 figure business, but it wasn't all that long ago that I lacked the confidence. The budget and the time to focus on growing my small but mighty business. Fast forward past many failed attempts in lessons learned and you'll see the business I have today. One that changes lives and gives me more freedom than I ever thought possible. One that used to only exist as a daydream. I created the online marketing made easy podcast to give you simple actionable. Step by step strategies to help you do the same. If you're an ambitious entrepreneur or one in the making who's looking to create a business that makes an impact and a life you love, you're in the right place friend. Let's get started. Hey there, welcome back to another episode of online marketing made easy. I am so very glad you're tuning in today. I am recording this on a Monday morning and typically I really enjoy quiet weekends. If I get to go away to our Lake house on the weekend and just be with hobie and scout and sit and look at the water, read a book, go for a really easy walks. I mean, that's like a perfect weekend to me. However, this weekend was very different. It was very busy, but for really good reasons as well. So I had some friends in town, Jenna Kutcher and her husband drew were in town because they invited us to a charity event. It was for bob gough, and it was here in Nashville. And it was just a beautiful weekend. This charity event was so very cool. They're doing amazing things for people internationally, but also here in the U.S. and it was very inspiring. I loved every minute of it, and also Stu McLaren was in town. So I got to have dinner with Stu last night, which was so fun and we talked all about family and work and everything. You know, I've been away from my Friends for so long because of COVID that it was so fun to finally connect again. And something really special happened where hobie's retired now from the fire department. And I've been praying that he finds something that really lights him up. And he is super busy. He does tons of construction at both of our houses and he's always busy. He helps take care of anything. My mom needs at her house and he keeps himself very busy. However, I just know that on his heart, he wants to help in a bigger way. And so when we were at this charity event, he really loves charities that help people here in the U.S.. He loves to be able to go there and be a part of it and he wanted to really get involved. And that was the first time that I saw that something really sparked his interest. And he's really excited about it. And so he's going to make some calls today and see how he can get involved. And that was just like the biggest gift ever. And I loved seeing him light up to know that he can help and he was really called to do so. So that was just a big blessing of the weekend. Let me tell you about a podcast that I'm loving. It's called my first million. It's hosted by Sam parr and Sean Perry. And I say it's the audio destination for business professionals. So my first million features really amazing guests like Gary Vee, Sophia amoruso, and Hasan minhaj, where they're sharing their secrets for how they made their first million and how to apply their learnings to capitalize on today's business trends and opportunities. So with topics like how entrepreneurs can prepare for economic collapse or controversial business lessons or behind the scenes content, the stories of how people become millionaires is fascinating to me and I think you are going to love it. So you can listen to my first million wherever you listen to podcasts. So here we are Monday morning and I am ready to dive in. And today's episode is unique in the sense that it was it stems from a conversation I had with the woman who does my makeup for video shoots here in Nashville. So let me back up just a little bit. This episode is a little tender to me because it's all about how we show up when we feel something is not working or when doubt starts creeping in. So here's what happened. A little while back, I had a photo shoot for my upcoming book two weeks notice. Hopefully you've pre ordered it by now. It comes out in early 2023, but pre orders mean the world to authors. So I've learned. So hopefully you've gotten your hands on a copy or two. But anyway, I was getting my hair and makeup done for this big video shoot. And my stylist says to me, oh my gosh, you have been killing it on TikTok. And I looked at her and I said, what are you talking about? Our platform, it is crawling. We are not killing it on TikTok. It's like slow, slow growth. Because I got to admit, growing my followers and getting a lot of views on my post has been kind of agony to watch on TikTok. Now, I'll admit, it's also been very humbling. And I actually think it's good for me because when I teach my students to have patience and stay in it even when it's not working yet, I don't remember those feelings. They happen to me, but I've been in this almost 14 years now. So I'm not totally in touch with what it feels like to keep grinding when things aren't yet clicking. But all my friends, I am here to say if that's how you're feeling about anything in your business, I am right there with you. And I recently said to Stacy who runs my social media, what are we doing here? Like this, I don't think this is working. It's been a few months now at the time this is all going on. Maybe we had 3000 followers. We have more now, but still, I told her, I'm like, I just don't know if this is working, and if this is worth our time. And her response was, you've got to stick with it. We said we're doing this for a full 6 months. So whether it's working or not, we won't know until after 6 months when we come back together and figure this out. And I did make that commitment. So I'm like, okay, you're right. But when I said to my makeup, artist, I said, I don't think it's really working. She said, yeah, but you're clearly showing up for yourself. You clearly are doing it your way, and that feels very authentic. She says, when I watch you on TikTok, I know you are being absolutely yourself because I know you personally. And when she said that, it just kind of made me wonder, yeah, you're right, I am being authentic. It is who I am, but what if it doesn't match what the platform wants in needs?

Amy Porterfield Jenna Kutcher Bob Gough Stu Mclaren Sam Parr Sean Perry Gary Vee Sophia Amoruso Hasan Minhaj Lake House Nashville Hobie U.S. STU Fire Department Drew Stacy
A highlight from Marketer's Community Guide -- Ike Nwabah // Higher Logic

MarTech Podcast

07:05 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Marketer's Community Guide -- Ike Nwabah // Higher Logic

"A sponsor of the Mart podcast. And today, Ike and I are going to discuss a marketer's guide to community. All right, here's the first part of my conversation with Ikea, the senior director of marketing at higher logic. I welcome to the mar tech podcast. Hey, thanks for having me, Benjamin. Appreciate it. I'm so excited to have you on the podcast. We've talked a bunch offline that you joined our sponsorship program and I get to be the first person to bust your chops on a podcast. Are you ready for this? Oh man, looking forward to it. It's going to be interesting. Everybody, he's a rookie. He's nervous. We're going to take it easy, honey. I promise. Don't worry, hey, we're going to start with talking about stuff that you know about community. Hire logic. Let's talk a little bit about what higher logic is. You've got higher logic, there's higher logic, vanilla, help me understand the sort of the basic blocking attack lens of your company. Yeah, definitely. So again, great to be on the show. I'm excited to talk to you a little bit more about community. The funny thing is that I've been in the community space for 6 months now. So a fairly new but it's something that I have a passion for. Now to your question on higher logic, higher logic as a whole, we are the community people. We know community in and out. We've been in the business for 15 years. So with that, we have two different market segments that we target. So one really association based nonprofits and then the second one is the B2B B2C space. So with that, we help companies build community. We help companies grow their communities and we help companies understand how to effectively manage their communities. So ultimately we are a B2B community SaaS platform available for our end users. Now, to your question, just very high level vanilla, we acquired the company early last year. And they were also B2B vendor and ultimately we folded them into our organization. And so now we continue to do community, what we've been doing for a while now. Community is a hot topic these days. It is. We've seen this big migration from the world being the wild wild west data flowing free. You can buy data. You pump it into a social media marketing platform that give you your customers everything is hunky Dory. We saw the rise of Facebook Instagram LinkedIn and their ad platform. People were really focused on performance marketing and all of a sudden we're seeing the data wells dry up and there's this bigger need for first party data. So we've seen influencers become more important. We're seeing content become more important and all of a sudden there's this giant influx of everybody saying they need a community, all sorts of communities are popping up. People are trying to figure out how to do it the right way and they're trying to figure out what are the right vendors for them. So walk me through for the marketers, you focus on B2B. I'm in B2B. We want to create our own community here for the mar tech podcast. What advice would you give me for figuring out where to start when it comes to community? Yeah, definitely. I think that's your point. There's a lot of buzz right now on the market and space me being a marketer. You hear community left and right influencers, talking about community. But a lot of folks are still asking themselves, what exactly is community? I don't know where to start. I don't really know what community is. Is it Facebook? Is it Twitter is it Reddit? Where do I start my community? Or is it slack? Ultimately, it's being able to clearly define what community truly is, right? There are social media, social media is not community. So understandable community is this critical for any individual or any business. And so as a star for us at higher logic, how we define community is that community is a shared space. So whether it's in virtual or physical, we say community is a place that folks share a common jargon or a common interest and passions. So it'll be spaced, right? I'm a tech company that does finance, right? And so the folks that are interacting and engaging with my company, they have the same passion. They have the same interests. The third thing we say is the community are folks that come together and mutually share with one another. And then the fourth thing is that they feel a sense of the longing. And all this is actually from our head of community, but that's how we define community, having a clarity of what it is, right? Now when you look at social media, social media is good, right? It's a place that you could be able to broadcast what you're doing in the market, a little bit, maybe talk with your users, but there's not a sense of deeper engagement, a lot of times when you look at social media, also having that data owning that data, being able to quote unquote control the space, social media doesn't allow you to do that. And that's what a community allows you to do. So before we get too far down the rabbit hole of platforms and sort of where to put your community, something that stuck out the most to me about what you just said, when I think about community, I think about having a shared identity with a collection of people. And that was the last bullet that you had of like, if I am in a community, I feel a sense of belonging and connection to the other people, whether it is through shared experiences, you know, people have religious communities, people have communities related to their sports teams, right? I'm a cow fan. It's a long suffering community. Right. There's all sorts of different ways that we aggregate together, but my feeling is that the heart of community is a sense of identity tied to being involved in a group that you want to interact with. Now you mentioned, well, social media isn't community. And I might argue with you a little bit there because I think that there's ways to do community that is hosted on somebody else's platform or on your own. I think that community is where people are aggregating to have conversations about shared interests. And you can do that in multiple different formats. You can go where people are or bring people to you. Talk to me about the tradeoffs between social media, should I have a community on Facebook, LinkedIn, what about other ways to communicate like a slack channel or do you try to create your own entity in your own I'm assuming that's higher logic, your own community? I do think that there is a place for social media. So going back to your initial question of the starting point, what you see is a lot of times individuals, companies will decide to start off with social media. They may even say, let me start off with a side channel, which in my mind is a communication device, right? It's a way to communicate with your quote unquote community, your people to engage and have that conversation. However, to be able to do it at scale, there is a need to be really targeted and have a focus on using a community platform. And now I'm not subscribing to, hey, go buy higher logic. That's not my spiel here. Nobody's gonna be mad if you do though. Just throwing that out there. I'm just saying, right? But with social media, there's someone else that owns the platform. Facebook owns a lot of it, but the twitters of the world, they own your customer data. So for you to be able to engage. All the conversations that you're having, how do you make it searchable? How is a link back to your tool stacks that you use today? When you want to send them a shoot or an email or a note, how do you do that? And a seamless manner. When you want to brand it within your own theme, right? There's a lot of loss when you use a lot of social media. Now again, what I'm saying is that start off, that may be a good venue for you. But in terms of having that data ownership, having that experience having that engagement, there's a place for community platforms for you to leverage those. I think there's a tradeoff there. You can

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A highlight from 138. Toxic Thoughts

Purposeful Social Selling

05:41 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from 138. Toxic Thoughts

"Me show you the new way. Hey, Friends. Welcome back to another episode of the show, excited to talk about today. It's actually a take two or a part two to one of our most downloaded episodes of this show on the podcast. One of the most downloaded episodes we have is something called success thoughts where I highlight the 7 key thoughts that I use and cultivate and nurture and think about when it came to growing my business. And a lot of you love it, you listen to it on repeat and I thought, you know, what if we were to talk about the opposite of success thoughts and I believe the most common thoughts that stall people out keep them from moving ahead totally sabotage their behavior and get in the way of the results. I'm going to call them toxic thoughts because they literally make us sick, just one thought can actually poison the one bad Apple, right? Can poison the rest. And so I was really thinking about sharing this with you through the lens of I don't want to say it's toxic so that you think your toxic or through the lens of shame or something's wrong with you or anything like that. It's more I want you to understand the power of how subtle and nuanced these thoughts are and I guarantee you have thought one, if not all of them at some point in time in your business. So what I'm going to do is today I'm going to walk you through the most common toxic thoughts that get in the way of results that have you self sabotaging that have you disrupting patterns in your business that are really getting in the way of the outcomes that you want. And I'm going to share not just the thought itself, but also what the thought creates and the habits that tend to come from that thought and why that thought is so toxic. So let's go, right? Okay, so the first one, and it's one a year all the time. I should be further along. And I know many of you have said this, you're probably thinking it right now. Heck, maybe you said it this morning when you woke up, but here's the thing. When you're thinking about I should be further along, think about the place you are saying that from. Oftentimes I should be further along is I would say a direct impact or a direct result of the activity of comparison. Because further along is usually because you are looking at where someone else is and measuring yourself against them or measuring yourself against an ideal, but almost almost all the time you're looking at somebody else and seeing how fast your perception of their speed of their success of their results remember there is your perception and there is reality, but we make judgments of ourselves based on our perceptions of others, and it can be incredibly detrimental. So this idea of I should be further along, oftentimes it also creates a lot of judgment because you're looking at somebody else, there's the reason why it's comparing despair. I compare myself to you and only creates despair in me. And I also think this thought of like, I should be further along, creates a feeling of resentment in your business. You start resenting the thing that isn't giving you what you want and the amount of time that you want it in. And oftentimes, I just want you to think of where do you think you should be at this point, and why do you think that? Why do you think you should be further along? Just because you've put in more time than somebody else doesn't mean that you have a right to or that you're entitled to be further along. I'm going to give you an example is in a lot of ways, I grew my coaching business faster than most coaches out there. And they can look at my business and say, well, I, my business should be as far along as Kristen's because look at where she got in two years or three years and look at why am I not there? And again, perception versus reality, but here's the thing. You can look at the time, like, okay, Kristin spent three years, I spent three years doing this and I got X number of results built in 8 figure business. You have someone that's been in the coaching business for the same period of time, but maybe they're making their first 6 figures. And that person can look at my business and being compared to spare and think because their perception of my business, not having any context, they'll think, well, because Kristen has been in that amount of time, I also should have that amount of results, but we haven't gotten clear on like, well, what has been the differentiator in our decision making? And I could sit down and ask that coach and be like, okay, have you invested over a quarter $1 million in mentorship if you paid to get in rooms? Did you live beneath your means? Did you put the majority of your income back into investments or did you try to live off of it right away? Did you invest in audience growth early? How serious are you about mentorship and if they're like, no, no, no, no, no and no, and also I spent ten years researching. So there's just a lot there. I'm like, hey, it might look like an over success, but that is your perception. The reality is this is 12 years in the making reality. This was a quarter $1 million in investments. Reality is this is a lot harder. But again, when we say I should be further along, again, we are thinking about this through a lens of idealism and often our perception of how we think others successes

Apple Kristen Kristin
A highlight from Using Logic vs Storytelling to Inspire Prospects -- James Ontra // Shufflrr

MarTech Podcast

08:20 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Using Logic vs Storytelling to Inspire Prospects -- James Ontra // Shufflrr

"About the importance of presentation management. Joining us is James Andre, who's the cofounder and CEO of shuffler, which is a powerful elegant, easy to use SaaS solution that finally brings decade old presentation technology in the 21st century. Powering the presentation strategies of hundreds of fortune level companies, shuffler helps marketing professionals, save time and money by transforming the humble PowerPoint slide and everyday marketing file into invaluable business assets. Yesterday, James and I talked about his strategies for marketing through storytelling, and today we're going to continue the conversation by talking about using logic versus storytelling to inspire prospects. This interview is brought to you by the let's talk loyalty podcast. The let's talk loyalty podcast is the world's first podcast specifically for loyalty marketing professionals. Let's talk loyalty is ranked in the top 5% of all podcasts worldwide and a toasted by Paula Thomas, who was a guest on the mar tech podcast, a former judge for the international loyalty awards, and the author of the book driving loyalty in convenience retail. Paula has published nearly 300 interviews with some of the world's leading loyalty practitioners from brands, including Microsoft, Ikea, and American Airlines. So if you're ready to raise your customers affinity for your brand and your LTV, join me and tune in to the let's talk loyalty podcast by going to let's talk loyalty dot com or searching for let's talk loyalty in your podcast app. That's the let's talk loyalty podcast with Paul Thomas at let's talk loyalty dot com. And one last thing I'll add before we get to today's interview, since you're into marketing podcasts, check out the marketing against the grain podcast. Join kit bonnard and Kieran flanagan, the CMO and SVP of HubSpot's marketing department as they share their experience and the unfiltered truth about marketing that no one else knows about. You can listen to the marketing against the grand podcast wherever you get your podcasts or go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. All right, here's the second part of my conversation with James entre cofounder and CEO of shuffler. James, welcome back to the martech podcast. Thank you for having me, Ben. Excited to have you back on the show. Excited to continue our conversation yesterday we talked about the need and some of the uses and applications of presentations. It's a very powerful way to not only present information, but also there's a lot of waste. A lot of companies are creating presentations, each person's responsible for their own presentation management, and we're not able to use and share some of the resources. It's important to keep your presentations consistent. That's really what shuffler does. It's presentation management across a large company, so you can borrow a slide. You can take information from all around your company and put it in a cohesive deck or presentation. Today I want to talk to you a little bit more about the way that you can actually build those presentations. And specifically, I think there's two ways to think about what you're trying to get across or how you're making your point with the presentation. There's the emotional driven storytelling aspect. And then there is the data driven logic based methodology. Do you have a preference or do you have thoughts on what actually makes an effective presentation using logic and data or a narrative and storytelling? I think it's a combination and it also has to do with your audience a little bit, a very technical crowd might desire more data where a diverse crowd you might reach them better emotionally to use an example is TV ads are all emotional. They don't talk about the details. AT&T doesn't talk about their great switching boards. They talk about reaching out and touch someone. That's amongst employee versus they're a great technology company. That's an old example. But there's still a balance in presentations on those two methods. I don't know what the contrasting metaphor is. And I understand what you're saying with AT&T, but there has to be a commercial out there that says 75% of people that use this drug see this type of performance in whatever they're doing. You know, 75% of people that take testosterone see improved workouts, whatever it is. Yeah, there's balance on both of them. So how do you figure out what is the right strategy for the message that you're trying to get across? To find that strategy, I would say, divide it into two, take a minute and say, what's the emotional component? What's the data component? Merge the two. Find one slide to hit the emotional component and then follow up with the data to nail it home. So let's bring it back to writing one O one, right? When I'm maybe it was high school or college, but you need an introduction to your essay, you need the body paragraphs, then you need the conclusion. There's a kind of relatively simple format for writing an essay. Is there a system that you recommend people follow when they're creating their decks? There is structure to follow. I don't think there's a hard system when I say structure you want to properly introduce it, you want to get your message out. You want to go to the, if it's a story, the conflict, the issue, or in the solution that goes through it, yes, you want to do that. But I truly believe that the Internet and social media has kind of blown that up where people tend to force the whole message into as few images, slides as possible. I had an example of what you were talking about. You were talking about an emotional play versus a data driven play. And I thought about the trident ads. The first thing is freshen your breath while you chew gum. Emotionally, you're going to be liked. Then they say, four out of 5 dentists surveyed recommend sugarless gum. They turn around and say, you're going to have fresh breath and by the way, the data says from the smart people that you should be doing this to save your teeth. So it seems like there's a format there where you're creating an emotional appeal first and then you're using your data to supplement that and prove your point. Actually, that's kind of what I was thinking earlier is pick a slide to hit the emotional point early, then justify it with the follow through because if someone feels something and they believe it, they want to justify it. They want to have the reasoning that says they're feelings are correct. We can look at social media, how people actually go out and seek their own feelings to be reverberated back to them. You know, we talked about this a little bit yesterday, but one of my biggest concerns with marketing through slides is the idea of slide bloat is that, you know, hey, four out of 5 dentists to recommend that you use trident and the other dentist, there's a 75% chance that he's an alcoholic and there's also these other, you know, you can continue to add fact and layer and layer and layer and layer to prove your point and you're always adding more data and more information. Fundamentally I guess what I'm asking is, how many slides is enough slides? How many slides is too much? I'm sure that's a loaded question, but when you're helping people figure out how to tell their story through this medium, how do they figure out how much information to include in the presentation and where to stop? I try not to give too much information. I personally like images and presenting myself personally. Anything over 25 30 slides is really exhausting unless you're in like technology and you're just going through the data and you're just presenting stuff. But if you're looking to convince someone, if you're looking to sell something, if you're looking to bring someone over to your point, the last thing you want to do is cloud it with too many issues. Pick the most serious ones present your emotional cause, follow it up with your hardest hammer and maybe a supplement. If you need to keep on going to prove your point, it starts looking like you're desperate and people start wondering if you really believe what you're trying to sell. It's time for one minute break to hear from our presenting sponsor HubSpot. Creating great customer experiences starts with having a full picture and having a full picture starts with having teams that are connected. HubSpot helps your team feel so connected that can finish each other's sales pitches. Yeah, that kind of connected. The HubSpot CRM platform is designed to unite your data apps and teams in a single, easy to use system. So your teams can spend their time having conversations where they matter most, with your customers. To learn how HubSpot can help your business grow better, visit HubSpot, dot com.

Shuffler James Andre Paula Thomas Kit Bonnard Kieran Flanagan James Entre James Paul Thomas Hubspot LTV American Airlines Ikea Paula Microsoft BEN AT
A highlight from Marketing Through Storytelling -- James Ontra // Shufflrr

MarTech Podcast

07:44 min | Last week

A highlight from Marketing Through Storytelling -- James Ontra // Shufflrr

"To talk about the importance of presentation management. Joining us is James entre, who's the cofounder and CEO of shuffler, which is a powerful, elegant, easy to use SaaS solution that finally brings decade old presentation technology in the 21st century. Powering the presentation strategies of hundreds of fortune level companies, shuffler helps marketing professionals, save time and money by transforming the humble PowerPoint slide and everyday marketing file into invaluable business assets. And today, James and I are going to talk about marketing through storytelling. Today's interview is brought to you by E webinar. Webinars are great for awareness and they're great for nurture and they're also great for lead gen. But there's just one massive problem with scaling your webinar program. Someone always has to be there to run them. But what if you could run your highest converting webinar a hundred times every month? Well, now you can. With the webinar, the leading webinar automation platform that turns any video into a delightful, interactive webinar. With E webinar, you can run hundreds of webinars every month without actually being in front of a camera. Just create a video, set a recurring schedule and sit back while your prospects engage. And yes, you can still interact with warm leads in real time or later through email. That means you can do webinars 24/7 and never miss a lead. Visit E webinar dot com to see how it works and start automating your webinar strategy today. And one last thing I'll add before we get to today's interview, since you're into marketing podcasts, check out the marketing against the grain podcast. Join kit bonnard and Kieran flanagan, the CMO and SVP of HubSpot's marketing department as they share their experience and the unfiltered truth about marketing that no one else knows about. You can listen to the marketing against the grand podcast wherever you get your podcasts or go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. All right, here's the first part of my conversation with James entre, cofounder and CEO of schaffler. James, welcome to the martek podcast. Thank you for having me, Ben. Excited to have you as our guest. Excited to talk about what some people don't necessarily consider a marketing channel, but more, I don't know, sort of an internal communication tool. You work and help people create presentations. Tell me why marketers should consider a presentation part of their marketing arsenal. Because presentations are communications tools that are used by everyone in your organization and many times they're overlooked and everyone's kind of doing them in silos and spending a lot of time and effort on their own efforts, yet if it's managed and in a consistent method, it'll be easier to configure presentations and easier to give them and more concise messages. I feel like presentations get a bad rap, and now everybody, you know, I worked at eBay for years and there was always the meeting that you would sit down. It would be like, let's walk through this 45 page deck I created and its data and stats and the slides end up being too complex and they're just a bear to get through and it's basically somebody turning a word dock into a presentation. It's my nightmare. I'm sure other people feel the same way. As we start thinking about using presentations for something like storytelling, give me the secrets for actually how to create a good presentation. Well, the first thing is you want to think of your presentation, not just as a series of bullet points to vomit words on people. But actually, every presentation is a story in every slide is a scene. And if you think of each one of the slides as something that you're trying to tell something about what's going on, not just like spit information at them, you start looking at it more of a storytelling, what's happening in this scene, how am I teaching them in this one? And you're moving along a process. And that becomes storytelling. So when we think about storytelling, presentations aside, you know, you mentioned thinking of it like your crafting a movie, right? There's a narrative that you're building, and you're creating a document that outlined the individual scenes. Not everyone is a movie maker, not everyone is versed in storytelling, so give us the lay of the land when it comes to telling an effective story. I'll start with everyone is an effective storyteller and you learned how to tell a story the first time your parent came in the bedroom and it was a mess and you told your mom that a green dragon came and messed up your room. How did you know about the green dragon? But think of your slide or what you're doing and try to think about how would you communicate that if you had no words. If you talk to someone next to you who didn't have a lot of information and you were just going to be conversational with two or three sentences telling them what that scene was or that slide was. And then pull the slide back up and think of what you actually said and you'll find out that your messaging is more emotional as opposed to informational. And when it becomes more emotional and you move people, it's the way they feel after the meeting. That's an interesting contrast thinking about using slides to present emotion, not information. I mentioned before the nightmare presentation of 45 dense slides were all someone is doing is reading off of the slides. There's no point in that conversation. So how do you figure out what to distill down and when should you be presenting something that is emotionally driven as opposed to data based? Well, database is about convincing someone once they've realized they have an emotional problem, meaning a plumber. I could say, you know, that drip drip drip underneath your kitchen sink. Yes. That's an emotional argument I just made. I can follow that up with, you know that water is going to leak into your floor and bend your hardwood floors and it's going to get into the molding and you're going to have all this other stuff. But I hit you that moment of, God, that drips driving me nuts. Now I've opened up the ability to go in there. So I try to find some unique characteristic that is kind of uniform for your audience. I picked that for plumbing because leaky pipes is what plumbers do. Right. So the idea here is that when you're crafting a story and narrative, you need to address the underlying problem. Now when you're thinking about that in terms of presentation created, you have a limited amount of space. And this is something that affects marketers not only with their ad copy with their mobile app development. Obviously, presentations as well, you only have so much real estate and it's really easy to clutter your message with more information and supplementation. How do you figure out how to keep things as simple as possible without while also presenting the information that supports the underlying problem you're trying to solve? I'll give the answer and then an example. The first way is to think of the words that are on the page that can be represented with a graphic, an image, something that people can look at and gather a lot more information out of. That's the very first thing. But secondly, our society because social media has been programmed to make excellent emotional slides. Every meme is a slide. Imagine if your presentation was 5 really effective memes that are online, almost all of them have very minimal wording, but they cause you to think they cause you to contrast. It makes a point. Much like movie making, every scene they want to move someone somehow at the end of that slide, how does someone want to feel? Do they want to feel like they got more knowledge? Do they want to feel scared? Do they want to feel like there's an impending doom that you have to buy my product because you're going to save me and you want to think of the emotional reasons of why your product is being purchased in the first place and spend a slide or two trying to convey that. Maybe it's with a graphic, maybe it's with something else. But once that's conveyed, your audience is ready to digest the information much better because the information has context.

Shuffler James Entre Kit Bonnard Kieran Flanagan Schaffler James Hubspot BEN Ebay
A highlight from CRM's Role in Customer Experience -- Lars Helgeson // GreenRope

MarTech Podcast

08:11 min | Last week

A highlight from CRM's Role in Customer Experience -- Lars Helgeson // GreenRope

"The marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks, they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the mar tech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to the martek podcast. I'm your host Benjamin Shapiro, and today we're going to discuss why CRM is the key to alleviating your business growth problems. Joining us is Lars helgerson, who is the founder and CEO of green rope, which is a complete CRM all in one sales marketing and operations management tool that helps consolidate automate and streamline your daily sales and marketing operations. And in addition to providing us with our guest today, green rope is a sponsor of the mar tech podcast. Yesterday, Lars and I talked about using a CRM as a growth strategy, and today we're going to continue the conversation talking about CRM's role in customer experience. Today's interview is brought to you by wistia. You've probably heard on this podcast that video is an essential marketing tool. Long video short videos tutorials, product demos, testimonials, video marketing can do so much for your brand. But so many companies are hesitant to give video marketing a try because they think it's too complicated too expensive to something. Well, wistia is a video platform that simplifies video marketing. We're talking about a customizable video player, lead generation tools, video analytics, and much more. And it's a platform specifically designed to help us marketers with videos. If you're ready to upgrade your marketing videos, check out wistia dot com slash martech that's WIS TIA dot com slash martek. And one last thing I'll add before we get to today's interview, since you're into marketing podcasts, check out the marketing against the grain podcast. Join kit bonnard and Kieran flanagan, the CMO and SVP of HubSpot's marketing department as they share their experience and the unfiltered truth about marketing that no one else knows about. You can listen to the marketing against the grand podcast wherever you get your podcasts or go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. All right, here's the second part of my conversation with Lars helgason, the founder and CEO of green rope. Lars, welcome back to the mar tech podcast. Great to be here. Thanks for having me back. Always excited to have you on the show. Always good to talk to one of our sponsors and I'm excited to continue our conversation from yesterday where we talked about a couple ways that your CRM is not just a conversion optimization tool a lead management service, but it can actually help you fill the top of your funnel and make your business more profitable and a lot of that has to do with understanding who your customers are, understanding what those relationships look like, and the being able to mine the data to optimize your top of funnel marketing activity. There's also a role beyond just getting somebody to the finish line with your CRM, which is your customer experience. They call it a customer relationship management, not a lead management service for a reason. So talk to me a little bit about CRM's role in building great customer experiences. I think the important thing about how a business needs to envision its relationships with its customers is to know that they're all a little bit different. You'll have people that will do a lot of research before they talk to you. You'll have people that will maybe hear about you or your brand from someone that they know and immediately jump to you. You'll have people that find you on a search engine like Google. And all those people are going to see you a little bit differently. The relationships are going to be a little bit different. And they may use your products and services a little bit differently. So we have to always think about all of those. There's no way we can possibly model whatever single person could do. And how they could possibly do use your products and services. I'm always amazed. There are so many different ways that people will creatively use what our services or products are. So having a CRM is an important way to log all of that to understand all of that. Because the user experience is different for every single person. And I think that's the important part of how we need to think as business owners as marketers as salespeople to understand that you can try. It's human nature for us to put people in boxes so that we can easily categorize them. It's something that our brain does naturally. But no one wants to feel like they're being put in a box. Everyone wants to feel like they're treated like they're special. And as a business, if we can leverage our CRM to create that feeling, then we're going to create a better user experience. And that's going to create happier clients. It's going to create higher conversion rates, which also will create more revenue and more growth. So this is a direct effect, a direct impact on the success of our business is how well can we create this personalized positive user experience? Talk to me about when the user experience starts. Normally, I think about user experiences, post first payment. Now you're a user and it seems like there would be separate tools other than your CRM to manage what that experience is. Where does the user experience start and why is the CRM the right product to help you optimize it? So the user experience starts really early. One of the most common things that you'll hear when people are doing paper click ads, for example. They'll say that if you're going to do an ad on a Google site that you want the language of the ad to match the language that's on the landing page. So if you're mentioning a particular theme or a product element or something about some keywords, some phrase that attracts somebody's attention, and you bring them to a landing page after they click on that link. And the landing page language matches the language of the ad, it has an enormous impact on click through. Which seems like such a subtle thing. And that's sort of like the very earliest top of funnel example of a positive user experience. One thing that you can do with CRM is if you're able to identify a particular target market or a niche or even individuals that you want to sell your product to so you get device IDs or whatever from various different data providers. You can create a message in your ad and your landing page that are specifically tailored to meet the needs of the people that you're directly targeting. And that's going to get you a much higher conversion rate than just a generic spammy buy our thing kind of message. So the CRM plays an important part in all that. So if we know that we had a particular ad or particular campaign that was targeted towards people that are having a particular struggle. So if someone has a problem and your product or services is going to solve that problem, the ad talks about that problem and how you're going to solve it, the landing page talks about that problem and how you're going to solve it, you gather their information, and then the follow-up message, the primary part of that follow-up message that they get, whether that's done through retargeting ads, whether that's done through email, whether it's done through a phone call or text messaging, any of those things, if they're consistent all the way through, the lead now knows that you're listening. You care about their problem. You know enough about them and you care enough about them to be able to address that problem. You can automate a lot of that. And that creates that feeling that you as a business care about this lead and really that's the positive user experience. It's time for one minute break to hear from our presenting sponsor HubSpot. Creating great customer experiences starts with having a full picture and having a full picture starts with having teams that are connected. HubSpot helps your team feel so connected that can finish each other's sales pitches. Yeah, that kind of connected. The HubSpot CRM platform is designed to unite your data apps and teams in a single, easy to use system. So your teams can spend their time having conversations where they matter most, with your customers. To learn how HubSpot can help your business grow better, visit HubSpot dot com.

Benjamin Shapiro Lars Helgerson Green Rope Wistia Lars Kit Bonnard Kieran Flanagan Lars Helgason CRM Hubspot Google
A highlight from Advertising Delivers For DoorDash, With VP Of Ads Toby Espinosa

AdExchanger Talks

02:26 min | Last week

A highlight from Advertising Delivers For DoorDash, With VP Of Ads Toby Espinosa

"Toby, welcome to the podcast. Nice to be your Alison. Thank you so much for having me. So it's become my habit with these podcasts to ask my guests to share one fun kind of unknown fact about themselves, but I was doing a little classic LinkedIn stocking of you before the recording. And I found a fun fact of my own, which is that you're a lecturer at Stanford. And not only are you a lecturer at Stanford, you also founded an entire course at Stanford, and I'm going to quote the description here. It demystifies the alternative investment landscape through the lens of industry experts, which I need actually that to be demystified for me. What does that mean? What does that mean? Yeah, absolutely. So again, thank you for having me Allison. A little bit of background on me. I grew up in Palo Alto, California, which is the hometown of Stanford University. I left to go to school when I was 17 back east. And then I worked for about two years at a family office. And a family office is basically just a large holding company that invests across multiple sectors to kind of keep the family or large foundations that they manage into the future into perpetuity. And so when I got to Stanford with the idea of joining a company, a young startup where I could go and kind of take on the world and build, build the future that I was proud to build. I really also wanted to make sure I wanted to think about how to get alignment between a long-term mission of a company and also the core investing practice that I had learned for a couple of years. And bring that knowledge to students that were around me so that when folks wanted to think about starting a business or joining a company thinking about not only what the mission and values of the company were, the CEO, et cetera, but also the people that were on the cap table. And so, and so yeah, that was the idea of starting the company since then starting the class since then the class is expanded, continues to this day and is run by an incredible professor who's a mentor of mine. But yeah, it's a fun, that's a fun side thing that I still continue to love doing.

Stanford University Toby Alison Linkedin Palo Alto Allison California
A highlight from CRM as a Growth Strategy -- Lars Helgeson // GreenRope

MarTech Podcast

07:45 min | Last week

A highlight from CRM as a Growth Strategy -- Lars Helgeson // GreenRope

"Teams like pattern, sweetgreen, and Google who are saving more than ten hours per week using air, the leading platform for managing and automating creative operations. To learn more, go to air dot ink slash that's AIR dot INC slash martech. And one last thing I'll add before we get to today's interview, since you're into marketing podcasts, check out the marketing against the grain podcast. Join kit bonar and Kieran flanagan, the CMO and SVP of HubSpot's marketing department as they share their experience and the unfiltered truth about marketing that no one else knows about. You can listen to the marketing against the grand podcast wherever you get your podcasts or go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. All right, here's the first part of my conversation with Lars, helgason, the founder and CEO of green rope. Lars, welcome to the mar tech podcast. Thank you for having me. I guess I should say welcome back. You were a guest of our as a couple of years ago, and now you're returning not only as a guest, but also as a member of our sponsorship program, so let me start off by saying, welcome back and thank you for all your support of the mar tech podcast. Thank you. I think that one of the things that we see industry wide is the need for sharing information between people. You could call it education, you could call it training. You could just call it an exchange of ideas. I think the whole industry when it comes to marketing technology is in such a state of flux and there are so many different opinions and experiences and different ways to use technology to paint in what industry you're in or what company size you're in, that I think it's really important to have exchanges like this so that we can share ideas and just be able to learn from each other. I could not agree with you more the cliche way to restate what you're saying is every company is now a media company and that seems to be one of the tectonic shifts that's happening where all content producers were all distributing our content and try to build relationships because our customers are not coming inbound and going through our sales process there self researching. They are deciding what products they want to use off platform getting referrals, consuming content, maybe not just listening, and that changes how we think about all of our marketing data and it brings us to our topic today why CRM is actually your growth strategy. We're having a hard time getting people to get to our website, buying our performance marketing is getting more expensive. People are doing all their research off our sites on other platforms. So how are you thinking about using a CRM to not only capture the data for people coming to your platform, but to capture the experiences when they are off platform as well? There's only so much you can do off platform. But I think in the sense that you can control when someone comes to something that you can control. You want to be able to provide the information to your team so that they do the best that they can. You want to set your salespeople up for success. And I think that a lot of that comes from having the right technology providing the right information to the team members when they need it. And then having the automation tools that allow you to actually execute on whatever that strategy is. But so much of it comes down to understanding what's actually happening. Like you were saying, so many more research steps are being taken about our products and services before someone even reaches out to us now because there are all these platforms that have evolved, whether they're review platforms or they're just informational platforms or their companies that for SEO, they build these top ten products to do. Listicles. All of those lead magnets, you have to figure out as a company where you're going to gather leads from and then once you have control of that lead, then what do you do? And I think that's the challenge. And that's where CRM is so important because then what do you do? That makes the difference between converting at a 10% rate or at a 20% rate, which can have a massive impact on your ability to grow as a business. I think about growth and often we think about growth as filling the top of your funnel. How do I get more leads? How do I get more customers? How do I continue to build grow and have more relationships? Talk to me about what you think growth is and why is CRM an important component in that? So on the surface, you would think that a CRM is sort of a middle to bottom of the funnel kind of thing, because you're really managing the process of when someone gives you their information, whatever it is, whether they give you their phone number or their email or they walk in your store, you have a physical interaction with them or you meet them at a trade show or whatever. That's mid funnel type of interaction. But the reality is, if you measure it right and you are able to track where these people are coming from as a business that helps you define where you should put your money at the top of the funnel. So if you're going for efficiency and there's sort of like this old school macroeconomics terms where you can build a company for profit or you can build a company for revenue. And the two are often very different kinds of businesses. And you can think about the same when you're thinking about your sales and marketing strategy as well. Where if you're building for revenue, you're trying to get as many leads in the door as you can. And you've got systems in place to try and convert those leads, but really it's top, top, top of funnel. When you start to really use technology and look at how CRM can be used, it's really about understanding how to build your company for profit, which is really what we want as business owners, right? I mean, we want to maximize profit. We want to get the most leads that hit the top of our funnel down to the bottom. So there will be various different ways that we calculate what that process looks like. What that funnel looks like, depending on what we're selling, because there's sometimes we sell lots of different things as companies. Sometimes their services that require a lot more hand holding. And so what kind of leads do you want for those kinds of deals? Because they're going to be different than, say, something that is just like a product type of sale. So as a business owner, we have to take a step back and look at what are we selling? Why are we selling it? And how do we connect the dots between what we learned from our CRM? And what happens at the top of the funnel? So if we look at the example you're selling some sort of a service that may be fairly complicated, you may bring leads in through social media, they may come in through advertising, through SEO, PPC, they may have trade shows. If you've got all these different ways of bringing people in, and if you're selling a high touch type of a service, those leads will be different. They'll work differently with your team and you'll have different success rates, different conversion rates, depending on where they come from. So you may be able to analyze and say, well, we know that if we do say a competitive ad campaign on Google and we stack that up against a competitive ad campaign on Bing or we target people that search for a keyword or certain set of keywords that we think are highly correlated with people interested in our products or this particular service. We're going to have a variable number of cost per lead that comes in for each of those. But it's not enough to say the competitive ad campaign brought us ten leads and the normal keyword campaign brought us in 5 because you then have to look at the quality of those leads, what their conversion rates are with their average conversion values are to understand which one of those is actually where you should be spending more money. And you can't do that if you don't have a CRM. It's time for one minute break to hear from our presenting sponsor HubSpot. Creating great customer experiences starts with having a full picture and having a full picture

Sweetgreen Air Dot Inc Kit Bonar Kieran Flanagan Helgason Lars Hubspot Google Bing
A highlight from How to Use Google Analytics 4 for Marketing

Social Media Marketing Podcast

01:44 min | Last week

A highlight from How to Use Google Analytics 4 for Marketing

"This is the podcast for marketers and business owners who want to know what works with social media. Today I'm going to be joined by Dana di Tommaso and we're going to explore how to use Google Analytics for for marketers. I know that many of you have been sitting in their hands and maybe aware of the fact that the analytics as we know it is coming to an end very, very, very soon and that's the reason why you need to pay attention to today's episode. You're going to learn a lot. By the way, I'm at stelzner on Instagram and at Mike stelzner on Twitter. And if you're new to this show, be sure to follow us so you don't miss any of our future content. I don't think I've ever shared this story. Our conference social media marketing world has no speaker application process. It never has. Instead, it's 100% recruitment. And there's never a guarantee that a speaker will ever be asked back. And that's kind of a novel concept in the world of conferences. Here's how we do it. Me and my team were always on the lookout for new talent based on our internal research. What we do is we do these studies multiple times a year and we study what you want to learn more about, then we go on an active hunt to find amazing people from diverse backgrounds who are excellent communicators and know what the heck they're talking about. We do a lot of vetting before we ask anyone to speak. This means when you attend social media marketing world, you'll experience speakers who really want to be there who really know what they're talking about and they really care about helping you get real results. Our customers tell us it's a super refreshing experience. It's kind of magical what happens when you get amazing people under the same roof. Let me ask you this question. Has attending social media marketing world been on your wish list?

Dana Di Tommaso Mike Stelzner Instagram Google Twitter
A highlight from #516: 72% Of Entrepreneurs Struggle With Mental Health: Proven Ways To Deal With This with Lori Gottlieb

Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

02:22 min | Last week

A highlight from #516: 72% Of Entrepreneurs Struggle With Mental Health: Proven Ways To Deal With This with Lori Gottlieb

"Especially I think for entrepreneurs, they get very afraid of uncertainty. You know, like I know this, this is safe even though I have a feeling there's probably isn't the right thing and I need to kind of move in a different direction. They think, oh, but I've invested so much in this direction already. Well, sunk costs. So you're losing your opportunity cost right there is what could you be doing with this time instead that takes you on a better track, even if it feels scary. It's like being plopped into a foreign land where you don't know the language. You don't know the customs. You don't know your way around yet, but it might be really exciting. I'm Amy porterfield, ex corporate girl turned CEO of a multi 7 figure business, but it wasn't all that long ago that I lacked the confidence. The budget and the time to focus on growing my small but mighty business. Fast forward past many failed attempts in lessons learned and you'll see the business I have today. One that changes lives and gives me more freedom than I ever thought possible. One that used to only exist as a daydream. I created the online marketing made easy podcast to give you simple actionable. Step by step strategies to help you do the same. If you're an ambitious entrepreneur or one in the making who's looking to create a business that makes an impact and a life you love, you're in the right place friend. Let's get started. Well, hey there, my friend. I'm so glad you're here today because there is something that we, as entrepreneurs, need to be talking about more. And that is our mental health. Did you know that 72% of entrepreneurs struggle with mental health issues? I'm raising my hand right now. I'm absolutely part of that 72%. And I'm curious if you are as well. And here's the thing, if you don't manage your mental health well, entrepreneurship can be lonely, you can have decision fatigue. You can have burnout, tons of external pressures like being part of the hustle culture, all of that is showing up for us anyway, but if we're not managing our mental health, it's taking over. And so because I believe to my core

Amy Porterfield
A highlight from Video Creative Approval Process -- Niklas Dorn // Filestage

MarTech Podcast

07:07 min | Last week

A highlight from Video Creative Approval Process -- Niklas Dorn // Filestage

"Minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks, they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the mar tech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to the Mart podcast. I'm your host Benjamin Shapiro, and today we're going to discuss effective ways to get customer feedback faster. Joining us is Nicholas dorn, who is the CEO of file stage, which is a content review and approval platform for marketing teams. Team members can comment on videos, images, documents, and even live websites. And imagine all of your project file formats, versions, comments, and approval decisions in one platform with a simple to share link that your stakeholders can tap on to add comments, tag teammates, and give the full context as you watch the feedback roll in. And in addition to providing us with our guest today, file stage and Nicholas are also sponsors of the mar tech podcast. So far this week, Nicholas and I have talked about how to get feedback faster in yesterday we talked about closing the gap between content creation and publication. And today we're going to wrap up our conversation talking about the video creative approval process. All right, here's the third part of my conversation with Nicholas dohrn, the CEO of file stage. Nicholas, welcome back to the mar tech podcast. Thank you. Pleasure to be back again. I am selfishly very excited for this episode, and you know why? I think that we're gonna get into video marketing. And this is a way that you can actually really help us. I have not done a lot of video creation over the last, I don't know, ten years. My first startup was a video guitar lesson website and we were basically selling a package of 50 guitar lesson videos for $50. Hey, the first 50 guitar lessons you need in one place. And it worked? No, not terrible. That's why I'm a podcast host now. But 50 videos for 50 or a $100 or whatever we priced it at back in 2005 was a great offer. That doesn't seem to be the case now. Now you need thousands and thousands of videos and all sorts of creative and I'm sitting here saying we create podcasts on a daily basis. How do we take advantage of E YouTube and TikTok and Twitter and Instagram and Facebook and all these different channels that are now becoming video reliant, help me think about what first off the current landscape of video marketing looks like and then how can we think about creating great videos at scale? For me the biggest difference today in when you look at content and video itself is like companies really have started to produce a lot and then turned marketing basically into media production firms within the company, right? So loan like the output, the amount of content that you produce is a lot higher than 5 years ago and I don't know salt in times higher than ten years ago. So one thing, if you look back, let's say in the old days, you produce like one big advertising one TV spot, took a week time, produced it with your producers in the studio, spend a lot of money on it, and then it went live, and I think you run it on TV, maybe for three months. And you were like doing a good job then. But nowadays, you have to serve you mentioned it all kind of different social media channels. You have to serve all kinds of different segments within social media. So you want to target like really fine granular. And how can you achieve that basically in most cases you don't have the budget that you had maybe ten years ago to produce that big spot you have maybe half the budget and this means you have to start to produce a lot more efficient, maybe you have to produce 200 videos with just the same budget. And when you start to think about those dimensions, you realize that you need to come up with a really efficient process to produce video content on scale and at the same time you need to be really clear how to edit small changes and make small changes in order to fit the right social media channels for your audience. A lot to unpack there. What I'm hearing from you is over the last decade, the last 15 years, we've gone from this strategy of high fidelity, small volume of content. We're going to produce a television ad. We're going to run it on TV. It's only going to be on TV and it's going to be three months. We only need one ad every three months. Let's go spend a $1 million on our creative. Now over the last 15 years, we've gone from, well, we're not just going to run on TV. We probably aren't going to run on TV. We're probably going to run on 15 different social networks, YouTube, our own blog, and we're changing the not only content length format usage, probably the amount of fidelity that's included in it as well, so we're producing a higher volume of lower quality content. Now, why is that the case? Why is the quality of content going down? Why do users care less about fidelity? I'm not sure if the quality of content actually goes down, maybe the quality of the production process is a different one. I think on the one side, we have technology that allows us to produce for very low cost high video quality, right? And at the same time, I think maybe people are less obsessed about a strict format or a strict structure or seeing stuff produced in the studio versus it can look a bit like I don't know, share yourself and it's still fine as long as the content is interesting to them. I think that's a great answer and you're right. It's not that the content quality has gone down. It's that higher quality is accessible to everyone because guess what we all have iPhones in our pockets. And the cameras on these things are awesome. And so you can create a high quality video that's probably as good technically as what was being shot on television ten years ago, just by pulling your phone out of your pocket. Now, it's easier to create content pretty much anybody can do it. So what are some of the ways that you can create content at scale that still is high quality, not only from the fidelity perspective, but also from the content perspective. How do you just not take everything that people are shooting from their phones in your company and say, okay, let's just go publish this everywhere we can. How do you figure out what's good? For us, it all starts with a clear, clear deal, what you like to answer. I think it all starts in terms of, hey, who's your target audience? What are they interested in, what do they want to hear? And then you can come up with a plan and say, okay, there are 20 different questions, 30 different questions. They're interested in. Let's try to answer them for them in an interesting way. And once you have your, let's say, content plan calendar in place and the stories you want to tell, then I think you can start to think about how you want to produce it and pick your format, then you can say, okay, we prefer that it's like employee content and everybody just gets an iPhone and answers different questions or you can start out and say we work with a small production firm that is specialized let's say in small YouTube clips and can produce stuff for us on scale or you can even decide okay now we build our own studio in-house always the same setup but still we try to let's say be as useful as possible to our target audience and I think this is a standard we have established for 5

Benjamin Shapiro Nicholas Nicholas Dorn File Stage Nicholas Dohrn Tiktok Mart Youtube Instagram Twitter Facebook
A highlight from Closing the Gap Between Content Creation & Publication -- Niklas Dorn // Filestage

MarTech Podcast

09:16 min | Last week

A highlight from Closing the Gap Between Content Creation & Publication -- Niklas Dorn // Filestage

"Get customer feedback faster. Joining us is Nicholas dorn, who is the CEO of file stage, which is a content review and approval platform for marketing teams. Team members can comment on videos, images documents, and even live websites, and imagine all of your project file formats, versions, comments, and approval decisions in one platform with a simple to share link that your stakeholders can tap on to add comments, tag teammates, and give the full context as you watch the feedback roll in. And in addition to providing us with our guest today, file stage and Nicholas are also sponsors of the mar tech podcast. Yesterday, Nicholas and I talked about how to get feedback faster and today we're going to continue the conversation talking about how to close the gap between content creation and publication. All right, here's the second part of my conversation with Nicholas dorn, the CEO of file stage. Nicholas, welcome back to the martek podcast. Yeah, hi. Thank you. Always a pleasure to have you here and excited to continue our conversation where yesterday we talked about the importance of feedback and not only in the importance, but the pace of feedback. How do you reach out to the right people at the right time and get their feedback in a format that's actually useful? Honestly, it's where file stages incredibly helpful and I want to talk to you a little bit about not just asking for feedback but also making sure that you're creative process flows. So talk to me a little bit about how you can go from the creative process through publication actually getting your content up live and in front of your customers. How can you make that process faster? Yes, I'm happy to run you through a process. So what we recognize is I mean on the one side, most companies and teams out there they start with a project management software, they have something good in place, like Monday, asana, G rom, they're really good tools out there. Then as the next thing in the content production process, there is a really good creative software, right? So you use figma sketch, Adobe suite, and I think also most companies out there have invested in good software on pretty good shape. And then from there from the creative side, once you produce something, it needs to go through a review and approval process. This is definitely like where our sweet spot is and where we recognize that most companies out there I would say around 90% of the companies still have a pretty old school reading approval process, but once the file is approved, it goes into the distribution mode. So it needs to go out via social media. You want to promote it somewhere you want to upload it to YouTube and so on and so forth. And those are for me like high level four major steps in production. I had a conversation with a potential content as a service client and we make podcasts for other brands and they have an existing podcast. It's in the productivity space. And their founders had somebody in-house that was working on their podcast and the person left and they had to go figure out how to create a podcast and that's why they reached out to us. And they didn't understand why would you charge a 600 to a $1000 per podcast episode all we're doing is turning on the mics, pressing record, we've got 15 minutes of audio, don't you just take that and upload it and it's like, no, there's 15 different steps that require 15 different people to get that piece of content up and running. You've got to hand it to an editor. You've got to hand it to a copywriter. You got to have somebody write the show notes, the quotes, a blogger, you got to have a social media person, you have to have somebody that's going to edit video, then somebody's got to take all those assets and publish them, distribute them to the guests. There's a lot of work that goes into real content syndication. So talk to me about how a, you can help executives understand what goes into this process, and then also how do you expedite that process to make sure it's efficient. So one thing I think that's really impressive normally, we run a big report last year. We ask a lot of marketeers basically how the review and the proof stuff, how much time they spend with feedback and what we learned is that the average person working in marketing spends 15 hours a week giving or receiving feedback, which is a big number and especially that's the other learning, the more senior the people are, the more time they spend giving and receiving feedback and once you realize how much time you spend on this kind of process you realize as well that it makes a lot of sense to start optimizing this process, right? To save time. Absolutely. It's an underratedly difficult part of the process, which is getting all of your stakeholders to not only understand what their roles and responsibilities are, but to be able to add their contribution. So when you think about the creation process, I sort of talked about how we daisy chain and handoff, we use Monday dot com to assign responsibilities for each task. We've got clear roles and responsibilities. We've basically micro tasked out and automated the content production process. What do you think are the standard processes for people that are starting to think about getting from content creation to publication? And one of the basic building blocks of going from concept to actual publication of a piece of content. On the one side it stars again with looking at what kind of company you are, are you an agency or are your brand? Are you small? Are you large? If you are working for a brand, typically you have already a lot of requirements coming from your organization. So they require you to run through different approval steps, for example. It's first. You can marketing, then there is the product team, then maybe there's a sales team that needs to review and approve things and then finally, legal needs to check everything that you publish, right? On the other side, if you're an agency, typically you aim to make your customers happy, your clients happy. And what we recognized most of them have kind of four eye principle where they in general say there is a creative director or somebody higher in the organization that is responsible to make sure everything that they send out to client fulfills like really high quality standards. But then the question mark is, how do you make sure this is working on scale? So if somebody is on vacation or I say, how do you make sure you always deliver the same really good quality and don't have fluctuation in your content output? And I think this is where, again, like a really good approval process comes into place. So for an agency, typically you can start with something simple and just say there's internal review and there's an external review. And internally, you make sure, let's say the designer produces something and then the art directors reviewing it before sending it out to the actual client and then your client gives you feedback basically on all the artwork you send and then again like maybe the art director is translating it back for the designer telling him basically what the client wants because it's often not clear what clients really mean and want and what they need. So you have a lot of translation work and I think that's the other big part and a job of somebody in an agency but also of a brand manager and a big big organization. You know, often we think about ways that you can expedite your pace of content creation as either a body count or your simplifying a process and you're duplicating the same work. And that doesn't always lead to the best results. Often what helps you produce the best content at scale the fastest is being able to coordinate with your team efficiently and a lot of that goes into the feedback creation process, the feedback aggregation process, and just having a plan in place to be able to take the right steps in order to go from content creation to publication. So as you think about your content creation efforts, think about ways that you can exploit not only the volume and simplify the types of content that you're creating, I urge you to also think about how you're going to collect and aggregate your feedback in that process as well. And that wraps up this episode of the mar tech podcast. Thanks for listening to my conversation with Nicholas Doran, the CEO of file stage. Join us again tomorrow when Nicholas and I wrap up our conversation talking about the video creative approval process. If you can't wait until our next episode and you'd like to learn more about Nicholas, you can find a link to our LinkedIn profile and our show notes. You can contact him on Twitter where his handle is Nicholas dohrn. That's an IK LAS DOR N, or you could visit his company's website, which is file stage dot IO file IO. Just one more link in our show notes I'd like to tell you about. If you didn't have a chance to take notes while you were listening to this podcast, head over to martek pod dot com where we have summaries of all of our episodes and contact information for our guests. You can also subscribe to our weekly newsletter and you can even send us your topic suggestions or your marketing questions, which we'll answer live on our show. Of course, you can always reach out on social media, our handle is mar tech pod, MAR, TEC, POD, on LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, or you can contact me directly. My handle is Ben Jay shapp. And if you haven't subscribed yet and you want a daily stream of marketing and technology knowledge in your podcast feed, we're gonna publish an episode every day this year, so hit the subscribe button in your podcast app, and we'll be back in your feed tomorrow morning. All right, that's it for today, but until next time, my advice is to just focus on keeping your customers happy.

Nicholas Dorn Nicholas File Stage Adobe Youtube Nicholas Doran Nicholas Dohrn Linkedin Twitter Ben Jay Shapp Instagram Facebook
A highlight from #515: Behind-the-Scenes Of My Latest DCA Launch: The Highs, Lows, & Magical Moments

Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

04:23 min | Last week

A highlight from #515: Behind-the-Scenes Of My Latest DCA Launch: The Highs, Lows, & Magical Moments

"You said that it's like, it's not working. And I said, Amy, we did something different. We are doing something different. We're not just sitting here, twiddling our thumbs and waiting for the magic to happen. We are making the changes necessary for us to really see the needle move. And I do think that it was just, it was something magical because what happened is that maybe we didn't see the jump that we wanted to see in the number. But what it did is it changed our mindset in the moment of the launch where we were going and we're like, oh my gosh, something's not working. What's what's going on? What's happening? Then we did that pivot. We got excited the energy filled the room and it literally took us to the very end of the launch, where we just were able to apply the changes and do the work and really, really work until the very end because I told you I was like, it's not over until it's over. I'm Amy porterfield, ex corporate girl turned CEO of a multi 7 figure business, but it wasn't all that long ago that I lacked the confidence. The budget and the time to focus on growing my small but mighty business. Fast forward passed many failed attempts in lessons learned and you'll see the business I have today. One that changes lives and gives me more freedom than I ever thought possible. One that used to only exist as a daydream. I created the online marketing made easy podcast to give you simple actionable. Step by step strategies to help you do the same. If you're an ambitious entrepreneur or one in the making who's looking to create a business that makes an impact and a life you love, you're in the right place friend. Let's get started. Hey there, friend. Welcome back to another episode of the online marketing made easy podcast. This is going to be a fun episode because I've invited my director of customer experience Josh Palmer to join me here and we are going to take you behind the scenes. And really just share with you what it looked like in terms of behind the scenes of my latest digital course academy launch. We did it in September of 2022. It was an amazing experience. There were definitely highs and lows and we're going to talk about all of that. But I thought it might be fun if I brought Josh in because Josh is during launches, he is now seems to be my sidekick. We are together. A lot through this whole thing. And he has a really unique perspective because he kind of has his hands in a lot of different parts of the launch. And Josh is from Raleigh, North Carolina, but he came into Nashville the entire launch. So he was here on site, which so were some other people on my team. So we'll talk about that. So let me tell you about a podcast that I'm loving. It's called my first million. It's hosted by Sam parr and Sean Perry. And I say it's the audio destination for business professionals. So my first million features really amazing guests like Gary V, Sophia amoruso, and Hasan minhaj, where they're sharing their secrets for how they made their first million and how to apply their learnings to capitalize on today's business trends and opportunities. So with topics like how entrepreneurs can prepare for economic collapse or controversial business lessons or behind the scenes content, the stories of how people become millionaires is fascinating to me and I think you are going to love it. So you can listen to my first million wherever you listen to podcasts. But we would just get into it. So Josh, welcome to the show. Thanks, Amy, for having me. I am so honored to be your sidekick. These launches. It's so much fun when we come together and we do this all in person. It just brings a lot of energy and magic. It does. Happy to be there. I'm so happy you're here. And when I say that you have your hands in a lot of things, you are running the customer experience department. And so during digital course academy, we get a flood of emails at all different times. We release a timely bonus, you get a bunch of questions about that.

Amy Porterfield Josh Josh Palmer AMY Sam Parr Sean Perry Sophia Amoruso Hasan Minhaj Gary V Raleigh Nashville North Carolina
A highlight from How to Get Feedback Faster -- Niklas Dorn // Filestage

MarTech Podcast

07:53 min | Last week

A highlight from How to Get Feedback Faster -- Niklas Dorn // Filestage

"Brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks, they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the mar tech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to the podcast. I'm your host Benjamin Shapiro, and today we're going to discuss effective ways to get customer feedback faster. Joining us is Nicholas dohrn, who is the CEO of file stage, which is a content review and approval platform for marketing teams. Team members can comment on videos, images, documents, and even live websites. And imagine all of your project file formats, versions, comments, and approval decisions in one platform with a simple to share link that your stakeholders can tap on to add comments, tag teammates, and give the full context as you watch the feedback roll in. And in addition to providing us with our guest today, file stage and Nicholas are also sponsors of the mar tech podcast. And today, Nicholas and I are going to discuss how you can get feedback faster. All right, here's the first part of my conversation with Nicholas dohrn, the CEO of file stage. Nicholas, welcome back to the mar tech podcast. Thanks for having me again. What a pleasure to have you back on the show. Great to have you here as one of our first returning sponsors. We launched a new sponsorship program you were one of the first people in the door and hey, we're 6 months in. Now you're back. It's great to have you here. Yeah, thanks a lot for having me in this really like pleasure to be back. All right, so we've done this before. We can get right to the chase. Talk to me a little bit about feedback. That seems to be where your company is centered. How do we get feedback faster? So definitely it's a topic we're dealing with for a couple of years now and I guess everybody out there that is proactively producing content that is working for big brand, working for agency, working content creation has probably seen situations like that, right? You have to super nice content that you produce. Let's say video or brochure or a new website and you just feel like yes, I'm really proud of what I have produced and then you go out and send it out really interestingly to I don't know your colleagues, your boss, maybe your client and you realize, okay, nothing happens. And you need to basically start to chase people for feedback, you need to follow up, you need to call them you need to ping them in order to first get a response and then get your feedback on the content, and then at a certain moment, maybe you get that feedback and suddenly they provided in all kind of different channels. They provided via slack, wire phone, they call you, maybe on WhatsApp, Microsoft Teams everywhere, and then suddenly if you like are now I need to get hold of it and need to collect all the feedback in different places and bring it all together and make sure I don't forget anything. And I think this is a really big problem many, many people out there have. And that's one of the main reasons why all feedback processes are so slow nowadays. Can you imagine a couple of different problems here? One, the idea of you create something and then you have to go out and hunt for feedback and there's a need for process there. We'll talk a little bit about that. And then the idea is, well, feedback comes in multiple different formats. Everyone uses different types of systems. Let's talk about the first part there, which is how and when should you be asking for feedback? What's the right place to suggest feedback from your clients, customers, partners? Give me the lay of the line for the sources of feedback. Let's say we all know the situation where you just have one other person that needs to give feedback and maybe you're sitting in the same office and then basically I think there is no need for any kind of software or feedback tool and it's perfectly easy just walk over discuss it and it's good. But as soon as you work with multiple stakeholders, if you have a team, let's say marketing team and then maybe content creators and then you have a product team and maybe a legal team and they all want to be involved at a certain moment, then suddenly it starts to become complicated. That's the one side and this is I think one thing to consider. So how many people need to give feedback when you think about is it the right time to improve my feedback processes? And then on the other side you talked about the different formats and I think that's the other point. So of course, if there's just, let's say, a PowerPoint presentation, you can start and give feedback within the presentation. It's okay. But then maybe you also have a video, then maybe you produce a new website with different landing pages and you need to localize it for ten different languages. And as soon as you have different types of content and really need to review on the proof that stuff, then it starts to become complicated. And I think this is the second point when you definitely should think about working with an online proofing solution. Okay, so there's a couple different scenarios. One, it is not only when you have multiple stakeholders, but also multiple different types of assets. I was actually thinking more about where in the creative process should you be asking for feedback. Let's do a little example of case study, right? I run podcasts. We create not only the underlying assets for people. We've got to create the logos and the podcast descriptions, and then the scripts, and then the actual content. And then there's this regular stream when we're constantly going through and having different episodes that we're editing. How do you recommend that we reach out for feedback with our clients? Do we do it at every step of the way? Do you aggregate everything to have a final deliverable? When should you be reaching out to get the appropriate amount of feedback? So I think the first part is to align on the feedback process and let's say a line when you want to have feedback, for example, with your client. What are the steps in your production process? So for example, most people go with, hey, maybe there is a stage when you discuss like the brief and discuss together what the scope is of the entire project and maybe at this point it's already good to align on it and say, hey, this is a brief document. Let's align on it. Let's approve it. Okay, we're fine. And then from there, typically you take the next steps, right? You typically say, okay, now maybe there's a script for a video and this is the first step and let's say, hey, this is a script. And then you can also line on that and improve that part. And once you are fine with the script, maybe there's the first rough cut of the video where you also want to have feedback. And what I suggest is to really split it up into different levels of the production phase, and then match it to the right people on the other side. For example, maybe the marketing person on the other side want to be involved in the entire process. But let's say the marketing big boss only wants to be involved right at the end when it's almost like completed and doesn't want to be bordered in between like with all the different sub steps. And so on and so forth and maybe legal needs to be involved early on to just see the concept, the prove it and that's fine and they don't need to have a hold on it later on. So what I recommend is really to adopt it to the different stakeholders. You have on the other side. And then build your custom review process based on that. What I'm hearing from you it seems like a little bit of the opposite of what you just said, which is figure out what your process is. Understand the process, build that out, and then think about who throughout that process needs to give you the feedback. Now, let's talk a little bit about the delivery mechanism. When you are asking for feedback to your designer, that is a different request for feedback than when you're asking a global CMO, right? Most likely they're going to respond in different channels. The designer is going to want to give you mock ups and I'm sure something that's a little bit more graphically inclined. As opposed to your CMO is probably going to say thumbs up thumbs down, something that's more of a snap judgment. Do I like it or do I not? You mentioned before, well, people give feedback in different channels. They also give different types of feedback. What's the way to aggregate all the feedback that you're getting? And what's the way to make sure that it's in the right format that you can

Benjamin Shapiro Nicholas Dohrn Nicholas File Stage Whatsapp Microsoft
A highlight from 137. Time Inventory

Purposeful Social Selling

07:53 min | Last week

A highlight from 137. Time Inventory

"Let me show you the new way. Hey Friends, welcome to another episode of the show. Today we're gonna be talking about something that I know is a big pain point for a lot of people. In fact, it's probably the number one thing I coach on and talk about the most because it always comes up for people, especially when it comes to building a business or making time for things that we want and results we want to create. So I want to talk today about the concept of time inventory and how you can manage and use your time in better ways, especially if you are somebody that struggles with overwhelm, anxiety, especially when it comes to your time management and you find yourself maybe procrastinating or dreading certain tasks. I also want to say before I really dive into this that I have floors, my floor is being worked on in my house right now. So if you hear some hammering and banging and nails and all those things, that's what's going on in the background. Hopefully it's not too bad, but that's what's going on over here. So, all right, without further ado, this is gonna be a short, sweet episode, but it's still I think is gonna be very helpful and impactful for you because I know a lot of people really struggle with time management and feeling like they use their time well. And I'm even gonna say a lot of people I think have a sense of time scarcity like there's never enough and they never feel like they're accomplishing they think the things that they need to accomplish and they're always feeling like they're running behind. So I bring up this topic because this happened to me recently I knew I had a certain number of emails to write and I had a goal of writing three to 5 emails. And what was interesting as I noticed that my brain really wanted to generalize the overwhelm and the time it would take me to write the email. So for example, I was sitting there saying, okay, I know I need to write three emails today. And I noticed I was feeling resistance and overwhelm and some procrastination to getting it done. And I asked myself, okay, so why am I feeling this resistance? Why am I feeling overwhelmed? And by the way, this is a really helpful exercise to do with yourself when you notice that you are not executing on something that you say is important is just get curious whether yourself and ask, okay, where is all this resistance coming from? Why am I not wanting to do this? And so for me, what I noticed was that I had this inner dialog that was telling me that it's going to take so long. And I felt a sense of overwhelm when I was saying, wow, it's going to take so long. I have to write these 5 emails and it's going to take me a long time. And the more I thought about the time in the effort and the energy it would take me, the more I created resistance to it to it, procrastinated, put it off. Have you ever noticed that? The more you think about a project and think about how much work you think it's going to take, you end up creating more resistance to the project and delaying it even more. And then the more you delay it, the more you feel anxiety about accomplishing it because you've put it off. Anybody in my speaking to my people, right. So, okay, so here's something I did that's really helpful that I want to encourage you to do. So what I did was I need to get clear. I realized, you know what? I realize that my brain is generalizing timelines and all it's telling me is it's going to take forever. It's going to be hard. It's going to be super time consuming. So I was like, okay, I'm just curious how long it actually takes me to write an email. So then it got me out of a place of dread and resistance and got me into this curious place. I'm like, okay, I'm kind of curious. I'm just going to write one email and I set a timer to see how long it took me to write an email when I sat down and did the focus work. And sure enough, it took me 13 minutes, 13 and it's not just like a, hey, how are you email? It was like an email with sales copy with calls to action and really creating an email that would create a result that I would want a revenue generating email, so to speak. 13 minutes. And I found it was quite fascinating that, you know, just a few minutes prior to that, I had been acting or thinking that it was going to be a lot more intense than that, take a lot longer. I was like, oh, 13 minutes. So now what's interesting is it removed all of the generalization and now my brain was able to operate with data. So now it's like, okay, if I'm going to write 5 emails today and it's roughly 13 minutes in email, it's going to be about 75 minutes, I believe, yeah. This is going to be about 75 minutes of work, but I can break that up into 45 minutes and 30 minutes. So when I actually looked at that, I was like, oh, 75 minutes of work. That's not bad. I can get that done pretty well, and actually once I'm in flow, writing the emails, I actually become faster, the longer I stay in flow, writing them. So it turns out I actually got it done in 60 minutes because I was staying with the task and I was in flow. I had my computer on airplane mode. I had my notifications turned off. It was just an intensely focused time, and I was able to execute it in 60 minutes. So there's two things that happened in that moment. I was able to gather data in how long it actually takes me to write an email. 13 minutes from a cold start, not being in flow. I noticed that when I'm in flow and all of my creativity is going and I'm in my creative space, so to speak, it takes me about 7 minutes to write an email. So I know now the next time I'm thinking, oh, I need to write an email. I now know that that's a 13 minute task, and it's very easy for me to say, okay, this is a 13 minute task. I can totally get this done in 13 minutes. This is where this concept of time inventory is actually getting very, very clear on how much time a task takes you. And there might be a new skill where maybe you're learning to write sales copy, maybe you're learning on really getting better at your content delivery and maybe 'cause I do remember there was a time when writing a post for me on social media used to take me 30, 45 minutes. Now it takes me less than ten minutes because of a lot of practice. I've honed that skill. And so I think it's really important to be patient with yourself. And so I was just honest with myself in the beginning. Okay, I'm gonna give myself 45 minutes to write a post, but also sometimes I think it takes 45 minutes to write a post because we're too busy judging the content that we're writing. And I know that's true because I talk to a lot of my students and they're thinking, this isn't a good post. This is invaluable. Nobody wants to see this. This is an interesting I'm doing it wrong and they're aiming for perfection instead of progress. And honestly, even if you did a lot of C minus posts, you're still going to get better because you are practicing and practice makes progress. I didn't say perfect practice makes progress. So this idea of a time inventory keeps you honest with how long tasks actually take you and it helps you get really clear on, okay, well, how can I clean this up and become even more efficient in this task? So when you're thinking about your business activities, I would encourage you to sit down and look at your main income producing business activity. That's networking, that's following up that's making posts, maybe it's closing a sale, whatever it is, and you can look at the batch work and be like, okay, you know, I'm gonna close orders or do follow up, you know, one hour, every day, or on Fridays, I'm gonna do this. You get to decide how that looks, but I think it's really important that you have hard data to look at and say, okay, instead of saying I need to engage with people in this feels like a really huge all consuming task and you go into overwhelming you shut down and you're totally paralyzed and you do nothing. And you end up just scrolling, I see you, a lot of people I talk to, they're just, they don't know what to do, they don't know where to go. They feel they allow themselves to feel overwhelmed, and they don't know how to execute their time efficiently, so they end up just scrolling and wasting time when they're not intentional. And the whole time they're telling themselves that they're working. And then they're frustrated when they feel like they're spending hours working, but not getting the results that they want. It's

A highlight from Marketing with Ductape & Podcasts -- John Jantsch / Duct Tape Marketing

MarTech Podcast

14:02 min | Last week

A highlight from Marketing with Ductape & Podcasts -- John Jantsch / Duct Tape Marketing

"Going to talk to one of the world's most popular marketing podcasters. Joining us is John jans, who is the president of duct tape marketing consulting, which is a marketing consulting publishing and training firm. John is also one of the hosts of my favorite marketing podcast. The duct tape marketing podcast and he's also the author of the referral engine, duct tape selling, the commitment engine, SEO for growth, the self reliant entrepreneur, and yesterday John and I talked about his new book the ultimate marketing engine how you can think about supporting and serving your customers opposed to directly selling with your marketing efforts, and today we're going to continue the conversation and talk a little bit about John's strategy for using things like, I don't know, podcasts, book sales and also running consulting businesses as well. But before we get started, I wanted to say thanks to insightly for sponsoring today's interview. So here's a few fun CRM stats that my friends at in sight wanted you to know about. Okay, according to an independent survey of more than 500 sales marketing and customer success professionals working in mid market companies, 64% of those companies have been with their CRMs for less than three years, and 41% of those companies plan to start shopping around for a new CRM and 34% of them are already on the market. So if a CRM is the center of your mar tech stack, why are more than one of 5 mid market companies looking for new solutions? Here's the main reason, enterprise CRM systems are simply too complex and expensive to operate. In sightly as a CRM platform that's right priced and sized for your mid market team. The entire CRM is customizable and it doesn't require a team of professionals or expensive integrators to operate and it includes marketing automation and customer service apps that you can add as your business grows. For a free trial of the insightly CRM, visit in sightly dot com slash martek. That's in sightly dot com slash martek INS IGH tl Y dot com slash martek. And one last thing I'll add before we get to today's interview, since you're into marketing podcasts, check out the marketing against the grain podcast. Join kit bonar and Kieran flanagan, the CMO and SVP of HubSpot's marketing department as they share their experience and the unfiltered truth about marketing that no one else knows about. You can listen to the marketing against the grand podcast wherever you get your podcasts or go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. All right, here's the second part of our conversation with the president of duct tape marketing, John chance. John, welcome back to the mar tech podcast. I barely could sleep last night knowing we were going to record again today. I am so thrilled to have you and let's be honest, John, it's been 5 minutes since we finished the last conversation. I don't want to ruin the secret, but John didn't actually have to come back this morning, but I was excited for the second part of the conversation because this is the one where I've got some real questions for you. Okay. Let me start off by expressing my adoration for what you do. Oh, well, thank you. I think the duct tape marketing podcast is exceptional. I think the content quality is great. I think that you've clearly understand the podcast platform to be able to make a name for yourself and your brand, but you do more than just podcasting. You've written, what is it 6 bucks now? You run a consulting business, you've got a lot on your plate. So I want to talk to you a little bit about the future for guys like me who are kind of stuck in one channel. And you seem to be able to operate multiple different marketing channels at once. All this stuff together. John, what's the future look like? How did you get from being a solopreneur operator influencer to being the man behind the duct tape marketing engine? Well, I would like to say that I sat down one day and created this master plan, but the reality is I just kept doing things and then I showed up the next day and kept doing more things and I will say that I do have a sense of being able to view things and seeing how they could work together. And I think that's one real key to if you want to stay lean and have a small team, things have to actually support each other. You know, I started writing blog posts in 2003 as a way to just kind of spread the word and get my message out there. I added podcasting, not so much to build a platform to have a bunch of listeners. I maybe I was hoping that but ultimately I did it because it supported the goal of me meeting other influencers. It was a great way for me to reach out to folks like Ben Shapiro and say, hey, you want to be on my show and then ultimately what I wanted to do was pick your brain for 30 minutes. You mean the political podcast or this guy? This guy. And so there was a reason for it. And that's what really allowed me to stick to it when, I don't know, maybe ten people were listening, but that wasn't the goal of doing it. You know, so many people start things like a blog or a course or a podcast because they want those things to make them money. And that's great. That's great. Ultimately, I hope they do in the podcast does supply a significant revenue stream for us, but it also supported building the brand. It supported a way for us to create content and support it away for us to build more authority. And so those are the reasons that we did it. So ultimately what I'm saying is everything that we've kind of added, there's been a logical reason of how it could support other revenue streams or other objectives. All right, so help me think about tackling some of the problems that we're having. I'm going to lie down on the couch here. I'm going to make you give me the therapist view of podcasting. We've been running the podcast for three years. We generate a couple $100,000 in revenue from ad sponsorships, but we're totally dependent on podcasting right now and pretty dependent on apple as our vehicle for reaching our audience. I don't know who the audience is. So we're thinking about things like websites and newsletters and I moved from a professional services business to being a media creator, so I kind of don't want to go back in that. How would you advise me to think about moving from being a podcaster with leveraging this medium to start expanding into other channels? I think the biggest opportunity you have is because you have a listener base. What could you develop for them? A pretty logical thing would be some sort of consulting, not that is dependent on you showing up every day and speaking with client a and client B but some form of teaching people or training people based on what comes out of the show, what goals they reach by listening to your show. Certainly, of course, a membership program. I mean, there are many ways that, again, I don't know if I can give you very specific advice on it. But I think that to me, just as an outsider looking in, there were many, many ways for you to, I think, expand by looking for ways to serve the core audience that's already tuning in and listening. It's funny that you say that, well, I can't give you exact advice and yet what you said was exactly what our plan is. By the time this episode airs, we will have launched the new mar tech podcast website, Marta pod dot com. We move from Squarespace to a more comprehensive website on WordPress and a big part of that was we wanted to do a better job managing our newsletters, right? Let's understand who is in our audience and then once we know who's in the audience will have a better ability to provide value by being able to stay in their inbox and not only share more tech podcast content but also some of the other great content that we find sort of a link roundup type newsletter build a community of our listeners to help our guests continue to reach the listeners, maybe create some courses with them and find monetization paths using those channels. It's time for one minute break to hear from our presenting sponsor HubSpot. Creating great customer experiences starts with having a full picture and having a full picture starts with having teams that are connected. HubSpot helps your team feel so connected that can finish each other's sales pitches. Yeah, that kind of connected. The HubSpot CRM platform is designed to unite your data apps and teams in a single, easy to use system. So your teams can spend their time having conversations where they matter most, with your customers. To learn how HubSpot can help your business grow better, visit HubSpot dot com. You also mentioned building a community. When you say build a community, you know, you're thinking something as simple as a slack channel, you know, what is a community mean to you? You know, one of the challenges with podcasting is it's one to many like other than people that maybe comment or that leave reviews. You in a lot of ways don't even know who's listening or why they're listening. And so if there would be a way to attract those folks into a place where it could be one to one, interaction, I think you get a better sense of who they are or what they need, but obviously nobody needs another Facebook group, right? So there's got to be something that would really draw them to it that would be valuable to them. And how many shows have you done, Ben? We've done 900 episodes of the mar tech podcast and 500 episodes of the voices of search podcasted three years. Okay, so if you can't find some products inside of that much content, you're not trying very hard. What do you mean by products? 173 SEO hacks from the SEO blah blah blah for 75 bucks. People are selling stuff like that right now. And I'm not just talking about creating stuff to make money off of your listeners. I'm just saying there is an audience out there that would love for you to curate the best 27 minutes theoretically of tips or whatever it is shows throughout the years where you basically can say just follow these one a day one a week or whatever and you're going to be on the road to success. Can I give you my big master plan? Yeah, I want to hear. We're going to create this newsletter. It's going to be a roundup of everything that's happening in the mar tech industry. It's going to also be a promotional vehicle for our content. We'll get to know who our listeners are. We're going to build a community. We'll be able to share courses with them, help our guests monetize their experience. And at the end of the day, I want to write 365 smart statements about marketing, so you can have a once a day marketing lesson as a book. Now, you're an author. Writing a book takes a lot of work. I want to write 365 sentences. I'm thinking about it the wrong way. Is that too short or do I really need to write it? No, no, I think there's definitely a place for that. Is that book going to land you as a household name in the world of marketing? Maybe not. A lot of people may find that as a really nice valuable format to consume. I've written a daily book and there are people out there that like those things. So I think everything you just revealed is spot on. I mean, I think you're definitely on the right track. So the last question for you. How the heck am I going to do all of this? I'm buried in creating a podcast. There's just not enough hours in the day between managing my family where my kids are screaming in the background right now. Hopefully the microphone is blocking it out. Look, we create a ton of content for the podcast. We have a hard enough time keeping our head above water now. Now we're talking about managing groups and newsletters and courses and books. How do you manage it all, John? That's part of the community. Recruit volunteers, recruit evangelists, recruit people that want to help you do this. Start putting the word out that you're going to do it and that you need help doing it. And they will start showing up. That's my guess. Again, John, you make it sound so simple. I swear it has to be harder than you make it sound, but I appreciate the advice and I'm going to work on it as much as I can. It's always good to connect. Thanks for sticking around for an extra day and extra episode and appreciate you being my guest on the mar tech podcast. It was my pleasure. I look forward to chatting again soon. All right, that wraps up this episode of the mar tech podcast. Thanks to John Jan's president of duct tape marketing. If you'd like to contact John, you can find a link to his LinkedIn profile in our show notes, so you can contact him on Twitter, his handle is duct tape. Do you see TT APE, where you can visit his company's website, which is duct tape marketing dot com. You can also find a link to his book the ultimate marketing engine at the ultimate marketing engine dot com. And a special thanks to HubSpot for sponsoring this podcast, creating great customer experiences, starts with having a full picture and having a full picture starts with having teams that are connected. So if you are ready to get your team connected, the HubSpot CRM platform is designed to unite your data apps and teams in a single easy to use system. To learn how HubSpot can help your business grow better, go to HubSpot dot com. A special thanks to insightly for sponsoring this podcast, insightly wants to know if the CRM is at the center of your mar tech stack then why are more than one out of every 5 mid market companies looking for a new solution. Here's the reason, enterprise CRM systems are too complex and expensive to operate, and in sightly is a CRM platform that's right priced and rightsized for your mid market team. For a free day trial of the insightly CRM go to insightly dot com slash martech that's insightly in dot com slash martek. Just one more link in our show notes I'd like to tell you about. If you didn't have a chance to take notes while you were listening to this podcast, head over to martek pod dot com where we have summaries of our episodes and contact information for our guests, you can also subscribe to our once a week newsletter and you can even send us your topic suggestions or your marketing questions, which will answer live on our show. Of course you can always reach out on social media. Our handle is mar tech pod POD on LinkedIn Twitter Instagram and Facebook, or you can contact me directly my handle is Ben Jay shapi and if you haven't subscribed yet and you want a daily stream of marketing and technology knowledge in your podcast feed, we're gonna publish an episode every day this year, so hit the subscribe button in your podcast app, and we'll be back in your feed tomorrow morning. All right, that's it for today, but until next time, my advice is to just focus on keeping your customers happy.

John John Jans Duct Tape Marketing Consulting Hubspot Kit Bonar Kieran Flanagan John Chance Ben Shapiro Apple Wordpress John Jan BEN Facebook Linkedin Twitter