Latinx

Listen to the latest audio content in Latinx culture, identity, politics and history. This playlist features Latinx individuals having great conversations on relevant topics through a cultural lens. Sourced from premium podcasts.

A highlight from How Queens' Star Nadine Velazquez is Making the Most of a Second Chance

Latina to Latina

07:01 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from How Queens' Star Nadine Velazquez is Making the Most of a Second Chance

"What happens when you get a second chance? That question is at the heart of the new TV show, queens, about a 90s hip hop girls group that reunites for a second chance at fame. And for Nadine Velazquez, who plays valeria, the only member of the group who is still in the limelight, that question is deeply personal. You know Nadine from her roles on this is Earl and the league, those gave Nadine a taste of success and left her feeling lost anyway. Took being fired from a job and being given a shot at a do over to grant needing the clarity she needed to go after the things she wants most. Nadine, thank you so much for doing this. Thank you for having me. What is sort of the dates that queens hooks into is 1999? And watching it, I was wondering, what were you actually doing in 1999? Who were you in 1999? In 1999 I was cool. I think I was a junior it Columbia college. I was living with a man who was older than me. I was working for talent agency as an assistant, and then I think I was also waitressing or hosting or something at night. That squares because it seems like you're the type of person who's always living 5 different lives at the same time. Oh yeah, there was definitely a time I had 5 jobs at once. Especially when I was I moved out when I was 16, I became very ambitious at 16. I knew I had to survive. So I was determined to finish school was determined to get a degree. I was determined to have money because I knew I could be a statistic and just be a deadbeat. All the odds were against me. You know what I'm saying? And there have been a lot of detours along the way. My understanding that you really in your heart wanted to be a writer, but got redirected. What was that redirection? Acting? It's a very long story, but when I was working for the talent agency, I thought I was going to become an agent while I finished school and after I graduated at Columbia. I wanted to get a master's in writing. And so part of that was television writing, fiction all kinds of writing. And that's the year that I met my husband. My second husband, because I was married twice. And he was an agent in Los Angeles. For a literary agent writers. So it was perfect, but then the agency that I worked for as an assistant, the agent there told me that I had to be an actress. That was my calling. Why? What was it about you that made that person say that? Thought I was. She was like, she's the one who actually pushed me to get my head shots and 'cause she kept saying to me to this day. Her name is mirna Salazar. She lives in Chicago. She had a Latino agency. The only Latino boutique agency in Chicago for a long time. And she was also like a mother figure to me because I left early at gravitated to just her sense of business and the fact that she was a strong woman. And so I really enjoyed working for her. And one day she was just like, when are you going to ask me for your headshots? And I'm like, I'm not planning to be an actor. I feel like that vote's gone. She's like, are you kidding me? You belong in Hollywood. This is the perfect time for you. And so my thought was, if I'm going to be an actress then I don't want to be in an actress in Chicago like then take it all the way. And she was like, no, you have to go to Los Angeles, and I thought I don't know how to get to Los Angeles. I only know Chicago. I have this job here. I'm going to school. That didn't make sense to me. And then I met my husband who was a literary who was in Chicago happened to be working with one of his clients I was working there for a weekend, and then we just connected. There's a whole long story of how we actually came together 9 months later after September 11th, we were brought together again, but this time I fell in love with him. Before I didn't. And then that's how I ended up in LA. I did end up and I didn't know how I was gonna end up in LA, but I ended up in LA and then when I ended up in LA, I thought about what she told me. And I was like, this is the time I'm here. She said that I should be here. The universe got me here, so I had an agent and a manager like this overnight. And I'm like, so it's right here in my hand. What do I do? And then so I started pursuing that more than the writing. I was taking writing classes in LA for a little bit. You're letting me talk way too long. I got all the time in the world. You're the one who's got a heart out. Yeah, okay, so anyway, more of the story is, I follow signs. I've lived my life that way. I do want to get to the moral of the story because I think there are a lot of us who are not going to be Hollywood writers or Hollywood actresses, but your story as I understand it is very much one of being ushered in a direction and then after you had achieved some success, ushered down that path. Sort of do hit a dead end where you start to wonder for yourself, is this really what it is that I want? And that is a very familiar feeling for a lot of us, right? Whether we feel like we have been ushered into partnerships into motherhood into careers that somebody else picked for us. And for you, that realization comes pretty dramatically and at what could have been a incredibly high cost. You're on this film, you're acting alongside Will Smith and as I say just burn out. Another breakup coming off of a TV show, I hated being away. I hated being in North Carolina. I hated being in Vancouver. I was questioning everything. Why did I take the job? Why do I think that I have to just take any job? What am I going to do if I don't take the job? I'm with the guy only because I'm 37 and I think my time is running out and I should just stay with him because he's going to want to hear her. A lot of ideas that were false that I bought into because I had a plan. Sometimes I told this story, I saw my life up until I was 30. When I was a teenager, for whatever reason I just saw two 30. And I didn't see past that. Maybe I thought at 30 I would be going so well that I would then think of the next ten years. But I never saw my life passed 30. I just knew I wanted to be professional and I wanted to be a millionaire by 30. That's what I said. I would always say that. My 30, I'm gonna be a millionaire. And by 30 I was. I was on my name is Earl. It was several seasons. I was making really good money. I had a husband, he also had incredible income. We had home in Los Angeles. We had car. We had everything. I had it all. The way that I envisioned it. But

Nadine Nadine Velazquez Chicago LA Mirna Salazar Los Angeles Valeria Columbia College Earl Hollywood Columbia Will Smith North Carolina Vancouver
A highlight from Reclaiming Our Homes

Latino USA

00:45 sec | Last week

A highlight from Reclaiming Our Homes

"So excited. We were screaming and just overjoyed. We had community over. They came and played music. We had some hard show. We had rancheros. That's multicultural. She's remembering the day she moved into her new house. It's a two bedroom on Sheffield avenue in a soreno. A residential neighborhood in northeast Los Angeles. Martha's living room is filled with books and on one of the walls is a banner that reads housing for all. This is the first room we walked into and when we walked into, obviously it was empty. And now it's filled with furniture and some of my art in my rocks. That's mostly Martha's

Martha Los Angeles
A highlight from From the Akron Community Podcast Lab

Latino Rebels Radio

06:41 min | Last week

A highlight from From the Akron Community Podcast Lab

"And I came and I saw and I experienced and I have fun and I cried and I couldn't figure out, you know, why, why does this seem like I'm not invited to the club some years, you know? Yeah. You know, or people would say things to me like, you know you discuss a job because you're a black. I was like, really? And at first, it was sting. Why do I have to justify or have to walk into the room and stand out my resume? I've just gotten very comfortable with myself and understanding and oftentimes, yeah, I will be the only one in the room. It's okay. I will have a very different perspective. Yes, okay. It doesn't mean that my perspective is not a value and I know that and I have to understand it. And those who are very hard lessons, like you, I will be engaging outdoor spaces and in my adult life I just kind of stopped. Why do you think that is? Fear. And your adult life, you have a different level of fear that you did not have as a child. And you had a protector as a child, so you didn't just go roaming around by yourself. You know, you had family groups that were together. No one knows a white child or a white adult ramen that they can't go hanging by themselves. You know? That's true. So fear, fear is a really, really, really making. It is real. And it's very real because there is a foundation for that. When black people go to the Woods we come up hanging in trees. And I know this very blunt, it hits people is, but even in my lifetime, I have known people who were hanged. My lifetime. So it's a very real thing. The other thing is access, how do you get the majority of our parks, even here in some metropolitan? We've been working on this for a couple years. They're not accessible via bus. Good year metro parks is, but we've had time slowly tried to play in school programs and it gets going to ride the bus and we're trying to get in places or internships and shadow experiences. And we are trying to can we get this so the access and again statements like who's going to invite you to go camp, but your pleasure, you don't go camping. You have to be too cognizant of your hair. You know, your nails, you know, so you can go camping. You don't know anything about their life, right? Right. That's what they say. Yeah. It's always a filmed. And now is a stone. So you're not a part of that conversation when it was camping. I had a supervisor who had of changing this nature center until the agricultural empowerment center. Agricultural center basically for education. And as he's talking to the chief of the department and I is sometimes well, I want to be interested to be the manager of it, but I know she doesn't know anything about agriculture. But why did she think that? These calluses on my hands from years of digging potatoes and shucking corn has never been. Who would you know, anything about agriculture, you know? I include those. And so my legs from chickens get after me, you know? You're running. How would I hear no? You know what? You know, the question that my husband said, did you say something started to tailor? And for me, it was like, I don't think she's really interested in knowing what my real skill sets are. I think she's just interested in me doing something that she wants me to do. She wants me to manage it, but she wants me not to design it and not to have an input and not to be a part of it. She never asked if people never ask you. Yeah. What are your skill sets? They never ask you what you're doing on the weekends. They never ask you about your home life in your personal passions and things like that. Those things are just naturally assumed oftentimes because of the color of your skin. And to be perfectly honest, sometimes because of their limited experiences with other African Americans it's just a broad, you just have to fit in this bucket. Well, I know it's probably a little bit easier now since you're at summit like it. You have a lot of volunteers and there's actual interest in it now. But how do you rang a program? How do you make it inclusive? One of the things that I have had to teach the staff is to have to create data driven decisions. Typically, we program on what we enjoy, what our interests are. If I like gardening, then I'm going to do garden programs. If I like sewing and using recycled materials that's what I'm going to do. And if I like birds, then I'm going to be, you know, have a lot of burning programs. That's what we've typically done. And so what I'm trying to train this staff to do is to look and see what the interests of the community is. Needs assessment. What are your visitors looking for? What do they want? And when you start to do that, you start to hear differently. Then you get an idea of what is needed. So I'm very excited number one. There's going to be obviously traditional nature based programming. We have an excellent resource with some it lay there. So you'll see birding programs, waterfall programs you'll see some programs to some natural animals that are around just some fabulous little creatures that are all around that people oftentimes drive and ride right by and don't notice. So there's a traditional things. I think we're pretty much going to bring back nature club, which was an ongoing after school experience that was at the pop up. And we created space for our little naturalist kindergarten through 12 years old. Kind of nature based things and sometimes it's just simple to make playing in the water. But giving them a space. And of course, most of the children were of African American background, just simply because of the population there. But it gave them that space as you talked about that you had as a child and I had as a child to be outdoors and okay and to get 30, it's okay. And so then we're going to have a partnership with let's grow Afrin in which a partnership with west grow actor and has a lot of gardening programs. So everything from seating to preservation food preservation as you're canning and things of that nature to consumption programs, some integrating some cooking, how do you use this? What do you do with a butternut squash?

Agricultural Empowerment Cente Agricultural Center Squash
A highlight from Flickering Fame

Latino USA

01:15 min | Last week

A highlight from Flickering Fame

"Aina rosa here. So today we're going to share a new episode from the port of entry podcast. It's a series from kpbs and PRX that we've featured in the past on this feed. The podcast tells personal stories of love, hope, struggle and survival from border crossers front there is and front the resource. And other people whose lives are shaped by the wall. In this episode, we're going to meet Mexican musician Javier battis, who very likely would have been world famous had he headed north of the border with his good friend and bandmate, Carlos Santana, way back in the day. Instead, Javier went south to Mexico City. That's where he discovered an internal peace and fulfillment that he says is a lot more important than fame. So here's a new episode of port of entry, Esper, let's go. Enjoy. From kpbs and PRX, this is port of entry, where we tell cross border stories that connect us. I'm Alan lilienthal. Maybe you're familiar with this

Aina Rosa Kpbs Javier Battis Carlos Santana Javier Mexico City Esper Alan Lilienthal
A highlight from Why Beauty Entrepreneur Aisha Ceballos-Crump Stepped Out on Faith

Latina to Latina

07:22 min | Last week

A highlight from Why Beauty Entrepreneur Aisha Ceballos-Crump Stepped Out on Faith

"Appearance and dramatic financial decisions. You will notice me gasp a few times in response that ayesha's many leaps of faith. I want to start with you being born and raised in Gary Indiana. How did the Puerto Ricans end up in the Midwest? The Midwest Gary Indiana in particular was a booming still industry. At that time, we had inland still U.S. still and they were jobs. And everyone on the island talked about going to the mainland to create a better life for their family. My father's side, the family, they came over first, and then my mom saw the family at that time, usually the fathers could only come. So he left my grandmother on the island with the kids, but he came here and all of them got jobs in the still industry. And it was like new money. It was a new world, a new life. So there was a huge Puerto Rican population growing up in Gary Indiana when I was a child. But when the still industry collapse basically a bust it, a lot of people lost their jobs, people were laid off. A lot of people less scary. And Gary at that point started to go downhill. And that's when the crime increase. That's when just everything started to change. It felt like my dad was always out of a job. He tried to work in the still industry. He was always getting laid off. My mom ran a domestic women's shelter. So when I say we grew up exposed to so many different things and it just built tough skin, it was the Gary that I knew. But it was the Gary that I loved. How did that instability affect the way that you saw your own career and your own ambitions for yourself? I wanted to change. My parents, my parents actually were born and raised in Gary Indiana and they met in high school. They were 18 and 20 when they got married. They got GD's. They didn't go to college. I just always wanted to just do better than them. I wanted to elevate each generation, education, just really thinking about community. And I wanted to make them proud. I do need to know my sister in law is from Indiana and she has taught me about the concept of Midwest nice. So I need to know how Midwest nice squares with being Latina. I'm not nice. I'm friendly. I went to Purdue, which is in West Lafayette, India. That is like a night and day difference than Gary Indiana, Gary, Indiana is predominantly black. It is poverty. I think when I was in high school, we were murder capital of the world. So you have to be tough. And you have to have tough skin. And I spent my childhood always defending myself, always trying to be tough a little 5 foot three Puerto Rican girl that was so tough. Yes, I'm very friendly, but at the same time, I always have this facade about me that it's just a tough skin because I dealt with so many adversities in my life. Yeah. When you spend your life being tough it's hard then to be soft. I'm always soft with my kids. That's good they deserve that. Talk to me then how did you make your way into engineering? Were you always good at math and science? So I love math and science. I did well academically, Alzheimer's touring a middle school valedictorian in high school, and I was grew up in a poor family, so I pretty much could have shows that he college I wanted to go to. And I wanted to go to NYU to become an actress. I wanted to be in Bela novella's, and even though my Spanish is not perfect, I want it to be in Broadway. Even though I can't sing, and it was my senior year and all the recruiters were coming to my high school. And they looked at my transcripts and they looked at my SAT scores and they were like, holy cow, you should go Ivy League. You should go to one of these schools. It was actually a recruiter that came in from Purdue, which is only an hour and a half from my home. I sure as heck didn't want to say that clothes. And she was like, you should come to Purdue because you're so good at math and science. And you could become an engineer. I really didn't know what an engineer did. And all she said was it's the highest paid undergraduate degree. And I said, what? She was like, yes, chemical engineers come out and you make more money than anyone else in four years. I said, sign me up. Alyssia. I had no idea what I was getting myself into. But I was like, oh, good. I love math and science. Unfortunately, kids in the inner city are going to be at a disadvantage going into college. I didn't know that at the time. I had algebra. I had a four. I did everything that I possibly could. But there's only so much they give you. We didn't have AP classes. We had calculus. We didn't have a lab. We didn't have anything that these other kids have. So here I am, sign me up for chemical engineer. I got in. I got a scholarship. I'm going to go in there and take 18 credit hours, my first semester, because I'm brilliant because I'm a valedictorian from Gary, Indiana. Oh my God, that was the biggest culture shock of my entire life going from a predominant black community being around Latina culture, strong Puerto Rican culture to going to predominantly white institution and I've never in my life been in that environment and majoring in chemical engineering. And when you look in the room and there's 250 people, there might be one other person that looks like you. There's not many women and not many women of color. I think there were four black women that were in the class with me and two other latinas, and that was it. And we stuck together and we really helped each other because it is a big cultural shift. It's a big change that we don't talk about. We don't talk about growing up in the south side of Chicago. I love Chicago now, growing up in Gary Indiana, growing up in Miami growing up in LA in these communities where all your exposed to is one thing. And then they poof, they throw you into this completely intense environment and you have to survive. How did that change you? My first semester, I took 18 credit hours, calculus chemistry, computer programming. I thought I can handle anything in the world. And I got a 2.64. And I remember this because I never made anything less than a in my life. I found a circle of friends that had some of the same struggles. And I said, I am not going to fail. I am the first person in my family to go to college. I'm going to put on my big girl panties. And I'm going to do everything that it takes. I just made a major shift, you know, my Friends that I was hanging when I started hanging with engineering students. I was working in the minority engineering office. I got a tutor. I was participating in everything possible. And by the time I graduated with honors in four years in engineering for Purdue university. It was not easy, but I learned so much about myself and how thick my skin is. Do you like a hair? You already know I'm a first republic bank client. But have I talked to you about their app? This best in class banking app allows you to bank anywhere anytime. That's in addition to your dedicated personal banker. For when you need one on one service, with this combination of personal attention and convenience, it's no wonder that first republic bank has a client satisfaction rating two times the industry average. So, whether you're starting on your financial journey or planning for your future, you can count on first republic to be there for you. Every step of the way. Visit first republic dot com. Today, to learn more. That's first republic dot com. Remember FDIC equal housing lender. It has been a long, tough couple of months.

Gary Indiana Midwest Gary Indiana Puerto Purdue Ayesha Bela Novella Puerto Rican Alyssia West Lafayette Purdue University NYU Ivy League U.S. Alzheimer India
How Are the Latinx Community Represented on TV

Latino USA

02:00 min | 3 months ago

How Are the Latinx Community Represented on TV

"Latino and latina representation in film and television is an age old conversation topic and despite some recent milestones. The numbers are still pretty disappointing. According to a recent study by the la times latinos and latinas are underrepresented across all aspects of television and film productions despite making up nearly twenty percent of the us population that dino's and latina's constitute only six percent of main cast members less than nine percent of writers seven percent of directors and six percent of senior executives. The presence of african and indigenous latinos in the industry is even smaller but statistics can only tell us so much how latino individuals and communities are portrayed. Onscreen is another part of the conversation. That's why today we're taking you behind the scenes with two award winning latino creators were breaking stereotypes about how our communities are depicted on television. Stephen canals and linda evatt charges. My name is steven canals. I am co-creator executive producer writer and director of the f. Extra series pose. The category is hosed centers. The black and latin queer and trans individuals who are part of the new york city. Underground ballroom community as they are navigating the difficulties of the hiv as and crack epidemic of the eighties and early nineties. Stephen was born and raised in the bronx to an afro. Puerto rican mother and an african american dad. He made history when posed premiered in twenty eighteen featuring the largest cast of transgender actors in tv history

La Times Stephen Canals Linda Evatt Dino Steven Canals United States New York City Bronx Puerto Rican Stephen
Looking Back at the Secure Fence Act

Latino USA

02:35 min | 4 months ago

Looking Back at the Secure Fence Act

"This october will mark fifteen years. Since president. George w bush signed the secure fence act of two thousand and six bill. I'm about to sign is an important step. In our nation's efforts to secure our border and reform immigration system congress approved the act with bipartisan support authorizing nearly seven hundred miles of new barrier along the southwestern border with mexico up until this point just a few dozen miles of border wall had been built and that happened under democratic president. Bill clinton under president george w. bush the secure fence act would focus on militarizing the nearly two thousand mile long border with mexico the act allowed vehicle. Barriers checkpoints increased uses of satellites cameras and other technologies order. Property owners would soon received letters from the federal government asking them for permission to enter and survey their land. This would lead to legal battles and property seizures with many of these moving into new administration's today reporter aaron nelson takes us to a university in brownsville. Texas we're dr. juliet. Garcia led a legal battle against border wall construction. This case is a reminder of the fights. Many continue to wage against an opponent almost impossible to defeat. Here's earn nelson. One overcast morning and late spring. Dr juliet garcia stands at the wild entrance of a defunct golf course overgrown palm palm fronds obscure the welcome sign where the university of texas brownsville. Golf team was headquartered. The golf course was popular with retirees and young golfers hosting tournaments for local high schools countless thousands of rounds of golf every year. If it's part of what we're trying to build here but that's gone now. What lies beyond the wall. Today is a no-man's-land. An outcome of goliath versus david kind of battle. This story begins in late. Two thousand seven a few months after the secure fence act became law the federal government targeted. Utd's land and other private land to try and build a border wall as president of the university. Dr garcia was forced to step away from the classrooms and into the forefront of an unexpected fight to protect the institution. She had helped create. Nobody wants to take on an issue like this. You know. I mean. I'd jobless to hire faculty not fight department of homeland security.

George W Bush Aaron Nelson Mexico Dr Juliet Garcia Golf University Of Texas Brownsvill Bill Clinton Federal Government Congress Brownsville Juliet Bush Garcia Nelson Texas Dr Garcia David Department Of Homeland Securit
What's Happening With the Vaccine Rollout in Ecuador?

Latino USA

02:23 min | 4 months ago

What's Happening With the Vaccine Rollout in Ecuador?

"At the start of the pandemic equality was one of the countries hardest hit by the virus reports showed bodies piling up in its streets. They were frightening times. My name is mankind upping adelaida. I'm from kito. Maria lives in the capital of ecuador. She like everyone else could only follow the recommended guidelines where mask stay home as much as possible and hope that she didn't become infected but then came december eleventh twenty twenty the new york times and washington post now reporting that the fda has given the green light to distribute. Its covert vaccine. The first kovin vaccine was approved for emergency use. And a few days later the us began its vaccination rollout at first distribution was slow and uneven in fact even today vaccination rates in communities of color lag their white counterparts. But by april of this year the us vaccinating over three million people each day. Meanwhile in ecuador just a little over one percent of the population had received at least one dose. The country sought vaccinate. It's healthcare workers senior citizens and other vulnerable groups still distribution. wasn't smooth. Lot of people. Most of them were ill. They're equal how to wait for more than ten hours to get the vaccines a my grandma's best friend. He had the appointment to get her vaccine at nine. Am and she ended up getting her vaccine the same way but eleven pm and she is eighty two years old it for me. That was inhumane. The way that the treated the elders in guitar but long lines weren't the only bump inequalities vaccine rollout battles control the code nine thousand nine pandemic and latin america is underway but it's being hindered by patchy deliveries of the vaccine and scandals in the government related to is the ecuador and health may still fun call survived. The health minister resigned shortly after reveal that his family was part of the lucky ones. Unfortunately this wasn't unique to ecuador in baru. Both the health and foreign relations ministers resigned after news. At almost five hundred government officials and well-connected people had received cove nineteen doses before they were available to the general public and not cantina reports of people using connections to get access to vaccines also led to the resignation of the health minister.

Kito Ecuador Maria Washington Post New York Times FDA United States Health And Foreign Relations Latin America Baru
What's Happening With Peru's Contentious Election

Latino Rebels Radio

02:31 min | 4 months ago

What's Happening With Peru's Contentious Election

"Talk to me. What happened in the last couple of weeks like so people there. There's a lot of people don't even know what happened in federal with the election. Can you just break down the facts of what happened in the last couple of weeks. Yeah sure so. In june six petrol kostya won the presidential elections in peru. And this as you said his historical never before a casino a peasant. I ruled schoolteacher. A union leader has become the president of peru so casteel also defeated the right wing forces that tried to overturn electoral results that gave casteel dispensary. This is what happened in in the past few weeks so this righ-wing forces including the leads us donald trump's playbook they opposition candidate. Her name is geico for giamatti daughter of former dictator. Fujimori cried fraud with no basis with no evidence in fortunately after a big legal fide more than a month after the elections to place. Castilla was proclaimed precedent earned. From what i understand. I mean gusty people say like oh he's just coming out of nowhere. I mean he does have some political experience right. He organized in education. From what i read right. I mean he didn't just literally come from the air. You know what. I mean like he. He has been involved in some form of organizing in the past correct. Yeah that's correct so casteel was the leader of a teachers strike in two thousand seventeen. Nevertheless it's true that his victory wasn't inspected by deleting peru and of course the righ-wing is not satisfied. And they they still want to get rid of castilla. Say try to during the past few weeks so casteel socialist and he keeps also has indigenous origins so peru's extremely racist country ran as i said historically by the elite school leaf in the capital city in that are mostly white. So right now. Several members of congress are talking about organizing an impeachment process against steel. So so i'm saying this in order to to give you an idea. How much rejection from the elites in the wind castillo is receiving

Casteel Peru Giamatti Fujimori Donald Trump Geico Castilla Congress Castillo
Ada Limon on Her Beginnings in Poetry

Latino USA

01:45 min | 4 months ago

Ada Limon on Her Beginnings in Poetry

"Hi my name. Is ada leeman. And i am a poet. I was born on a green couch on kargar road at home in cinema california and then was raised in glenallen sonoma. I loved growing up in california. I still think of it very much as my home. I think that one of the things that was really important about my upbringing was my connection with natural world and i think you can see that a lot in my own poems in the idea that the land and the trees and the birds and the creek across the street the calabasas creek all of that was as important to me as some of my human ancestors. It became such a part of my world and my making as an artist. My family influence me a great deal as a poet. My mother is a painter and My stepfather is a writer and both of them gave me a lot of permission to follow my dream and no-one dismissed my wanting to write poems. And then my stepmother and my father were also very supportive and My father was an educator and my stepmother at the time was a speech pathologist so language was key in that household. I remember writing songs and reciting poems that i wrote for my labrador dusty and running through the little alleyways and and reading poems to to my dog at quite a young age

Ada Leeman Glenallen Calabasas Creek California Sonoma
The Problem of Femicide in Puerto Rico With Activist Tania Rosario Mndez

Latina to Latina

02:45 min | 4 months ago

The Problem of Femicide in Puerto Rico With Activist Tania Rosario Mndez

"Tanya there is a renewed focus on femicide in puerto rico but this is of course sadly not a new phenomenon. What is your earliest memory of stories. Like this is actually a story. My grandmother told me when she was very young. She married a someone else not not my grandfather. So she's this young wife. She has two small girls and her husband used to lock her up in the house. She told me this story and she was not being. She was not even resentful. She was just telling me this story about her first husband and how he would leave to work and leave her locked up. She was saying how silly he was so jealous. Like that right so for me. I was terrified. The idea that someone else who loves me an adult and in her house because he was jealous. Someone will look at me are for me. It was a -rageous. But i don't remember voice saying that to her because she was so matter-of-fact about it and that's the earliest memory i have. I was thought nine a grueling me. And how normalize it was for several generations in my in my country. We culture that men do that women. Draw a line for me as you see it from that story to how we're still talking about femicide in the year. Twenty twenty one. I think we've overcome some obstacles. But sometimes i think everything that has been gains always the parable of being lost so way not on we have to fight key what we gain but also to forward was boulder and expensive ways off noli dealing move. The problem itself generates violence vosa with naming storytelling. It's how do you tell the story of the victim. Why do you say deaths and you don't say homicide because i'm raising a daughter and sometimes i terrified that she's going to go out in a world that doesn't think of her as full human.

Tanya Puerto Rico Noli Boulder
The Effects of Trump's Migrant Protection Protocol

Latino USA

02:22 min | 4 months ago

The Effects of Trump's Migrant Protection Protocol

"So it's sunday march seven and it's to be eleven. Am and right. Now i'm in the modus mexico I'm in a small plus that is right next to the microphone. Tenting cat mint is. I recorded this audio earlier this year the day after a migrant camp just across from brown so in south texas was cleared out for almost two years it was the home for hundreds of mostly central americans and mexicans seeking asylum in the us most had finally been allowed into the us some were sent to nearby shelter before they can be processed into the country others however were left in limbo. You know what i'm looking inside and it's really really quiet I'm used to you know hearing you know kids families moms dads talking to each other running around playing really really quite now at one point this now. Empty area held more than three thousand asylum. Seekers forced to wait in mexico as their cases made their way or us immigration courts. Historically for decades people had always been allowed to remain in the us while seeking asylum. It's their right under. Us law and international treaty obligations but the trump administration disregarded all of that when it is the remain in mexico policy officially known as the migrant protection protocols or mpp the policy. I rolled out in january of twenty thousand hundred in southern california and slowly spread across the entire southern border. As they walked by the ten are here. They're empty. They see firewood branches. I see little tables. They see shoes. You know that have been left behind. It's kinda crazy that it's like now closed. I met so many families who had been living in this camp without much help from either the mexican or us governments. They injured a hurricane a freeze deaths in the rio grande a pan-demic scorching hundred degree summers extortion and violence from criminal organizations and so much more

Mexico United States South Texas Southern California Hurricane Rio Grande
The End of DACA?

Latino Rebels Radio

02:22 min | 4 months ago

The End of DACA?

"So if you're someone who is a dreamer right now who does not have daca. You can have daca right. Is that correct. Yeah i think like in the most basic of census right like that is probably the interpretation that most folks are walking away. And if you know you're an outsider. Meaning that you don't have or you're trying to essentially figure something out that might just be the simplest way to look at it but for the people who are in the process of applying for dhaka for the first time right they are seeing a lot of very specific questions that have quite just been answered right. Judge heynen though federal judge in the southern district of texas who has been essentially overseeing a variety of different cases on this subject as made no secret that he's not a fan of the daca program so people need to understand that first and foremost number two his ruling basically states that new applicants as you mentioned julio people who are in the process of applying for dhaka for the first time short of them being fully approved into the program will no longer be eligible for the program. What exactly does that mean. May the young daca applicant. Who says well. I sent in my application. It was received. I gotta biometrics appointment. This is where they go and take your finger branson that take a photo and all this jazz. You know i did dad. I haven't heard back from you. If my application going to be considered is gonna be frozen. It's going to be thrown away and that's kind of where we are at earlier this week. We saw that. Uscis basically said in a statement. You know we acknowledge that this is happening. Where abiding by the court order. There will be more guidelines following up. So i i actually have it up on my phone because i tweeted out and it's interesting because let me just break this down because it says i'm rita and this came out on july nineteenth and i'm glad you brought it up because i was kind of like my next question but let's let's give the people some context. This is the giving people some context portion of the show so basically they say you know based on the order issued by the us district court for the southern district of texas and texas. The united states department of homeland security is enjoined from granting initial daca requests. Basically saying you haven't even started like don't even try

Judge Heynen Dhaka Julio Texas Branson Uscis Rita Us District Court Department Of Homeland Securit United States
The Story of Jose Marti: Poet, Patriot, Dreamer

teikirisi

01:45 min | 4 months ago

The Story of Jose Marti: Poet, Patriot, Dreamer

"Monty was born in louisiana on january twenty eighth eighteen fifty three aquarius. His parents were poor. spanish immigrants. His father was sent to cuba. As first sergeants from valencia. Yeah and so it. Only sixteen years of age as modesty was already arrested and accused of disloyalty to spain. It's interesting that he is one generation off from being spanish but at the young age of sixteen is already against spanish but he saw a lot of atrocities at the hands of the spanish. Exactly when we get into what life is like in cuba. During that time a lot of it was influenced by the spanish colonial rule. In so back will at the as early life. After he was arrested in accused he was sentenced to force labor. He got actually pretty lucky. Because he was granted clemency and deported to spain. The reason i say he was lucky is because A lot of other folks during this time. Who got accused of something like this loyalty. They were sent to the firing squad. So this teenager rebel. Who doesn't like spain and gets accused of disloyalty to spain get sent to spain. And what does he end up doing while you know what they say. I can allow gondola threat. Dasa so he gets to spain and he continues with his bullshit he continues making writings against the spanish and he specifically writes political prison in cuba where he described his experiences in cuba and critiques spanish further handling of him as a prisoner and further handling of

Spain Cuba Monty Valencia Louisiana Dasa
Hector Rodriguez on What Inspired Him to Create El Peso Hero

Latino USA

02:12 min | 4 months ago

Hector Rodriguez on What Inspired Him to Create El Peso Hero

"I. Am the creator of the graphic novel lattes next series as best so hero hours raised in the border so specifically i was raised in eagle pass texas. Which is about two hours away from san antonio in the sister city of being that us negative. While we la norfolk mexico. The border is a whole different world. It's rage between cultures languages food and growing up. I had a huge appetite for mexican entertainment media. And so i used to watch a lot of lucia di team flask staticky of when the yolk when the letter mccain and my grandparents loved the golden age of mexican cinema. Aw and so. Those characters are greater than life. And i had that influence. My father was also huge geek himself with being raised by watching. You know the old scores star trek. And you know reading captain herkus upturn rock and so i had these two worlds and i was just fascinated with these greater than life characters by you know. The american characters never really spoke to me. You know i like. I like to get around you know. When was the last time you saw batman eat bananas. You know or superman eat bundled say a spider meeting poly no of of course it wasn't until By ninety late ninety one eighty two. We moved to middle of texas college station which to me was a huge culture shock going from a majority latino classroom bilingual classroom to a general ed monolingual classroom but really cool thing about college station that they actually had independent comic bookstores. And so my dad would take me and my siblings to pick up comic books.

La Norfolk Lucia Di San Antonio Mexico Texas Mccain Texas College Station
What Is the U.S. Doing to Help Cuba?

In The Thick

04:00 min | 5 months ago

What Is the U.S. Doing to Help Cuba?

"Get to it with our first topic. Which is actually about the historic protests in cuba where thousands of people took to the streets all across the country amid an economic crisis in food shortages exacerbated by the corona virus pandemic. In the last few days we've seen the government in cuba restrict internet access and block most social media sites. Although from what i read. Twitter is still like bobbin in cuba because the government uses twitter and also there were reports of over one hundred people who have been arrested or missing and that actually is. According to amnesty international and at least one person has died in clashes with police on wednesday. The president of cuba miguel diaz canal announce that they would lift restrictions to allow travelers to bring food and medicine into cuba from abroad. There is also an admission by him saying that his government could have done better with these protests that was interesting meanwhile back in the united states i feel like a comic book like meanwhile back at the white house on thursday president joe biden call. Cuba quote failed state and condemn their government's actions. We also know that the us has a role in this as there has been a decades old. I mean more than sixty years trade embargo by the united states against cuba which essentially prevents any business between the countries didn't back to nineteen sixty two k. So this has become an american tradition. Now the embargo just what it is. Yeah right you know what i'm saying. So but then the other thing is during the trump administration and this is what i find interesting. There were more sanctions put on cuba under trump and flight and remittances from family members in the us to cuba were even further restricted by the bynum ministrations. Pretty much has done. Nothing since biden has come into office. Nothing's really changed when it comes to cuba which you would think by now you know if we all remember obama he was like. Let's lift the embargo. You know what i mean. It was like you're in that administration. Joe right but according to the vitamin administration. They said that they are reviewing these policies but they've yet to reverse. Any of them are fabulous intern. Sarah her shandor spoke with an i guests. She has been on. Itt before seventy nine three goes who is a correspondent for political and somebody is of cuban-american descent and she has been reporting on cuba. This week and sabrina talked about the government's suppressive tactics like cutting internet access. And what cubans are hoping for so. Let's listen connecting for people has been a difficult. There's friends that. I haven't heard from in days that i know went out for the protests in there is that frustration anxiety about were. They beat in where they arrested. Are they missing an. It's hard to connect with people at this moment but a lot of people feel a level of frustration and desperation. That i had not heard before i mean. People have been tired of the dictatorship in cuba. But i will actually say from my perspective. Who was born and raised in cuba has been in exile in the united states for the majority of her life at this point. She's ninety one and she is optimistic. That change can happen. I mean her attitude about this is it can't stay this way forever and that these human rights can be violated forever. People can't be going hungry in dying on the streets from the pandemic without access to a hospital without access to medicine let it cannot continue that way indefinitely so that if it doesn't happen this time it has to happen at some point

Cuba Miguel Diaz Canal United States Twitter Vitamin Administration Shandor Joe Biden White House Biden ITT Sabrina JOE Barack Obama Sarah Government
How Will the Cuban Government React to the Protests?

Latino Rebels Radio

01:58 min | 5 months ago

How Will the Cuban Government React to the Protests?

"Big question for me is sort of. How do you describe the cuban government right now to the view. What kind of government is it. I mean you hear. Words like dictatorship in authoritarian and his government. I mean you hear repression you hear even these reports of people getting detained and you see right. You go on social media and it's an obviously there's a lot of politicization about this topic and you really. It's really hard to navigate through those waters. So what's the best way to describe like the dissatisfaction with the government of cuba as you know as best as you can from the cuban people perspective you know. Language is tricky and this is not to evade the question. But i think that language choices often obscure some of the complexity of the analysis that that's required and that's not to sidestep the authoritarian practices that we've seen in the past couple of days fantasize that the fact that the cuban government is a one party state that doesn't allow other political parties are organized political opposition in a legal way. But i think you know there is this kind of tendency to sort of refer in an abstract way to a regime. Or sometimes you know. Nc state the system of certainly on the part of cubans on the island and in the diaspora on the one hand. Those words make a lot of sense because they are in part a result of the projection of the cuban state itself as simply kind of monolithic entity that is the representation of the people in speaks for the people with one voice. But just like the cuban people are not made up of one political strain of thought. There is diversity in the cuban government. You know whether you like it or not or think it's sufficient or not and i would say it's insufficient right. There are actions of the cuban government that are more pro economic reform less forum. I mean there doesn't seem to be however any kind of fraction government right now when it comes to maintaining one-party rule right and certainly people on the street. Many of them are just demanding. That right simply put

Cuban Government Cuba
Representative Nydia Velázquez Is Fighting to Support WOC-Owned Businesses

Our Body Politic

02:00 min | 5 months ago

Representative Nydia Velázquez Is Fighting to Support WOC-Owned Businesses

"Go through a little information. That came out in a recent report. It was the small business trends alliance and it found that fewer small business owners of color felt supported by the government's covid relief plans and that even though a majority of small business owners of color voted for president biden. Forty five percent said they didn't belong to or didn't feel represented by any existing. Us political party now Women of color are more likely to be small business. Owners than white women are compared to white men. You're the chair of the house. small business committee. What are you doing to support. Women of color entrepreneurs. Well i have been working. Twelve grass issues of systematic inequities when it comes to fatal policies if there's anything that we saw throughout the pandemic was the fact that the most impacted those in underserved communities way men and minority businesses. Those who dating half free relationship with banks where left behind and under the biden administration will minutely move to change that so what we need to continue to do is to use every tool that we have within the federal government whether it's an infrastructure bill whether is enacting policies or legislation that will allow for the treasury department where we have. Cdfi's mda's those are institutions that are nation base lenders that are rooted in our communities to have an opportunity to work with the small business administration and look at ways where we kinda empower those mission based lenders to have an impact in women owned businesses especially women of colour.

Small Business Trends Alliance President Biden Small Business Committee Biden Administration Government Cdfi United States Federal Government Treasury Department MDA
Behind the Scenes of Havana Libre

teikirisi

01:58 min | 5 months ago

Behind the Scenes of Havana Libre

"Emily. Bray is a film that follows primarily to surfers in cuba. And you learn about what it takes to be a surfer in cuba and you also follow them as they try and take steps to legalize the sport in their country and the journey takes them ultimately all over the world. but most of what's important is right there in cuba even though the story is about cubans with a particular passion seeing aluminum for me. It was felt like an opportunity to see cuba after so many years of not being on the island of seeing people cubans going about their daily lives. I assume that you are not in any way shape or form. Latin american or cuban for that matter. So how did you end up landing on the story. How did you get to cuba. How did this happen gory. Speaking you are correct in your assumption that we are not latin american and when we began the film. We didn't speak any spanish at all. I'd always had a fascination with cuba. Just because it's such a mysterious place to people outside the island. So i had the opportunity to travel there quite briefly and in that time i met both of our main characters in the film franken and they sort of welcomed me in as a friend and started to explain to me what surfing was like there and it was really just kind of just like exchange of know things that made us excited and by the end of it left. Cuba was like this is incredible. I had no idea that this scene existed here. And you know you spend so much of your time looking at the cuba that is sort of stereotypical and said he gets some insight into something that you just don't know exists in a place that you know. So little about your. You're just a. I was instantly intrigued. That's i came back to the states. N i talked to steph. Who collaborated on the film with and we went down there as soon as we physically after

Cuba Bray Emily Franken Steph
How Chavela Vargas Broke Gender Stereotypes in Mexican Music

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:44 min | 5 months ago

How Chavela Vargas Broke Gender Stereotypes in Mexican Music

"Before she was chubby. La she was e- seville bosley sanel. She was born in costa rica on april seventeenth. Nineteen nineteen to francisco bargains and immediately saana. I was born singing chubby. Once proclaimed she sang to entertain herself during her lonely and painful childhood. See much lenny. Naroda the strange girl and her religious family and conservative community. She did not present herself like a prim and feminine young lady as is expected despite her upbringing china was a romantic and determined to chase her dreams leaving. Her conservative community became her obsession at the age of seventeen. Something called her to mexico when trump arrived she. I turned to singing on the streets and later saying taverns bars and cabarets chubby saying banchetta a traditional genre of mexican music that dates back to before the mexican revolution of nineteen. Ten branch showed us our festive songs. Usually sung from a man's perspective with mariachi band when women perform them they typically did so in heels and colorful bright dresses with ribbons chubby. Did none of these things instead she drank tequila wore toted a gun and sang like a man. She didn't even change the pronouns in the songs. I was the first woman who dared to sing to another woman she later said. Her performance caught people's attention. They wanted to know who this woman was who wore pants. Cha took other artistic liberties to she slowed down the tempo of these

Seville Bosley Sanel Costa Rica Lenny LA Francisco Donald Trump China Mexico CHA
How AOC Inspired Women to Get Involved in Politics

The Cut

01:02 min | 5 months ago

How AOC Inspired Women to Get Involved in Politics

"I've always had this sort of pipedream of running for office and while back. I wanted to see if that was actually possible for someone like me because for the longest time. It just didn't seem possible. Because i'm kind of a ridiculous person. It kind of seems like that career was people who had never done anything wrong or at least for people who could pay to make their mistakes. Go away but ever since two thousand eighteen. I've been thinking a little differently. How are you feeling. Can you put it into words. No put this i will. I will say that. Aoc did change a lot of things for me because up to before her. I did not ever think that my personality would vibe. Well for actually campaigning. But since eos see. Obviously i've changed a little bit. It's made me reconsider some things and now it's like i could actually do this

AOC
The Legacy and the Future of Pride Month

In The Thick

02:23 min | 5 months ago

The Legacy and the Future of Pride Month

"June twenty eighth nine thousand nine hundred sixty nine fifty two years ago. Police raided the stonewall in a gay bar and the uprising. That followed was led by trans activists. Marsha p johnson and sylvia rivera and it sparked a movement that has continued for decades marsha and sylvia like the trans vibe in lower manhattan at the time. It was real. They were taking up space at the stonewall inn and other places and that's why when the police raided they were like nana. You're not gonna quietest so. The first pride march in new york city was held on the one year anniversary of that uprising at stonewall similar marches went on in chicago san francisco los angeles but the history of that is rooted in resistance towards police violence over the last few years. It's like you know. Hey everybody is celebrating pride there you see. Cvs there you see comcast there you see. At and t. Putting out statements basically professing to be lgbtq allies but still giving money to politicians who are pushing anti lgbtq legislation and this is just three out of the twenty five companies that are actually pushing anti lgbtq federal state politicians. So as june comes to an end can do a little bit of a temperature. Check kinda how are you feeling at this moment in our. I'm wondering how are you thinking about this moment in going forward in two thousand twenty one post pandemic to put it singly. I think that aside from everything i think. That pride is as much about a recommitment to the unfinished business of nineteen. Sixty-nine as it is a celebration celebration has to be a part of any type of commemoration especially for people color. It's how we retain joy in the moments of difficulty but at the same time. I think that we have to recognize that. There's a lot of unfinished business. And specifically when it comes to the intersection of gender identity and race and economic opportunity all of those things that sylvia and marsha embodied in their life of the challenges in the hope that still remains very much on the table. And so i think that's what pride is every year and that's what i look to do with a recommitment

Marsha P Johnson Sylvia Rivera Stonewall Inn Marsha Sylvia Manhattan CVS New York City Comcast San Francisco Los Angeles Chicago
The Fight For Abortion Rights In The Dominican Republic

Latino USA

02:12 min | 5 months ago

The Fight For Abortion Rights In The Dominican Republic

"The dominican republic has one of the harshest anti-abortion laws in the americas. Abortion isn't allowed. Under any circumstances only five other countries in the continent have such harsh restrictions on ending a pregnancy legally. That's haiti on dudas. Nicaragua jamaica and el salvador today. I'm joined by amanda. She's a dominican journalist and our former digital media at her here at let the usa. She's gonna tell us more about what's happening in her home country where she's based right now and what's going on in the fight for women's reproductive rights on the island. Hey amanda welcome to let him. Usa alumnia thank you for having me today. So amanda you've been following the protests that have been happening in the dominican republic since march and that's when women's rights activist set up an encampment in the capital in santo. Domingo more recently there was a national march where a lot of people in the protests. Were chanting something pretty particular. They were saying less. Today's cows silas which can basically be translated into the three grounds or the three circumstances. So that's a less three scou- sally's i mean it's like it's it doesn't roll right off of your tongue. I'm trying to think of ever used the word. Gauss silas anywhere in my life in spanish. And i'm like. I don't think i've ever used that word. So kisses to the last three days. Cow sally's yes. So the silence. Which was a word that i've personally gotten very used to saying because i've been in the middle of these protests They're basically three circumstances under which women would be allowed to have an abortion and these are considered sort of the basic circumstances right. So it's when there has been a case of rape or incest when the fetus non non-viable and when the health of the woman is at risk

Amanda Dudas Dominican Republic USA El Salvador Americas Nicaragua Jamaica Haiti Gauss Silas Domingo Santo Cow Sally Silas Sally
Biden and Harris Pledge to Fight Voter Suppression Efforts in Latino Communities

In The Thick

01:56 min | 5 months ago

Biden and Harris Pledge to Fight Voter Suppression Efforts in Latino Communities

"Yesterday afternoon. That would be thursday afternoon. President biden and vice president. Kamla harris gave remarks at the thirty eighth annual nelio conference. So for those of you. Who don't know now. Leo is really important. It's standards for the national association of latino elected and appointed officials and again it's a very important organization within latinos and latinas and people who are engaged politically. Okay yes yes so a. And it's an important conference and this is the first time that a sitting president and a vice president have spoken at the conference which is incredible. And so you end browsing if you think about say like why okay. Twenty twenty one okay. So biden harris both talked about protecting voting rights. Thank you about providing a pathway for citizenship for dreamers thank you also for tps holders temporary protective status holders and for farm workers. They spoke about supporting latino latina families and businesses. This is what president biden to say. I spoke to last year. I said that we have an opportunity to close the gap. The dignity gap the wage gap opportunity gap. That have hurt. Latino workers from much too long. That's why we put equity at the core of everything we do in my administration. The work of art ministration isn't just about recognition or representation. It's about deliver results and as public servants. That your job as well together. We're not just building back. We're building back better with an economy where we deal everyone in this time. So the speeches came day before harris and the department of homeland security secretary alejandra. Your guys went to a bustle To visit the. Us mexico border. We know that the vice president has come under some criticism for not having made the trip to the border yet especially since earlier this month she went to what the marla into mexico to address the quote root causes of migration.

President Biden Kamla Harris National Association Of Latino Biden Harris LEO Alejandra Department Of Homeland Securit Harris Mexico United States
You Want To Talk About Hot Cheetos?

Latino USA

02:02 min | 5 months ago

You Want To Talk About Hot Cheetos?

"For over forty years. Richard thing is had a successful career as a motivational speaker. I realized that as much as i wanted to fit in. I was never credit fitted. I was granted to stand out. That's why a lotta young people your whole life. You felt like. I don't feed in because you're not supposed to is supposed to stand out as vice president of multicultural sales and community promotions. At pepsico. he'd been called the godfather of hispanic brandon and was considered one of the most influential latinos in corporate america. His rags to riches story was truly the stuff of legends. He's one of ten children or into mexican field workers in wa steve. A town in southwestern california were italian and mexican immigrants ones all shared the same ocupation. Picking grapes richard began working as a janitor at frito lay in nineteen seventy six when he was just eighteen years old eventually. He climbed the ranks to being a top executive at the fortune. Five hundred company. He says his happened after he presented an idea to his superiors. It was pitched that he says would later be turned into the trademark flaming. Hot cheetos line. This spicy injured. Red snacks are today. One of frito lay's top celine flavors fairness. What if. I put chili on cheeto. So i went to work. You know i'm actually made up my own seasoning and all that and put it on a on season cheeto. My wife took some to work. I took some to work. Everybody fell in love with it. All of this was an american dream like story that most people knew and loved up until very recently in may of this year the times published a story under the headline the man who didn't invent flaming hot cheetos. In a five thousand plus word investigation. Business reporter sam. Dean revealed severe inconsistencies. In the timeline of richard. Storytelling

Frito Pepsico Richard Brandon Steve America California SAM Dean
Fichas: Cuban Dominoes

teikirisi

02:06 min | 5 months ago

Fichas: Cuban Dominoes

"Is doug game that cubans play. It's a must have for keeping party. You can throw cuban party without the ability to accommodate a good domino game. Domino's is a game where you have fifty five tiles. There's also a twenty eight but most cubans play fifty five and the tiles all have dots on them. And you're supposed to match the number of dots on a table. Domino pieces are they are so satisfying to touch our in leon. Domino up baby. Oh yeah i think. Once upon a time they used to be made out of ivory or pearl or marble. Now there may not have resins and plastics. But they still look the same. They're typically like an ivory color. Sometimes they'll have a design on the back. I guess. I don't know which is the in. Which is the back. Let's call the front side. That has the pontypool's like the little. Usually these dots are in dented. That is because you are constantly rubbing that side of the domino up against the surface of a table. And you don't want that to get scratched up rubbed off we fun fact have some stickers and some of them are dominoes and the long-term vision is eventually have the entire fifty five piece set so that you guys can play community domino's on a wall or someplace public near you but anyway shameless plug for patron. Please join to be honest with you. I can't imagine playing dominoes with anything. That's too fancy. Because every time i pay domino's like i'm ready to slam some pieces on the table. Okay not me. But i feel like that is how you play dominos. That is how you play dominos. And you have fun with it. You're like really interacting with these pieces. You're not just like gently putting them down. Sometimes it balances that is one way to play. You can be someone who places it ever so gently you can be someone who's screaming every single time they make a move and you can be that person who hasn't spoken once since the game started domino mental move that means domino was invented by a mute. And that's something that you get told. And i was like a ghost scolds when. You're just being too vocal about what's

Cuban Party Domino Doug Leon
Breaking Through Your Own Glass Ceiling with Linda Gonzalez

Cafe con Pam Podcast

02:16 min | 5 months ago

Breaking Through Your Own Glass Ceiling with Linda Gonzalez

"Linda. Welcome back to government bam thank you. It's great to be back. Yes so there's a new book that's been birth dead. We'll talk about that. And i love the topic because i think it's something that's often overlooked for people of color because the message of lake make it happen put the mindset make the vision board yes listener. She's rolling her eyes. As i'm saying no so those are all important. They're not bad. And there's the and behind it. That's right your coach. Amoco we believe mindset is important and there's also the own internalised ceilings that happen with people of color because of the system the system was not built for us not ultra. How did this come about their coach for many many years. And as i say in the book my clients never come to me and say leaned. I wanna break through my own glass ceiling. They say. I want to reach these goals. Or i have really been working on these goals. And i keep hitting up against things. They always somehow think it's something that they haven't done Right so one. Of the most important messages i began to have to give my clients is. It's not your fault. it's not that you're not trying hard enough. There are so many message we got especially as people of color by pack as immigrants or children of immigrants that we just have to try really hard. We have to get a good formal education and we have to reach at least middle class status. And that somehow poof. Like magic there's no oppression there's no klutzy lane and yet and still we look at only s. I mean there is almost like two cents difference in what women earned two men in like the last forty years. Right we're still fighting for our civil rights. people are still fighting for. Civil rights are being. Caged are being deported are being killed. I mean it's like are you watching the same world. I am

Amoco Linda
In The Heights and Colorism

In The Thick

02:17 min | 5 months ago

In The Heights and Colorism

"We're gonna talk about colors in latino and latina communities and yes. It's a conversation that was brought to the forefront last week after the release of the film in the heights. It's a movie. Adaptation of the broadway musical of the same name written by yada allegria hueys of politic prize winning playwright and the playwright enactor. Linneman will meet under so in the heights takes place well in washington heights were actually of course alexis joining us from it's predominantly dominican neighborhood. It's predominantly afro latino neighborhood but you know. I actually spent three years in washing deep from one thousand nine hundred eighty three to nineteen eighty six eighty seven. Those were interesting times most. Definitely i mean. I was on one seven one in fort washington and it was very dominican. Mind roommate was dominican but he was also. I was like i mean. Our parties were massive. Highway wait are parties were massive. Oh yeah i was hanging out with like letty. No phd's academics from columbia from city college and refugees and activists so people from inside by from nicaragua from cheer from tina from coup. All of these people were living in washington heights at the time. What i'm saying is that it's a community. What was incredibly vibrant and yes diverse in the sense that lengthy knows were staking their claim. They're predominantly dominicans better. They must felt safe living in that community. It was a latino community predominantly right right and we know even beyond washington heights. The afro latino population in this country is actually pretty significant. According to the pew research center in twenty sixteen when this came out approximately twenty five percent of all. Us latinos identifies afro latino afro-caribbean or of african descent with roots and latin america. So if you think about twenty five percent of sixty million people that's a pretty significant population and in another pew study from two thousand and nineteen five percent of all black. Americans identified as for latino which was a figure that doubled since two thousand

Yada Allegria Linneman Washington Heights Fort Washington Alexis Letty Nicaragua Tina Columbia Washington Pew Research Center Caribbean Latin America United States
Why Is Joblessness Higher Among Black and Hispanic Workers?

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:15 min | 5 months ago

Why Is Joblessness Higher Among Black and Hispanic Workers?

"Yes. Voting rights is on the agenda today in the senate a try by that body to begin to bid on what congressional democrats say is their biggest priority. But we direct your attention on this tuesday to the other side of the rotunda and a hearing by the house select subcommittee on the coronavirus crisis guest of honor. One home powell there was the usual potpourri of congressional questions for the fed chair and his usual catalogue of answers in his remarks though. True paul did take pains to point out that the worst of the corona recession has fallen mostly on black and hispanic americans noting specifically how their unemployment rate is still disproportionately high marketplace's. Nancy marshall. Genzer gets us going with a look into that. The overall unemployment rate for may was five point. Eight percent the rate for hispanic workers was more than a percentage point above that for black workers more than three percentage points higher. And so it's like well. Why is that. Kristen brody's economist at the brookings institution. I think much of it is is structural racism When you think about who was able to get vaccinated i it was people that had broadband who probably head jobs. Brody says. people of color may have less access to training and education or employers discriminate against job applicants because of their race. Rebecca given who teaches labor studies at rutgers. University says it's also the ability to live in a place with good transportation quality housing access to affordable childcare if you don't have housing transportation or childcare. It's hard to work. Also given says black and hispanic workers are more likely to have low paid service positions and some of those jobs were automated during the pandemic tulane university economist. Gary hoover says we won't see those jobs again remember There was a time when we had elevator. Operators that's a job. Once it left it never came back and never will who says it could take more than four years for the unemployment rate for black and hispanic workers to get back to where it was before the pandemic which even then was higher than the overall jobless

House Select Subcommittee Nancy Marshall Genzer Kristen Brody Powell Senate Brookings Institution FED Paul Brody Rutgers Gary Hoover Rebecca Tulane University
How I Made It: Fluxus Foto

Latino USA

01:52 min | 5 months ago

How I Made It: Fluxus Foto

"Today for a how i made it. Series fluke sues photo a group of ecuador photo journalists telling their own stories in october two thousand nineteen ecuador went through a violent large scale. Uprising demonstrations paralyzed the country for twelve days straight. After former president lenin moreno cut decades old fuel. Subsidies and implemented tax labor reforms indigenous communities were hit especially hard by the changes. Tens of thousands marched from the andes mountains into ecuador's capital city hito to protest the motive demos at keep barrett defended lose their ages. Calicut meant that. The of competitors indiana's alachua protesters declared. They were defending their rights. As indigenous people from ecuador for decades indigenous communities have demanded the government support to protect their land from exploitation by domestic oil companies and to be included in national political dialogues during the twenty nineteen demonstrations ghetto streets were covered in debris and government buildings burned. Police threw molotov cocktails and tear gas at protesters who lobbed them right back amid the turmoil. One photograph from the ground became instantly iconic in it. A woman from the andes dressed in a traditional garment and face mask stands in the middle of a street with her back towards a cloud of smoke. People stand behind her wearing face masks to prevent breathing in the gases.

Ecuador Lenin Moreno Andes Mountains Alachua Barrett Indiana
Environmental Racism is Real

Tamarindo

02:27 min | 6 months ago

Environmental Racism is Real

"Are going to talk about environmental justice and along with that environmental racism and which describes the fact that people of color and low income people are most likely to be situated in your sources of contamination and away from clean water air and soil so research by the la times finds that in the us. The best predictor of whether you live near hazardous waste site is the color of your skin. That is wild but not surprising right. This is america so now from not far from where i live here in the very latin next community vernon here in los angeles families have been waiting for over three years to have lead contamination. Cleaned out of their community. Contamination came from the exile plant which melted down. Used lead acid car batteries. You don't want that in your backyard. But that's what these families had in their backyard which state regulators had allowed to operate on a temporary permit for more than three decades so state regulators like thirty. But you keep doing it. And then they kept letting them do it for over thirty years. It's crazy right. And what can i tell you. More about this. Despite history of air pollution and hazardous waste violations. They were still continued to operate ex. Able to operate it. California health department analysis found that nearly three hundred children under six years old living near exide have elevated blood lead levels in two thousand twelve. We've known this for a while. The last year the plant was in full operation in twenty twenty. A court allowed exide to walk away from its clean up responsibilities leaving us the taxpayers with the bill to clean this up and i wanted to echo this example or highlight these example because a heard of exits. Its own backyard but too because you see the failures of the government time and time again in airing on the side of corporations and this is an example of environmental racism at play and unfortunately as a nation points out this is. There's nothing you this has been happening for decades and decades and a few insights here about specifically about the us fifty six percent of the population. You're toxic waste. Sites are people of color. People of color have thirty eight percent higher nitrogen dioxide exposure compared to white people. There are two times more likely to live without potable water and modern sanitation and ninety five percent of people of color that have claims against polluters denied by The environmental protection

California Health Department La Times United States Vernon Los Angeles
Lin-Manuel Miranda Apologizes for Lack of Afro-Latinx Actors in 'In the Heights'

News O'Clock

01:11 min | 6 months ago

Lin-Manuel Miranda Apologizes for Lack of Afro-Latinx Actors in 'In the Heights'

"Heights creator. Lin manuel miranda has apologized for the lack of dark skinned afro latino actors featured in the film the movie was initially celebrated for putting latino stories the forefront and giving afro latino culture a rare spotlight in hollywood but after the film premiered in theaters. And on hbo max. Many people took issue with the lack of dark skin actors in leading roles director. John defended the movie noting. How many of the backup dancers were effort. However on monday miranda posted a response to the backlash on twitter quote. I hear that without sufficient. Dark skin afro latino representation. The work feels extractive of the community. We wanted so much to represent with pride and joy. He apologized adding. I'm learning from the feedback. And i thank you for raising it and i'm listening. Okay so again. I mean i feel like after you apologize. Like what else can you do. The movie has been made but it does feel like. I don't know. I kind of expected more from him. No no i totally get what you're saying it's like yes. He was like leading this charge. So it's like it is on him. And then you know on the other hand it really is on casting and producers as well you know it takes this whole machine to really make it work and obviously a ball was

Lin Manuel Miranda HBO Hollywood Miranda John Twitter
How NASA engineer Diana Trujillo's Pursuit of a New Life Led Her to Space

Latina to Latina

01:55 min | 6 months ago

How NASA engineer Diana Trujillo's Pursuit of a New Life Led Her to Space

"For diana through a life in a different place in just bring her to the united states. it brought her to space. Diana is an aerospace engineer. She works at nasa where she's one of flight directors for nasa's perseverance rover which is looking for signs of past life on mars. Her journey to get here is remarkable. It was fueled by some really powerful women and her deep conviction. That latina's need to be in the room. When we learn that there is life on this planet. I want to start with the women in your family because it seems to me that the entire trajectory of your life is informed by your mom and by the women who raised you. So would you start by telling me about them. My mom my grandma. My great grandma any general. My grandma's sisters my cousins. This was a group of women that will get together on my grandma's house which was a block away from my house and we will always have you know it got his seat. Though in the kitchen they will talk about their marriage life but was going on with her husband what was going on with their kids and it was funny because all of them were older women and i think that the only kid was me and sometimes my mom's cousin but jimmy. Their home wasn't like first second thirty. I was like mighty s watching them. Talk to each other about the dig. Said they wanted in their lives that they wanted to keep for their own personal development but at the same time how hard it was for them to make that trade with their significant others. So i think that hearing all of that but at the same time hearing them try to find a way to get what they wanted made me think two things one of them was. Why are you not choosing the thing that you wanna do. Why are you not going for that thing. I hear you say one. But i wanted but i can

Nasa Diana United States Jimmy
What is a "Cholo"

Latino USA

02:48 min | 6 months ago

What is a "Cholo"

"You may remember this early. Two thousands hit song. Lean like a chill low by down aka or watch movies about trouble culture like blood and blood out three bottles dot goes full of garnell or american me to state is so lame paid for the game but you know where the we're solo really comes from and did you know that a solo and south america is not the same chiloe from the united states. I only recently learned that. There were charles in south america during a conversation with my partner who is peruvian american so i feel like proving really proud right and it's like even if you're a channel like at least for me and my failure. What do you mean like a lake. My dad was always like listening to wine. No or like speaking wa. Which i literally didn't but like gangster. No he wasn't a kinks turkey like Like barry indigenous were that poncho and like wanting a toll and indigenous people in peru johnson indigenous person for you yet. This was the first time i ever heard the word used to describe someone in a way that didn't mean hood or gangster immediately wanted to know if the from southern california and if the from south america had the same meaning and if so how did they come to mean such vastly different things. Where did the word originate. Who was first of california or the role of the andes in my search for answers a researcher. Dr couching rodriguez a professor in colonial literature. At the city university of new york its origins are uncertain. Some scholars of belief that it comes from the now our show logged. Which was the word for dog. Now it is a language of the. Sx bob one of the earliest mentioned of the word appears in common darius realities royal commentaries by the peruvian mystique so Inc other see lasso. La vega dot work day back to sixteen owned nine. He indicates their dad d. Word means dog and it was used in a figurative eurodif way by the spaniards to refer to this individuals of makes origins african and indian. But now he's apply differently is applied to almost any one that could be off mix

South America Peru Johnson Dr Couching Rodriguez Poncho Charles United States Southern California City University Of New York Peruvian Mystique So Inc California
Flamin' Hot with Richard Montaez

Cafe con Pam Podcast

02:34 min | 6 months ago

Flamin' Hot with Richard Montaez

"Though we have this gomez like behold ball and like. Put your head down to get to work. I think and you share it in the book. When the ceo said think like an owner richard back then was like okay. He asked us to like an owner. And then you started developing distinct and you got the courage to make that phone call roy. So we'll explore that later. Let's take it back a second. Who is literature. What's his heritage mexican. And i was. I was born here. My dad com from a water s. And he moved out paso from el paso. He went to new mexico and from new mexico. He went to southern california where he met my mom. And that's where it all started. But i was born in in what was called a farm. Count everybody in the area that was born. Take greater wass to california's probably about two thousand people. You know what the pretty cool about the history. There's people don't know this. The area that i was born in the ontario airport guadalete california rancho cucamonga. All that was acting the biggest wine producing area in the country. It was bigger than napa valley. That's where i was born in a one room apartment. I was gonna say my birth certificate doesn't have an address. It has a house number cost number eighteen. 'cause you know the gwozdecky. I never met him of course but know he from what i was told you know my grandfather stories of him was he was a good a good man you know. He built the housing for the latino. He built the school he built a grocery store. He built a church. He came from italy so everything was replicated of his hometown which was pretty cool You know my grandpa and my dad really grew up with a challenge. I got a little bit because we got out of there. Like eight years old or something. But you know i'd go back and visit but it was know a wonderful place to for me as a child. You know there was. There was no bathrooms inside. The one room. Bathrooms were outside. You know it was like a college or a school showers and all that and then there was no kitchens. The kitchen again were across the hallway. They were community kitchen. It was big stoves like a restaurant so every morning i had lunch or dinner with ten fifteen different families and you know i learned community because as mama grandma was cooking if you ran out of something the lady next to you would pass it on and she needed something you you pass it on. So i i saw community for san the other thing too that i wanted to say to is a. I'm not an immigrant. But because of being latino in the sixties i was treated as an

New Mexico Ontario Airport Guadalete Cali Gwozdecky Gomez California El Paso Paso ROY Richard Napa Valley Italy SAN