Leadership

What makes a good leader? What are the skills, qualities and basic characteristics individuals need to organize, co-ordinate and manage a team's path to success? Listen up for essential info, testimonies, research and theories on the business of management, aired on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

A highlight from Teneshia Jackson Warner | Achieving Your Big Stretch Dream

Dose of Leadership

01:38 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Teneshia Jackson Warner | Achieving Your Big Stretch Dream

"Where I sit in my personal experience. And I know everyone journey will look different. But in my personal belief, it's a co creation with God and a higher power. And there's a God that dwells within us. You have to almost get in relationship with that voice. You know, that inner voice, this guiding you, that's not just you. That's connected to a higher power. Right. I mean, you can start getting in a dance with that in spirit, absolutely unbelievable. And that's where purpose. That's where, you know, your reason for being. Are you on the planet? All of that starts to shape up through that. So absolutely. Hey, welcome to the dose a show dedicated to deep and engaging conversations highlighting individuals that are in the pursuit of authentic and courageous leadership who poach life with insatiable curiosity bold action and common sense in these divisive and uncommon times. It's my hope that you take something away from each and every one of these conversations. Apply to your own life. As we all intentionally attempt to become the best we can possibly be, being drawn towards our purpose and calling committing to a life of service and making this place better than we found it and living true lives of consequence. Today's guest meets all of those criteria tanisha Warner and this is actually an episode on the other project that I produced that are podcasts that produce next level method. I wanted to share it here 'cause I'm trying to increase the awareness of my project next level with method with the owner of Matt lily. Teenager Warner is the author of the big stretch. She's the founder and CEO of

Tanisha Warner Matt Lily Warner
A highlight from 2/2 A Renaissance Model for Protecting Innovation: Peter Samuelson

Leadership and Loyalty

07:18 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from 2/2 A Renaissance Model for Protecting Innovation: Peter Samuelson

"Going to talk about the double bottom line how to make the world a better place and make yourself happier as an entrepreneur as a business person while you do that. Welcome back to part two of our delicious conversation with pro social entrepreneur mister Peter Samuelson. He's the cofounder of starlight children's foundation and a bunch of other amazing foundations, some of which he's done with people like Steven Spielberg. He we were just finishing up in part one talking about Ida, which was everyone deserves a roof to help people who are unhoused at this time Peter lives in LA and realized that there was an old lady living under some road with a living in a box that was the same box that might have fitted the fridge that was living in his house. So I decided to make a difference to make a change. And he's done a lot to help children, as well as their homeless. As an example, just wanted to tell you this, that recently, about, I guess, three, four months ago, I watched a movie called foster boy, which is, of course, one of Peter's movies. And it's about the foster care system. And I don't know if you recently saw a movie that was called I think it was called I really care, it was about the caste system for the elderly. And it was showing how it's a for profit system and how it's corrupt. And it was done to sort of a dark comedy and it was very well done. This really foster boy, Peter's movie shows the same thing. It shows how the systems are set up in ways that are not beneficial for the children are for profit and extremely damaging. It was a powerful, powerful movie that gave us a look inside of a system and it was a moving show. It was very well done and I encourage you to go watch it, you can download it through Apple TV or whatever it might be or one of the streaming services. But again, foster boy, great movie. We finished up as I said talking about Idaho. We also talked about that Peter came to this realization that in order to make the changes that were needed in the world that people seem to do better of function better whether they are foster kids or anybody else for that matter. If there's a level of happiness, which can be difficult to find in certain situations. So I want to start this part of the conversation by asking Peter what do you see as real? I mean, because we can be happy we can watch movie and feel good. We can listen to a comic. We can feel good. We can get some new and feel good. But what do you see as real and meaningful happiness? I think that one of the functions of parenting I've raised either because of parenting skills or possibly despite getting it wrong so many times. Somehow my four young adult children have survived and thrived. I think one of the things that we should be doing as parents is causing our children and frankly anyone else that we're mentoring to think about the really big questions in life. None bigger than what is the meaning of life. And I mean beyond Monty Python's version, although actually I tip my hat to the geniuses that wrote what is high comedy, but also has some very meaningful clues to the true meaning of life. And but beyond Monty Python, what is the meaning of life? And I think that it's not a pretentious thing to think about. And I think sometimes we should dream big aim high question widely, poke with our pencil at the edges of the envelope. We inhabit and see how much bigger we can make the envelope. And I think it's really important. Me, I can tell you, it's really simple. I've made tons of money as a film producer, and I did have some joy mostly standing at the back of auditoriums and listening to people laugh at, I don't know, revenge of the nerds or something like that. Or having them dust with horror in a scary film if I've produced it. So there are some joys professionally for sure. You know, hey, we brought it in on time on budget and it's kind of good. Look at all these audience rating cards that they've handed in. Wow, we got this one right. Not always the case, but, you know, every so often you do get it, right? And you hit it out of the ballpark and then you feel really good professionally. However, I have to tell you most of the joy in my life comes from two places. One is from my children, but the other one is in strenuously working repetitively widely deeply broadly longitudinally in pilots in replication to try to make the world a better place. I think that where most of my joy comes from is in my work in the nonprofit area. It's the high quality people that it allows me to partner with and volunteer alongside of the high caliber of employees who are all in my book volunteers as well as employees because why would they be there working so hard and such long hours, so I think if you want to be happy, paradoxically get outside yourself and find a way to volunteer to help other people. Get someone else's less fortunate than you get their priorities in front of your brain and watch how your own sense of purpose and resilience and your rewarding sense of having made a contribution see how much joy you get out of helping other people. I can give you an example. In first start, which as you know, we take high school age foster kids, crown wards, you call them in Canada. Looked after youth and children, we call them in the United Kingdom.

Peter Mister Peter Samuelson Starlight Children's Foundatio Steven Spielberg Monty Python IDA LA Idaho Apple Canada United Kingdom
A highlight from The Top Business Strategies for Social Media with Jasmine Star

The EntreLeadership Podcast

05:48 min | Last week

A highlight from The Top Business Strategies for Social Media with Jasmine Star

"I sat down with her to talk about social media marketing and what you can do to implement it in your business today. In our second conversation, I talk with Ramsey leader Jenny greeson, and we talk about the practical steps you can take to get social media to work for you. Up first, we've got my conversation with Jasmine star. Jasmine, it's so good to have you on the entre leadership podcast. Thank you. I'm happy to be here. You are doing some amazing things. And as we start here, I just want you to let the business leaders listening know what you do and what you're all about. I like to believe that I make people believe that the impossible is possible. And most of the time people can achieve this by doing some of the above serving people well and monetizing along the way. Wow, nailed it. That was a great elevator pitch. Thanks. So you're one of your expertise out of many is social media. Something that you've become known for, you love helping entrepreneurs use social media as a platform to grow their business. And a lot of business owners out there, they might be asking this question is social media a waste of time for my business. And before we go there, if you'll allow me to kind of detour a second, is at this point in time, at the time of this recording, people would introduce me as being Jasmine star is known for X but I have to tell you that it's been multiple iterations. And I think that the core of it is Jasmine star is known for taking whatever is affordable, accessible, quick, and highly effective. So next year, when I'm hopefully invited back to the show, I might be talking about something else where you might introduce me as Jasmine star is great at, and then whatever is, effective, cost, you know, it's not going to break the bank and gets results. That's what I'll be talking about. So today we can talk about social media, 'cause I'm all about it. But that's my pitch. And so people are here being like, okay, I do want to do something that's light lifting that's effective that's affordable for my small business, then we can have a conversation. So let's go back to the question. I love it. Is it a waste of time? Well, I think in history, people could have said that when you decided to run a radio commercial, it was a waste of time because who was listening to the radio. Likewise with television, likewise with blogging, likewise with early days of social media. So I don't think it's waste of time. I think it's art form, and I do think that it's well worth your time if you have a plan and a strategy. Throwing darts in the win never a good idea. And that's what I see a lot happening on social media. So people are just going, well, I know I need to be on here, so I'm just going to make an account and kind of hope for the best and make it up as I go. Yes, and it's kind of like the same. I really want to lose ten pounds. So I'm going to go to the gym. I'm just going to stare at the treadmill. This felt like a personal attack. And you know me. You know me. That is me. I walk in and I go, there's a lot of machines, I'm just gonna walk around and look like I know what I'm doing. Or like, I'm gonna find myself in the sauna and that's my workout. Yeah, that's a lot what a lot of people do on social as well. And it works when you work. And oftentimes, people, and I get it, that struggle is real. Small business owners have 10,000 things that they need to do. And so social media feels like another thing to do. And I truly get it, but when it comes to marketing your business, if you're not talking about your business, very few other people will. So I think that this is our opportunity to take control of the narrative, give people things to talk about, make them think favorably of your brand and then have that result in sales. So it's not just a box you check off on the business checklist. It is a foundation for your business. So what are the top reasons businesses should be on social media if they're not already? I think I said it's free. So that in and of itself. And it very, very easy to learn. If people like to complicate things and if the idea is just to get content out and to speak to a singular customer who will then have long-term ramifications and ripples in your business, then the idea is like, what could you say in a singular post that's going to make somebody think favorably about your business? And that could be wildly effective, cost virtually nothing at all and have long-term effects. And this is what we see on very inspirational, helpful, educational posts on social media. So it's not about, you know, if I'm a business owner, I'm thinking, well, I can get a sales guy or saleswoman to make a call today and get money in the door. But what am I gonna do with this Twitter feed or this Facebook account that's gonna actually impact my business revenue wise? What do you say to that person? So I think that salespeople are great for sales. I think that social media is great for brand. And over time, we are going to be competing more on brand than we are on the efficacy of a salesperson. And it is not currently the over indexed in the present. It is the future, though. Had wonderful conversations with a couple by the name of Rory and AJ Eden. And they focus on brands and they were talking about how the next big buyer sector is going to be millennials. And is 70, 80% of millennials want to choose a doctor or a lawyer based on their personal brand. Never mind the fact that they want to Harvard or Yale. It's the fact of what are you putting out on Twitter? What are you putting out on Instagram that's making me feel an affinity for you so that I can then trust you? So if that's going to be the demand on the highest educated in the land, imagine what the demand will be for somebody who wants to bring in a plumber, a locksmith, a photographer into their life, the brand is going to be the thing, especially as we move to voice. People are going to say, I don't give me a plumber Alexa. They're going to say, please send me John in Nashville on 8th street plumber. It's gonna get very specific. Yeah, so as we get more competitive and we're in the information age, people have access to every single contact for every plumber in your area. And so it's going to get a little become harder to compete. And so you've got to have a strong brand out front and social media is one of the best ways to do that. When you think about it, if you were to look at your own buying behavior. And you are looking for you move to a new town or perhaps your vacationing, and you need something last

Jenny Greeson Ramsey Aj Eden Twitter Rory Facebook Yale Harvard Nashville John
A highlight from 1/2 In Quest of The New Medici: Peter Samuelson

Leadership and Loyalty

02:51 min | Last week

A highlight from 1/2 In Quest of The New Medici: Peter Samuelson

"How to make the world a better place and make yourself happier as an entrepreneur as a business person while you do that. Congratulations, you are tuned into Dolph baron's leadership and loyalty show. The number one podcast for Fortune 500 executives, and those who were dedicated to creating a quantum leap in leadership. Your host dove Barron, he's an executive mentor to leaders like you. A contributing writer for entrepreneur magazine. CEO world, and he's been featured on CNN, Fox, CBS, and many other notable sites. Dove Barron is an international business speaker, who is named by Inc magazine as one of the top 100 leadership speakers to hire. Now, over to doll of baron. Welcome to your friend's fans and fellow fishing Otto's leadership excellence. Thank you for joining us on this episode of leadership and loyalty tips for executives. Hey, would you do me a quick favor? Send me a note DM me on one of the four big social media outlets. Tell me what platform you use to listen to us. You know, as Apple broadcast Spotify iHeartRadio, Google podcast, you know, whatever is you let us know. And while you're at it, tell us one of your favorite episodes because I'm going to pick a winner and offer a very nice prize for that person. So let me ask you, what do you need to do to up level your leadership? Well, let's start here. Have you considered your other bottom line? Now of course you, to stay in business, you got to take care of the conventional bottom line, the one that measures fiscal performance. However, there is another bottom line that measures your performance in terms of positive social impact. Not just on your culture, but on the extended community that you are part of. Well, stay tuned because that's where we're going on today's show. I'm your host of Burnham here to assist you Tapping into the one thing in your business that changes everything by transforming meaning into action. Here is the normal, simply go to dove, Barron, dot com. This episode of leadership in loyalty is brought to you in part by our other podcasts, curiosity bytes. Kirsty bikes is the answer to the question. How can we bring people together who completely disagree? This is exactly what your mind, your heart, your soul has been craving. It's your chance to sit in on some real and oftentimes the intense conversations with some of the world's most interesting people, including astronauts, neuroscientists, philosophers, wholly people quantum physicists skeptics, Grammy Award winning entertainers, and some folks you might think you'd completely disagree with, but you'll find truly fascinating. In fact, one of the guests on that show is our guest today. So if you enjoy today's show and you want to go deeper with our guest Peter Samuelson, you'll be able to do that on curiosity bytes.

Dolph Baron Dove Barron Inc Magazine Entrepreneur Magazine Otto Baron CBS CNN FOX Apple Burnham Google Barron Kirsty Grammy Award Peter Samuelson
A highlight from 2/2 Why Business Plans SUCK! Sean Castrina

Leadership and Loyalty

07:55 min | Last week

A highlight from 2/2 Why Business Plans SUCK! Sean Castrina

"Your latest book, the world's greatest business one. Business plans. Oh my God, dry boring, horrible, nobody wants to talk about them. And yet you're saying there's a world's greatest one. And it works. Tell us about it. Yeah, I mean, the world's greatest business plan, the concept behind it was is that, you know, I start quite a few companies and I get asked to start a one I recently been involved in about three startups over two year period. My son wanted to start one. And so at 19, I was like, how can I simplify this? What I wanted him to go through the process that due diligence business plan. I mean, you wouldn't go into a, you know, if you were a coach coach a team, you have a strategy and how you're going to win. You look at what you can do well, what you need to overcome and you know, who's their best player, you know, this is common sense, same thing in business. So I laid I started getting going on Amazon I'd order business plan books. And I ordered like 13 of them. One was worse than the next. They're like 300 pages. And every book what I found is is that they assume the business would succeed. So they'd reverse engineered the book. So in chapter one, Susie and Donnie start ABC supplies. And chapter 14, the business is a great success or giving money to charity. Everything went perfect. And every one of these books and more professor wrote the book. And I'm like, wait, wait, wait. I've never had that experience. I've never had a business go the way I thought. Either it did way better than I thought it scaled faster and I needed to adjust on the fly. Or everything I thought would happen didn't happen and I had to absolutely make a massive pivot. To profitability to find a different direction because, you know, it was crickets. It was, you know, we weren't doing that. And so my philosophy in a business plan was, we got to we don't need 300 pages. Number one, there's this critical questions that you have to ask in a business plan and you'd be wise to ask them. And so I just kind of broke it down into the simplest form possible, but over 2020 years of starting businesses that I thought, you know, if you did this, give you a much greater chance. And I did it with my son, and he launched a very successful company. So, you know, I know it works. And I've launched a couple companies just in the last two years. One's going to hit a $1 million. It's third year in. So I know they work. I've scaled multiple $1 million companies. I know it works. So what are we missing when it comes to business funds? What are we missing? Like I said, it's dry it's boring usually. It's due diligence. You've got to look at a business plan like this for every hour you put into a business plan is probably ten hours of aggravation and $10,000 you're going to save. So all of this frontend knowledge. Let's just kind of like if I go really quickly in it. Sure. You know, the first thing is, I ask a person. Why do you think this business will succeed? Just tell me. And then go into a bar a pub or an ask ten people if they think this business will succeed. That may sound really dumb, but you'll get some good advice. Ask people if they would ever pay that amount for that product. In other words the problem is in an entrepreneurs in our mind we absolutely believe it's the greatest idea in the world. And sure people will pay for that. And a business plan should test that should test that theory. You know, who's your competition? What's going to be your competitive advantage? Why would people buy from you over them? Okay. Your pricing at this. Well, how can you get it manufactured for that? What is your profit margin? What are your expenses? I mean, these are just, you know, how much is going to cost to start the business? How much is this going to cost to continue the business? Who do you need to open the doors on day one? You know what I mean? This is just common sense, but you got to answer these questions. Right. Because if not, you know, you're going to have a lot of expenses that you never saw coming. Always. Yeah. So the interesting thing now, Sean is that, you know, as we talked about our in life, but also in business, is stuff's going to come out of left field, right? The feces is going to hit the fan and you didn't expect it. IE let's just stick an example. A pandemic and suddenly you can not do business for maybe a year, right? There's no due diligence for that. And I always say, you can't strategize life around an outlier. In a pandemic defies all logic. I mean, if you're a restaurant, if you own a restaurant during a pandemic, I can't tell you I have any great idea for you. I've learned how to deliver. I would learn how to do family meals and deliver them. You know, I know what I would do. I'm not saying it would work, but I know the pivot I would take. But just in business in general, the point is this is when you're bringing and coming to there's going to be stuff you can't plan for. There is no doubt. No business plan can cover everything. Right. But you've got when you're doing your business plan, you've got to think of, okay, one thing in a business plan is what's other revenue streams you could tap into. So I do a business plan and let's say this is my ideal situation. I'm going to sell these widgets. Yes. My business plan. I also got to be what are other things that I could sell? Within this industry and things of that nature, you know, you got to have a plan B, you know, you may not want to use it, but you got to consider that a plan B may be necessary. And clear, with the pandemic that kind of violates every rule of business. Yeah, of course. But, you know, it's one of the things you were saying about the business plans is that they start with the presumption that everything is going to go right. Yeah, right? And that's where the fault lies is that that's not actually what happened. It doesn't go quite like that. Yeah, no. And it's funny, but on the front of a business, there's a lot of times I have a business idea and I think it's really good. And then I go through a business plan and my business plan disqualifies it. This is one of my key things in a discipline. If a business plan gets you not to go forward with the business, it achieved its goal. See, a business plan is not designed to pat you on the back and say go do it. It's equally responsible to tell you to not do it to pause to rethink this to consider something else. For everyone business plan that I did that told me this was a great business. Four told me it wasn't a good business. So a business plan is allowed to talk you from jumping off the bridge. Yeah, and that's the problem, right? I mean, we fall in love with our own ideas. Right. So we reverse engineer a business plan to support our theory instead of asking other questions that are painful. Right. So yeah, so this is going to be a $1 million business in a year. So what do we need to do as opposed to well, maybe it won't be let's find out. Yeah, I always say, how are you going to track customers? You know what I'm going to do? I'm going to do social media. Okay, do you have an experience with have you have you had success with social media and business? You start asking those painful questions. Whether it's business is fairly simple. One thing I like about this, I'm a simple guy. You only got to do three things well in business. You had to track customers, sell customers and fulfill what it is you sold

Donnie Susie ABC Amazon Sean
A highlight from Terri Cole | How to Be a Boundary Boss

Dose of Leadership

00:48 sec | Last week

A highlight from Terri Cole | How to Be a Boundary Boss

"Hey, welcome to this special episode of dosa leadership where it's actually a next level method podcast episode that's my other project that I have with my podcast that I have with business owner Matt lily next level method. We launched this last August and it's an up and coming podcast, but I'm playing it here because I want you to get exposure. We got a bigger audience here in dose of leadership and I'm trying to grow the audience next level method. So I'm doing playing it here. And today's guest is Terry Cole, she's the author of boundary boss a psychotherapist and host of the Terry Cole show. Before earning her master's degree in clinical psychotherapy, however, she was an agent a talent agent for actors and supermodels. She was your typical type a overachiever, no balance, no internal piece, her ambition, her fearless attitude fan the Musk get to the

Matt Lily Terry Cole
A highlight from Why We Married in the Temple After 20 Years in Same-Sex Relationships | An Interview With Bennett & Becky Borden

Leading Saints Podcast

06:49 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Why We Married in the Temple After 20 Years in Same-Sex Relationships | An Interview With Bennett & Becky Borden

"Today I am in a beautiful immigration canyon with my good friends Bennet and Becky Borden. How are you two? Doing great. Well, I first met you two at the north star conference back in March. Mark of 2017, and you were there, you were one of the keynotes to talk about your experience. And unless you get you to in context, Ben will start with you. How would you describe your upbringing? Where are you from? And maybe what landed you on a mission? Sure. Thanks, Kurt. Yeah. So I'm from small town to Tennessee outside of Knoxville, Tennessee. And so was born and raised there to first generation converts. And have 5 older brothers and no sisters. You can imagine what that was like growing up. And growing up in the rural south where the church wasn't very big and strong. So we knew everybody in our little branch that eventually became award. But also as challenging drug companies in the south because I had always known since I was a little kid that I was gay. And came out of a difficult kind of growing up period because of that. And in fact, when it became more an issue in my life, it caused the separation of me and my family when I was a young teenager and so spend a lot of my life alone as a younger kid. But eventually reconciled that with my family and went on a mission, I was a sign language missionary, which is kind of a cool mission because you get to instead of going call to a mission you're called every time you transfer your transfer permission to mission. Which was nice. And so I spent the first 8 months in Indiana. And then the second 8 months I was in North Carolina, which is where I actually met Becky's family, which is a big part of the story, because her stepfather was our ward mission leader. And so I spent a great deal of time with their family. And then I finished my mission in Michigan. But throughout that period, the same sex attraction was really part of my life ever since I was a small child. And so that really became a predominant issue. And my life. But that took me through my mission anyway. And Becky, what about you? What was your upbringing like? So I was also born and raised in the south to a first generation convert parents. And I am the oldest of 5 kids for my mother and grew up a member of the church and I did all the things that I was supposed to do and was president of all my little groups and present and Wilson and I presented moral president. Yeah, I did it. The exact Molly Mormon. But I knew from the age of probably ten or 11 that I was attracted to girls and you know some people maybe have heard me say this before, but when I knew that I liked girls more than other girls liked girls. I thought, yay, I thought, you know, yeah, I'm special. It didn't occur to me that there was something wrong with me. I just thought, hey, I've got something not only do I appreciate boys, but I really like girls too. So Ye me. Interesting. So I kind of went with that. I dated boys through high school. I was never, I never dated any girls in high school, but you know I got married, gosh, by the time I was 21 to a boy and it was not the best decision I ever made. And I ended up leaving the church during that time and was excommunicated and which was a huge blessing in retrospect. I didn't think so at the time, but it was in retrospect. And so then that brings me to about the age of where we just left off with Bennett story. But yeah, I met Bennett. I was 14. He was a missionary in our ward. And we had almost 20 sisters and elders assigned to our wardrobe because it was rural North Carolina. So there was lots of work to do. And the mission he was in was half of the state. So we, when we had correlation and dessert on Saturday nights at our House, it was all afternoon and evening because there were so many sisters and elders. So we, you know, the fun thing was because my mom was also a steak missionary at the time. Whenever Ben and his companion or anybody needed to go anywhere, if they didn't have a car, my mom took them wherever they needed to go. And so we spent a lot of time with them. We got to know Ben it really well in that 8 months. And he just kind of became part of our family, I think, at that point. It was wonderful. We've stayed friends since that time for the last 25 years, 28, 28 years now. Yeah. Something ridiculous. Yes. And so after your mission, there was still that connection with Becky's family. You Christmas cards, maybe go visit type thing? Yeah, quite a lot. Her family really became my family. So little brothers and sisters became just like my family. We were very, very close. And for, really, the next 25 years. And he was at people's weddings in school plays and family where he came to family reunions. I mean, he was just part of our group. He was like the big brother. It was very close to that family, which has been one of the great blessings of my life. But soon after my mission, I went to BYU right after I got off my mission and after a couple of semesters actually got married to a sister missionary who I was on my mission with. And it was interesting because she knew my background. And your background is experiencing same sex trafficking. What I'd gone through as a kid and all of that. And she really wanted to marry me. And I thought, well, that's unusual. This is going to be the only chance I have ever having a marriage. And so we got married a temple wedding. But within a couple of years we got divorced, which was hard on everybody. But in the looking back on it, it's a good thing. But that was a really challenging for me after I had gone on my mission and done had a temple marriage and all these things and yet same sex attraction was still a huge part of my existence. And when my first marriage fell apart, I wasn't terribly thrilled with things. I was pretty mad at God at that point. It was one of those things where he felt like you were doing everything you were supposed to do. Even on mission, he came home, found a girl to marry and that didn't work. Yeah, exactly. Follow all the formula you're supposed to we were. Sunday school teachers and they always go on presidencies and all that kind of stuff. And looking back on it now, I really understand much more about my journey. But at the time, I felt like betrayed almost but handed a really raw deal. And why fight this anymore? Why? And so I came out at that point and really was out for the next 20 years, living in opening gay lifestyle. And when you say you came out, your family was aware of that you were gay. But you're just coming out as the full lifestyle and everything. Yeah, because I had when I went on my mission and then got married, of course, everyone was thrilled with that. Good.

Becky Borden Becky Tennessee Molly Mormon BEN Bennet North Carolina Knoxville Bennett Kurt Indiana Michigan Wilson BYU
A highlight from How to Create a Powerful Personal Brand with Christine Gritmon

"You're In Charge: Conversation that Spark Change" with Glenn Pasch

04:53 min | Last week

A highlight from How to Create a Powerful Personal Brand with Christine Gritmon

"Your message in front of thousands or potentially millions of people. And while that's great, the problem is, a lot of companies and individuals are looking at social media only as an advertising platform. They forgot that social media is social, that the key to success is building or relationship with your audience. Let them understand who you are as a person as a company. What you stand for and more importantly, how you can solve the problem they may be facing. But if you don't connect if you don't focus on the relationship, no one's going to listen to you because you're just going to look like everyone else. Now I know many of you are going, okay Glenn, well, how do I do it? Well, that's why I brought Christine gripman on the show today. She is a social media expert, but also an expert on personal branding. And she's going to share some tactical advice, some common sense approaches that for many of us, we may have forgotten. It's about the people. It's about building the relationships. And I can't wait for you to hear what she has to share with you today. So let's dive into today's episode of you're in charge conversations at spark change with Christine gritman. Okay. Okay, Christine, thank you so much for being here. I've waited to have you on for a while. I've been very excited about this because just following you online. I was really attracted to your branding, which is what I want to talk to you about. You really seem to walk your talk. So my first question to you for the audience is there seems to be this idea of throwing the word brand around as this this concept that anybody could latch on to. So when you're working with individuals or businesses about this idea of brand. What are they getting wrong and where do you start to set them on the right path? Absolutely. So different people have their own interpretations of the word brand. I like to say it's the version of you that lives in other people's heads. And you want a version of you to live in other people's heads if you're in business. And you can take control over what that picture looks like. In fact, you should. Because people will hopefully have an impression of you one way or the other, no matter what. So it's good if you can make sure that that impression that they have of you is one that will also benefit you. Another thing to keep in mind is another way of looking at brand and other site, you can put on it is who are you and why should people care? Also, why should people even remember you? Why should people even remember if they've seen you before? How can they remember if they've seen you before? Why should you stick in their heads? Why should you take up some of that valuable mental real estate of theirs? And that's really where I start with people, which is who are you and why should people care? Because we're all bombarded by so many people and things and brands and entertainment and just everything, trying to get our attention at all times. Social media has made this constant. Yes. And so if you really want to break through that, you need to help you need help people understand instantaneously why on earth they should even care. And some of that is done because you have a really clear message of how you can help them of what's in it for them to give that to give you their attention. And sometimes it can be as simple as being likeable. I mean, that's actually helped me a lot in business. The fact that people actually want to deal with me, the fact that people feel better after having had an interaction with me has helped me more than my actual skills or intelligence in the early stages. Simply because you don't get a chance to show what you can do and you don't get a chance to really work with people. Unless they want to give you that chance. And so that's a big part of it. Let me ask you on that because I really want the audience to understand that because what you just said, well, first, that's one of the reasons why I connected with you or was attracted to your message. As you came across approachable, right? Number one is I felt just watching you or being part of your chat about brand on Twitter. It's you

Christine Gripman Christine Gritman Glenn Christine Twitter
Snippet with Julia Newbould

Radical Self Belief - The Mojo Maker© Podcast

05:19 min | Last week

Snippet with Julia Newbould

"Another thing is that even if you're not in your 40s or 50s, you much younger, you've probably still got money that you don't think you have because if you've got a super fun and you've got insurance to that super fund, which typically people do, you've got a couple of $100,000 there. So there is a meaningful amount that everybody's leaving, but you know you've got to figure out what it is that makes you take and what you want to leave behind. I mean, personally, I love the arts and I have had a lot of pleasure going to theater and concerts and so on. So when I really thought about what I wanted as my legacy, I want to help someone perform in the odds that probably wouldn't get a chance before. And it's very complex to set it up and you really think about what how would I pick that person, you know, after I'm dead, who would choose that person and you know I had to think about, well, which of my friends would be good to put in those positions and you know, that's the kind of fun part of it. I think the thought that we're going to die, that's not a fun part. But you've got something positive to leave behind. That can be very, very pleasant. And I think that that has actually made me feel less afraid to die, knowing that there's something that I will leave behind. It's so interesting the word mortality. I mean, I lost my father a couple of months ago. My mom's 81. So once you get to a phase where you start losing your parents, then you start thinking about what's next. And also when we talk about legacy, we're not just talking about when we pass on. I know a lot of CEOs and business founders and people they're trying to bring their children through their leaders inside the corporation legacy is not just, I guess you're well on testimony. It's also if you founded a business or you've got something going, what happens with all that vision and creativity and culture that you're trying to create. So there are many footprints that we leave as individuals. And I just wanted to say I love the fact that you found who would be if the executioner of your will who would have the charter of putting up this fund and finding those people, you found that a fun thing that bought light to what would normally be a discussion and a thought process, most people just don't want to go to. Yeah. And I think that bringing up the discussion that's really difficult. And I think it was this time last year I was talking to a lawyer and we were talking about wills and he said, now he's a good time. You know, the families get together for Christmas. You know, when everyone's together, talk about your will and your parents will and what they expect and what a siblings maybe you eat expect to do for your parents and so on. And what you expect for your children as well. So depending on what stage of life you're at, it's a good time when the families together to bring things out in the open. Because there's so many things with wheels. You know, if you have more than one child and you don't want to split things evenly or even if you do, you know, the kid's going to say bit so and so got something more when I was alive when you know it's a very complex area and can cause so much family problems. And I think getting yourself right in your own ground and energy is the most important thing. But you know, why do you think that we have money in itself as a topic? The other thing about this is a lot of people feel they don't have enough. So once you start looking at what do I need to retire with so my legacy after work, let alone what do I need to pass over? Is that if he actually front you from a lot of people because there was a thing going around Instagram that said, if you retire with a $1 million, you know, you have to live off 33,000 a year, so to speak. But a lot of people can't even imagine retiring with a $1 million at the moment. And so there's a lot of fear around not having enough right now, let alone set sparks a lot of triggers in people that what if I'm not wealthy enough? How do we know our idea of wealth and how can we be comfortable with what we have now in order to do the next step of planning? How do you help that discussion with your read is even? I think all of it, you know, whether it's your will or whether you've got enough money. To be discussed. And I think it's the way that it comes up in conversation. And so for myself, I read a book a couple of years ago with Kate McCallum a financial adviser. It's called the joy of money. And basically, we looked at money as it's not a discrete topic. You don't talk about money as separate to the rest of your life. It's the enabler for what you want to do in life. So can you afford the holiday break it down? You know, what do I need to leave each week? It's hard to talk about the future without looking at what you have now and is that enough is that satisfying is that giving you pleasure? Can you turn that down and swap work for life after you get retirement age? It's a difficult topic. And I think there's so much going around about how much you do need in retirement. And you know that $1 million figure. Yes, you know, you're living off 33,000 a year, but that's if you don't draw down on the capital. And at some point, maybe you will draw down on the capital. You know, that's what most people will do. But you've got to look at it and figure out what would you do if that was all you had. If you had 33,000, how would you make up the shortfall if you're going to have a shortfall in your life and think about alternatives? You know, retirement now isn't just shut the door on your job and you walk away. You might do something part time. You might do the same job part time. You might change careers.

Legacy Financial Planning Radical Self Belief Money Magazine Wills Kate Mccallum Instagram
A highlight from The Story Behind Pornography Use | An Interview with Jay Stringer

Leading Saints Podcast

05:48 min | Last week

A highlight from The Story Behind Pornography Use | An Interview with Jay Stringer

"Flying solo today have a Steven shields on as a co host with me today. You're a former guest Stephen and well known among the leading saints audience. How are you today? KF, as you are now going to be known by our leading saints audience. I'm always happy to be here. And super excited to be here with our guest. Yeah, so Jay stringer, the author of unwanted, how sexual behavior reveals our way to healing. How are you? Current Stephen, good to be with you. I don't know if you all know this. I broke both my elbows. No way. About two weeks ago. So I y'all can't stand up or no, I mean, part of the thing with an elbow injury is that you get slings on for about two days, and then they want you into physical therapy, pretty quickly after that, just to make sure it doesn't get stiff. So it's been a circus. Was it the long board, Jay? What did it? It was not a long board. It was an electric scooter. Really? And yeah, I mean, the paradox of my body has just been like, I ran a marathon. But that morning, my wife had to get me dressed. Had to get my socks on, had to get a shirt on. Because I don't have full mobility. And I'm waking up pretty consistently through the night just in pain, usually three or four a.m., so I've had better better month. Oh my goodness. I'm excited to be here and dive into our conversation. That's great. We'll clear that because I was getting way ticked off that you didn't wave at us. I was like, what's this big problem? But now I'm compassion. I got more. It's like the John McCain arms, right? You can only go so high, right? Yes. Yeah. I'm getting a little bit further each day. So awesome. Now Jay, you are not a latter day saint, but a Christian for sure. How do you describe your faith background? So I grew up my dad was a Protestant minister grew up in the Presbyterian tradition and then I went out to seminary. So I got my master of divinity in my masters of counseling psychology. So I'm an ordained minister in a reformed church. And then also, most of my work is as that master of counseling psychology students. So the MA CP has gotten me all my work since graduating from seminary and grad school. Great. And I always have to ask when we have a non ladder day saint on the leading saints podcast. Any specific experience, whether it's positive, negative or really strange with other Latter day Saints or Mormons as we're often referred to that comes to mind. I mean, I think the first thing that always comes to mind is just the word integrity. I mean, I think you all have been so hospitable to me. I mean, I think it's there's been so many organizations that I've partnered with. And so I think I've just always seen this kind of, especially among leaders like this very firm conviction that something needs to be done about this issue, but also what are the resources? What's the kindness that we can begin to extend to this? So yeah, I'm deeply encouraged by just what you all are doing to even have this conversation. So that's always the first thing that comes to mind is integrity and compassion with regard to what you all are doing. So all right, good. I was worried of a strange interaction. So it's not just a latter day same issue. It's a Protestant issue. It's like any community that tends to have some level of purity, holiness. It begins to kind of set up this kind of zone of secrecy, where rather than really believing that the gospel enters into our heartache actually incarnates God's self into places of misery throughout human history. think that we need to be able to clean it all up for God and Jesus and I just don't find that to be true, theologically. And so I think any time there's a tradition that deeply wants to honor God remain some level of purity, sexual integrity, it's going to set up something of hiding in a lack of education around understanding our bodies. So I think that's just the challenge of a lot of faith traditions these days is we have not adequately prepared our men and women for the bodies that they're entering and understanding of sex and sexual health. And we can dive into all those themes later, but it's just, it's a huge challenge for any faith based organization, community. Yeah. And so I'm curious, there's lots of leaders listening and I remember being in that bishop who sing individual come in time and time again, just struggling and getting to the point of like, okay, well, I've shared all those scriptures I usually share and I've said all those things I usually say like what's going on? Like, how do you frame this topic in a way that is actually encouraging that leaders can say, hey, you know, there's actually a way forward to help people. Yeah, I think part of what the church has really failed at is to be able to make this something that needs to be managed. And so usually when someone is struggling with some form of sexual brokenness, it's a sense of what you should probably get some relationship around this. Let's break the shame and bring you into community, which I'm all for. Maybe let's try and get you some Internet monitoring on your computer. And it's essentially let's put up fences and guardrails around temptation. But it doesn't ever address something of the core issue. And so a lot of what I did with my book unwanted was to research about 4000 men and women to get a sense of what is actually driving this because we know it's ubiquitous.

Steven Shields Jay Stringer Stephen JAY Saints John Mccain Grad School
CEO of X2, Mark French, on How His Product Has Disrupted the Market

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

02:06 min | 2 months ago

CEO of X2, Mark French, on How His Product Has Disrupted the Market

"Now. A couple of questions. I have here for you one. Is you guys are operating this business. And i would say that it is. It is disruptive what you're doing from what i can tell. The brand seems to be disruptive. What do you accredit the the rapid growth to do. What do you attribute the rapid growth to why is it. Being such a disruptive success. I would say there's more people coming to the category now right so there's certain people that would never try an energy drink right that more health conscious consumer really was not interested in putting in other bodies some of these beverages that had you know some you know ingredients that you can't even pronounce so as more people. Are you know looking for energy solutions. Whether it's a coffee drinker. That wants something. A little bit cleaner lighter Or you know somebody that might be drinking other energy drinks but is trying to live a healthier lifestyle. You know. i think that's really where the disruption comes in also. There's never really been a brand that you know was built in the locker room in this energy category right so you know. We're really fortunate that Death net recently featured us as a sports drink. Innovator we're not really a sports drink. We're not a hydration drink or something that you might take Before you want to do some exercise or if you wanna just have a little bit more energy and focus throughout the workday but you wanna have it with clean healthy ingredients and you know the other reason why people might consider us to be somewhat. Disruptors is just because of you know this athlete a model. there really haven't been athletes like saquon. Barkley labonte david kawhi leonard and now kendall tool who's one of the top peleton athletes That are joining a company like ours as shareholders and partners in the business. I think it's just you know shedding some light that there is renovation innovation in the energy category and that's where we could probably be looked at as being somewhat

Barkley Labonte David Kawhi Le Kendall
Grinding Towards Success With Build Your Brand Online Founder Jesse Eker

Gary.club

02:42 min | 2 months ago

Grinding Towards Success With Build Your Brand Online Founder Jesse Eker

"Well off you know your childhood. I grew up in a single wide trailer with a single mom in southern west. Virginia you and i didn't grow up that much. Different the differences at a certain point in time in your life. You know you're blessed enough in your dad. Did something pretty remarkable. Yeah and that's when. I saw the light where i was like. Whoa like this is what making it is like. And it was a quick shift and went pretty fast you know. The atmosphere of our environment completely changed but the values of the like. What made him there. What i saw behind the scenes and how he kind of became this person like what it took to get. There was always ingrained in what i was doing. So even though i had to find my own path and go through ups and downs and challenges of my own habits and procrastination's and fears and normal. Human shit. I did get to embody what he went through to. How the success he had and i got to experience both sides of the spectrum. Now i wasn't necessarily poor what we weren't well off. We were comfortable at the time and went through influxes of money but getting to experience both sides. I knew which side i wanted to be on no matter what and that was. Not on the o k side. It was on the successful and rich side. So that's what i've been grinding for and ostlund for other than you know serving and helping an impacting obviously to solve problems for other people. But i knew that was my got to. My y was not to go back to that life. I wanted to stay in the lifestyle that was created in my second half of my child. You know it makes a lot of sense. What are some of those values that you've stuck with from the first part of that childhood. You know. I think one of the biggest things that most people forget is that nothing worth. It comes easy and everything takes time and energy and i think a lot of us are so used to this immediate gratification world of like press this button. Do these things you're only one funnel away kind of mentality when you have gone through it and you know what it takes to be successful. You understand that. There is a certain amount of time energy and effort required to reach a certain level of success. And i think that value of understanding what it takes to actually get to that level was really you know what i saw an experience from watching my dad constantly in his office like just really going after it now.

Southern West Ostlund Virginia
How to Achieve Your Greatest Purpose With Serial Entrepreneur Michael Koenigs

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:06 min | 3 months ago

How to Achieve Your Greatest Purpose With Serial Entrepreneur Michael Koenigs

"Let's go through the stages of purpose you broken down into three different stages. What is that all about her right. So think of like this our first stage or what i often call are doing stages imagine when you get paid to do something that you could be flipping burgers working at a gas station or whatever that may happen to be. It's task oriented. Where really you are a meat puppet. You know you're just doing something for the money and also you're trying to just cover your basic needs your maslow's hierarchy of needs in the grand of things and the next level is where you're at your knowing phase and you are maybe getting paid for knowing something's got to be a white collar job But then you go through your next phase in life for your at your being phase and that is where you're paid for who you are not what you know not what you do and i think there's a fourth level to this so this is different than the stages but the force level is being a full human expression. Not just a human being meaning to to express yourself where you're being rewarded for your expressions in life now. What does that mean in terms of the first second and third stages so first stage is the basic needs. The maslow's the second stage is The experiences you're providing in the third stage has to do with true transformation your true purpose in life where you've done the work you know who you are. You know your greatest value. Your unique abilities are what we call your superpowers and you found a way to provide huge transformative value. But here's the big kicker. The highest state is when you help other people find their purpose and you help them. Identify and and In help them achieve and be in that state all the time so that is really usually the final stage of most people's lives is helping people identify find live inside their

Maslow
Lessons I Learned After COVID Killed My Conference

The $100 MBA Show

02:14 min | 3 months ago

Lessons I Learned After COVID Killed My Conference

"The first lesson. I learned is that. Don't use optimism as your guide meaning that you know. We were super optimistic. That we're going to still the conference when we went into lockdown. You know we didn't realize how long lockdown was going to be but It's always good to have a disaster plan. It's funny because i know this in my software company we always have these. What if conversations and Center standard operating procedures. But we need to have the same in the conference we need to think. Hey what if is in happened way before it would give me more time to have options or to Make some changes provide some options to the attendees but basically when i found out we're three weeks out from the conference so i had limited choices to what i can do. Second i learned was. I knew in that moment. The best thing i can do is i need to communicate. I need to communicate with my people. The attendees And i just needed to make sure that they're included in any decision and that i let them know what's going on so they don't feel like they're in the dark. I was very conscious. These people trusted me. They give me their money. I want to make sure that they know that. I got their back and that you know there are some options. I'm looking at when we actually had a discussion on that call before the cancellation was confirmed. Because the accession of lockdown of what are some options. And what. I was pleasantly surprised by how open people were there were like. Hey we totally get it. I understand they're all entrepreneurs zeno how these things happen and They presented some ideas from creative ideas. I didn't think of as alternatives creative ideas in terms of different dates. Different locations Because it became clear that this is not going to happen This oscar will not happen in the winter at least this year because The lockdown will extend past the winter season. So the idea of going skiing together is just not going to happen so by having open communication. Just putting your cards on the table. Hey these are options. This is will happen. This were our monies deposited. What's going on. this is what's happening. It makes it super clear to people to understand all right. These are options. Let's work with

Zeno Oscar Skiing
Whenever You Fall Down, Pick Something Up

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

01:15 min | 3 months ago

Whenever You Fall Down, Pick Something Up

"Familiar with the idea of whenever you fall down you've just got to pick yourself back up again. But what about this one from famed canadian. American medical researcher and physician also bold theodore avery. Whenever you fall down peak something up. What i love about. It is the idea that when you are up here you sometimes forget how things operate down the and so if you happen to fall down spend a bit of time down there understanding what's going on down there understanding what is happening that relates to this upper world. That you've come from you fell down. Pick something up. That can help you on that journey as you grow. Gather some more information gathered some more data some more research the more insights and there's even another dimension to it if you wanna flip it just a little bit pick someone else up so the idea that when you fall down you not only have to pick yourself up you not only have to pick up other things around you but pick someone else pick someone else up. That has that is down. They maybe they've fallen down to or maybe they just haven't been able to get up but when you fall down just pick yourself up have a look around. See what's the pick something up and see if you can pick someone else up as well. Great

Theodore Avery
One Minute Leadership Thought of the Day 09.08.21 - burst 2

Leadership Lifestyle Podcast

00:47 sec | 3 months ago

One Minute Leadership Thought of the Day 09.08.21 - burst 2

"Today's hold us back in our own mind for a number of reasons. Anxiety era failure the term. I hate the most imposter syndrome. We don't think we can do it. We don't think we deserve it. Who am i all those things creep in into not thinking. You're probably better than you think you are. And you certainly don't want to go to the other side of the tracks where you're full yourself either. But you just gotta start doing things you want to do right now somewhere. Somebody is doing something that you wanna do. Simply because they're doing it and they got over that hump they got over that fear in really take a hard look in the mirror and it's okay to save yourself. I'm probably a little better than i think. I am and i could always get better than if you're focused on those two things you can start to accomplish the things you want to do but you gotta start there in.

Nike CEO John Donahoe's Lessons on Servant Leadership

Venture Stories

01:56 min | 3 months ago

Nike CEO John Donahoe's Lessons on Servant Leadership

"What star. John rains that i am most associate with you. Which is servant leadership. And i'd love if you could describe your philosophy on servant leadership especially try to conceptualize it for much smaller organizations. What does it mean to serve leader as a ceo of a bunch of ceo's around the table how should they think about how that philosophy conform away they run their business so when i talk about servant leadership. It's frankly the the way. I learned to lead because i actually learned the lead in partnership a ban where you aren't really empowered to do anything to you have to earn the respect and the followership of others. You guys don't have that as founders. But i do think you'll find that. Many of the best leaders exhibited the principles servant leadership. And i just say how do i serve serve. The purpose of the organization serve the customers served. The employees serve the communities in which we operate in a jim collins called at level five leadership other people call from things. But it's when someone it's not about the leader it's about what it is. We are trying to accomplish right and some of the antithesis of what's hot silicon valley at different times the narrative. Always around the all-powerful founder. They're all powerful leader. And i think there's actually very few examples where that actually great sustainable companies come out of that my leadership role model for large parts of my career with phil jackson of the chicago bulls. Now it'd be steve kerr for your younger and would always struck me. He was able to do is get people who actually were better than he was klay. Together he got michael jordan. Scottie pippen dennis. Rodman caster characters to win six championships. It got shack kobe to play together. You look at you. Look at steve kerr the warriors right. Now he's getting. Somehow he's getting steph curry klay thompson and kevin durant andrew mongering all vying to something greater and they win i view with how do you build high performance teams of top talent to win and servant leadership is part of it.

Jim Collins Steve Kerr John Phil Jackson Chicago Bulls Scottie Pippen Michael Jordan Rodman Steph Curry Kevin Durant Andrew Dennis Klay Thompson Warriors
Bill Gates on the Important Choices He Made in His Tenure at Microsoft

Venture Stories

02:46 min | 3 months ago

Bill Gates on the Important Choices He Made in His Tenure at Microsoft

"As the founder and operating ceo for twenty five years of one of the most prolific invaluable startups. I wanted to start with your perspective on the important choices that you made during your tenure microsoft and how you view those choices as they've related to the long-term growth story at the company well microsoft was very lucky in that we're not a capital intensive business. You know it was financed by money. I made in high school. And i did the school gasoline and there was all sorts of things you can do and make money fairly easily in those days. 'cause i'm people who knew how to do. Software things was was very small. We did take an investment. We sold five percent of the company and by the way from twenty million to win a million dollars from venture firm dave mark carts venture them just because we wanted to have him actually. It was more senior people but it ended up being him. Advise us about various choices we had to make and those early days we were because we knew that software was this magical thing and it was enabled because the chip was magical and weirdly. People didn't understand that. Moore's law essentially said that computing power would be infinite and so the best way to think about it was to say okay. Software would be the limiting factor towards any sort of digitally assisted activity and we thought of ourselves as a software company. We ended up competing with companies that were single product companies. so like. I wonder if anybody's here's ever heard like ashton tape or has anybody ever heard ashton. Okay good was a great article where i gave a hardcore speech about our database in it. Said gate says ashton-tate never existed. But i did actually say that. I said that they might cease to exist at some point anyway very competitive. There was a spreadsheet called one-two-three a word processor called wordperfect so these were single product companies and in terms of really building your engineering tools. You're international distribution sales consulting. How you work with corporate tells forced you thought of yourself as a software company and a platform company was very different than saying okay. I have one two three. Which was a lotus spreadsheet products. So we didn't feel for ambition but then the intensity of executing on it was super super

Dave Mark Carts Microsoft Ashton Moore Tate
Maximizing Productivity and Efficiency Through Delegating With Tech Entrepreneur Aaron Kemmer

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:23 min | 3 months ago

Maximizing Productivity and Efficiency Through Delegating With Tech Entrepreneur Aaron Kemmer

"Aaron all we have is time and how we use our time. Is everything so. Break it down for us. How do you know when it's time to delegate projects. He i love that. You know one thing. I often quip about time. As you only get like twenty eight thousand days in line you want to really optimize us when eight thousand days in behind me on my wall. I have a piece of paper that has you know a a little circle for each of those days showing that you could fit each day on one sheet of paper not a lot of time and it really goes by quick and you know i think there's that famous quip like you know you and bill gates have the same amount of time right But the one thing that you can do is maybe buy more time by by delegating. You know and i think a really good time to to start doing that is before you before you think you should or before you kind of get kind of overloaded Because when you delegate you need to make sure you have the time to train. Somebody coached them. Build out a little bit of a process And that's hard to do. If you're completely swamped working. Eighty to one hundred hours a week. You know for instance which many many entrepreneurs kind of have so one of my entrepreneurial goals is usually like get the ball rolling. I loved like kick start something and then try to hand off to someone who's like even better than me at least at that specific kind of project or skill said One thing magic right now get like a few hundred people A few other companies have kind of reached. This this is is well usually when you get to a certain size. Say way before that it's You know maybe out. If it's a half a dozen or a dozen you if you really important aspect of the business you wanna have at least one person focused on that one singular goal that you kind of want to accomplish So it's a really good time to start delegating so it's like i don't know if you're trying to grow the top of funnel of your business you probably don't want If you've got like a dozen people in the company you know your admin exact focus on top the final scheduling emails. You know calendering all that kind of stuff like one person. Kind of focused on

Aaron Bill Gates
Purely Elizabeth's Elizabeth Stein on the Beginnings of Her Entrepreneurial Journey

Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

02:27 min | 3 months ago

Purely Elizabeth's Elizabeth Stein on the Beginnings of Her Entrepreneurial Journey

"Love to hear maybe just start out telling a little bit about your story and how why you decided to take the leap. Yes so i started officially in two thousand nine but before that really. I was living in new york city i was. You know it might twenty trying to figure out life. And at the time i was working for a handbag company doing doing sales and marketing and i met my boyfriend at the time who was a triathlete and he really got me into this kind of whole new sense of health and wellness. I would say. I was always a healthy person but starting to do marathons biathlons certainly a two point. Oh version of that. And i think you started competing with them i did. I got up to doing a half. Ironman was along. Just were the person who would hide in the woods during the cross practice in high school. Because i hated to run them. I know really what he taught me. Was that an so much more mental than physical. And i think that art became super intriguing. Jimmy a really holistic health and that is so much more than just what you put into your body and so i started searching for another career option and ended up finding institute for integrative nutrition on i did bear program in two thousand seven and really what that taught me was food medicine. You know kind of everything that's coming to the forefront of health and wellness today in that program really learned that there is not many options for healthy gluten free products and i had started to eat. That way really was working with a lot of clients sewer eating that way suggesting and then they end up feeling better. Products on the shelf were few and barbara. I really saw an opportunity for healthier better tasting and initially started as something in the background of my mind. I ended up going to a local. Triathlon exploded participate in the race but really to promote my nutrition practice. I had a booth at the expo and figuring any thing to entice people to come in shop with me. So i've made this batch of blueberry muffins to get people to talk to me at of course not one person sign up for my nutrition practice. Everyone just wanted to know where they could buy these not fence and that became the moment and took off from

New York City Jimmy Barbara
Theres Always Room For More Than One Leader In A Market

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

01:23 min | 3 months ago

Theres Always Room For More Than One Leader In A Market

"Interview last night with a guy called peter. Murray who is the ceo of the pf l. the professional fighters league now the pf l. claims to be the number two mixed martial arts business after the ufc and the comment that he made. When asked about you know considering even taking on the ufc because the ufc really owns the market. They are the number one player he said. Yeah but there's always room for more than one leader in the market. Sure they can only be one number one but how many markets do you really know where there's only one brand that represents that market. Not many you know. I mean the only one i can probably think of is maybe google i guess. Even something like amazon is amazon a giant. Yes do they rule the markets. I go to usually but are they multiple online shopping platforms. That brands. that succeed. Yeah there are so. I think the lesson for anyone who's thinking about taking on an industry incumbent which is the gorilla in the in the room is the big company it is possible to take on that guerrilla possible to go into that market because they can be multiple leaders in a market. Might not be easy to take on google. It might not be easy to take on amazon for example but certainly in most markets. I think there is always room for more than one leader.

UFC Professional Fighters League Murray Amazon Peter Google
How to Set Yourself for Abundance This Week

Activate Your Wealth Show

02:17 min | 3 months ago

How to Set Yourself for Abundance This Week

"Wanna share a message today with you about how to create more abundance by the end of the week here. It is monday morning and really. This can be applied to any moment any week whether they really helpful that monday morning and probably by the end of the week you'd like to have generated more abundance. Who wouldn't right. Who wouldn't want to do that. And here's the beautiful thing hyme okay time. It is an illusion and at the same time. It is an abundant resource when you have access to time like five days ahead of us seven days ahead of you. It's an so the first thing that you wanna take in. Is you have this week to create an abundance shift. You went out of this week to generate the money the impacts of visibility that you want all those things create abundance or you so one of the things you wanna take in is. Are you showing up each day and each week looking at it as an opportunity of abundance are you doing that. Is that your perspective every day. Or are you living in what i would a default reality where it's like groundhog's day every day and you're like another day another day here. I am with my patterns of limitation in blocks and in my saying money story. If that's the case then you have the opportunity right now to say you know what by the end of this week by friday i am going to a new experience with money going to have a new flow of abundance and money pouring into my life into my business. So that's the first thing to be aware of and this may seem really simple but one of the things. This is one of my secrets you guys like yesterday. It was a sunday arrest as a family day. I use it for that. And i look at it as an opportunity create wealth. So while i'm not. I wasn't on my computer. It wasn't you know doing were when i was focused on. How do i raise my wealth frequency. Right now wait us this day this next hour. How do i use this moment right here. You'll create a shift in my perspective around money. That's my constant intention.

How to Attract, Develop, and Retain Top Nonprofit Talent

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

02:05 min | 3 months ago

How to Attract, Develop, and Retain Top Nonprofit Talent

"Great to have you and thank you so much for all the work. you do. Thanks so much for having me here. I'm a huge fan of your leadership in this field john. Well thank you The feeling is mutual so galley. Clearly you get the challenge in the sector and this is what your organization is about. Why don't you tell folks a little bit about leading edge and its origin story. And i'm also curious about the thinking about your organization being focused specifically on jewish organizations. Sure let me take this in two parts. The first is genesis origin story. So it was a dark and stormy night noticed. it was Twenty thirteen Toward the end in two thousand thirteen when an informal group of ceo's of foundations and major jewish organizations have been meeting informally for some time and The purpose of these meetings was talking about some of the major issues of major challenges facing the community in thinking about collaborative approach or shared warnings. Those types of almost like informal networking kind of conversations and at that time in sort of building up to that time the conversation was all about the leadership pipeline right. There were a lot of folks in those rooms. A lot of leaders who admitted. I'm not sure he's taking over for me when i retire in. Fill in the blank years and joan. You've talked about this gap and so in two thousand thirteen. Just like in the general nonprofit non see jared say general society jewish nonprofit sector was talking about a turnover in the c. suite of seventy five percents ninety percent by some estimates and fuelled by generational. You know what the demographics and and so this group of of really investors in the jewish ecosystem understood that there was essentially exposure to our organizations because we know that the marker of a great organization starts with a leader that that transition was going to be precarious so they wanted to do something about it and what

General Society John Joan
Should You Be Publicly Recognizing Your People on Social Media?

Hacking Your Leadership

02:27 min | 3 months ago

Should You Be Publicly Recognizing Your People on Social Media?

"What i want to talk about is recognition of your people and how public or not public that that needs to be There's been this rising tide of public recognition on places like lincoln. You know like. I know that when i was in my teens and my early twenties the idea of public recognition was like. Oh my leader. Got up on a morning meeting on a saturday and said chris the best salesperson for the month or whatever it is and that was public recognition when when facebook for started lincoln for started. If my leader was doing that i would've thought was kind of weird. It doesn't seem so weird anymore. I don't know what do you think. Yeah no i completely agree. I think that. I've seen it over the last few years here especially on lincoln but other platforms as well. Mostly lincoln though is just this overwhelming element of positive public recognition for for both employees and leaders. I mean at this point right. Now you know linked in his added into their. They're posting where you can like. Welcome welcome somebody to the team. You can give kudos. You can talk about a work anniversary. There's a lot of things that you can do in their. I see some of those kind of defaults pop up and just you know highlighting. Somebody's name saying that. They think that they're a great leader or that celebrating some type of a milestone. but then i've seen a lot more pictures recently. And i think over twenty twenty and so where pictures of people with their families and talking about the value they bring to the organization or to the team and things like that in again. I think people like to receive recognition different ways. But i like this trend. I think it's a great threat. I think it's i think it's Something that that is helping to inspire other leaders of other organizations to think about how and where they recognize. There are people. So i've enjoyed it. Yeah i i think this is happening when it comes to public recognition of close friends and mostly family members too. I've seen a rise in post from people posting a picture of their spouse or their partner or their whole family. Saying you know. Oh this. i got a lot accomplished over twenty twenty and i thought this was going to be a lot more difficult to incorporate work life and home life and personal life and all this stuff. I wouldn't have been able to do it without these people. And it's like a picture of their family and i thought what's that seems normal. That seems like okay. Like a something you'd want to say And there's been a rise of that on lincoln whereas a few years ago you wouldn't have seen a lot of that that would have been considered not work

Lincoln Chris Facebook
Dr. Katie Nielson: Delivering Personalized Needs-Based Learning at Scale with EnGens

IT Visionaries

01:39 min | 3 months ago

Dr. Katie Nielson: Delivering Personalized Needs-Based Learning at Scale with EnGens

"What is engine in. What does it do so engine is a web and mobile platform that i used to teach english learners all over the united states. And what makes it different is that we use real world materials to give language learners the english skills they need to improve their careers to get into nuclear transition programs to continue their academic studies. It's personalized it's it's based on a decades of research on how to use technology for language learning and how we can use mobile technology to deliver effective outcomes at scale so one of the unique things about this is. This tool is not used to teach. There's dual lingo is like many people to learn many different languages. This is for everyone to learn english. Is that accurate. That's accurate. I mean the united states has many many many non native english speakers here who don't have access to instruction you're my mom is one of them is really hard as an adult learner in the us to get english instruction so we meet the needs of only percent of the adults who want to learn english. And the reason why invented this platform. And i've making it available throughout the country. Right now is we need a new model to do this so instead of going to a church basement or a high school at night to take free. Esl classes where everyone learns the words for like what you say at the zoo or the ball is on the table. Like a bunch of stuff. That isn't helpful. This is a platform that learners can access on their phones anytime anywhere to get them the english they need to do their jobs. Better

United States
Shifting From Time Management to Attention Management

How I Built This

01:06 min | 3 months ago

Shifting From Time Management to Attention Management

"Had a love hate relationship with time management on the one hand i wanna use my time as efficiently and productively as possible on the other hand. All the time. I've spent trying to optimize my schedule. Just makes me more aware of how much time i waste and at the end of the day. I do not know how to get more hours in the day. I've tried to sacrifice. Sleep doesn't work. I can't function. So i think that what i've tried to shift to is from time management to attention management to say that the one thing i can really control is what i focus on and i'd like to start every week with the people in projects that matter to me and that way when i'm focused on you meaningful relationships and trying to accomplish something worthwhile. It doesn't really matter how long it takes. And i found that that's much better for my productivity than setting a goal of using my time more efficiently because efficiency serves no one what i'm ultimately after is doing work. That's interesting and important and that means it's got to be intrinsically motivating to me. It has to be beneficial to others. And if i can concentrate on. That doesn't really matter whether it takes two hours or

Make Work Awesome by Reinventing Your Business Culture With Pam Ross

Top Advisor Marketing Podcast

02:50 min | 4 months ago

Make Work Awesome by Reinventing Your Business Culture With Pam Ross

"When we were talking before we were talking a little bit about about the aspect of culture with leadership but but no matter the size of the organization. You firmly believe that culture is something that should be worked on not just initially but continuously will one. Why are you so passionate about this. And then to where to somebody even begin. Okay so why. Am i so passionate about this in a few like l. Tell us quickly as i can but my first job work was awesome so i was fresh out of university. I worked for a restaurant company. That was growing quickly and i got promoted to their quote unquote training team. Which meant that. I was traveling across the country and actually into the states as well. I'm in canada. And i was opening restaurants and at twenty two. I became the leader of this opening team. I had a ton of autonomy over how we would get this restaurant up and ready and everyone trained and ready to serve our guests a ton of accountability budget of millions of dollars and tons of collaboration with anyone. From the franchise department. Legal department construction our operations everything and we would go and beyond site for weeks at a time. Sometimes months at a time training staff preparing the restaurant and opening these these restaurants. We had a ton of fun and we got great work done. And i truly like that was my first full time job out of university tonight. Thought work is so awesome. Like i am so excited. That i don't have to go back to school and do all those things because this work world that i am in is the best thing fast forward. A couple of years and i realized quickly. That work was not so awesome in most organizations so i came across people. Kind of just might a biding their time until five o'clock when they could go home. I worked in organizations where people were almost literally. You could almost see these badges of honour all over their clothing. That said things like. I'm working so hard i can't take a weekend off or i missed my son's piano recital because i am so busy and this focus on time at work people not feeling like there's or meaning in their work and ultimately work being soul-sucking and we're gonna spend about ninety thousand hours of our lives working and i just refused to agree that that can be a terrible of my

Legal Department Canada
Vision Boards vs Ouija Boards

Leadership Lifestyle Podcast

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

Vision Boards vs Ouija Boards

"Vision boards versus we. D- boards welcome to today's leadership. Thought of the day brought to you by the leadership lifestyle. Podcast yeah i said we board so vision boards versus ouija boards. Do you have a vision board. And actually there are companies that have created digital versions of vision board so google that and check it out and put your vision on there to see if you're going in the direction you wanna go or are you more intimate we d- boards thinking what happened in the past or can we try and predict the future can some some apparition tell you what direction you're gonna go. That's not gonna work. Which you really should be using is a vision board. Something that keeps you center keeps you focused. Keeps you moving in the right direction. So you solve what. You're trying to solve a not get so worked up over what you're missing. Don't think about weed keyboards and hope somebody could tell you something. Get a vision board and get your vision going

Google
The Importance of Successfully Introducing Yourself

Dose of Leadership

02:18 min | 4 months ago

The Importance of Successfully Introducing Yourself

"How to introduce yourself when you're brand in a branding leadership position or a brand new team or maybe you're a brand new project manager to certain project a lot of have been there and i've ever received a lot of over the years questions about this and they've answered them and i thought well this'll be episode because people seem to be concerned about it and i think i thought about those times i've been. I've been multiple times. And it's very stressful. It's when i think back because first impressions are crucial. And you don't want to be digging yourself out of whole from a bad first impression so you wanna make it as effective as possible in. I guess when we think about this there's multiple types of situations that you can be in. You probably have to handle them all a little bit differently. And as i was thinking about what i would talk about in this episode. I think i think about those times. Were even when i've coached a few clients when they've been brand new to position that there are certain situations that are different than others. For example i think the best situation to be in is if you become part of a brand new team or a brand new project that has that has never been formed before. I think you're a definite advantage when you're being one of the first one to join and create a legacy right and so that's when we think about team building and we think about leadership that's kind of the classical sense right 'cause now we we're all getting to know each other we're of going through this experience together. It's a great way to kind of do life together and share the ups and downs in the highs and lows. It's a great opportunity Particular when you've got a blank slate so that's one scenario. I think to me on the ideal scenario. The second one is an. I've had this happened a couple of times where you become the new member of an existing team or existing project. That's already good shape and they've been doing well. I think it's a good situation to be in. It is fraught with some risk though. Because you're the good thing going here you come late to the party essentially and you know how do you thread that needle without disrupting a good thing

One Minute Leadership Thought of the Day 08.11.21 - burst 2

Leadership Lifestyle Podcast

00:47 sec | 4 months ago

One Minute Leadership Thought of the Day 08.11.21 - burst 2

"Lifestyle podcast so every single successful person. You know you've read about you've seen on. Tv the all go through the same pendulum and some go through it quicker than others depending on it but they all have doubts and insecurities. There was a time they were not that person that they had to prove themselves that they had to get over things holding them back in their mindset in order to get where they want to go in we all. Who aren't there those of us who aren't where we wanna be. Don't see that we can get there because we have those same insecurities of same anxieties. That are stopping us. But you look to people who've made it and you think they didn't do that but they did. They went through the same thing. You're trying to do what you gotta do is learn how to get past it until these leadership. Thought of the

How to be More Credible as a Leader

The Impact of Leadership

01:33 min | 4 months ago

How to be More Credible as a Leader

"The number one thing you can do to become more credible sound super. Simple when i said show up on time because it's the easiest thing to measure right steve. You're either there or you're not and here's the thing. I had a mentor. Who taught me that. And i remember showing up to meetings on time because i used to be parentally just barely on time and at the beginning of this whole showing up on time thing i was going. I'm here and of course. The other person would be late. And i would get upset if i this isn't fair. I busted my butt to get here on time. Why are you here. And i realized it took me a little while but i finally got to the point where realized. I'm not showing up on time for them. I'm showing up a time for me because every single time you follow through on the commitment to yourself you are building trust with yourself that you are the type of person who does that and one of the things that we know around behavior change. Is that one of the core things to people to change. Behavior and to maintain behavior is identity. So for example. Are you a smoker steve. Do you smoke cigarettes. I do not know if i if your cigarette. What would you say like no thanks. Nothing's because i'm not a smoker. Like not even a question for you because it's off the table because your identity and identity statements are so strong so all of which to say is self leadership is a way for you to cultivate the identity of the person that you want to be and it starts by looking in the mirror and taking an honest self assessment of is this there. Yes great celebrate that honor that and if not what do i need to do to close a gap to become the person that i wanna

Steve
Are You the Reason People Are Leaving Your Organisation?

Leadership Lifestyle Podcast

00:59 sec | 4 months ago

Are You the Reason People Are Leaving Your Organisation?

"Are people leaving your organization. Yeah it's probably you welcome to today's leadership. Thought of the day brought to you by leadership lifestyle. Podcast and i know this is a hard truth to accept but if you are having people leave your organization at a rate that you can't keep up with or you're frustrated by it probably is you. It probably has something to do with interview skills. Not explaining the job not not doing due diligence to make sure they wanted to do the job and then once you had them did you onboard them the right way and did you have something that retain them well beyond a paycheck a culture and environment a place. They actually want to come to work or do they pull in the parking lot turn. Their car often shrug their shoulders in size. So if you have your team leaving at an alarming rate a hate to break it to you but it's probably because of you and today's leadership thought of the day brought to by leadership lifestyle. Podcast grow yourself just a little bit more.

The Creation Story of THRV With Founder & CEO Jay Haynes

Code Story

02:30 min | 4 months ago

The Creation Story of THRV With Founder & CEO Jay Haynes

"Jj haines has always been interested in tech just like his dad in nineteen seventy nine. His dad bought and brought home an apple two plus though he was using it for his business to do spreadsheets. Jay began writing code so he could play video games for free riding his games and basic. It's worth noting that this was back when you had to pay a quarter to play video game. His dad was a navy pilot and hobbyists sailplane flyer which j. flu as well even to thirty thousand feet in the air as he says he got grounded as soon as he got married and had four kids early in his career. J. got into finance and quickly became familiar with using debt to get equity returns however he was always interested in the core innovation of why customers buy new products and why they switch throughout his career his time at microsoft schooling start obliged etc. He found out that no one really had the secret sauce innovation. He started evaluating new ways to do it and came across the jobs to be done theory which became the foundation to what he's built. Today this is the creation story of thrive at thrive we build enterprise product management software for product teams are software is built from the ground up around methodology known as jobs to be done and jobs we don in its very simplest form. Is the idea that your customers are actually not buying your products. What they're doing is hiring it to get a job done. If you're on a product team and you want to create a product strategy and a product roadmap that is going to be successful. meaning it's going to generate more customers and it's gonna get customers to switch from your competitors to your product to build that kind of product strategy you should think about your markets in terms of the job. Then you're costumer is hiring your product to do rather than just your product in your features. We mentioned music before. Because i view on eight tracks cassettes cds. What's interesting about that. Market is a great example. Job done so the job. There is to create a mood with music. That's what we're doing whether you're using a record seedier streaming service or string quartet you're trying to create a mood with music and that job is the same. It's never gonna change. So the power of the method behind our software is it gives teams stable target to aim at and try and

Jj Haines JAY FLU Navy Apple Microsoft
Learning to Lead Yourself

Craig Groeschel Leadership Podcast

01:34 min | 4 months ago

Learning to Lead Yourself

"Great leadership isn't just about leading others. Great leadership starts with self leadership. Why because your potential to lead others is a direct result of how you lead yourself. Let me say it again. Your potential to lead others as always a direct result of how you lead yourself now. Why does self leadership matter so much. Let's talk about it if you're my leader. I'm not just listening to what you say. But i'm watching. How you live and lead. You know this because you do this with the people that lead you so if you're my leader and you live with discipline intention outy integrity and purpose. What happens my respect for you grows my trust for you. Deepens and my willingness to follow you grows exponentially but the opposite is true as well when you live without discipline without intention analogy without integrity and without purpose my respect for you diminishes my trust for you weakens and i honestly don't wanna follow someone. I don't trust or respect. You know this is true. You've worked for all different types of leaders and you will work for a paycheck but you'll give your heart to emission you love and a leader you respect so when you lead others. Remember there watching you closely because your potential to lead others is a direct result of how you lead yourself.

Leadership's Fundamental Principle: How to Get People to Follow You

THE BRENDON SHOW

02:28 min | 4 months ago

Leadership's Fundamental Principle: How to Get People to Follow You

"Biggest believe my biggest teaching and all of leadership and it's five simple words people support what they create people support what they create. This is the defining leadership principle of my life every time with leader and they're frustrated with the co worker. They can't get the team to be motivated energize. The down line isn't performing the up. Line isn't listening. We got this problem where you can't mobilize a movement or you started a political action committee and it didn't stick or you start your non profit and no-one contributed it always comes down to a fundamental misperception about this topic of leadership leaderships fundamental principles. People support what they create. If you want people to follow you they must create with you. They must feel enabled. Trusted empowered autonomous capable rewarded for participating in the journey in what. We'll call the vision today. Right if they don't have any hand in shaping it and if they have no reward autonomy or trust in participating in it they got no skin in the game they got no reason to be enthusiastic excited hard-working excellent. So what happens well as you see around the world. It's like we have these command and control old models from the past these dictatorial ways of leading. Where it was like. Do this do this do this. You know berry like you know early. Eighteen hundred stuff that should have been done by the nineteen fifties but people are still learning and so you have this situation where a lot of people still think like. Oh i have positional leadership. I'm the boss or i'm this leader. Everyone needs to only do these things and it becomes a one way street or it becomes something where the leader doesn't have the connection with everybody else because no one has a part in it. They can't play yet. They don't believe in it yet even if they like you even if they think you're an okay person even if you had great successes in the past if you don't get them collaborating to create where we're going how we're going there and how we'll be together. They're not interested.

Berry