Leadership

What makes a good leader? What are the skills, qualities and basic characteristics individuals need to organize, co-ordinate and manage a team's path to success? Listen up for essential info, testimonies, research and theories on the business of management, aired on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

A highlight from William Kilmer | Why Innovation Is Not The Key To Success

Dose of Leadership

05:51 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from William Kilmer | Why Innovation Is Not The Key To Success

"Always been investing and really building great companies. That's awesome. That's amazing. I'm an entrepreneur myself and love everything entrepreneurial and doesn't even really matter what the industry is. When I get around people that have started businesses or that are running businesses or wanting to start businesses just like I love the stories. The stories are always, there's always an amazing story and continual story with anybody that's in business to any degree. Especially when they're startups. Startups, there seems to be a magic to those energy to them. There's just so many highs and lows all at once. I would agree. I mean, to me, that's what's so addicting about it. No matter what side you're in, it's just that energy and enthusiasm for building something new and something that is going to be beneficial to others. This is a drive that is unlike any other. Yeah, totally, totally. You have a new book out called transformative, right? That's the title of the book. And I know it leans. It is about businesses. But I think typically on the show, we talk about, we talk about health. We talk about wellness. We talk about business. We talk about entrepreneurship. We talk about leadership. We talk about everything here. And so as we get into it, we can certainly talk organizationally, but then for listeners, obviously these same principles will apply to your personal life, your family life. Other hobbies, whatever you have to do, right? So you basically have a premise that companies don't spend enough time in kind of the transformative space, I guess, give us some color around that. Where do you think companies are failing or not doing as good as they should? Right. So I think there's a little backstory behind the book. I'd love to share with you. Yeah, please. Again, I've got a fair amount of experience in the industry I've spent a lot of time with leaders, entrepreneurs, in particular, which has been my passion. And I've always been looking for what is sort of the right framework for thinking about your business and how you're really going to accelerate it and grow. It becomes something impactful. And that's the whole idea about transformative is like, what is the difference between a company that has had such impact on the market that they almost stand alone versus companies that can grow, but they're sort of part of the market norm. And so much so often we think about products and they created a really interesting product. It's a new product. We get this ideal that companies oftentimes are sort of the first to market they're the ones who invented something that has become so big. And I've spent a lot of time sitting in board meetings with working with CEOs and with others. And I really kind of went on this journey myself to say, say, how do I step back and really look at both what I've learned from working with so many great leaders, but also looking at some of the most transformative companies out there. And what can we distill away from that to really identify how a company should look at their next great opportunity. And so transformative really is around essentially how companies are able to find build and then scale a market that they in particular can win. It's almost like Dave Taylor fitted it to their capabilities and have just done such an outstanding job at creating something new and that they basically win that market. And when you peel that back, there's very simple, very basic principles behind it. Number one is that much to our surprise. Most of these companies aren't out there inventing something that is just completely new. Oftentimes they're taking a small seed of what's already in the market, something that's already in demand and they're shifting that in a way that just creates such a profoundly different outcome for the customers that it ends up changing that market. And I think about one of my favorite examples is it really simple one that some people who have had enough experience may remember which is Netflix one. And at the time of Netflix one, when they were a DVD rental company, they just really appear to everybody like they're just taking on blockbuster and they're doing a better version of blockbuster. But the reality is if you peel that back, if you think about the blockbuster experience back at that time, it was rushed down on a Friday or a Saturday night, trying to get the latest movie that's come out before everybody else had watch it and then get it back to blockbuster within 24 hours so you don't get the late fee. And what Netflix ended up doing, what's interestingly enough, they actually copied a lot of blockbusters model for their first year, but what they ended up doing was creating a totally different experience. It wasn't about that latest blockbuster used to be. It was about at the time when DVDs were just coming around. How do you open up an entire library of 50,060 thousand plus DVDs that you can start borrowing on a subscription? And so it wasn't about, you know, let's get the latest movie. It now became what part of that long tail of content do we really want to watch? And so people started watching not just movies, but also documentaries, TV shows, all of these other things that they probably wouldn't have rented elsewhere. It was a shift in that customer experience that gave them a much different outcome where they could walk over to their TV, pick up a DVD that was sitting there that they had already subscribed to and decided that was their priority and watch it any time they wanted to. And really, that genesis, that thread is what's led to streaming and on demand content because they sort of created that in an analog way to begin with. And so that's really the first principle of the book is how do you identify new opportunities by shifting the customer outcome, shifting it so that they fulfill their overall basic need, but they're doing it in such a profound way that it really shifts the market in your favor. Interesting. I didn't even know Netflix did that to be honest with you. I didn't realize that there was I never realized that they actually sent stuff to your house. Yeah, yeah. You're not old enough to. Well, I probably just didn't do it.

Netflix Dave Taylor Blockbuster Genesis
A highlight from How to Clarify Roles and Get Results with Daniel Ramsey

The EntreLeadership Podcast

04:52 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from How to Clarify Roles and Get Results with Daniel Ramsey

"To all of you who have left us voicemails with feedback on these new segments we've been trying. Some of you are really enjoying them. Love the new segments. Keep them up. And some of you, not so much. I have to say, I thought I was going to like it, and I actually did not. But either way, we want you to keep that feedback coming. We really appreciate it. All right, in our first segment today, Jason Williams will join me to share how role clarity creates focus and a clear picture of what it looks like to win in your role. And then our second segment, Daniel Ramsey will join me to dig into how to create role clarity for you and your team members. So let's get into it. Our first segment is a teaching segment with Jason Williams, vice president of entrez leadership, Jason, thanks for joining me. Thanks, George. It's nice to be here. Always love having you on the podcast. You always bring some wisdom and some sports references. So I'm hoping for big things today. You'll get both. Absolutely. So let's talk about how KRS key result areas create focus and winning in your role. Tell me about a job you had. You have some amazing experiences where maybe a role wasn't super clear. Yeah. So I've had multiple careers in this short amount of life. My first one was an athletic trainer. I was a part of sports medicine team that would take care of athletes. And I did that in the NFL. And I worked in the NFL back in the days in the late 90s and early 2000s when concussions were a big deal. But we were really just learning about the science and you can watch the documentaries and your understand that that was a big deal. But the NFL was telling us one thing and the coaching staff that we work forward telling us something different. And so when you have two leaders, this happens a lot to team members. When you have two leaders telling you competing things, it's really confusing for the team. So the NFL was saying, take care of players in one way. The coaches were saying, hey, these people are really important for me to keep my job. I need them back on the field. And so it was really hard to decide which of those two you go with. You fast forward years into business and it happens all the time. You have, I was a salesperson and I did sales in a way where, you know, I had a quota. So in sales, you carry is pretty easy. Like sell some stuff. But then you have one leader that's saying sell this thing, and you have another leader saying, sell this thing. They've got a vested interest. In either one. Both of them get compensated differently because of what you're selling. And so they're trying to get your attention. It becomes really confusing for the salesperson. What do I spend my time on? What does winning look like for me? It's so confusing it happens all the time. Yeah. That question of how do I know if I'm winning or losing and who do I have to make happy nobody wants that? And it causes frustration that causes some team members to just leave. Yes. As part of a bigger problem of just poor leadership. So we don't want that on our teams. We don't want this chaos and confusion, which is why entre leadership we teach key results areas. So we're going to dive into what it takes to do that in a later in this episode with Daniel Ramsey. But for you, tell me about a time your kra helped you stay focused. On the other flip side of this and not chase some idea that was not on goal. Yeah, the biggest thing that helps a K array is only good if the leader and the team member agree. And so we talked about that a little earlier. If there's not agreement on what this winning looks like, then it's really a struggle. So the times when it's worked, it's when my leader and myself are both aligned. And we have, we both understand and we both agree to. This is what winning looks like, because in those other situations, you have two leaders, and they both think that there are ways the right way. And I'm caught in the middle. So I'm also a three on the enneagram, which some people don't understand what that means. That means I'm a performer. I will just do stuff. You want to win and you want to look good doing it. Yes, and I don't feel things. I just kind of go if there's a problem, I'll just go do something. I'll spend time and activity and not necessarily on figuring out what the right way to do this. I'm just going to activity wins. And so in my past roles where I really get in trouble is I am just doing things and not thinking about it and doing things and not thinking about it. And so I may get a roadblock in part of a key result area that I have. Like maybe my number one is really something that I'm running into something big. And instead of actually spending the time to figure out and going back to my lady and saying, hey, I'm having a hard time with this or trying to figure it out on my own. I'll just go do something different. I struggle with that. And there are many people that struggle with that. And so in the example I'm about to say, I had this situation where I was getting roadblocked. And I was really struggling. And my leader came to me as part of a regular review and said, hey, let's review your carry. Let's talk. And so we sat down and talked about it. And during that conversation, I was able to flush out what exactly am I supposed to be doing with this. This is an issue. It made me slow down and stop. And instead of saying, I can't do this. I'm just going to do a whole bunch of other stuff that my leader would not think is winning. It was because he prompted me and said, hey, how is it going? And I thought, oh, yeah, I have this issue, and together we're able to solve that. I was able to accomplish that, overcome that roadblock and just keep on going. And it made us both feel super accomplished with that. And I got complimented by that because I brought it to him, even though he was the one that prompted it. So I thought it was good. Yeah, well, it's a win win because we both feel the momentum and excitement of we're winning and we're running towards the same thing in the same direction. And when you have that, it creates a great culture. As well.

Daniel Ramsey Jason Williams NFL Jason George Confusion
A highlight from 1/2 Capitan William Toti (retired) Thank You For Your Service... You're Fired

Leadership and Loyalty

00:59 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from 1/2 Capitan William Toti (retired) Thank You For Your Service... You're Fired

"Barron is an international business speaker who was named by Inc magazine as one of the top 100 leadership speakers to hire. Now, over to dove Barron. Welcome, dear Friends, fans and fellow Christian adults of leadership excellence. Thank you for joining us on this episode of leadership and loyalty tips for executives. Listen, even if you're very much a anti war individual, there's a pretty good chance that you are a pro vet individual. You see, whatever the reason a person goes off to war, I think we'd all agree that the deserve to be treated with respect and assistance upon their return. But what happens when we give a job to somebody and we say thank you for your service and then end up soon and we have to fire you. Because according to our guest today, that is actually what happens way more often than you'd like to think. We'll talk more about that in a moment. As always, we need your help in staying relevant, so please get over to wherever you tune

Barron Inc Magazine
A highlight from Part 1of1) Stan Slap: Tough Times - Tougher Teams!

Leadership and Loyalty

01:02 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Part 1of1) Stan Slap: Tough Times - Tougher Teams!

"Friends fans and fellow aficionados of leadership excellence. Thank you for joining us on this episode of leadership and loyalty tips for executives. Let me ask you, what do you need to do to up level your leadership? Consider this. Are you and your team tough enough, resilient enough to deal with tough times? Do you know how to assure extraordinary success in this today's extraordinary circumstances? Well, stay tuned because that's what you're going to discover on today's show. I'm your host, dove Barron. I am. The dragon is, and I'm here to assist you, tucking into the one thing in your business that changes everything by transforming meaning into action. Find out more about me, simply go to dove baron dot com. This episode of leadership and loyalty is brought to you in part by our live to our interactive dragon leadership trainings. They are now being made available to you. Imagine being in a virtual classroom with me where I personally walk you through the techniques and strategies that have previously only offered to top CEOs, executive teams, high level entrepreneurs, athletes and entertainers.

Dove Barron
A highlight from Perdue Farms: Jim Perdue

Wisdom From The Top

00:52 sec | 6 d ago

A highlight from Perdue Farms: Jim Perdue

"From luminary built in productions and NPR is wisdom from the top. Stories of crisis, failure, turnaround, and triumph from some of the greatest leaders in the world. I'm gay rise and on the show today, Jim perdue, chairman, spokesman, and former CEO of Purdue farms. We get 3000 to 4000 contacts a month from consumers. Most of them complaints and that's how we learn where we have problems. And I love that. And we actually get on the call and replay the recording and how we screwed up their dinner. And then the plants are on there, and that plant manager has to answer the question about how they're going to fix it. How Jim perdue took the reins of the family meat processing business, navigated changing consumer demands and helped grow Purdue

Jim Perdue Purdue Farms NPR Purdue
A highlight from How to Avoid the Quiet Firing Trend with Dr. Tim Elmore

The EntreLeadership Podcast

07:03 min | Last week

A highlight from How to Avoid the Quiet Firing Trend with Dr. Tim Elmore

"All of you who have been leaving us voicemails with your feedback on these new segments we've been trying out. Some of you really like it. So I'll let you guys know I think it's great. And some of you, not so much. I have to say, I thought I was going to like it, and I actually did not. But either way, we appreciate that feedback. So please, please keep it coming. Our first segment on the show today is a teaching segment with our friend Casey Maxwell, executive director of marketing for entrez leadership. What's up KC? How are you doing? Good to have you back. Great to be here. So we've talked about quiet quitting a lot on this show lately. And this is really just employee disengagement. It's not new, but there's an increasing amount of employees who are kind of falling into this category, and one of the main reasons as we point out really stems from poor leadership. And with that, there's a new term called quiet firing, which is the leader side of kind of this passive aggressive way of approaching this. So how would you describe quiet firing? Yeah, so it's definitely a rebrand. It's a rebrand of something that has been happening for a long time. And because it's associated with quiet quitting, they kind of gave it the quiet name. It's so quiet. So quiet quitting is when an employee does the bare minimum to not get fired. Well, this quiet firing is on the leader side. So it is doing the bare minimum to support a team member with the hopes that they're actually going to leave. So this is when if you think about a boss and I want to call them a boss because people who quiet fire are not leaders. A boss intentionally does things to make people's lives not great at work so that hopefully they make the decision to quit. So this has been around for a long time and the best example comes from a movie that came out a long, long time ago. 1999, right? That was a long time ago. Office space. And we still talk about that. And yes, it's an old movie, but one of the reasons that that still gets talked about is because it highlighted so many of the negative things in culture and in corporate culture that really made people hate working in those environments. And the sad thing is, most of those things are still happening today. And one of those is quiet firing. So if you remember the character Milton. Oh, epic character. It was the guy who loved the stapler stapler. Yes. Well, he basically gets quiet fired throughout the show. So in the film, the boss comes in the first thing they do is they move his cubicle from a window view to the interior. And then they move him three more times. And then they start storing boxes in his cubicle. And then they eventually move him to the basement. I think they, I think they stopped paying him at one point, and it's not until the very end where they take away his prize possession of the red swing line stapler. And boy, was that a mistake? That was a mistake. Because what happens? He burns down the entire office building, which is terrible, right? But instead of firing him, they just kept making his life more and more uncomfortable. So this has been around for a long time, but the reason we're talking about it now is it's happening more and more. We're seeing this in the great resignation. We just saw that there was a LinkedIn news poll that went out. And this wasn't something that we had 300 people respond to, right? This was something that had over 20,000 people respond to it. And 48% of people said that they've seen quiet firing in the office. And 35% say that they had it happened to them. So this is definitely not something new, but it is something that is contributing to the leadership crisis we have today. Well, I'm kind of glad there's a spotlight on it because I hope it creates a new trend of great leadership coming out of this because that's the only solution to what's happening. And what you're describing here is just creating an unbearable workplace where there's a lot of poor leadership, a lot of spineless leadership for people go, I'm just gonna react to this in a passive aggressive way because the employees being passive aggressive, the team member, and so I'm not going to lean into it. I'm not going to coach. I'm not going to rise up and be decisive. I'm just going to give them mundane tasks and make their life miserable until I hope they just one day decide, I can't take it anymore. I'm going to leave on my own volition. Exactly. That's a terrible way to live. It is the worst kind of leadership. It's we call it spineless leadership. You said that. It's not taking responsibility for what a leader is supposed to do. And this can either be intentional or unintentional. There are things that happen like passing people over for promotions and not letting them know why. Never giving them a raise, cutting their hours. There are key things that people do intentionally to kind of signal, you don't have a future here. But there's also things that people do in an unintentional way that may be sending a message that they are being quiet fired. So this isn't always malicious. There's a lot of leaders out there who are going, oh, I didn't realize I was doing that. Oh gosh, exactly. Exactly. And some of it is just because people get so busy, right? But you might be sending some of these signals like if you start missing one on ones. You cancel meetings that you're not able to attend that the employee is setting up, or maybe you even just don't reply to emails. You're just unavailable. Whenever they start seeing that my leader is not available to me, it signals that my leader doesn't care about me. And so they are going to then disengage. And so that means they're either going to quiet quit or they're going to real quit. Yeah. And I mean, if this was a marriage, it would be like quiet divorcing. If you just kept canceling date nights, you never connected with your spouse. Everything was always more important than them. It's going to lead to a destruction in the relationship. Exactly. And I think that's what we're seeing in the workplace across the board. And when a boss chooses to quiet fire someone versus actually fire someone on, what's the heart behind that? Why don't they just step up and go, I gotta let this person go. Yeah. There's a lot of different reasons. And let me first say, there is never a valid reason to quiet fire someone. Like that is leadership at its worst. And any of the examples that I'll give as reasons why are not, hey, man, if that's me, I'll go ahead and do it. But some people feel that they're powerless, right? They feel like, oh, I can't, I can't actually fire this. That is somebody else's responsibility. So I just got to deal with this. Some people think, man, if I fire that person, then all of it's going to be on me. I'd rather have someone with a pulse, or they think, you know, I just don't want to have a hard conversation. Most of the reasons when there is a disconnect between a leader and a team member is often that there's some sort of issue. Maybe that person has a really bad attitude. Maybe they're doing something that is disruptive to the team, or maybe they're just not performing. Well, the role of the leader is to bring that person in and have a hard conversation. But nobody likes doing that. Hard conversations are called hard conversations for a reason because they're difficult and they're not fun. And so people think, well, I could have this, or I could just disengage, and maybe the problem will solve itself.

Casey Maxwell Milton Linkedin
A highlight from Part 1 of 1) Dr Chris Dickson: The Sleep Sciences

Leadership and Loyalty

01:22 min | Last week

A highlight from Part 1 of 1) Dr Chris Dickson: The Sleep Sciences

"Congratulations, you are tuned into dove Barron's leadership and loyalty show. The number one podcast for Fortune 500 executives and those who were dedicated to creating a quantum leap in leadership. Your host, dove Barron. He's an executive mentor to leaders like you. A contributing writer for entrepreneur magazine, CEO world, and he's been featured on CNN, Fox, CBS, and many other notable sites. Dolph Barron is an international business speaker who was named by Inc magazine as one of the top 100 leadership speakers to hire. Now, over to dove Barron. Welcome dear Friends fans and fellow fish and of leadership excellence. Thank you for joining us on this episode of leadership and loyalty tips for executives. In recent years, even workaholics have been trying to understand the importance of sleep, and if it's possible to get less and do more. If sleep is as important as we think it is, maybe. Is it even more important than we think it is? Well, more about that in a moment. As always, we need your helping stay in relevant. So please get yourself over to wherever is you tune into us and do us a favor. Rate review and subscribe to the show. And if you are a regular listener, big thank you to you for making us the number one podcast. For Fortune 500 around the world.

Dove Barron Dolph Barron Inc Magazine Entrepreneur Magazine CBS CNN Barron FOX
A highlight from Hala Khouri | Harnessing Individual Wellness Through Community Care

Dose of Leadership

07:49 min | Last week

A highlight from Hala Khouri | Harnessing Individual Wellness Through Community Care

"Global movement to bring 8 million people together who are inspired to live bright, live bold and share bright vibes. Alone it can be hard to change, but together we can change the world. Welcome to the bright vibe podcast. We'll work excited to have holo Corey on our show today. Holla, welcome. Thank you for having me. Yes, it was very timely, I think. You've got a book that came out a little over a year ago, right? The piece, it says piece from anxiety, get grounded, build resilience and stay connected, a myth, the chaos. We do have there's a little bit of chaos in the world. We'll be talking about that today. But your background psychology. So you have looked like multiple different degrees in psychology. Tell us a little bit about that. Well, I have two master's degrees. So my first degree is in counseling psychology. And I really entered into this work, really thinking about individual well-being. I'm a trauma specialist. I'm trained in a technique called somatic experience. And I wasn't private practice for about 15 years working with individuals and couples, as well as teaching yoga for a really long time. Apologies, it's garbage truck day here today. So I don't know if y'all are here. No, I can't hear it. I don't hear it. Good. And, you know, my path has really taken me from this inquiry about, how do we heal ourselves? How do we heal our families to really how do we heal in community? One thing that I discovered in my own journey is that well-being is something we do together. It's not just about finding a therapist and finding your right diet and healing your body and figuring out yourself that we are all part of the community, a culture and a world. And we're all impacting each other. So I went back to grad school and got another master's degree in community psychology with an emphasis on social justice and environmental justice. Which really invited me to expand my view of how do we actually build cultures, whether it's inside our nonprofit organizations or our mental health institutions or our schools, right? How do we build ultimately we want our broader culture to be a culture that supports everybody's well-being? And so that's really been my work lately is working more inside of organizations for them to build cultures that let everybody be well. It looked like you were working with shelter when I say shelter was like women's shelters and things like that. And so typically you're working with the staff then inside those organizations. I am not necessarily the recipients of the care, but the actual caregivers. Yeah, you know, I'm working with from the front desk person to a board member, right? So I spent a lot of time working in domestic violence shelters and a lot of the stuff there also at some point were participants, right? They were impacted by domestic violence. And what starts to happen is in these community organizations where folks are really wanting to help and support others. Oftentimes inside the organization, they recreate some of the dynamics. They are pushing against whether it's a toxic work environment, total burnout, not feeling like they have a voice, so I got really interested in supporting helping the helpers essentially to figure out how do we build organizations that actually help transform lives because these organizations are often underfunded and overworked and a lot of people lose their spark. They get into the work because they really want to help and they lose their spark and they start to burn out. Right, yeah, yeah, that's pretty common in the healthcare industry as well. Not just people with good hearts get in and then they're disappointed because of all the stress and anxiety and everything that happens when you're dealing with lots of people who are needing your help. Right? Yeah, yeah and the structures that don't support them to actually help people, right? So it's both. Their own stressors and the structures that can be problematic. And so are you working within these typically it looked like not for profits. But are you working with these not for profits to, I mean, I guess how are you getting them to look at those structures and culturally change those things? Well, I don't always get there, but usually if I have buy in from senior leadership, then there are really looking at from their hiring practices to days off, right? How are they actually allowing their staff to be well? So whatever when folks want to hire me and they don't want the senior leadership to be in training as well, I'll say to them, then you're going to have a rebellion because if I'm training your staff and to find their voice to set boundaries, they're going to be asking for what they deserve, right? So unless you're ready to really, to whatever extent you can shift expectations, look at what you're providing for your staff, then for me to come in and offer them tools for self regulation. It almost feels sometimes the staff will resent me because they'll feel like I'm asking them to be well inside of a structure that doesn't really allow them to be well. Right. Right, right. Yeah. Yeah, totally. And so what made you want to get and we'll come back to this one. But I do want to start with kind of what made you want to get into psychology because obviously you've got so it's three different degrees in psychology, right? Because you had your undergrad and then your two masters degrees. So what on earth made you want to get to psychology? Well, I mean, I think if I'm really honest, I feel like from a really young age, I kind of thought if I can figure out why people do what they do, then I'm not going to be as hurt. I can anticipate it, right? Like I think that that was honestly my motivation is growing up in a household where there was alcoholism and addiction. And a lot of confusion around like my own pain and the pain of my parents, the people around me, from really young, I always preferred being in the role of the helper, not the healthy. So I was, I was like sneaking out of school in 8th grade, going to the bookstore nearby and sitting in the self help section and reading books on psychology. So from a very young age, I was like, I need to figure people out. 'cause that's gonna help me figure the world out. So it was my own coping strategy for a while. I was one of those people that from a young age, people would just open up to me and, you know, I think that that's a really good quality, but I think it was also my own defense because I didn't want to be vulnerable. I didn't want to look at myself. So I figured if I was old around people that needed me, then I could kind of be safe. So I often say that the gift is the wound. The wound. Of course. It came from my desire to try to figure out how to feel comfortable in the world. And I mean, from 8th grade, I knew I wanted to be a therapist. It's just wanted to do. Yeah. Interesting. But it sounds like you've kind of morphed and that journey has taken you to different parts of psychology or different areas of psychology. Like you said, you kind of gone back and done some advanced education in different areas. And so as you were speaking, you talked about helping the world out. And so, and on this on the bright by podcast, we go all kinds of different directions. And we like to dive into the deep end of the pool, not just tread water. So we can go wherever you want to go today. But you said helping the world out. So what do you what did you see then? And then what do you see now? What does the world need help with? What I saw then was really different than what I can see now. I think back then, I thought about individual people, right? If I can get individual people to deal with their trauma, to be kinder to not want to do harm, then that will make the world a better place. And now, as I'm understanding, as I'm looking at the world within the context of culture and politics and power and history, I think about our collective trauma, I think about

Holo Corey Confusion
A highlight from 2/2 Compound Collaboration: Peter Williams

Leadership and Loyalty

05:32 min | Last week

A highlight from 2/2 Compound Collaboration: Peter Williams

"We've been talking about is called productive accidents. Now we talked a lot about that book in part one. We talked about what actually is a productive accident. And why it's important to say yes and I know we're all trying to say no more to sort of bring down our overwhelm, but why is it important to say yes to get out of our own comfort zones and Peter talked about where innovation really comes from is in having these connections across not just platforms but industries. You see, sometimes I one of the things that I do is in my groups I have these private masterminds and I make sure I bring people together who are not from the same industry. And it's fascinating to me that somebody can see something when they're from one industry that the person in that industry can not see. And Peter's talking about that as being this path to a life and to business being purely an adventure and he's done that through volunteering through being involved in many different things. And one of the things he's done is he threw open his doors. Now, you might think, well, there's a crazy man. He's inviting people to come stay in his house. And that's what's happened for many, many years, and instead of just having a cup of coffee with somebody, they come and stay with him. Told us about that, Peter. Todd was about how that started. And, you know, we don't need the gory details, but we want to do that trepidation about, oh my God, I'm inviting somebody into my house with the wife's going to kill me. That is a perfect lead in to exactly what happened. So I got involved in the TEDx community when I landed in Hong Kong. There's a gentleman there called Gino U and he brought TEDx to Hong Kong. And we got to know each other quite well. And Juno is an interesting character. He goes to Davos economic forum. Then he goes to Burning Man. Then he goes to take global, and he meets cool people, and he invites them to speak at TEDx on Congress. So that's why for 50 bucks, you got 90% as good at experience as a $10,000 TEDGlobal experience. And one of the over time, he would just reach out randomly. And one Tuesday afternoon at 3 p.m., he'd kind of just wrote it and said, hey, are you in town? You know, it's always sort of sneaks up on you. And I say, well, yeah, so what's going on? Well, I've got this guy in town. He just catch served around the world for three years, making a documentary about happened that you should meet him. And I'm like, I've got meetings that night or whatever, but I would always reschedule a meeting to switch it for something that could be life-changing, right? No big deal. So I went to that dinner and I met this guy called Adrian belic. And it turns out he grew up in Chicago, and he loved BMX box. So we were set for the next hour. We could talk about all the old brands, GTB, mongoose, horror, whatever. And at the end of it, I said, hey, you're a couch surfer, where are you staying tonight? And he said, well, I'm okay tonight, but tomorrow. And I said, all right, I instantly said you're coming to stay with us. And then I had to go up the escalator in Hong Kong to where we lived and set up my wife, Catherine, and say, look, we've got this dude with dreadlocks. He's going to come and stay with us for a while. Are you okay? And she was cool. So to be honest, you know, she has been a core to all of this adventure, right? She's sort of sitting there accepting my craziness. And it's turned into a tradition, because not long after that, we were, I was mentoring some startups. And there was a city innovation sort of presentation or I think competition going on. And one of the teams that I was mentoring was based in Miami in the U.S. and I got to know one of the guys in miles and eventually said, look, don't come all the way to Hong Kong for just a two day event. You should stay a week. Don't bother wasting your money in a hotel, you're a startup, don't burn your cash. Just stay with us. And so he did that. And every day I introduced him to like three or four people that were relevant to what he was doing. By the end of the week, he said, man, we need to start an office here. You know, he'd made such great connections so quickly. And I always tend to try to host a dinner when you've got something interesting in town. So there's another dinner series that I've discovered through a guy that I hoped with his TEDx talk called Patrick ip, he's got a dinner series called baller dinners, BAL, ER. I think he kind of regrets the name because it's baller means you're full of yourself in some ways, right? Top of the game. But it's got this community of 1700 people that are prepared to host dinners anywhere in the world and to learn people's stories and to help each other with that expecting anything in return. And I've hosted many of them in Hong Kong. When I go into New York, I say, look, I'm there for 5 days. I've got Thursday night for free. Someone I don't even know will book the restaurant, ten people I don't know will show up, and we'll have this conversation. And it just keeps on a bottle. So Eric sim and I are about to kickstart and new version of that in Singapore. On the 29th of September and we're going to have, we'll be cohost. We entered by 5 of it. We each invite 5 of our most interesting friends, they don't have to know each other. In fact, it's better if they don't. Because again, we're trying to amplify the differences across ourselves because we're more likely to learn something new from someone that has barely a pixel in overlapping in terms of life experience. Then to have a massive overlap so that people ask me to speak at a treasury conference as well, why would I want to do that? I'm not going to learn anything. They're not going to learn anything.

Hong Kong Peter Gino U Adrian Belic Todd Patrick Ip Congress Catherine Chicago Miami Eric Sim U.S. New York Singapore Treasury
A highlight from Gensler: Diane Hoskins

Wisdom From The Top

01:00 min | Last week

A highlight from Gensler: Diane Hoskins

"Ted radio hour, we go on a journey with Ted speakers to seek a deeper understanding of the world. And to figure out new ways to think and create. Listen now. This interview of wisdom from the top was recorded in 2020. From luminary built at productions and NPR, it's wisdom from the top. Stories of crisis, failure, turnaround, and triumph from some of the greatest leaders in the world. I'm gay ra's, and on the show today, Diane Hoskins, co CEO of gensler, the largest architecture firm in the world. We don't have stars. We have ideas, and we have a very open platform. Today, we need to solve problems that have not been solved before. And we have to be innovative, which means we need everybody's ideas on board. Diane Hoskins went from the drafting room all the way to the

TED Diane Hoskins NPR Gensler
A highlight from Dr. Corey Yeager | The Power Of Self Assessment

Dose of Leadership

03:50 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Dr. Corey Yeager | The Power Of Self Assessment

"Vibe podcast. While doctor Cory Yeager, welcome to the bright by podcast, so happy to have you on this morning. It is so good to join you. I'm excited to spend some time with you this morning. Yes, I am as well. As I was saying kind of in our green room backstage, this may just be a session for me today. At some point. At some point, I start crying or breaking down. I appreciate your help. And hopefully everybody in our community can benefit from my experience and my pain this morning. I would say, I would say there's reciprocity in therapy. So maybe getting something just as much as you are. So there's reciprocity there. I love it. I love it. So I want to give people a little bit of background. So you're a licensed marriage and family therapist at the doctorate level. So your doctor of enlightenment in marriage and family therapy, which I think is really amazing and incredible. We need more good stuff like that in the world. Help me understand the difference between it says psychotherapist. So what's the difference between a therapist and a psychotherapist? So look, you start off with the most important. One of the most important questions that I don't think we really understand. So when people think about hiring someone or having someone come and help them in the psychological realm, the first thing they usually think about is, well, we'll hire a psychologist. Right? That's what you always hear. Psychologists. But there's a differentiation between a few of those pieces. So a psychologist is trained at the level to assess. Let me tell you what I think is wrong with you. That is my focus. I'll assess you. The psychiatrist is a medical doctor that can prescribe drugs, but focuses in the psychological realm. A psychotherapist does they can do all the assessment, but what they're really focused on is that therapeutic piece engaging same things like so how are you? So what's going on? Tell me more about that. So when did that begin for you? Let's talk through that. How does that make you have you felt so that therapeutic sense is really the driving force. So me as a psychotherapist, that therapy piece is the cornerstone of my work. Perfect. Perfect. And so you do this for profession for the Detroit Pistons as one of your is one of the organizations you serve. So that's got to have, I'm sure that's going to be unique. You probably get good seats at the games. I'm hoping. I love that. That's a perk of the job. Seats in the arena. I love it. So I will hear you. I don't follow the pistons. That much, but I love basketball. So I will say that if this goes well today, maybe I'll come up and see you. Then I'll see you on TV when I watch the game. So you don't follow the pistons yet. Oh, I love it. I'm going to be a raving pistons fan. That's good. And the other thing I want to mention right at the top of the show is that you do have a new book out brand new in fact, the ink is not yet even dry on it. It looks like that says, how am I doing? Is the name of the title? And it's 40 questions that you can contemplative questions. That you guide through people, guide people through in the book that help them kind of unpack. It says self care strategies, how do they navigate? So we're going to get into some of those questions today. We want to get into the book today. Certainly any stories that you want to share from your practice, I'd love to hear about stories from your practice. But what was the catalyst? I didn't grow up. Maybe I should have, but I didn't grow up and get a degree, like you did in therapy and psychotherapy. So what was the catalyst for you going into this profession? What made you want to go down this road? You know, I think I've like many therapists. I think like early on in my life, I was really almost practicing to be a therapist. People came to me almost naturally. Early

Cory Yeager Pistons Detroit Pistons Basketball
A highlight from Growing your coaching business

The Maverick Paradox Podcast

04:55 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Growing your coaching business

"So that my company is called authentic conversion. And the idea behind that is I came up with the name in 2017 and what I was seeing a lot of in the industry, like back when I had my gym, you know, earlier in that decade, a lot of the marketing, like marketing was really changing, and it was, I started before Facebook ads for small business were a thing, but as marketing was shifting, you know, there was this kind of like, I always think of it like kind of punch you in the face marketing, right? It was like this really loud direct stuff that was happening in commercials and in sales letters and all kinds of things. And then it switched to being a little bit more passive when ads for small businesses came out, meaning that you could kind of just run ads to anything and build a business before there was all the competition in the space and before trust was at an all time low in that kind of thing. So then that transition kind of happened. And then I think we entered a phase of, again, it was like a different version of the punch you in the face marketing with a lot of the cold pitching cold DMs I call them, you know, the hey girl messages where people you haven't spoken to in 20 years are hitting you up telling you you'd be a great fit for their company and that kind of thing and now business coaches do it like everyone's kind of pitching in that way now and I just think it's really unfortunate. So this whole concept of authentic marketing and authentic conversion is really putting trust and relationships at the center of the business, particularly when it comes to the marketing and sales so that people are really getting to know like and trust you. And then they are raising their hand or coming to you asking how they can work with you versus all of that kind of like cold spammy stuff and tactics that we've been seeing now for the last couple of years if that kind of makes sense. Look at the things that there's something about people collecting people on a platform with some sort of message and then immediately reaching out to a pitch, but it's even that even if someone reaches out to you, doesn't hit you the pitch appear to be in conversation with you. And then when you say, oh, I don't want what you want. They just disappear. So the things they kind of have built up a relationship where that person would be prepared to refer them elsewhere. But then they've just left them now with a bad taste in their mouth. Right. And it kind of makes it feel like, well, this was never even about you or your best interest. It was all just about meal alone. Yeah, yeah, especially when you say about people that haven't spoken to for 20 years, turn up anybody else. Re-engaging into this relationship and it's facts, oh, no, you're not buying my thing. I'll see you in 20 years. Totally. So yeah, that's quite interesting. So how do you build trust relationship online business then? Yeah, so it's done in a variety of ways. And I actually do teach offline marketing methods like public speaking and that kind of thing and how to create those opportunities and what to say and all of that. I do teach, I do teach and believe in that very much based on my own experience. But I think it starts with really understanding what you're doing and who you're trying to help and kind of getting inside of their heads first. And then the second step is creating that content that genuine content that really speaks to you and who you are and your values and your story and your experiences and balancing that with content that speaks directly to this type of client that you are wanting to attract, whether it's calling out their pain points or painting the picture of what's possible or sharing client transformations so that you're really peaking people's interest. And it's a process, right? Because sometimes people will come in and they'll just say the exact right thing that that person needed to hear and all of a sudden they reach out to you based on your content and they become a client. So that can happen. Other times, the content can lead to a direct message conversation, which then leads to a sale. Other times, you know, you start to kind of warm people up with your content and then you offer different what I call conversion event opportunities, which could be things like workshops, training as webinars, free or low cost paid opportunities for people to work with you have that experience before they take that next step. And everything kind of affects everything else with this authentic organic marketing because maybe they start to pay attention because they saw this cool webinar that was going on and then they follow your content and then they send you a DM and then they become a client. So it can happen. And quite a variety of ways, but often those are some of those big touch points. Thank you. So

Facebook
A highlight from When the Gospel Seems Unjust to the Rising Generation | An Interview with Tyler Johnson

Leading Saints Podcast

07:09 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from When the Gospel Seems Unjust to the Rising Generation | An Interview with Tyler Johnson

"To another episode of the leading saints podcast and a big shout out for this episode to Mary mcclelland, who connected me and Tyler Johnson, who, as my interviews with today, just a phenomenal discussion because here's the thing with being a church leader, especially leading young single dots or young people in general. I mean, this rising generation, even teenagers, they're sort of this feeling of like, man, we're losing them, right? And we testify, we try and do all the things, the activities, and nothing seems to be working. At least that's how it feels like at times. And Tyler Johnson, who teaches at Stanford, just obviously a brilliant gentleman who can really articulate and put a framing around what it is we're looking at when it comes to this rising generation and how do we talk to him? How do we understand them? How do we even approach them with empathy when they just don't get it, right? As a feeling, there isn't so you're going to love this conversation. This is going to be passed around and especially if you know a YSA bishop, bishopric member, state pregnancy member, wow, this would be one to drop in an email and send off to them or really anybody with teenagers with young people coming back from missions and whatnot, powerful episodes. So let's jump into it. Enough talking about it. So here's my interview with Tyler Johnson. Tyler Johnson, welcome to the leading saints podcast. Thanks so much for having me, Kurt. I appreciate the chance to be here. Yeah, this is fun. Now you are a professor at Stanford or how do you, when people ask you what you do, how do you articulate that? Yeah, so I'm what's called a medical oncologist. So I'm the kind of Doctor Who gives chemotherapy to people who have cancer. And then, yes, I'm on the faculty at the school of medicine at Stanford. Nice. And what was did you always want to grow up and be a doctor? Is that the idea? No, I wouldn't say that I always thought about that. I think that I first seriously thought about it when I was maybe senior in high school or a freshman in college. And then kind of solidified the idea when I got back from my mission, I went on my mission after my freshman year of college. And so in sophomore year, I kind of made the decision that of all of the options doctors seemed like the best fit. So I made the decision that I was going to act like I was going to become a doctor until something happened to convince me not to become a doctor and here we are. So I guess nothing ever happened to convince me that way. That's nice. And did you I went to the idea of teaching and coming to all this? Or did you imagine yourself in a hospital for your career? Yeah, that's a good question. So when I was, so it takes a zillion years to become a full fledged doctor. Just to paint the path, so I finished college in 2005, then I went to medical school to help 2009, then I did general internal medicine residency in till 2012. Then I did sort of a teaching year called a chief residency from 2012 to 2013. Then I did oncology fellowship from 2013 to 2016, and then I was finally a fully fudged doctor starting in 2016. So it was, I think, 11 years after college. And when I was in my, when I had just finished my chief resident year, so that would have been about 8 years after I finished college. I looked back and realized that everything literally every job I had had since the time I graduated from high school had involved teaching. So I had been a TA and four or 5 different capacities when I was at BYU, then I was a TA again when I was in medical school, then when I was in residency, my favorite part of residency was teaching the other residents that I did this chief resident year, which was pretty much all about teaching. And I said, oh, gosh, it looks like I must really like teaching 'cause I just keep doing it over and over and over again. And so then that was sort of a moment of recognition to me to say, okay, if I like it that much, and if I'm gravitating that much towards it, natively, then I should probably think about how I can really build that into my career, and I've feel really fortunate that I was able to do that. And that's I spent about half of my time caring for patients in about half of my time teaching in one capacity or another. Wow. And so now do you still obviously have your teaching workload, but do you still practice, put on the white jacket and be a doctor? Yep. Yeah, so I spend about 6 weeks, 8 weeks, a year, leading a team of medical trainees, taking care of patients in the hospital, and then I also have a team here at the Stanford cancer center where we see patients day and a half a week as well. Wow, wow. So you're in the thick of it with cancer and patients and things like that. We take care of patients with GI cancers and as I said, anyone who has had cancer knows that it takes a team to take care of a cancer patient. And so I sort of supervise the part of that team that is responsible for providing chemotherapy. Oh, wow. Well, I hope I have never have to see you just like everybody else. But my mother is a survivor of colon cancer. And so I just turned 40 this past year. So that means the colonoscopy parade begins. Yep, I do know what that means and I'm glad that your mom is doing well. And that's one of the kinds of cancer that I take care of. So random question, there's so much like cancer awareness and fundraising and things. Are we ever going to cure this thing? Or is it more complicated than that? That's a complicated question. I mean, I think what I would say is that there are so the most recent good news in cancer care is that there has been a revolution over the last ten years in terms of using what's called immunotherapy to find cancer. And so that is basically harnessing the power of your own immune system to fight cancer cells and that has made a marginal strides forward in most kinds of cancer and in some kinds of cancer. It's been absolutely transformative. And so I think that, you know, in the hope is that that's just a harbinger of even better things to come because there's still certainly elements of utilizing immunotherapy that we don't fully understand yet. But so all that is to say that things are clearly getting better, but the issue is that the possibility of the development of cancer is unfortunately written into the deepest architecture of how our bodies are put together. And so it's unlikely that we will ever be fully rid of cancer no matter how much the technology improves. Well, at least we have Jesus, right? I mean, that's the hope we need. And he's there ready to give it some. Even when even when other sources of hope fail. Nice. So maybe just give us some of your experience before we hit record, you talked about, and this will lead into our discussion today, but just some of your experience in church leadership since you've been teaching it at Stanford and the wards there and especially the student wards or why I say words that are available. Yeah, so Stanford has two young

Tyler Johnson Stanford Cancer Mary Mcclelland Saints Stanford Cancer Center Kurt School Of Medicine Gi Cancers BYU Colon Cancer
A highlight from Breast cancer and infidelity

The Maverick Paradox Podcast

05:57 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from Breast cancer and infidelity

"It's great to be on your show. Thank you for coming. Thank you. So CJ, what does CJ stand for? CJ? Well, that's my writing name. I always thought that if J. K. Rowling could sell a lot of books with that name, I could do well having CJ as my writing name. So that's really where it comes from. Yeah, it's an old traditional, they are my initials, but CJ is my writing persona. Brilliant. You're definitely following a great line of women that have chosen to use their initials to sell their books. Maybe my next book I should do that. So this is more about you. Well, you know, I, in many ways, was living a charmed life. I had a dream job as a journalist with a BBC and there I was meeting celebrities and politicians and fascinating people who were making their mark on the world. And then I got a transfer to work for China radio international in Beijing, and it was there that I had this fairytale falling in love with an American. And if I fast forward to our 25th wedding anniversary, it was the best one ever. We spent it in Hawaii and I thought I was in the land of the gods, but little did I know that just two years later, both my marriage and my health would be in tatters. My husband was openly carrying on an affair with a woman half his age, and I was diagnosed with breast cancer for the second time. I carried that dreaded BRCA gene that Angelina Jolie had believed could be a death sentence. So, you know, it was a double whammy that left me reeling, but it led me writing two books. Thank you. Thank you for sharing that. That's a difficult one to share. You do sound like it's something that you've put in your past now. Absolutely. You know, the first book that I wrote, adulterous wife, how to thrive whether you stay or not, the mantra of that book was that the best revenge is to get past the need for it. And I saw so much vitriol in what I was seeing online about people dealing with infidelity. I didn't want to go there. I wanted to put my life energy into moving forward into making my life better than it was before, rather than wallowing in victimhood and self pity. It takes a lot of courage to do that though. Did the infidelity come before after your diagnosis? Well, I had breast cancer twice. So I had it in 2007 when I thought I was more or less happily married. But my husband had been having affairs throughout the marriage, but you know, the wife is always the last one to know. And then I found out about the infidelity in 2000 and 12 right at the end of that year and then less than two years later I got my second case of breast cancer and it was worse than the one before. I had it on the left side in 2007 on the right side in 2014. So after I began writing my second book, that's my wild ride, how to thrive after breast cancer and infidelity. I found that there was a huge connection between breast cancer and infidelity, both ways around that one often follows the other. the men not been able to cope with their wives not being well? Yeah. Yeah, I mean, there was a study done by Michael glantz. He was a neuro oncologist at the barrow neurological institute in Phoenix. And he did some research that showed massive gender disparity in the rate of partner abandonment in patients with serious medical illnesses. He did one study, I think, in 2001, and then he did a follow-up in 2009 of the same couples and found an even starker disparity there. That, you know, maybe it's that women are more natural caregivers. We've got that in our genes. In our biology, we read the children and all of that. We bear the children and usually do most of the rearing. And so it really shows in those statistics. And although I'm not saying that every single man is like that and there's some wonderful guys that I've met who really stepped up to their plate when their wives were seriously ill. But statistically speaking, if you're a very sick woman, you're much more likely to have your husband leave you than if it's a very sick man having the wife leave. That's much rarer. So women listening to that is going to feel quite depressed now you've told them that. Well, you know, the thing is that I don't, I can't, I can't put lipstick on a pig, it's not really a great statistic, but the other thing that is a concern is that when women deal with infidelity, if you have something like that happening to you, it creates such a lot of stress, financial stress, emotional stress, you know, it's almost like a bereavement because often your relationship is gone when you split up. And so much research is out there showing how stress creates illness and specifically cancer.

Breast Cancer J. K. Rowling Angelina Jolie Michael Glantz Beijing BBC Hawaii China Barrow Neurological Institute Phoenix Cancer
A highlight from Taking the Guilt Out of Family History Work | A How I Lead Interview with Rick Bennett

Leading Saints Podcast

04:25 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Taking the Guilt Out of Family History Work | A How I Lead Interview with Rick Bennett

"So my name is Kurt frankel, and I am the founder and executive director of leading saints and obviously the host of the leading saints podcast. Now, I started leading saints back in 2010. It was just a hobby blog and it grew from there by the time 2014 came around. We started the podcast and that's really when it got traction and took off 2016, we became a 501c3 nonprofit organization and we've been growing ever since. Now I get the opportunity of interviewing and talking with remarkable people all over the world. Now this is a segment we do on the leading saints podcast called how I lead. And we reach out to everyday leaders, they're not experts, gurus, authors, PhDs, they're just everyday leaders who've been asked to serve in a specific leadership calling and we simply ask them, how is it that you lead? And they go through some remarkable principles that should be in a book that should be behind a PhD. They're usually that good. And we just talk about sharing what the other guy's doing. And I remember being a leader just simply wanting to know, okay, I know what I'm trying to do, but what's the other guy doing? What's working for him? And so that's why every Wednesday or so we publish these how I lead segments to share. My name is Rick Bennett and welcome to the leading saints podcast. Okay, this is a little bit inside joke because you do that. Every time on your podcast, which is the gospel tangents podcast, right? Because it's good. It's always my sound checked. That's what I. If it works out well, then makes it. I love it. So a lot of people may be familiar with it. I think you have a good size of audience and some may not be. Nothing like leading. You're like ten times bigger than me. Now hang with us folks. The first ten minutes or so of this episode, we're going to geek out about stuff that Rick talks about on his church history podcast, which I love, I listened to pretty much every episode and I encourage you to check it out. And maybe there's some that I just want to encourage you to check it out. I don't know, it's interesting. But today we're not so that's the first ten minutes or so, but then we talk about your time as a family history consultant. How you lead as a family history consultant, right? Right, right. As big of a church history geek, I am, I'm also a family history geek. I love family history. And then hopefully I can be infectious and infecting you, Kurt. That's right. To do more family history. That's right. And we talked about everything from why the computer guy in your word is so important. And ways to actually connect with your in laws, helping people tell their story and on and on. So this is, if you're really struggling with family history and reward, this is a great episode. Listen to so. Yeah, and personal history, I think, is an underrated and easily done being in family history. All right. So here we go. My interview with Rick Bennett, the host of the gospel tangents podcast. Let's see his form in history, science, and theology is your tagline. The best source for me. The best source for more industry science and theology. So here we go. People will note, like there's just like this, this community of podcasters behind the scenes, and we all got each other's back, right? Latter day saint podcasters. Do we all have each other's back? Well, but I guess there's that one guy and that other guy that we don't talk about. I don't know. I like to think we do. Especially those that are striving to put out really faith promoting content. Would you say gospel tangents as faith promoting? I'm a very uncorrelated, so I'm faith agnostic, I think. Yeah. And that's an interesting take because you interview all sorts of people that have some type of tie to church history. Like the general authority. Yeah, yeah. I mean, the funniest thing is like, so I interviewed elder snow four years ago. Right after he was released, right? It was before he was released. Oh, look at that. Yeah. All right. And I don't think I've interviewed an active general authority. I got really lucky. But I told my wife that I was interviewing a 70 and her response was for whose church.

Saints Rick Bennett Kurt Frankel Rick Kurt General Authority
A highlight from Decisions right first time

The Maverick Paradox Podcast

05:36 min | Last week

A highlight from Decisions right first time

"Is Kevin hannigan, hi Kevin. Hey, Judith, looking forward to this pleasure to be here. Thank you. I'm looking forward to our conversation too, but before we begin, tell us a little bit about you. Yeah, thanks for asking. So I think kind of an unusual background, my passion growing up was technology. So actually computer science and math major at university and as I started getting into the workplace, I was starting to see a lot of things where maybe I learned better as a kid and I wasn't really learning things that differently as an adult. So I actually went back to school and learned a little bit more about psychology, how the brain works, making decisions, how adults learn different than kids. And it kind of put me in this perfect triangle, where now I work with companies and organizations helping them make better decisions with their data and analytics and part of it is technical as understanding that the tools and technology. But the part I really like is kind of that human element of technology doesn't solve everything. There's a psychological and sociological aspect of it that really interests me and piques my interest. And I think it's important because there's so much misinformation out there that people are overwhelmed and they don't know what to do with it. Yeah, I totally agree. And I'm curious, why did you decide to actually go and do psychology, what was your thought process there? Yeah, so I started out individual contributors started getting into leadership and realized that I'm a servant leader. And in today's world, I think that's the way to go. And to do that, you have to understand everyone is unique and individual, but at the same time, there are some key philosophies of what people what their needs are, what their warrants are. How they process information, and what better way than to go back. I recommend anyone, even if they don't have a major in psychology, go back and learn about psychology, individual psychology, organizational psychology, and then with the up and coming research around neuroscience and neuroplasticity, we're learning so much more about how we make decisions and how the brain works. It just seemed like the way to get a better understanding of how I can help motivate and engage in mentor the teams I worked with. Yeah, that makes a lot of sense way back when for me when I was thinking about or I want to at the time I wanted to be a manager had or go back doing that. I looked at psychology too. And I was absolutely what's the love cognitive psychology. I was particularly fascinated with social psychology and why people do the things that they do. Absolutely. And it's still fascinating to me. And I still can see a situation and what's interesting is now I have different perspectives on why it's happening and I focus more on the why than what's happening because different interventions are needed depending on the why. And to be honest, I learned it from my kids too because every kid is different and unique and you have to apply the same principles to your kids to some extent. Yeah, and you know what, I use that energy a lot when I do that you ship stuff because I'm saying nobody who has two children go, right, I'm going to parent them exactly the same because they're exactly the same. It sounds like a nonsense when someone says it and it's the same with individuals. So I am curious about decision making. So I help create clear thinking and decisive leaders. So I'm very interested in decision making. And our matrix didn't know what makes somebody have better decisions. Do you know how to make better decisions? Yeah, I think it's alerted question. I'll try to take a step back. I think what helps make better decisions, let's talk a little bit about what helps you avoid poor decisions. And one of the things today, this wasn't an issue decades ago, hundreds of years ago, is there so much data and everyone talks about how data is great and information is great. And when I say data, I don't want anyone to be alarmed. I'm not talking technical. You don't have to be a data scientist. You don't even have to be data analytics data is just the raw form of information. It could be a review on Amazon. It could be customer feedback. It could be a number. But there's so much of it that our brains can't comprehend it all and find out what's relevant and what's not relevant. So it takes shortcuts that we call a heuristics. And these shortcuts sometimes lead us down less than ideal decisions, they could be the right decision, but the problem is we're moving in such a fast paced world. We don't check our decisions. We don't say, is there a situation where this is different? Could I, for example, you know, in science, we use the scientific method. Let's try to invalidate a hypothesis. But in business, no fault of anyone's own, we find a data point and we're like, aha, I told you, so here's my answer. And we drive forward in the brain what to strive for it because it sees the connection. I'm like, wait, time out. There could be 30 different reasons why that is that. Let's double down and check those. And so I think the reason that decisions are hard is because we all have implicit bias. We all are moving fast. What was true yesterday isn't true today. I'm always dating myself. I mentioned I was computer science in undergrad. I took a class on meteorology and it talked about clouds, now clouds and IT thing, like things are different in all of our as adults.

Kevin Hannigan Judith Kevin Amazon
A highlight from Leading with Authority & Equality | An Interview with Brooke Rasmussen

Leading Saints Podcast

01:08 min | Last week

A highlight from Leading with Authority & Equality | An Interview with Brooke Rasmussen

"Come to the leading saints podcast 'cause you love podcasts and you love consuming content in this manner, listening to a pre recorded conversation or interview or presentation, and we get a lot of good stuff here. But nothing compares to an in person retreat experience. This is one thing I've learned in the last few years that we are infusing into our leading saints content is the need for in person experiences, also known as retreats. So leading saints has started putting on retreats both for men, women who are going to play around with couples retreats and I will try it all, but retreats are a transformational experience and I implore you to go check out leading saints dot org slash gathering where we list all of the upcoming retreats, some are open to register others you can get on a waiting list, but we would love to have you at the next in person retreat. Now, if you can't afford it, if there are maybe if you price out of these opportunities, don't worry, we have very generous donors willing to put up money for scholarships. So either go there, check it out, register, or apply for scholarship, and we'd love to have you the next gathering saints retreat. Put on by leading saints. So go to leading saints dot org slash gathering

Saints
A highlight from Judith Germain on the Leaders Council

The Maverick Paradox Podcast

04:26 min | Last week

A highlight from Judith Germain on the Leaders Council

"In this episode, I am interviewed by Scott Chanel from the leaders council and was asked a series of questions about leadership and the role it has played in my career to date. I share my views on the leadership culture and the fact that it has had on employees and customers. We also discussed what is like to be senior leader who was young, female, and a person of color, and I explain what makes a maverick leader and the language of a senior leader. The leaders council of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is currently in the process of talking to leadership figures from across the nation in an attempt to understand this universal trait and what it means in Britain and Northern Ireland today. Scotch on the commented hosting a show like this where you speak to genuine leaders who have been there and done it even on national stage or within a crucial industry sector is an absolute honor. This is my podcast appearance on the leaders council and is republished with their permission. Listen to this conversation to discover my thoughts on leadership and listen to Scott puts me through my pasties and understands how I help entrepreneurs and senior leaders. The memory paradox magazine. The maverick paradox magazine is for the pathologically curious. Written by a swagger of socialised mavericks who I divergent thinkers, the magazine tackles, the biggest issues affecting maverick leaders today. You might be a business owner or a leader within an organization who wants to have your thinking challenged to be exposed to a diversity of thought or to learn from diverse experts in their fields. If so, the maverick paradox magazine is for you. Join the swagger at the maverick paradox dot com and engage in the conversation. My name is Scott chaloner and you are listening to the leaders council podcast for the people who run the country and the people who keep the country running. Now, as regular listeners of our program will now very well, part of our mission here at the leaders council is to bring you a variety of distinct perspectives on leadership and to this end today it is my delight to welcome Judith Germain onto the show. Judith is known for creating clear thinking and decisive leaders who can thrive in complex constantly changing environments. She's an executive mentor working with the C suite and senior teams. A consultant author speaker and trainer. She's also the leadership columnist for HR zone and her expert opinion has been sought across BBC Radio and national and trade press as well. So without further ado, Judith, welcome to you and thanks for joining us on the show. Thanks, Scott. I'm really looking forward to this. Yeah, myself as well, Judith and it's a real pleasure for me. Welcoming you on to the program with us. Obviously I've given a brief outline of the work that you do as an executive mentor, but just for those listeners that might not be familiar with you. Please feel free to expand upon that and just tell us a bit more about those leaders that you work with and kind of what it is that you really help them with. Sure. Yeah, what I have found over the years is that you go on to the sleep safely. And you're expected to know that you expected that all your training has taken place in your ready to just run the organization and what happening right now is that there's a real imbalance between your impact and the influence that you provide. So when I work with a C suite particularly, I help mentor them to amplify their influence so that they make these impacts that they want on the organization in the most effective way. And I also work with senior leadership teams to ensure that they can set strategy they can lead effectively and I can take the collective impact in a manner to have the right leadership culture to drive your business forward. Yeah, that certainly makes sense. And when we talk about kind of the right leadership culture, just sort of touching on that for a moment. What does a good leadership culture look like? Or would you say that's dependent upon the organization that you're working with? There is some dependency, but they've also found common things. And I think in the past when people talk about culture, they said, culturally, what happens around it? I say that culture is what has grown here. But it's also who you are around here. And I think we, as an organization, and it's always really heavily on the organizational culture. Without realizing that in individuals, themselves have

Leaders Council Scott Chanel Leaders Council Of Great Brita Northern Ireland The Maverick Paradox Judith Scott Chaloner Judith Germain Scott Mavericks Britain BBC
A highlight from Q&A with Lysa TerKeurst: Leading with Productive Boundaries

Craig Groeschel Leadership Podcast

05:25 min | Last week

A highlight from Q&A with Lysa TerKeurst: Leading with Productive Boundaries

"Hey, welcome to another episode of the Craig Rochelle leadership podcast where it is my mission to help you become a leader that people love to follow. And today we have a very special guest on our podcast before we do that. For those of you that are new, we drop a new episode on the first Thursday of every month with occasional or often bonus episodes. And if you're new to our leadership community, I want to tell you it's really, really helpful for you to get the leadership guide. If you go to life dot church slash leadership podcast, you can let us know you want the guide. We'll send you a guide that comes with additional information and great questions to cover with your team. Also, I want to say, man, I love seeing you guys invite others to be a part of our community on social media. You can tag me, tag our guest today, any of our guests, and we may repost you. I want to tell you about our guest today. This is going to be a conversation I promise is going to help you grow in your leadership. I am excited to have back Lisa turkey, a very, very good friend of mine. She is the founder of proverbs 31 ministries, a prolific author, two times number one New York Times bestselling author, 5 time New York Times bestselling author. She has a new book out called good boundaries and goodbyes loving others without losing the best of who you are. It's my honor to welcome back Lisa. Lisa, I'm glad to have you on the podcast. Thank you. It's always an honor and joy to be with you, Craig, thank you. Hey, Lisa, you amongst many other awards and incredible attributes. one today. You're the one and only three time guest on the Craig Rochelle leadership podcast. Well, that is incredible. And maybe even slightly intimidating. So maybe you should have shared that with me at the end. Well, there'll be more, but you're the first and that just is a reflection of how much I appreciate you and your team and your leadership and a lot of people around the world know you as prolific author and congratulations on your new book, good boundaries and goodbyes, loving others without losing the best of who you are. So many people read your books, but I also appreciate you just as world class leader, getting incredible team and great people. And I wanted to do with energy before, but I want to hear a little bit of your leadership backstory, Lisa, can you tell us when was the first time in life when you recognized that you were actually a leader or had leadership gifts? I never really considered myself a leader in middle school and high school. I wanted to be. And so I ran for a lot of school elections and had some pretty sad moments where I had to take my posters down after losing the school elections. And so I didn't really consider myself, I didn't really consider myself a leader. Until I got into my mid 20s and I was helping behind the scenes to start this little endeavor called proverbs 31. And people started looking to me and asking me advice and I wouldn't have called myself a leader in that moment. But I think my leadership journey, I won't say it started accidentally. I'll say it just started small. And I think when people were looking to me to help make important decisions and wanting my advice, I think that's the moment where I became a leader. Now, I quickly learned that in my leadership journey, I did not want to be the smartest person at the table. I think some leaders are intimidated to bring in, especially in a new organization. I think some leaders are intimidated to bring in people that are smarter than them, or I should say more equipped in certain areas than them. But I always saw the great need and necessity for that. And so I surrounded myself with people who were enthusiastic and who also were better equipped to handle certain specific areas of responsibility in the ministry and that served me really well. I love your leadership story, Lisa. I love the fact that you started small. And I love the fact that you are wise enough to surround yourself by people that are smarter than you. I want to kind of ask you a follow up question because you didn't see yourself as a leader, but you did have leadership gifts. What would you say to someone else right now, this kind of on the edge, they might be like you. They're doing something small. What would you say to them to build a little bit of confidence that they actually can grow in their leadership? What would you learn in your early 20s and what would you say to someone like that? Well, I think it's important to pay attention to where we are most comfortable and where we demonstrate strengths that have been part of our life for a really long time. So an example of that for me, I was never comfortable doing accounting or math or trying to crunch the numbers for the budget. So I recognized that there were other people that could do that and do it much better than me. Where I was comfortable and where I can look back in my even early childhood, I was comfortable communicating.

Craig Rochelle Lisa Lisa Turkey Time New York Times New York Times Craig
A highlight from Keeping Christ in Sunday School | A How I Lead Interview with Joseph Dixon

Leading Saints Podcast

01:02 min | Last week

A highlight from Keeping Christ in Sunday School | A How I Lead Interview with Joseph Dixon

"Kurt frankel, and I am the founder and executive director of leading saints and obviously the host of the leading saints podcast. Now, I started leading saints back in 2010. It was just a hobby blog and it grew from there by the time 2014 came around. We started the podcast and that's really when it got some traction and took off 2016, we became a 501c3 nonprofit organization and we've been growing ever since. And now I get the opportunity of interviewing and talking with remarkable people all over the world. Now this is a segment we do on the leading saints podcast called how I lead. And we reach out to everyday leaders, they're not experts, gurus, authors, PhDs, they're just everyday leaders who've been asked to serve in a specific leadership calling and we simply ask them, how is it that you lead? And they go through some remarkable principles that should be in a book that should be behind a PhD. They're usually that good. And we just talk about sharing what the other guy's doing. And I remember being a leader just simply wanting to know,

Saints Kurt Frankel
CEO of X2, Mark French, on How His Product Has Disrupted the Market

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

02:06 min | 1 year ago

CEO of X2, Mark French, on How His Product Has Disrupted the Market

"Now. A couple of questions. I have here for you one. Is you guys are operating this business. And i would say that it is. It is disruptive what you're doing from what i can tell. The brand seems to be disruptive. What do you accredit the the rapid growth to do. What do you attribute the rapid growth to why is it. Being such a disruptive success. I would say there's more people coming to the category now right so there's certain people that would never try an energy drink right that more health conscious consumer really was not interested in putting in other bodies some of these beverages that had you know some you know ingredients that you can't even pronounce so as more people. Are you know looking for energy solutions. Whether it's a coffee drinker. That wants something. A little bit cleaner lighter Or you know somebody that might be drinking other energy drinks but is trying to live a healthier lifestyle. You know. i think that's really where the disruption comes in also. There's never really been a brand that you know was built in the locker room in this energy category right so you know. We're really fortunate that Death net recently featured us as a sports drink. Innovator we're not really a sports drink. We're not a hydration drink or something that you might take Before you want to do some exercise or if you wanna just have a little bit more energy and focus throughout the workday but you wanna have it with clean healthy ingredients and you know the other reason why people might consider us to be somewhat. Disruptors is just because of you know this athlete a model. there really haven't been athletes like saquon. Barkley labonte david kawhi leonard and now kendall tool who's one of the top peleton athletes That are joining a company like ours as shareholders and partners in the business. I think it's just you know shedding some light that there is renovation innovation in the energy category and that's where we could probably be looked at as being somewhat

Barkley Labonte David Kawhi Le Kendall
How to Achieve Your Greatest Purpose With Serial Entrepreneur Michael Koenigs

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:06 min | 1 year ago

How to Achieve Your Greatest Purpose With Serial Entrepreneur Michael Koenigs

"Let's go through the stages of purpose you broken down into three different stages. What is that all about her right. So think of like this our first stage or what i often call are doing stages imagine when you get paid to do something that you could be flipping burgers working at a gas station or whatever that may happen to be. It's task oriented. Where really you are a meat puppet. You know you're just doing something for the money and also you're trying to just cover your basic needs your maslow's hierarchy of needs in the grand of things and the next level is where you're at your knowing phase and you are maybe getting paid for knowing something's got to be a white collar job But then you go through your next phase in life for your at your being phase and that is where you're paid for who you are not what you know not what you do and i think there's a fourth level to this so this is different than the stages but the force level is being a full human expression. Not just a human being meaning to to express yourself where you're being rewarded for your expressions in life now. What does that mean in terms of the first second and third stages so first stage is the basic needs. The maslow's the second stage is The experiences you're providing in the third stage has to do with true transformation your true purpose in life where you've done the work you know who you are. You know your greatest value. Your unique abilities are what we call your superpowers and you found a way to provide huge transformative value. But here's the big kicker. The highest state is when you help other people find their purpose and you help them. Identify and and In help them achieve and be in that state all the time so that is really usually the final stage of most people's lives is helping people identify find live inside their

Maslow
Lessons I Learned After COVID Killed My Conference

The $100 MBA Show

02:14 min | 1 year ago

Lessons I Learned After COVID Killed My Conference

"The first lesson. I learned is that. Don't use optimism as your guide meaning that you know. We were super optimistic. That we're going to still the conference when we went into lockdown. You know we didn't realize how long lockdown was going to be but It's always good to have a disaster plan. It's funny because i know this in my software company we always have these. What if conversations and Center standard operating procedures. But we need to have the same in the conference we need to think. Hey what if is in happened way before it would give me more time to have options or to Make some changes provide some options to the attendees but basically when i found out we're three weeks out from the conference so i had limited choices to what i can do. Second i learned was. I knew in that moment. The best thing i can do is i need to communicate. I need to communicate with my people. The attendees And i just needed to make sure that they're included in any decision and that i let them know what's going on so they don't feel like they're in the dark. I was very conscious. These people trusted me. They give me their money. I want to make sure that they know that. I got their back and that you know there are some options. I'm looking at when we actually had a discussion on that call before the cancellation was confirmed. Because the accession of lockdown of what are some options. And what. I was pleasantly surprised by how open people were there were like. Hey we totally get it. I understand they're all entrepreneurs zeno how these things happen and They presented some ideas from creative ideas. I didn't think of as alternatives creative ideas in terms of different dates. Different locations Because it became clear that this is not going to happen This oscar will not happen in the winter at least this year because The lockdown will extend past the winter season. So the idea of going skiing together is just not going to happen so by having open communication. Just putting your cards on the table. Hey these are options. This is will happen. This were our monies deposited. What's going on. this is what's happening. It makes it super clear to people to understand all right. These are options. Let's work with

Zeno Oscar Skiing
Whenever You Fall Down, Pick Something Up

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

01:15 min | 1 year ago

Whenever You Fall Down, Pick Something Up

"Familiar with the idea of whenever you fall down you've just got to pick yourself back up again. But what about this one from famed canadian. American medical researcher and physician also bold theodore avery. Whenever you fall down peak something up. What i love about. It is the idea that when you are up here you sometimes forget how things operate down the and so if you happen to fall down spend a bit of time down there understanding what's going on down there understanding what is happening that relates to this upper world. That you've come from you fell down. Pick something up. That can help you on that journey as you grow. Gather some more information gathered some more data some more research the more insights and there's even another dimension to it if you wanna flip it just a little bit pick someone else up so the idea that when you fall down you not only have to pick yourself up you not only have to pick up other things around you but pick someone else pick someone else up. That has that is down. They maybe they've fallen down to or maybe they just haven't been able to get up but when you fall down just pick yourself up have a look around. See what's the pick something up and see if you can pick someone else up as well. Great

Theodore Avery