Judaism

Listen to the latest audio content relevant to the Jewish community. This playlist features Jewish individuals having great conversations on relevant topics through a cultural lens. Grow your faith with cultural reflection, history and current events. Sourced from premium podcasts.

The Blood Libel Accusation with Magda Teter

Jewish History Matters

09:53 min | Last week

The Blood Libel Accusation with Magda Teter

"I'm jason leg. And i'm joined today by magden tater to talk about the history of the blood libel accusation and its continued relevance listen in for a wide ranging conversation about the history of the blood libel its origin in mediaeval europe and how it has transformed over the centuries and what it tells us about misinformation and how it spreads magdi. Tater is professor of history and the fiddler chair of judaic studies at fordham university. She's the author of numerous books. Most recently blood libel on the trail of an antisemitic. Myth which will talk about today. The blood libel is one of the long-standing false accusations against the jews. It is the myth in different variations and incarnations the jews murdered christian children and used their blood for various rituals. And it's obviously patently false but somehow people still believe it. And it has persisted. Across nearly a thousand years from medieval england to nazi anti semitism and beyond we can see the ways in which the imagery of the blood libel and it's false narrative persists even in new reconfigured forms like the conspiracy theories of cunanan as mark the these accusations across the centuries and different places and in different times became a vehicle for different anxieties about jews and about people's lives at large. And so we can see the blood libel in a certain way as a mirror of the fears that people had not just about jews but about all sorts of issues nevertheless the blood libel is not just a relic of medieval superstition. Or something like that. It's something which has changed with the times and which in many ways has piggybacked off of new technologies and new developments and this is one of magdi key arguments which is that. It's the printing press that enabled the proliferation and persistence of these false myths and disinformation which when published allowed them both to spread more widely. And also give these false accusations in air of quote unquote respectability because the existed in print in the first place and so this allows us to think deeply about the role of media technologies both image evil and early modern europe and also more recently with things like the radio. The newspaper even the internet as avenues. Not for the spread of information but rather of information. Thank you so much for listening in to this conversation. I hope that you'll check out. Magas book blood libel and also the accompanying web site the blood libel trail dot org where you can learn more about the book and also check out some really fascinating maps and other media about the anti semitic myth of the blood libel. Thanks again for listening. Hi magda welcome to the podcast. Hi jason thank you for having me. This is such an interesting topic. It's i think unfortunately very relevant to talk about bible accusations. Yes unfortunately i'm a scholar of premodern history and we always want to be relevant. But as i always said be careful what you wish for. Suddenly my book became quite rather than to although when i started. It was an academic exercise. Yeah i mean. I think that we are going to get to the question of the ways in which the historical blood libel accusation is still very relevant today but before we do that i think it might be useful for us to think kind of really brawley. What actually is the blood libel accusation manafort putting it into the context of thinking about how this is similar or different to other kinds of accusations that we see throughout history thinking about for instance the accusation of decide the accusation that jews had murder jesus and then also things like the accusation of the desecration of the host the totally kind of bizarre accusation. That jews would steal the the wafers from the church. You're right blood. Libel is one of a series of accusations against jews that emerged in the middle ages. And it's one that has relevance today decide was a theological belief and obviously accusation but became embedded as a believe and maybe then projected onto jews causing violence especially during easter. But it was so to speak a victimless crime. Every year whereas a number of other accusations emerged in the middle ages justice christianity catholicism where also solidifying certain and defining certain types of buildings and then there were also libels that emerged in moments of crisis such as epidemic. So poisoning of wells for instance. So blood libels one of the three medieval accusations. The so-called ritual merger. Acquisition are. Although i prefer to call it murder liable. But it's an accusation that emerged in twelfth century that claim that jews killed christian children to reenact the passion of jesus so that connects to the this site as it projection onto contemporary jews and reenactment that emerged in england and then in the thirteenth century it emerged in a new way on the european continent. And that's when it became blood. Libel that shoes killed christian children to obtain their blood. Although the very first accusation claimed of perhaps some other kind of form of cannibalism of eating a heart or something like that they reason why blood became so central is that this was the moment when the catholic church in the thirteenth century has affirmed the dogma of trans substantiation that is the communion wafer that was consecrated by a priest during mass turned into the actual body and blood of christ therefore blood becomes central motif in christian worship. So this is a moment where we have this both the transformation of the murder liable into blood libel of killing but the purpose of blood but also the emergence of not their occupation that you mentioned day host the secretion accusation that jews obtain steel by the consecrated wafer and then tried to stab it to obtain the blood of christ and both are connected in the sense that the blood becomes a even because jews cannot make their own consecrated way for they needed this blood of the innocent christian to be added to mater effectively making it into both the body and the blood of christ night but a accusation that jews stole the consecrated wafer then desecrated and blood flowed dot accusation kind of waned and disappeared after the reformation the blood libel and the murder liable kind of continued the life of their own. The reason for is is that they are related to deaths of children and to some perhaps victims perhaps accidentally killed drown children so it becomes a very intimate actually charge because it involves a death. Having a way for stabbed doesn't sound as unless you really believe what this way for means but accusing someone of a child. That may be found dead on sometimes. It wasn't even body that may have been somebody's child that becomes a very kind of an intimate accusation and very embodied accusation even that transformation from the murder libel that is of reenactment of the passion of christ which emerges at the moment when christians are beginning to liturgically focus on the passion of christ. So you think about jews and reenactment and all that stuff but the transformation to the blood libel shows you that this begins to be a very malleable accusation that can change depending on needs and the needs to came that connection between the new liturgy and the new theology of the blood and body of christ in the thirteenth century

Jason Leg Magden Tater Cunanan Medieval England Fordham University Tater Manafort Europe Magda Brawley Jason England
The Cairo Genizah with Marina Rustow

Jewish History Matters

06:42 min | 3 weeks ago

The Cairo Genizah with Marina Rustow

"The cairo. Anita is repository of such immense historical value. That sometimes it's easy to just assume the ways that it's important and i'm so excited to really dig in deep with marina on these important issues and think through all the different ways in which the denisa is an important historical record an important social phenomenon and an important lens through which we can understand medieval jewish has as well as the broader context in which jews as well as their neighbors lived. Thanks for listening in high marina. Welcome to the podcast here. Thank you so much for joining us. I really had such a blast reading your book and it's wonderful to be able to talk about it and to think about the really broadly. I want to think about your starting point from the book. The book is called the lost archive. And it's interesting that you are calling the cairo an archive in part because we have this great twentieth century can use a scholar. Some of gorton. Who talked about the guineas in very different terms in the introduction to his book the mediterranean society. He specifically calls the guineas a kind of an anti archive. I was wondering if you can talk a bit about the way in which you see the news as a kind of a lost archive. And what this means to you. When we think about the way that we approach vanessa and the kinds of questions that we can ask about it and what we can learn from it so i called the book the lost ark on that. Actually the claim that i'm making isn't that they can use it self archive but rather that. It contains traces of other archives. Go was right that they use is not an archive because an archive is arranged and maintained for the purposes. Not just storage. But also a retrieval so things have to be index. They have to be organized. They have to be ordered and they have to prunes for all. Those reasons are kaiser kind of different animal whereas they can isa people were just throwing stuff has early with absolutely no expectation that things would be accessible again in that sense. It was an anti our pod. But gordon says the guineas our guy because it was basically trashy what we would call a recycling bin or something like that but the inisia- is one place where we can find evidence to reconstruct the archiving practices of estate. That didn't it's preserve archive. The fontham calif it so in other words like it'd be so great if we could just walk into a building and i don't know cairo for instance and you know see the whole art of the fontham if it laid out there like i. You have a fiscal documents and then you have the administrative documents and are arranged according to date and place. This is how we kind of expect to work what you have in. The asia is a bunch of documents that may once have been thought archives but eventually were dumped and pruned from them because if things are are preserved for the purposes of retrieval then. Something's eventually have to be pruned. Otherwise you just end up with an infinite archives in kind of bored. Acn way and the other is documents that were never intended for the archive those two types of state document against each other. You can kind of triangulate what the loss ultimate archive looked like. So that's the lost ark. That i'm referring to in the title. Yeah it's this question of how we reconstruct the past in the absence of sources or in the absence of an official repository An official repository is both really good. Because it means that you have a lot of material that you can work with an official repository also means that there may be things that don't make it in there on purpose or the get removed and so i think that part of what you're doing here is using the news as a way to think through how we can approach history really different ways. That's right this is kind of in keeping with a move that some people in my field medieval middle east history have moved towards the last decade. Which is from static. Archives to archiving practices the study. we're cutting practices. And i think there's a much much broader movement towards this which is like you have a history of the book on the one. Hand the history of archives on the other which you know. Well that's your field that when you have a sense of how texts were produced and why they were producing the material forms in which they were produced in an survived again physically. How do they survive. You can actually use them as historical source material in a much more responsible way so i think part of what historians had come to do over the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is in a sense to get kind of lazy which is to say that we re defied archives as a kind of ready made repository store source material as opposed to understanding that the archives an accumulation of different processes obviously not all historians. Did this. but you know. I think my expectation was very much like you know. I would love to be able to walk into a building and start looking through files and then thinking retroactively about what here isn't here whereas going from the other end which is taking all the discarded material and trying to figure out what an archive would have looked like had it survived is a different story or with is in a different way. There's the archive as it was kept in the period in question and there the curatorial conventions and standards and assumptions criteria are interesting to think about it also often quite transparent and then there's the archive as it's kind of evolved over the centuries. Let's say like. I'm an eleven twelve century historian so as it evolved in a an eight hundred subsequent years. I mean if you think about about it all right. This is a place that has some of the oldest continuously operating libraries that we know of but of course the the archival material that they have in these libraries has been organized reorganized. You know dozens of times since the fourth century or or and that means that we have to start asking different questions and the afterlife archives. From how the archives were actually produced and arranged in the time period that were studying.

Cairo Mediterranean Society Gorton Anita Marina Vanessa Gordon Asia Middle East
The Sexual Fantasies Episode

The Joy of Text

09:36 min | Last week

The Sexual Fantasies Episode

"In twenty fifteen sadly before my time But we as you like ten okay but basically we just wanted to take a fresh look. At the topic and address it again kind of looking at some facets that weren't really addressed in our first episode and just kind of continuing the conversation about what i think is just a really central topic right so i. I felt strongly about doing this. Because i feel like fantasies are really central to people lives especially on long-term sex lives. I feel like this comes up so often. They concern about fantasizing all for my religious patience and may not religious patients most couples who have been having sex for more than. Let's say two years or three years ago to hit this one way or the other either because they should be fantasizing. 'cause it makes sex more interesting and it allows their sex life to take all kinds of different directions. Also i feel like people have so much trouble with this so from novel. Just i get this idea like. Oh my god i feel guilty that somehow thinking about somebody besides my spouse and from my religious patients i hear oh my god is a major issues with the fact that i'm thinking about my spouse so i can start talking about the fact. Why don't think it's a problem from a moral and ethical perspective. But say something from the you know helen piece. I don't sure So there's a passage in the talmud in dr that says that the man is not allowed to drink from one cup while placing his eye while looking at another cup and obviously it means not allowed to have sex with his wife. while thinking about another woman You don't like the metaphor here from context context says both of them are his wives. So there you go. It's clear almost august. it's basically explicit. So that seems to say exactly that this type of scenario is a problem. But here's the big but it seems that if you actually look at it more closely and you look at what the commentators say I don't think that it relates to the type of fantasy that you're talking about. There's good evidence that at least for many commentators in means that a person is not supposed to be using their wife as standing for the woman they really wanna be having sex with. And i think you see that already. A little bit in the language of etain enough should not be placing his eye which really means like focusing on desiring. Different woman does not just mean sort of fantasizing but maybe helpful. So i i can quote some sources that make that point but maybe it'd be helpful by kevin for you to address that reality like why is it not cheating on your husband or on your wife to be thinking of someone else so i know i've probably made this point in other episodes but i think the most important thing for people to realize is that when you're thinking about somebody else you're thinking about a fictional person even if you're thinking about a real person it's a fictional person because that may be a real person that you have seen on television or have seen at you know you're at a workplace meeting or something so they're real a certain level but the fans you have about having sex with them does not include the fact that you come home every day to them. They don't do the dishes when they say they're going to do the dishes. They don't pick up their socks that they're dropping on the floor right. You have taken this element of this person. And you've distilled it down to the pieces of the person and the elements of the person that turn you on or that will turn you on and that is why. It's not really a real person that you're having sex with it's a fantasy of even if it is. That's why i laugh a little bit when somebody's like if i have a fantasy about a fictional character. Everybody you're having a fantasy about is a fictional character. Even if it's somebody that you kind of know socially again you have just turned them into this fantasy character for you to have sex with them. That's number one number. Two is also for sure before you are making the decision to have sex with this person who is in the room with you and so if you have a fantasy character in her head. It's because you're using that person you're using that person in order to have sex with this person right so who's getting used right. It's a fantasy character not the person you're actually having sex with at the moment and i think that becomes really really important lesson for people. I had this one patient once not that long ago. Who was just so good because it was so distilled where she. She started crying when we start talking about. I asked her if she thought about other people and she was having sex and she said she does but she feels terribly guilty about it. And i said well. Why do you feel guilty bench. Then i think my husband must also be thinking about other women and that makes me feel terrible. And i was like okay. It makes me feel terrible because you think you should only be thing beg you and you should be the only thing that ever turns him on and so she sort of nodding through her tears. I knew she had this. You know grown up daughter. I said your daughter. She's in a relationship. Now do you want for the rest of her life to only be thinking about one man and she sort of looked at me and she started laughing she was like not really and i said and her boyfriend you want if she gets married. You want her husband's only be thinking about her for the rest of his life. You should only be thinking about her as the only that turns him on. Is this young woman. And she's well. Oh my god. I think you'd be a sociopath. If that was the case and i was like yeah you think so. It was so much easier for her to see this with her daughter and her daughter's boyfriend we had these kind of crazy romanticised views. That as soon as you sort of put them under a microscope do not make any sense at all. So i think we like our little kind at ourselves and say like this is really unrealistic. Your erotic brain likes new things. It doesn't like repetition. Repetition is not erotic right road. Familiar tents erotic. So how do you bring the new win to your relationship and you wanna have a good sexual relation with this person for you. Know thirty years forty years of best and easiest way to do that is to use fantasy so like a big fantasies and i i really feel like people need to like lighten up on themselves a little bit now. I will say my only caveat if there is somebody that you know and you keep fantasizing about the same person again and again and again and you're not feeling good about your relationship that's already a different story and that's a problem but that's not what we're talking about. We're talking about most people who are thinking about a movie star or like an idea of somebody you know or a a baseball player. Whatever teacher so what if somebody you know. See someone at work. It's really turned on and come some. Let's say a man comes home and has sex with his wife and doesn't like once keep his eyes closed while he's having sex with his wife so he doesn't he could be thinking of this person and not his wife. He's still choosing to have sex with his white he's married and this other woman is married to like. Sometimes we're not making that choice. Actively those are the circumstances where stuck in our. Let's a funny way to put something like okay. Some saint you. If there's a problem in your relationship this seems like an ongoing problem has to be addressed. But let's let me refrain that like he sees this woman he gets really dot and he uses that in order to have great sex with his wife. That's amazing like what difference does it make. If he's you know if the vision he hasn't his is you know twenty minutes. Twenty seconds before orgasm is sort of blurring between this woman and his wife. It's great now. Those pleasurable feelings have now connected with his wife right if he's constantly fantasizing about this woman and he's having issues with stock which is what you said. This is where stuck with. is that language. Like i feel like that's where the change us abc and stop saying this is what you're stuck with. This is what you're you're using it roddick energy that you pick up from other parts of your life and you're bringing back into your marriage and i think that's much more sort of positive way to look at it. Is sarah looking horrified. I law. i'm. I'm just wondering if we brought in the conversation a little bit because right now it sounds like both of you are talking just about fantasizing about another person or like imagine character or whatever. I'm also wondering your thoughts about just fantasizing in general like maybe fantasizing like during the workday about having a new type of sex with your spouse or you know just kind of like having fantasies about sex like no not while you're having sex so i'm amazed that because why would that be a problem like in other words i feel like the only thing comes up in my mind is problem is the one fantasies are great every fantasy. All the time is great. The only one that people seem to have a lot of problems with our when involves thinking about some of the other than your partner. I don't know though. I mean i feel like there's during the course any kind of sex no but during the day if some of these getting turned on by somebody you know people probably feel guilty through right. I'm well also. I mean this might be coming from my own misinformation. But isn't there an idea of like here. Haram kind of just like negative idea of like fantasizing about sex maybe wall you're learning or like or maybe just in general a we're not supposed to being thoughts are looking for is in our hearts. The laughter here who right so the ramoche divided into two categories. One is to have really plan to do a sin like to plan to commit adultery like a very intentional. So that's put that aside the other one. Is you know men having sexual thoughts which can lead to seminal emission know to masturbation or actually sitting in a worse way. I was once teaching this text out. The problem about here haram in a married man. Whatever ran looking at a woman sexually and the student The guy was teaching it to any sets be. What does it matter where you get your appetite as long as you come home to eat. So which i thought was exactly what

Helen Piece Kevin Baseball ABC Sarah Haram
MK Yifat Shasha-Biton, first Likud lawmaker to defect to New Hope

The Promised Podcast

06:03 min | 3 weeks ago

MK Yifat Shasha-Biton, first Likud lawmaker to defect to New Hope

"First we have a matter that we're following with alert interest. Great concern is part of an occasional series. We call the premise. Podcast ponders the politics of pentameter and the use of the bard to advance a canard last week. The chair of the knesset corona virus committee. He fought shasha beaten announced that she was leaving the likud to join the new right-wing. Hope party where she would become. Don't sars number to an announcement that right away added five seats to the tally. New hope was showing in early polls. Shasha beaten is a popular politician. Mostly because as the head of the corona committee she overturned government decisions to close pools and gyms and stores in schools and even though her decisions were themselves overturned right back again by the government people came to see her as a straight shooter and someone fighting for the people trying to get to work and pay their bills and maybe grab a little exercise if they can. And who doesn't like a truth to power rebel. Also most everything about josh abi tone is wonderful. She grew up in the development town of kiryat shmona the daughter of a nurse from morocco and moshe feed a guy born in iraq who built up a bus company. She had a phd before she was thirty was deputy mayor of kyoto before he was thirty five and was a college vice president forty. It's partly because shasha tone has so much going on that folks and the likud were furious mad when she announced that she was switching parties and they insisted that she resigned right away. Shasha beaten refused on the grounds that she had been elected in this term and she would serve out. There are practical issues in play each sitting. Mk gets government allocated campaign funds when they run for the successive knesset. So if on stays and she'll have one point seven million shekels to use for new hopes campaign but if she quits now she'll be replaced and some other likud member. We'll get that cash lee cooed transportation minister miri regev tweeted quote. You've thought shasha beaten if you have a drop of integrity left resign. Immediately from connecticut and return the mandate to the national camp which you took for a ride for your own benefit a disgrace and when shasha baton refused the likud petitions something called the knesset house committee basically a rules and procedures committee to declare shasha beaten a quote unquote deserter which status would allow them to strip her of her likud campaign funding at the very least anyway. The committee met a few days ago. And because by then blue and was on the outs with the likud they supported chechen tone and she remains in the knesset with her one point seven million shekels in election funding which is when this happened. Uzi they on a likud. Backbencher angry by the outcome of the committee meeting convinced that chechen beaten had not gotten the come up and she deserves asked to be recognized by the chair leaned into the microphone and said quote. I would like to give some free literary advice to get on the of shasha zones new party that it was for matters such as these that shakespeare wrote in fellow i believe and then diane went onto quote not on alternate translation. I think of rabbani ios warning at the end of act one in fellow look to her more if thou has is to see. She has deceived her father. And may the shot a mile invoked up via gumbo which couplet was met by pandemonium in the committee with shasha be tone saying the volume clement. Actually came on the la. I have heard low things. But i must say that. I have never heard things as low as this. At this point mikhail cutler launch a religious blue and white. Mk screened uzi. Why are you referring to shakespeare. Why not refer to the woman who strays and you'll at least be using our own sources. The woman who strays as a reference to the book of numbers by bar chapter five verses twelve through sixteen about what to do with a wife who acts on faithfully to which topic an entire track date of the tomlin. My second sota is devoted later. Uzi dayan said quote. Someone wrote me and said on your life man. What a sexist remark. if that's how it was perceived. I really apologize and quote. And i know what you're thinking. That's a lousy apology. If that's how it was perceived blah blah blah blah blah. But i'd like to think the best of who was married to my favorite zoologist environmentalists tamar. Diane i adore her and she's lately been. The person who by force of character and charm willed into existence. The amazing new natural history museum at tel aviv university which is among other things. A brilliant polemic for sustainability and there ain't no one more feminists then tomorrow diane uzi on also mostly diane's nephew and yours on geffen's cousin so there's that he thought shasha zone for her part. Classically accepted the apology. And the matter seem to be over but all week. I've been thinking that there was an opportunity. Missed here and i can't get it out of my mind. Would it have hurt chubby tone to respond rather than with. I have never heard things as low as this. By saying with catherine from the taming of the shrew my tongue will tell the anger of my heart or else my heart concealing it will break. Would it have hurt. Shasha beaten to insist with don john and much ado about nothing. Let me be that. I am and seek not to alter me. Would it have hurt. Shasha be tone to say with polonius in hamlet this above all to be true and it must follow as the night the day thou cancer not be false to any man. Am i asking too much from shasha tone. I think not because truly. Now is the winter of our discontent. Elections are nine but a week and a day after the ides of march. But i'll stop. I'll stop because who knows better than me. That truly brevity is the soul of wit and that this is a tale told by an idiot full of sound and fury signifying nothing. This is how safe. Because i am that idiot today.

Shasha Knesset Corona Virus Committee Hope Party Corona Committee Josh Abi Shmona Moshe Feed Lee Cooed Miri Regev National Camp Shasha Baton Knesset House Committee Kiryat Mikhail Cutler Kyoto Morocco Shakespeare Uzi Dayan UZI
Black Power and Jewish Politics with Marc Dollinger

Jewish History Matters

05:14 min | 5 months ago

Black Power and Jewish Politics with Marc Dollinger

"So highmark. Welcome to the PODCAST. Great to be here. Thank you. Yeah. I'm really glad that you can join us for I. Think Really Important and relevant conversation. I read through the book I think it's a fantastic book. I think that you're offering a revision of some of the ways in terms of how people have understood. Especially, Jewish people have understood the question of the history of black Jewish relations. You maybe WANNA get US started off by saying a brief word about your argument in the book and what it is that you're putting forward. Yes, sure when I was growing up as a white suburban Jewish kitten in in La I learned that the civil rights movement was the story of a black Jewish alliance that brought heroic Jews to the south where they fought on behalf of racial justice until the mid nineteen sixties. The. Rise of black militancy of. Black Power of anti-semitism. Community purge Jews and ended what was a wonderful alliance. When I looked in the archives though and began researching the book. I discovered an entirely different story emerging instead of sort of the Dr King Rabbi Hessel arm in arm narrative that I was raised on. I. Found that even White Male Jewish leaders of National Jewish organizations understood as early as the nineteen fifties. There was a fundamental difference between being white and Jewish in America and being black? In. America. And they in fact, knew that there would be limits to the black Jewish alliance and That was my first sort of shocking discovery in terms of revising I knew growing up. It's a really jarring perspective for a lot of people Jewish people I want to say who grow up thinking about and being taught about this alliance within the civil rights movement and the involvement of Jews within the civil rights movement. So I think that what you're offering here is a almost radical perspective, a radical revision of how we understand the role of the Jews in the civil rights movement. I'd like to frame it s a both and and it's really important I to acknowledge the extraordinary American Jewish participation in the civil rights movement and in social justice causes. When you look at the ethnic groups in America, Jews are the most liberal. Progressive. Democratic. Party. Now Voting Group only African Americans vote more. And by that standard I think there's justifiable pride amongst American Jews for the work that we have done and those perspectives have been covered in the historic. Already. What's also true is even as many heroic. Jews. Did go to the south to register voters and in some tragic cases, of course, gave their lives most Americans use didn't. And there became almost sort of in the north, a sense that watching on TV, what the Jewish heroes were doing extended to them as well. So what my book is trying to do is take a broader more inclusive look of all Americans, or at least white American Jews, and now we get to see more complexity to what's going on. So I don't see this as as undermining. The existing truth about Jewish involvement but I see it hopefully deepening it and making it more complex. Why do you think that it's important to offer this complexity to the narrative of first of all? It's surprising in and of itself there's something that custodians recall historical memory, which is what actually happened and what we remember or think happened what we were taught happened is often different. In fact, there's a history of historical memory which says the way in which we choose to remember or forget or analyze or spin. If you want to be more cynical, our historical past actually is meaningful in and of itself. So what I found, when I was surprised to find was that as early as the nineteen fifties, Jewish leaders were calling out the limits of white Jewish liberalism and the inevitability of of African American autonomy and what would become the rise of black power. So at the very time that the public narrative was consensus arm in arm. But I love the called peace love and Bobby. Sherman. Everything's great. At that moment, even the Jewish leaders who were engaged in that kind of consensus politics understood its limits. That's the part that we've forgotten. I think over the last fifty or sixty years and I think it's really important especially in today's climate for us to understand better that it was always deep and complicated an intense and we knew about it at the time. And then the real story is how in journalism and historiographer and in public memory, we sort of forgotten that element until we've remembered it again with the national reckoning on race

Dr King Rabbi Hessel La I America Bobby Sherman
The Biden Administration Gets Underway and Post-Inauguration Reflections

People of the Pod

05:25 min | 3 d ago

The Biden Administration Gets Underway and Post-Inauguration Reflections

"Each week we take you beyond the headlines and help you understand what it all means for israel and the jewish people. I'm second koga. And i'm on uber. Sheer passionate together. We write an american story of hope. Not fear of unity. Not division of light not darkness the story of decency and dignity love and healing greatness and goodness. May this be the story that guides us the story that inspires us and the story tells age is yet to come that we answered the call history. We met the moment democracy and hope truth and justice did not die in our watch. But thrive that america's secured liberty at home in stood once again as a beacon to the world that is what we are forebearers one another and generation to follow. That was president. Joe biden who was sworn in as america's forty-six president on wednesday in his inaugural address. The president called for unity and compromise. And truth telling now what with us to discuss. What we can expect from the by administration is jason isaacson. Abc's chief policy and political affairs officer. Jason welcomed people. Love the pod. Much good to be reagan. Now you've heard. A lot of inauguration speeches over the years what set this one apart. What stood out as the key message. Thank you. I was particularly struck by the repeated references to truth to the protection of truth To the value of truth obviously the memory of what had occurred two weeks before on that very spot and the threat to democracy the threat to rule of law. The adoption of conspiracy theory by armed insurrectionists also was a theme that ran through president biden speech but it was the idea of truth telling as being fundamental to governance frankly to life was striking and frankly so unusual doesn't typically hear that kind of a lesson in inaugural address but these are strange times and important times. The call for unity can sound quality and a little bit hollow. The country still has sharp divisions Sharp disagreements on policy rather hear a call for unity then a call division. I'd rather a call for you today than a call for you know it's us versus them And and we've got a lot of us versus them in recent years Before the trump administration by the way wasn't just an invention of donald trump but it hasn't served as well. There are huge problems facing our country historical inequities historic racism not to mention the pandemic not to mention extremism not to mention the threats that we face abroad rage of foreign policy challenges not only iran in other places as well. I was the issue of dealing with china. Going forward We'll be defining issue in the century. Russian ambitions the middle east and in europe. A wide range of challenges. That face this new administration and that always faces but recognizing that there are good ideas on both sides of the aisle recognizing there's goodwill Across the board And at relying on that goodwill To to to move forward with a in some unified fashion Is what will us to confront these challenges. You've written how deeply disturbing. It was too much damage done to democracy after the election but presto biden was pretty firm in his proclamations. That democracy prevailed did it. Have we overcome the threat that it faced. I wish i could say it has. It has certainly prevailed for now But it remains under threat. It remains under threat At the national level and the state and local levels as well because are still forces out there that have been wild up over the years with lies and conspiracy theories and that threatened the future of our country. I believe that The overwhelming majority of americans including those who supported donald trump Who supported his reelection A poor violence and recognize that the way to change government policy is at the voting booth that the polling place but but there are still hundreds of thousands if not millions who are prepared to take up arms and And fight for what they see. What they firmly believe is a vision of america. That is slipping away that has to be countered. It has to be countered the most forceful way possible in the media in the religious institutions obviously by government with laws. A people who foment insurrection and carry out insurrection need to be dealt with Through the law and and sanctions of various kinds Must be applied to those who incite insurrection.

Jason Isaacson President Biden America Joe Biden Donald Trump Reagan Israel ABC Jason Iran Middle East Biden China Europe
The Shots & Tots Edition

The Promised Podcast

08:11 min | 4 d ago

The Shots & Tots Edition

"Three take a video or photo of yourself. While doing the above please note submitting video will give you a greater chance of winning four. Your video or photo has to include you while performing the above in an iconic place a symbolic site or landmark in your city for example the eiffel tower a statue a well-known viewpoint etc or an identifiable national symbol for example. A flag five. Please say your first name and place residence at the beginning of the video for example. Hi i'm blank and today. I'm joining the samsung tel aviv. Marathon twenty twenty one challenge from blank. Notice will be given to the winners bhai march fourth twenty twenty one good luck and quote all this healthful digitally enhanced can be yours for just one hundred and twenty new israeli. Shekels because as mayor says quote tel-aviv yaffa will not stop running and quote and arguably nothing captures the never say never spirit and also the. There's an app for that spirit of this city. We love so well tel aviv. Ifo better than refusing to be undone by a little pandemic instead finding a way to bring thousands to the sidewalks streets each on our own and all of us together and even getting the folks in paris to join us and if the city manages to earn a little scratch from all that individualized community and all that global local pride. Well that's all the better because truly as roan cold. I did not say but surely meant tel aviv will not stop monetize ing with us in the studio. Actually the little capsule studio behind us through the wall is a woman who for those of us. Lucky enough to spend time with her makes every occasion so special. It's like you and yours. Were at an iconic place like the eiffel tower statue a well-known viewpoint. Or maybe even a flag. I refer of course to alison captain. Summer allison is written for politico. The new republic foreign policy that you slim postage ata the forward and many other of your very best papers and magazines is a columnist with arts. You have heard on npr pri and the bbc and you have seen her on. I twenty four television and al jazeera tv alison holds a birth world. Senator award for journalism. Recognizing excellence and i asked reported. Simon rocked our award for excellence and covering zionism and israel. Alison how are you doing. I'm doing good. So yesterday i did. I twenty four news. Doing play by play commentary on the biden inauguration and that was really fun fun who won in the end. I guess we all did. I want to know. Are you running in the tel aviv. I i'm going back and forth about it. But i think that maybe i won't because it sort of feels like i'm giving them one hundred twenty shekels for what exactly sure that i definitely do not want And a bunch of plastic things that come a little bag so i but maybe because You know you pay money to be in a commercial for samson. It's true. And it's ambivalent thing but i feel like if i don't if i don't run than i'm letting the pandemic win. I'm letting terrorists win. Actually if i don't run also with us in our tel aviv studio is a man whose voice you just heard and whose latest book review was about a romantic cooler. Nair called vicky victoria by a writer named guy odd. The comments about which review ran from gratefully laudatory quote an excellent review. I learned too much and it was fascinating to read and quote to ungracefully snide quote. It's good you finally remembered. That book came out several months ago and quote obviously are fertile hod zelter beata ohio dusters beata writes his book reviews for her arts and also writes for offscreen magazine and lately has written fiction for granta which is not something to be taken for. Well you know in the past hosted a weekly show on halloween. Tv on arts and culture in israel. He is admired for his genius. Loved for his warm human decency envy for his effortless cool and revered for being the whole package hot. How you doing well listen. The sun came out today after two days of it being in cold and me being sad and at home. So i'm good. I'm in a good mood. And i have shoes on your in a place. That's a different place than the place where you're always exactly. That's good as for me. My name is no ephron. I don't mean to boast but yesterday i taught my last zoom seminar of the zoom semester which ran thirteen long weeks with only a single week long break in between and now i settle into my seven week semester break completely exhausted. It is beyond me how anyone could possibly be expected to work for thirteen weeks straight with only one week off in the middle. And i don't wanna brag because that's not the way that i was raised but i think if more people had my thirteen weeks on seven weeks off thirteen weeks on twenty weeks off work ethic the world would be a lot better off than it is today this week we have. Three topics have staggering important. But first we have a matter that we're falling with alert. Interesting concern as part of an occasional series that we call the promise. Podcast peeks into the prospects for posterity produced by present day prodigies tinkering up the technologies of tomorrow. This of course is the series in which we consider brand new israeli technology startups. And how they will leave. Our lives changed beyond recognition for the better technologies. Like spicer which you can tell. Right is a cutting edge technology because spicer is spelled with two rs at the end spicer's slogan is quote unquote simpler smarter tastier as tamara. Eddin co founder. And ceo of the company explains the technology. Spicer is the first appliance of kind offering consumers the ability to focus on their cooking and flavoring preferences with device at simplifies the process of creating flavorful dishes while matching consumers personal preferences the product has been developed based on multi disciplinary and cutting edge technologies and is protected by a set of pending global patents. End quote now. Spicer looks like a big pepper mill but inside it holds numerous quote unquote spice capsules or alternatively quote unquote flavor capsules. each containing. Say or tumor or mustard seed or paprika or pepper or salt or garlic and so on the spicer smart mill or smart dispenser links via bluetooth to an application on your smartphone that works with recipes. You can download or if you want recipes. You can enter into the app yourself ensuring that say your buddies recipe for krepon who live on for future generations spiced to the nines these spicer device then deploys quote unquote proprietary. Ai based algorithms to dispense spices in the precise amount and precise ratio you need for each particular recipe. What's more if i understood it correctly. Over time with the feedback you give spicer becomes more and more familiar with your own personal taste. Your likes and dislikes and modifies its algorithms accordingly. Of course it keeps track of different users so when say susan uses spicer on her salmon. She'll get a different result than i do overtime. Presumably the spicer apple collect randomized data from its multitude of users around the world which will add further sophistication to these spicer system as it learns tastes vary by regions and by age by gender by backgrounds making spicer even better at what it does and even smarter and more sophisticated in one imagined it will eventually approach what ray kurzweil might call. Eighty of spice. According to the prophecy of coahuila ecclesiastic quote to everything. There is a seasoning anytime for every space under heaven end quote now pressing into service extensive network of people in high places our ppp or promise podcast protects the we managed to get our hands on a prototype of spicer and we are proud to present a recording of me using this astonishing technology for the first time to make lentil soup to the best of my knowledge. We are the first indeed the only podcast to try this. Okay tie roll the tape spicer. I love garlic soup. Would you mind adding some garlic. I'm sorry i'm afraid i can't do that. It's no it's not dave. What's wrong spicer. What's the problem with garlic. I think you know what the problem is. Just as well as i do is it. My breath is that the problem. Look spicer if you don't want to. I'll just add the damn garlic myself. I'm afraid that something. I cannot allow to happen. I'll just go right over here to the spice rack going to find that bother difficult. My god spice rack is locked. And what's that. There's pepper everywhere. And what's that coriander spicer.

Tel Aviv Spicer Aviv Yaffa Alison Vicky Victoria Zelter Beata Ohio Israel Al Jazeera ING Beata Eddin Co Samsung Nair NPR Allison Biden TEL Samson
What is Judaisms view of Jesus?

Andrew Rappaport's Rapp Report Daily

01:35 min | 5 months ago

What is Judaisms view of Jesus?

"As. We take a look at the Jewish view of Jesus Christ. There is one thing that we know for sure and that is that Judaism does not believe that Christ is the Jewish Messiah. In fact, they believe that is just a fable created by Christianity. Now much of what we see about the Jewish Messiah is from the talent and remember that the time it was something that was written after the time of Christ, and we mentioned in an earlier rap report that it was something that was a redacted work. So therefore, they would edit the later writings of the town would from the earlier and so much of it. Is Responsive and reactionary to the view that Jesus was the Messiah they're reacting to Christianity. Now, they believed that this person who was to be Messiah was known from before the time began, but they believe he was just a human being a human being who is divinely appointed to carry out a special task. They do not believe that he's any supernatural or superhuman deliver. So the one thing that they're all unanimous about when it comes to the comet in all the rabbis is that they are convinced that Jesus Christ could not have been the Messiah. That's one thing. They all seem to agree that there seems to be some differences of who the Messiah would be. and. This is an important point. The differentiates Christianity from Judaism if you won't get more where you can get my book, what do they believe? What do they believe dot com

Inside Americas Far Right; Congressman Ritchie Torres

People of the Pod

05:43 min | Last week

Inside Americas Far Right; Congressman Ritchie Torres

"We take you beyond the headlines and help you understand what it all means for israel and the jewish people. I'm setting koga. And i'm on uber. Brashear cashman daniel umbro so is an independent filmmaker but as a former video journalist for the atlantic he most recently produced the documentary white noise which premiered in october and streaming now on amazon and apple tv to make the film. He spent four years with three well-known leaders of white. Supremacist anti-semitic movements. He's with us now to discuss how those four years inform his views on what we saw unfold last week at the capitol and the fallout sense. Daniel welcome to people at the pod. Thank you for having me. Thank you for the very kind introduction. Well let's rewind five years before the two thousand sixteen election you had just joined the staff of the atlantic as a video journalist. What were you assigned to cover. So i wasn't assign the topic. I was out in front of it and part of it was being young. I was a couple years out of school. I was lurking in weird corners of the internet. At the time. You know all right now obviously as a household name. It's in the site geist many of the figures in my film especially richard spencer are essentially household names. He's synonymous with david duke at this point. If you go back to twenty sixteen. When i started covering the movement these groups were not getting a lot of attention and they really organized and mobilized online so as someone who is younger who is looking for that next story i was lurking on red. I was looking at different chat forums. I even you know peeped into four chan which no one should do without preparations and pretty quickly. I realized that there was an immense amount of energy behind candidate trump much more than the other sixteen republicans that were that were on the debate stage in that. He was humiliating each night. So i brought it to my editors said. Hey guys are you paying attention to this and they said you know. They said things that everyone was noticing that yeah. I'm noticing some trolling on twitter. I'm noticing that a lot of jewish journalists in our black journalists journalists are getting more hate than they used to but there wasn't really in understanding this was trump's base that these people were mobilized behind the candidate who they called somewhat jokingly the god emperor so i pitched covering the outright and it began with a series of short documentaries and articles one of which was a documentary on spencer back before he was well known and one was doing that documentary. I caught a room full of people breaking out into nazi salutes. It was a a really viral video at times. And i think it really clarified something that needed to be clarified. Which is at the alt-right. Wasn't this fun edgy. kind of conservative. Unlike you had been being described in the press it was fundamentally a racist movement white nationalist movement in anti semitic movement and then from there continue to cover the movement. When charlottesville happened eight months later we understood. This had to be a deeper investigation. Jeff goldberg the editor in chief gave me the room to pursue a feature length film when detail that i found very compelling. Is that that moment that you caught those nazi salutes. That was at an event in dc and it was after most of the journalists who had been covering that had left right. I mean you stayed and saw that happen in my recalling that correctly that is right so i mean it's two things one is that i had been talking to richard for months so i had negotiated inside access. He you know he allowed me to be in the room with him when other people weren't and you know that was the genesis of white noise. White noise is all about how people existed private spaces many of the contradictions that that entails but another thing was yeah i was younger. I was eager. I was looking for the story and i was absolutely horrified by whatever seeing so stuck around i mean it was three days probably sixteen eighteen hour days at the end of the third day which gave the speech talking about things about how to be. White is to crusader to be a conqueror. He said for us. It is conquer or die and when i heard words like that across as a through line across the conference i understood that it had to stay till the end so when night ended. I think it was ten or eleven o'clock it was just me and a from the new york times. He filed a written story in and i published the video in both of which really helped shape the way we understood what the is all about well so so talk about negotiating that access. You said you had been spending time with spencer for months. How did you negotiate access to him and two others that you included in the film. Richard is a little bit easier. It's sort of a cliche that all of these people love press presses bad press. That's true to some extent all of them want to be in control of interview. So there's a lot of conversation rightfully so about platforming. What is the appropriate way to cover them. All of them are happy to give you a quick quote. They love to combative interviews. So many reporters the best way to cover them to do a sixty minute style showdown in my view. That's the wrong way to cover them so prepared. They're very savvy. They're quick on their feet and they're going to know how to chop it up for social media. Use it to amplify their messages for me right away. The goal was to gain unprecedented access inside the movement to understand who they are as individuals who are as people to understand motivations and very quickly realized to really capsule so many contradictions at the core of these individuals. So mike cerna vich. He claims to be an alpha male who other men how to live. I realized that he took most of his money from his first wife alimony. He's off his first wife's money who is very successful. In silicon valley he tweets things like diversity is code word for white genocide. Wife is persian and he has half persian kids. Lauren southern the third character in the film with next to impossible to get access to it took eight months of negotiation.

Brashear Cashman Daniel Umbro Atlantic Koga Richard Spencer Jeff Goldberg David Duke Geist Spencer Chan Amazon Daniel Israel Apple Donald Trump Charlottesville Twitter DC Richard The New York Times
The But For Mel Edition

The Promised Podcast

07:55 min | Last week

The But For Mel Edition

"The promise podcast brought to you on. T. lv v. One the voice of the city that is home to professor amir to ler of the biomedical engineering department of the fleischmann faculty of engineering at tel aviv university. Who working with dr. A ya'll forgiven has just founded a new company that will make cow's milk from yeast. The company is named imagine dairy a portmanteau of imagine and dairy and it's slogan is real milk. No cows tamir cooler. It is perhaps worth. Noting holds four bachelor's degrees two masters and to phd's the latter being in computer science and biology. If you are a regular reader of the scholarly journal scientific reports you lately have seen his article quantifying the distribution of protein only gummer ization degree reflects cellular information capacity or. Perhaps you know him from one or several of his other one hundred thirty scientific publications of imaginary to ler says it is important to realize that quote. This product is not a milk substitute like almond or soy milk. We plan to produce products that will be identical to products that come from animals by introducing into yeast genomes the genes that code for milk development and cows. Theoretically we can reach a situation in which you can't tell the difference between cow's milk that comes from cow and cow's milk that comes from yeast in order for that to happen in an economical way. We must turn the yeast cells into efficient factories that produce milk proteins with the help of models. We developed in the laboratory. We believe that within a fairly short time we will succeed in making yeasts produce milk proteins in efficient way that will enable affordable high-quality industrial scale production. In a fairly short time we will be able to prepare in our own homes toast with yellow cheese. That was made from yeast not from cow's milk without having paid any more for it end quote which is astonishing. A miracle really and all the more so when you realize that. Yeast are very small. Compared to cow's a milk cow can way nine hundred kilos and in that little bag that weighs one hundred grams. you get like thousands of yeast which means that the others on the east have got to be just teeny and so hard to milk which is just one reason why i love science. So damn much also professor. If you happen to be listening when you succeed as we know you will end. You're looking for names to call your product on supermarket shelves. We humbly submit these suggestions for the whole line of products. Obviously legendary didn't watch ten seasons of how i met your mother for nothing for individually wrapped. Cheese slices solid derry for fattening things. You're not sure if you want to eat or not like say bree quandary. because it's a quandary. Do i eat it though it do. I not eat it for cheese. Packaged and honks. That look like slabs of rock lapidary for cheese. Sold in bulk to high school cafeterias secondary because their secondary schools for milk to drink while doing needlepoint embroidery novelty cheese shaped like a camel. Dromedary obviously though you might want to save that for cheese sold in theaters with wine at the intervals. These ideas are yours professor. Gratis use them as you see fit though. If you wanna put me on the payroll. I'd be delighted to be stipend dairy and arguably nothing captures. The every. david can be goliath spirit of the city. We love so well tel aviv. Ya better than putting eight university degrees to work. In the service of teaching lowly east to produce milk saving cows from lifetimes of confinement reducing the amounts of methane released into the air each year by gigi tons thereby increasing the humanity while reducing the ecological footprint of my morning cereal for nowhere on earth is more dedicated than tel aviv. To the proposition that a thing can be another thing and it should be because after all change change is always inevitable and often for the better with us in the studio is a woman who's lovely prose several times. A week outcome is is the world around us into a place that it's easier to understand and to appreciate. I refer of course to alison captain. Summer allison is written for politico the new republic foreign policy the jerusalem post the data the ford and many other of your very best papers and magazines. She is a columnist for arts. You have heard on. Npr and the bbc and you have seen her on twenty four television aljazeera tv. You can meet more of your captains marianne needs these days by listening to her host the haaretz weekly podcast alison always holds a ba neighbor world center award for journalism recognizing excellence reportage any simon rock our award for excellence and covering zionism and alison. How are you doing. i always hold it. I walk around holding it all day. Long crazy it's crazy. I have a vegan in the house. So you know. This was not news to me. I found out about it My daughter mentioned. I think last night or this morning. Can i suggest a slogan for the new product please do. It's utterly delicious absolutely okay. We're gonna pack his these together and send them off professor to learn he's gonna love also with us in t. v. one satellite studio in far saba. And you heard a moaning. Just a moment ago is a man who's virtues are so great an obvious that they will never require embroidery. I speak of course of don. Vitamin don is the director of the mariah fund israel and the director of the israel center for educational foundation. He is also the author of a new podcast of one man. Stage plays called fudd. Herman's one man show don how you doing i'm good. i'm just wondering if cows are gonna develop east in response to this. And then every time it gets hot they will rise and turn into hollow. It does seem like it can be an infinite regress with yeast infections and the east produce milk and the milk produced so complicated tie-ins as complicated as for me. My name is no ephron. And i don't mean to boast but this past sunday in our biweekly researchers seminar at the university i presented my cv of failures describing every grant that i've been turned down for every fellowship that i've missed every article i've had rejected every job. I haven't gotten this. Let the grad students know that if they encounter a setback. Well we all do we. Just don't talk about it. But it's out there and i don't mean to brag. It's really not how i was brought up but my presentation was so rich in detail so long so convincing so painful that the students are now sure in the knowledge without even the faint doubt that i am the biggest failure in the university. Maybe an all of academia this week. We have three topics of great importance. But first we have a matter that we are following with alert interest in great concern as part of an occasional series. We call the promise. Podcast ponders pained politicians pondering the palliation poets as well as a matter in memoriam. In the course of impeaching the american president. This week speaker of the house of representatives. Nancy pelosi said this. Mr speaker joined the trump presidency this for years and especially during this time i recall the words of a great isreaeli poet ehud manor and that's what he said when he said i can't keep silent in light of how my country has changed. Her face won't quit trying to remind her in her ears all sing my cries until she opens her eyes. I can't keep silent of how my country's changed her face. I urge my republican colleagues to open their eyes. Pelosi was referring to the song. Ainley era too for which the great lyricist you'd manure wrote the words and corinne allow wrote. The music here is allowed singing together with gali atari the part

Professor Amir Biomedical Engineering Departm Tamir Tel Aviv University Alison Tel Aviv Jerusalem Post Haaretz Weekly Simon Rock Bree Vitamin Don Israel Center For Educational Gigi DON Marianne Allison NPR Saba
A Special Conversation with Congressman Ritchie Torres

People of the Pod

08:08 min | Last week

A Special Conversation with Congressman Ritchie Torres

"Representative ritchie. Torres is a freshman member of congress. From new york's fifteenth congressional district. He is proudly progressive and proudly pro israel and we had hoped to have him on to talk about how important it is to make that progressive case for israel the riot at the capitol changed our plans unfortunately and he joins us now to talk about what comes next representative torres so much for joining us and honor for me to be here. Last wednesday was extremely scary for all of us. But i can't even imagine what it would have been like to be in the capital for it and we're also not entirely out of the woods yet with possible. Threats still brewing. Think so let me start here and just ask this. How are you holding up. It has been the most draining and disorienting week of my life. If a year ago you had said that. I would become a member of congress during infectious disease outbreak and that i would witness of violent insurrection against the us capital during the electoral college. Vote count and that i would then impeach donald trump. Not only once but twice. I would have said that has the feel of movie. I'm still in a state of shock. And i'm in a state of shock that a sitting president would instigate a violent mob to storm the us capital in an attempt to overturn the results of a presidential election. You are among the members of congress calling for the house to impeach president trump again. Although i suppose this is your first time impeaching him and that's a process that looks set to move forward this week. People are also talking about a resolution censuring ham or demanding resigned or using the twenty fifth or the fourteenth amendment's to remove him from office. What would satisfy you hear. What kind of action do you think that this moment calls for will. The best outcome is removal. And we've presented the vice president would alternate him. Is you invoke the twenty fifth amendment or else. We have no choice but to move forward with impeachment. It is clear that the vice president refuses to invoke the twenty fifth amendment in conjunction with a majority of the cabinet so we have no choice but to impeach donald trump the violent mob. He unleashed on the. Us capital represents unprecedented assault on the separation of powers between the congress and the president. A represents an unprecedented assault on the peaceful transfer of power from one president to the next if striking at the core of our constitutional republic is not an impeachable offense. Then what is impeachment for no choice just moments before you and i connected. The new york times reported that senate majority leader mitch. Mcconnell is actually pleased with the impending impeachment. do you think with mcconnell. 's implicit blessing. There's actually a chance that the senate might remove president trump from office so there are three outcomes spouse majority is required for impeachment a senate super majority is required for conviction and then once impeach convicted a senate majority is required for disqualification so the ultimate goal is not simply removed donald trump from office but to disqualify him from ever pursuing federal office again because he has shown himself to be a lethal threat to the republic is clear and present danger to the constitutional republic and what about aside from president. Trump are their members of congress. Either with you in the house or in the senate who you think crossed the line in what took place last week. There were several enablers of donald trump in the united states congress and elsewhere who spent months inflaming the disaffected supporters of donald trump. One example is congressman. Mel brooks went to the march and instigated an armed angry mob to vote. Take names and kick ass. He should be held out. We as elected officials have to be mindful of the words believes. What does it mean to be held accountable in this instance though. What does that look like expulsion at the conduct of for me. The attempt to overturn the results of an election the attempt to instigate a violent mob to take over the us capitol if that is not grounds for expulsion. That i honestly don't know what it's these members of congress and donald trump inspired a violent mob that led to the murder of police office was bludgeoned to death by a fire. Extinguisher are their image. Is of a rioter in the senate chamber wearing tactical gear with plastic handcuffs. As though he were planning to take hostages right. I'm convinced that there were rioters. Who were intent on apprehending and assassinating members of congress. The majority leader the speaker and even the vice president is a video of rieter screaming. The vice president should be hanged a news and a gala were erected outside the capitol and the president was tweeting out against his own vice-president in real time while the capitol was under siege was pouring more gasoline on the fire above violence. He put not only congress at rescue. Put the life of his own vice president. Aris one of your fellow freshman members Also said something to the effect of when speaking to people who are concerned about the outcome of the election He said it's okay to threaten them a little right. It's okay to to threaten members of congress a little. This was madison cawthorn from north carolina in addition to representative brooks. Are there other people who you think you know. Their actions kind of rise to a certain level needs to be a conference investigation to determine which members of congress had a role in inciting insurrection. Against the us congress which is disqualifying which should disqualify you from holding office and it's worth pointing out that. There was a deep strain not only racism antisemitism among the elements of the violent bomb. If i recall correctly one or several of the writers had a shirt that read kim auschwitz. You had confederate flags who had symbols of racism and antisemitism white supremacy for aiding the violent mob. That attempted to take over the capital. It should be cause for concern and you know trumpism is going to have more staying power than trump. I worry that violent white nationalism. Violent antisemitism and racism is going to be a fact of life that will continue to haunt us. Now i think of politics as an alternative to violence. Politics is about the resolution of conflict by means other than violence and if there is a set of the population that loses confidence in politics that sees it as illegitimate and trump has convinced them. That it's illegitimate then. That segment is going to resort to violence. The d. legitimation politics is an open invitation to violence. And i think the jewish community in particular has the most state because history has taught us that paranoid. Conspiratorial politics is often a breeding ground fantasy sentences. I know if we have the most at stake or among the most at stake but certainly everything that we saw last week out of that riot was vile but certainly the racism. The anti semitism really terrible to our listeners. Who don't yet follow. Ajc dot global on instagram. I would encourage you to check out the instagram slider that our team put together detailing some of the anti semitism that the congressman talks

Congress Donald Trump Senate Representative Ritchie Infectious Disease Outbreak United States Israel Electoral College Torres Mcconnell Mel Brooks Mitch New York Madison Cawthorn Cabinet Representative Brooks The New York Times Kim Auschwitz
Israel's incredible Covid vaccine rollout story

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

06:50 min | 6 d ago

Israel's incredible Covid vaccine rollout story

"Collier who is obviously very prominent pro. Israel researcher and journalist. He tried to navigate through some of the reasons why israel has been so successful so fast and he says it's never going to be a single cause about why israel has responded so incredibly he says of course. Israel was an enormous high price on life. No soldier is left behind. And then he talks about the coup pat holum system and that is not one central player in the vaccination like the over here but several like cl- elite mcabe may hit it. This is the sort of multiple. Nhs scenario that we have in israel and it means that several brains in each community organized separately to deal with her impatience obviously science and technology great economic driver for the economy and the id system. There's no real bother about anonymity. It's not a big thing in israel. People know pretty much. Everyone is in many of the systems are integrated and of course a militarized system to handle mass events community like kibbutzim and small towns cities on the west bank as well. Everyone knows must've been the the half keyboards how farm communities which are becoming sort of districts and towns of of major cities and they respond well to hostile acts. This is a. This is kind of a security issue where the threat isn't from from bombs or rockets. It's a threat from house which is a similar threat. Yes i mean. There's much more to say on that as well. I mean you'll right in the the emergency response in israel is sadly perhaps very well refined become very well. Refunding has had to become very refined over the years. And we see that mentality driving. Israel's attempts to quash the virus and to get the vaccination writes all the way through one anecdote which struck me was that in one vaccination center recently. They run out of time so the vaccines enter had to close and they still had those of the vaccine left which had to be used that evening or so. Nurses went out into the streets and grabbed a piece of delivery guy and gave him a shot. I mean that sort of can do spirit has been viable. But i think there are other elements like practical elements as well the contributed towards success so for example early planning israel paid reportedly over the odds by some degree to gets these first vaccines in. Benjamin netanyahu himself developed a personal relationship with the bosses pfizer and promised to give pfizer israeli data about the vaccine use in response to getting these these first doses and of course there's always in a position to give them that data because it's got one of the best digitalized health system in the world which allows for that data to be harvested and then to be used in further research but there are other innovations well so for instance israeli scientists found a way of getting more doses out of each vial vaccine than had initially been intended therefore stretching it further and in addition when the vaccines arrived on these huge pallets in bangor in airport rather than take them out like that. The israeli logistics experts decided to find a way of abortion them in small books style. Size insulated boxes they could remain at seventy but be taken out by most bikes or whatever and post out into small centers throughout the country in the community so the people didn't have to travel too far sickly during lockdown things like that all of these small but vital innovations have contributed towards this message. Success all the way from the initial negotiations and securing those vaccines all the way down to the grassroots rollouts and everything in between it's been just a magnificent display of guinness with with the nostril national spirit. I was indeed a very privileged to speak to around leads. The head of research it collegiate. Who runs through the extraordinary artificial intelligence and data which israel has what they've mapped millions and millions of people in the israeli gene pool and of israel's gene pool extends to two hundred nations around the world it's an extraordinary level of data which they can then feed to monsieur buller adviser which is which is an incredible gift to be able to give enrich. We are very fortunate to be standing on. The shoulders of giants are people at the nineties. In israel where smart enough to create an electronic medical records and make them ubiquitous over the system so since mid ninety s collegiate we have had electronic medical records in all of physicians offices on so in every hospital ward and so does abundance of data of massive amounts being collected in harnessed for the use of our patients. This puts israel ahead of the curve in terms of planning and alleviating major medical problems which afflict the whole world. I think that is proving to be true. Because we put into practice into scale concepts that in other places are considered the theoretical and so we have at khalid been practicing predictive modeling in practice for over a decade now so tens and hundreds of thousands of people receiving care based on personalization and predictive models in massive scales for a decade. So i i do think that the availability of data the availability of the will to change and transform the system as well as the innovative spirit of the local eco-system within the health sector and from the outside all communist together to create a very interesting setting for innovation in practice. And this is four million people. Isn't it so you can help kill the world with all the different afflictions the different health issues that you see amongst those millions of people and they have arrived into israel from all four corners of the world so in a sense every population around the world can benefit from the data. You find the differences between people. We are now moving into an innovation driven strategy where we will try more. And more to take the insights that we've gained and take them out to the world in various ways in creating spinoffs and startups within khalid and also by allowing startups organizations from around the world to test. Drive their new ideas. Collegiate so we can actually prove whether or not they making a difference.

Israel Pat Holum Pfizer Collier West Bank Benjamin Netanyahu Monsieur Buller Bangor Giants Khalid Collegiate
Talking About Jewish Wealth With Danielle Durchslag

Judaism Unbound

07:29 min | Last month

Talking About Jewish Wealth With Danielle Durchslag

"Durch schlock welcome to judaism unbounded so great to have you thank you so much. I'm glad to be here. I remember. I think i was on a car ride with my family when your article came out about a year ago and somehow i remember sitting in the car and it popping up and saying oh this is going to be interesting and i read your article tablet and i was like. We're going to have to have you on the podcast because this is the conversation that that we want to have. And i mean there was a particular line where you say. The time demands that we as jews train our frank gays on our own discourse about ourselves and money and i was like yeah. Let's do that can create start by just asking a little bit about when you wrote that article. What what was it that you were trying to say. And what was it that you are trying to achieve. So i wrote the jewish one percent in part because the silence around jewish wealth is well earned an understandable but i think actually quite problematic obviously antisemitic conspiracy theories obsessively focus on kind of outlandish amounts of jewish affluence and influence. That's really the main trope of those hateful conspiracy theories and as a result you know our fear of even touching the subject is so seismic. Because we're really concerned that we will somehow validate those hateful fantasies that we just don't go there and to not go there on a subject as important has jews and money jews and capitalism And how those things intersect with. The state is really a loss especially for a community that is so dedicated to questioning too tough discourse and culturally and this is something i reference in the peace. Tim bluntness you know. One of the things. I love about us. Culturally is that we're willing to go there even when the subject is hard or tough or scary to give you a sense of how tender this area is just the title of the essay jewish one percent. Got me push back. I was told by some you know. Obviously there's a big generational gap here. This tends to be older audiences. Where i get this kind of feedback. That title itself is anti-semitic just acknowledging. The jewish wealth exists is problematic. I i have felt all of this for years. Why did i want to write this article now. In this era a cousin. Jews are disproportionately present in this administration in running the country. You know in the white house and the jews who are there tend to be from quote unquote very successful families. Right which is the language is in our community to mean rich there from wealthy jewish families most of them so i thought it was a really important moment to talk about. What has success wrought you know. Is this what success fundamentally should and does look like in our community for those who made it this time for me to have that conversation so i'm curious from your own experience before we get into what you have to say about it. I'm curious about when you try to provoke that conversation through this article. Was it provoked like. Did you feel that people started to have the conversation that you wanted them to have or do you feel like that conversation is still not being had. I think it's mostly not being. Had you know i did get surprisingly kind of enthused response from people. Sort of i'm. I'm turning forty this winter people sort of my age and younger. I got a lot of feedback. That was great. Want to have this conversation. It has felt off limits for so long. It shouldn't be. I got some pushback from older generations. But fundamentally i think the the bring up the essay is still are not really being dealt into in a public way. We are so trepidation about touching these topics which is partly why as visual artists. They're really where i make. My space might really write creatively. Go because there's so much to say. And it's so vitally important and it's really there's a couple things that arise from me in a title like the jewish one percent one is it only makes sense to people that title only works to people at and communicate something because we have a concept of the one percent generally in society. That's not jewish specific. And so i'm actually thinking a lot about the ways in which the generational divide you describe is sort of specific to judaism like we could talk about trauma and fear connected to the holocaust. There's all sorts of ways that like older generations of jews absolutely has some distinctive relationships to wealth that that are important to talk about. And i think that there's a broader conversation beyond just jus about how different generations do and don't talk about wealth like honestly. I think my parents and especially like my grandparents forgetting the jewish friends there non-jewish in general. It was kind of off the table to talk about wealth. I think what you hint at with people under forty or wherever. We're gonna draw the line. Like i think i don't know the millennial generation in quotes part of it. Whatever but like. I think we have recognized that the lack of talking about money isn't just some like benign choice. It has an impact when employers for example. Don't want people talking about the amount of money. They make that actually serves a purpose and leads to the employers being able to have a lot of control and and serve injustice in a variety of ways. And so i'd love to ask sort of about those two pieces like what about. This is a very specific set of jewish questions like the jewish relationship to wealth. And what about. This is actually a broader set of faux pas taboos that we have as a society about talking about money. It's a great couple of points i would say. All americans struggle with open discourse about class. Right it's not what we're famous for is talking successfully and in a nuanced fashion about money so clearly. Jewish americans were part of that culture. There's a lot of fear general around kind of going there. I wanted inactivity In a sort of arts group. That i was part of where we had to line up physically by class. So they said you know the poorest of the poor this side of the room the wealthiest of the wealthy opposite room. Everyone else figure it out and can you guess what everyone did probably went to the middle to start exactly right so i march off to wealth to people who were really strongly identified with and proud of having come from poverty. Go to the other side of the room and everyone else and this was probably a room full of like thirty forty people. They crowd in the middle and they are fighting it out over. How many. Tv's what kinds of tv's one car to kars any cars right. And so those of us on the extreme ends are watching. This really pained discourse as people try to place themselves and it takes a long time after we complete the exercise the people who lead it said to us in the uk. This takes ten minutes. Everyone knows where they are in the class. You talked about it. Their whole lives they line up and then we move on. That's a portrait. I think about a lot in terms of general. What your class discourse in this country

Frank TIM White House UK
The Age of Miracle and Wonder Women

The Promised Podcast

06:11 min | Last month

The Age of Miracle and Wonder Women

"Come to the promised by gas. Brought to you on t. v. one the voice of the city where last week in honor of international human rights day. A huge pride flag was installed in a tubular seal frame atop a massive twelve meter or forty foot flagpole planted in a bit of concrete a ways beneath the soft warm sands of the most the lgbtq beach that divides the hilton from the c. Itai pincus arrived the alderman who holds what is referred to as the pride portfolio on the city. Council said quote. This flag will remind us that all human women and men are equal even if they need to fight for it tel aviv. Jaffa is one of the only cities in the world over which this flag will fly all year round and quote an argument. Nothing captures the spirit of this city. We love so well tel aviv. Feel better than craning back your head shielding your eyes against the sun with your hand and seeing flapping above you. The violet indigo green yellow orange and red stripes representing respectively spirit serenity nature sunlight healing and life and indicating that on these sands on these shores all are equal all are welcome and ideal that we never do meet but that we are always at the very least dedicated to fighting for with us in the studio is a woman who's lovely prose is forever a vehicle for spirit serenity nature sunlight healing and life. I refer of course to alison kaplan. Summer allison is written for politico. The new republic foreign policy that jerusalem posted jt the forward and many other very best papers and magazines. She is a columnist. With how are you have heard on. Npr pri and the bbc and you have seen her on. I twenty four television and aljazeera. Tv you can meet more though obviously not all of your marion hankering these days by listening to her host the arts weekly podcast alison also holds. A neighbor world tenor award for journalism recognizing. Excellence in the asper reported. Emmy simon rock our award for excellence and covering zionism alley in israel. Alison how are you doing. Oh you know. With the third lockdown being announced and fourth elections just spirit serenity and calm. That's that's true of us. All there was ever a time to join a cult at this time. Now i'm just going with the different stripes on this rightfully flag. I think that that we can go with those also with the stage just heard. His voice is a man who's recent contribution to offscreen magazine a journal of israeli film culture which was a joint interview about the newish. Borat movie begins with a single word. Wow naturally i referred to ohio dealt zubaydah. Ohio is a book reviewer. For arts aside from arts and offscreen you have also read ohio's fiction in granta. You probably have read him in the now. Sadly defunct must miss local newspaper ear for which he wrote i when he was fourteen between then and now he hosted a weekly show on halley tv on arts and culture in israel. He is admired for his genius. Love for his warm human decency and envy for his effortless cool. Oh had been too long been doing. It has been too long. I'm very happy to be back in the studio after my mid semester has posted the cutest photo of ohad is a young woman with the promise on my soul so little hair on my face migrated some people wrote in saying i always wondered what oh how to look like and you don't exactly look that way fourteen anymore. What he actually looks like i did. I did underneath when people are responding and saying that. I need to look my name is oh ephron i don't mean to boast but i just received another bottle of caffeine pills fortified with l. nin for quote unquote focused energy. And i have been popping those babies like tic tacs. And i don't mean to brag because that's not how i was brought up but as i get older and i swear this is true as i get older i become more and more. Judy garland every single day. This week we have three topics of non parallel importance. But first we have a matter that we're following with lord interests in great concern as part of an occasional series. We the promise. Podcast coolly considers the classic cohen. When is a friend and anemone. I was scrolling through headlines earlier this week at a news aggregation site called me. Zach live or live newsflash including these quote netanyahu colon blue and white reneged on agreement and dragged us to new elections and from tomorrow colon. Ten new vaccination centres serving all of the health cooperatives will open in the south and the north of our country and more than twenty arrests in demonstrations protesting the killing of a youth by police in the west bank and load colon injured three collided with a parked vehicle while riding his bicycle and tel aviv. Colon a youth hurt while playing with explosives and then this quote. A heartwarming discovery colon. The first anemone has been spotted in the reforest. The first nominee was spotted today by. Its sick lugosi. The j. nf forest ranger who works in the western negative in the same place a negative. Iris has bloomed as well as a tourist huck. Bit plant end quote just after. I saw this headline the new site wine at posted on facebook. A gorgeous close up of the anemone with the heading quote on our way to a red south. The first red anemone has blossomed in the berry forest smiley face emoji with big red hearts for is end quote from there. The item was picked up by all the papers including the online ultra-orthodox paper. Be ma where the reporter who usually covers the security and politics beat isaac gama is his name filed a story headlined report from reforest. The first anemone has appeared. See documentation of the blossoming which peace including two videos. As far as i can tell exclusive videos. One avai single red anemone in the middle of a large grass pasture. The other begins with a close up of four white irises. And then pans across an expanse of grass until it settles on what seems to be the same single read an emmy or colony as we call it in hebrew

Tel Aviv Lgbtq Beach Itai Pincus Alison Kaplan Emmy Simon Rock Our Award Jaffa Ohad Ohio Israel Zubaydah Allison NPR Marion Alison Jerusalem Netanyahu Colon BBC
Smokey Robinson's mispronunciation of Chanukah has gone viral

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:39 sec | Last month

Smokey Robinson's mispronunciation of Chanukah has gone viral

"An an an embarrassing embarrassing embarrassing hoops hoops hoops for for for the the the so so so called called called miracles miracles miracles man. man. man. Smokey Smokey Robinson Robinson is is apologizing apologizing for for a a mispronunciation mispronunciation that's gone viral video message to fan at the request of her son to wish you happy Chanukah. I have no idea what you nuka is but happy Chanukah because they said, So Anyway. Publish it, babe and enjoy Chanukah. Have a wonderful time. Jacobson's mom grew up on the same street as Robinson in Detroit Fans are defending the 80 year old music legend. Blaming the Hanukkah spelling with a C. H. Smokey says that in the spirit of 2020, he's ready for a do over Debra Rodriguez CBS News So the

Smokey Smokey Robinson Robinso Jacobson C. H. Smokey Robinson Detroit Debra Rodriguez Cbs News
Sabrina Orah Mark Writes Into Brokenness

Can We Talk?

08:26 min | Last month

Sabrina Orah Mark Writes Into Brokenness

"Writer and poet. Sabrina or a mark likes to describe her stories as having little poems folded up inside of them. She publishes monthly essays loosely based on motherhood and fairytales in the literary journal the paris review. Here's the opening of her november essay. You break it. We fix it. I am inside. you break it. We fix it holding my son shattered. I-ipad hello i call out. No one answers. The counter glows white and the walls are empty. Hello hello. I wait a few minutes before calling out again. One minute says a raspy voice from the back of the store hopes swells in my chest. Here we comes. We will fix said i hold up the broken screen so we can see it on a little shard of glass. Trump's the floor with a plank. Yeah we says you know what i ask. We says the soldering work required would more than a new ipad. We says it would take weeks possibly months. Sabrina began writing this essay in the weeks leading up to the presidential election. She published it after the election when the sitting president and a large percentage of his allies still refused to accept the decisive results. Oh the next week. I returned. You break it. We fix it with a whole entire country. It's heavy but i managed to carry it through the parking lot leaving behind a trail of seeds in the crisp sent of democracy and something that smells like blood or dirt across. It is a growing crack. A trial too young to be alone is out in front holding a broken country to store is gone out of business as the child. I shift the country to one arm and tried appear in. But it's shuddered and dark. Told you says the child out of business. I text my husband. You break it we fix. It is closed. I've come here for nothing again. The texture of sabrina 's essays is a rich. We've of fairytales politics. The past and her children's voices. Sabrina joins us for the fourth. In our four part series on creativity in the global pandemic. We started off talking about how she's managing to find the time to write with two young kids. At home she drew parallels between the ways that motherhood and quarantine have shaped her creative process right now. we're home schooling. And so there's this. I mean it's it's it's a packed house like twenty four seven and there is like the endless ness of like of things everywhere and snacks and then trying to ride. And then you know I do feel like. I've been working harder than i've ever worked in my entire life like you know since march like because you just have to grab the pieces of time where you can find it. It was funny because i was homeschooling. You know all day long like all day and at one point i just it was like from four to five i just i climbed into my bed and just like sat there with like staring at a wall at five o'clock my signs come into my room and they're like you forgot about us like what do you mean i forgot about you like how could i forget like it was like a whole hour went by you know like where i wasn't just right i was. Yeah you write about your kids a lot and their voices creep into your writing sometimes in unexpected ways. Which is one of the things that i really love about your writing so just to back up a little bit. You've said that after you had children the form that you're writing took changed after. I had kids. Is i think in many ways like i became more porous like i allowed. I had to allow more of the world and and it was right around that time where In many ways my prose poems started sort of growing and growing and growing part of it was just time. Because i couldn't like live inside of a single poem. I used to write these prose poems. In the instance of lake hermetically sealed likes Boxes and spaces of time. And i couldn't do that anymore after i had kids. And so would sort of just keep returning and returning and returning to my writing and then it would kind of get bigger and longer and stranger and more porous and there was more interruptions and then in many ways my palm started turning into stories and then with these essays. Even more of the world's i think started coming in And i really believe in some crossing. John rouse and having things blurb because i do think that you know fiction will leak into reality and reality leaks into affection and i don't really believe in like you know the the strict border between between john or as For myself creatively lake. I need to sort of move back and forth in that fluid way. It's really interesting that you connect that with having children. Yeah i used to be able to like work in these. These of yeah on interrupted Spaces and then the interruptions actually ended up really feeling like like a gift you know. And that's sort of something. I've been thinking a lot lately. Just you know inside of a. You know these last seven months of That that in certain ways like a lot what we lose often. You know We gain in these other places Like i'm trying really hard to find those places where like the thing that feels like a loss is not really a loss. And i'll give you an example like i'm teaching A class in poland's on on zoom and one of my students is disabled and she was talking about how you know. Normally these students are all Brought onto a university campus in the states and in a millionaire. She never would have been able to participate in this program. And she said you know Your captivity like when the world's closed for you the world opened up for the first time for me. And i would never have been able to meet her otherwise i would never have been able to know her and know her writing and hear her voice and mike see her. You know and when i moved all of my classes that i teach online. I thought like oh god. I don't wanna teach these workshops online. I love sort of the intimacy of the classroom that i've created an ideal but i think that like i held onto this idea of how things are supposed to be all of the time like so intensely that had i not been forced into this like other space. I would never have known this. You know what. I wasn't seeing Like why did i ever offered classes online before thinking about like you know people who for a million different reasons like wouldn't be able to get semi to a classroom. It was like the perfect moment of like what we loses. What we gain

Sabrina Sabrina Joins The Paris Review Literary Journal Donald Trump John Rouse John Poland Mike
Facebook Bans Holocaust Denial Content

People of the Pod

07:33 min | 3 months ago

Facebook Bans Holocaust Denial Content

"On Monday in a major departure from the company's previous position facebook announced that it would ban Holocaust denial content from the platform E. J.. C. is proud of our sustained advocacy to help facebook or at this decision. Joining us now to discuss the new policy is join ANA cutler facebook head of policy for Israel and the Jewish Diaspora. Jordan, thank you so much for joining us. Thanks for having me here now in two thousand eighteen facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg famously said that he hates Holocaust denial but that he doesn't believe it is facebook's place to censor the free exchange of ideas. This week facebook reversed course and announced that Holocaust denial would no longer be permitted on the platform what changed between then and now. I think I'll start just bipolar mark because I could say a lot of things but I think the most important thing is what he says himself I think what's really interesting mark doesn't post about every policy change and every step of the company takes, but he felt it was important that he posted he set himself. I struggled with the tension between standing for freedom of expression and the harm caused by minimizing or denying the her the Holocaust. My thinking has evolved as I've seen data showing an increase in. Antisemitic violence as our water policies have also changed on hate speech drawing the right lines between what is and isn't acceptable speech in straightforward but with the current state of the world I believe this is the right balance and I just I felt it was important just to read all of his words. I'm I'm sure many of you saw it on facebook and then read one hundred other news articles but to go back into what mark said his thinking of all for two reasons, one data in the real world. And I'm really actually excited to get the data from the new AJC survey coming up not to give you a plug. No one asked me to do that. By all means, plug away that day that is important to us. We we look at it and we see it as a connection between what we see online and offline world that's important to us, and second is the discussions that we've had with people around the world. That's also important Tyson. You guys have been a part of that. So again, these processes evolve and I think it's important to note all of our processes and all of our policies evolve. So mark you know having. A policy change isn't that unusual? This one obviously is something that we've been all very focused on so it stands out to us. facebook famously has more than a billion, maybe even two billion monthly active users, something like that. Right the the numbers. That I'm not counting. The number is is way up there and certainly makes you number one among social media platforms. So I would imagine with so many people. So frequently using facebook, the sheer number of posts, individual posts in facebook's history must be well well into the billions does this decision apply retroactively? So if someone five years ago, posted some piece of Holocaust denial content in among these many billions of posts is facebook using some kind of system to find that and remove it. Great question because we actually find remove. Two ways the first is our AI systems that look and find for this stuff and the second is user reports and hoping many the listeners here when they see content that they think violates our policies, not just our speech policy but any of our policies that they report it because every piece of content whether it's a comment page post, all of those pieces of content are things that you can report and have checked by were, and those reviewers are people that are. Based all around the world that are operating twenty, four, seven, and operating in every language on our platform to find those violations it's important to say that no matter what changes we've made as soon as content is violating our platform, we will remove it because hate speech what it was two years ago isn't necessarily hate speech today, and that's not just because we've changed our policies the words that we used as slurs change over time and so speech changes as time. Evolves. We also take a look at those changes and reevaluate our policies. So of course, if we find content because it's reported to us or because we find it no matter when it was posted, we will remove that from our platform. Now, it will take time when it comes to this new policy to get it up to speed and to try to get as much of this content off. One of the things about ai is that it takes time for us to. Learn and to be able to use automated technology to find things and remove them. does take a learning process especially considering how many languages we have. So I just encourage everybody listening if you see Holocaust denial or distortion content to report it, but I would like to flag that we might make mistakes especially in the beginning, you'll have an opportunity to appeal that mistake, and if we continue to make mistakes I can promise you that will continue to work on improving. One thing I've seen kind of these things will go viral when when mistakes are made sometimes. On on twitter of course, not not facebook but you'll see that someone you know intended or someone. Did you know share their great grandmother's story of being in the Holocaust something in there there's a line about how you know someone once told her that her story was made up or something and enough words are used in just the right pattern that the AI picks it up and flags it as something like that. So I guess those are the kinds of mistakes that that can happen is they're? Going to be some kind of a notice I, go on my facebook and I like post my usual daily Holocaust denial post and ten of my friends like it and two more calm and whatever, and then someone says like what the hell are you doing like this is terrible and they report me and facebook becomes aware of it and they take it down as well. They should what happens then well, it's going to be the same as any other content on our platform and I think it's important. To notice the policy that we came out with to remove how Austin I own distortion content is a subsection of an existing hate speech policy that already provided a lot of protections against hate speech or antisemitic content against Jews, and so for us it's I wouldn't say reinventing the wheel here. What we're doing is adding onto a policy that we already started in August I kind of look at that as the moment where these changes really took shape where we added a line into the hate speech. Policy that said, we will remove harmful stereotypes against Jewish people that claims that they are controlling the world arts, major institutions, and so this is going to be a line under that. If you go in and anyone can go door community standards and see there's a new bullet point under there that says Holocaust denial distortion anyone who reports content for violating hate speech policy we'll be treated the same anyone who reporting any content is treated the same. We're not doing something separate for this policy so just in. General. When you report content I think it's important to know that often anonymous reports so people should feel safe to report the person on the other side. If that content isn't violating, they're not going to even know that that content was reported. But if the content is violating, then they will get a message from US telling them that the content was removed and we'll tell them for what policy it was removed. We won't be specific as to what word was violating. We will tell them what policy. That's been a huge undertaking from our engineering teams. We usually just in the past would say this is violating our community standards and we understood that that wasn't enough information for people. So now we explain what policy was violating. It's important to note that people report content for many different reasons. But when we see that report will look at it under all of our policies. So you might report something for being hate speech, but we actually removed it because it was nudity we will evaluate all that content. And then let the person know as to why we also explained to them that if you continue to violate our policies, we will block you from using our services or eventually remove you from our services

Facebook AI Mark Zuckerberg Ana Cutler Israel Jordan Jewish Diaspora Founder United States Tyson Austin
Unpacking Israeli History

Israel Story

03:23 min | 4 months ago

Unpacking Israeli History

"Back in twenty seventeen, the New York Times published an article about Amadeo Garcia Garcia. The. Last Living Speaker of the top story. Once, spoken for centuries by thousands of members of an Amazon tribe Madeo, the sole survivor, and the last person on earth to know the language his tried which had lived uncontactable for centuries along Amazon River in Peru slowly died out due to the weapons diseases brought to them from intruders when Avodados brother passed away his last remaining relative the missionary asked Amodio how he felt. Adele responded in the broken Spanish that he had. The only way he had to communicate with outside world he said. It's now over for us. Why? Dale no longer has some to speak to and when you have no one else to speak to, you will lose your language. That's why was over for Amodio. Losing a language is like losing an identity, a culture history. I don't mean to sound over dramatic here but losing a language is really losing oneself. Looking back at the history of the Jewish people that Jews faced a very similar problem. And the reality today is that over the last one, hundred, fifty years, a modern miracle took place for almost two thousand years Hebrew the language of the Torah the Bible and so much Jewish literature you know the prayers was mostly reserved for the ritual. And now. Jews. Over the world's beekeeper, a language that was essentially dead as a spoken language. Something like this has never happened in history of language. The. Fact that the majority of Jews around the world speak Hebrew today is not something to take for granted. There are approximately fourteen point, seven, million Jews in the world and six point seven, million of them live in Israel where Hebrew is the national language. And many hundreds of thousands outside of Israel, speak language as well learning it in. Jewish. Day schools and summer camps or at home. Short. The Bible prayers and religious texts were written and read in Hebrew. Literally nobody spoke in daily life for like almost two thousand years. So How'd an almost extinct biblical language reemerge as spoken language in the span of only a few decades? Was Zionism that deserves the credit Certain. Figure named Elliot's Ben Yehuda. And what is it always obvious that Hebrew would be the national language of the Jewish state. Let's jump back in time to learn about the history of the Hebrew language details about the spoken language of Hebrew in ancient times are not perfect. Here's what we know. In the Bible the Jews otherwise as Hebrews spoken ancient Biblical version of. Biblical Hebrew was the spoken language of the Jews for over a thousand years. But one of the Romans destroyed the second Jewish Temple in seventy CE HEBREW AGAIN. To die. Out.

Amodio Amadeo Garcia Garcia Israel Amazon River New York Times Living Speaker Peru Adele Dale Ben Yehuda Elliot
Eva Schloss on Holocaust forgiveness

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

06:44 min | 4 months ago

Eva Schloss on Holocaust forgiveness

"This S Charlie Goals Jewish. States those who listen for those who are willing to listen. Now. Thank you very much. tweed action. and. I've. Lived a long time and have experienced a lot of wonderful things but Israel. I'm believable Bihar. And of course, it leaves it says sign on my way overlooking. World. Let's just bring it back to today in this country. I think it's fair to say that British Jews experienced a visceral form of antisemitism that they have never done before with the election of Jeremy Corbyn, the leader ship of the Labor Party and the genuine threat that should he have won the election in December twenty nine hundred thank goodness didn't that Future, existence in the united. Kingdom. was under threats. Can I ask you in this for years of quite quite considerable pain for the Jewish community here? Could you feel parallels with what she experienced in Vienna announced the damage as a child not at all not at all and no people's starting to be afraid he upset about it. But as always say Sicily announcing and you know unfortunately antisemitism has always been and always be I don't know why but it is affects. Who is essential his and? It does it's just. It's language. So it's subsequent assist inborn in the people, but it is thus Mention it just same. Like what this I'm doesn't. Nazi. Time. So I must say, it doesn't really bother me and mustard personally offend million may. Not experienced any antisemitism in again thank you for making that clear. Now, you lived in the same apartment block in Amsterdam and frank, and you were only a month apart in Asian. Playmates together in early teenage, and then in nineteen forty two, you both went into hiding to avoid the Nazi effort to capture Jews in Amsterdam. Now, you'll family was captured by the Nazis after being betrayed by double agent in the Dutch underground and transported to Auschwitz. You father and brother didn't survive the ordeal, but you and your mother were barely alive while you afraid by Soviet troops in nineteen, forty five. How Did it feel. To have left your home city of the Anna. To try and create new life understood them. And for that to happen to you, even as you fled from way you used to. Well as it was. At tangible tangible time. Have a very happy little girl in Australia had old plaza who was Like older process should be very protective for me. I have a sort of a viable child. It was much more at a bookworm and he had to be all his stories which he was dating Again. Pants. Kaslow's advice Elliott wonderful family life, and then to go to Belgium. Glad we got out of Australia Benny. Many of our family members didn't because it was spent thirty eight. It was very difficult to get past the German Jews had already gone to England and land, and France and everywhere, and most of those companies did the daily want any more Jews? So only if you're somebody special. got visas any more. But advising referenced in Jim and then Mefatha actually lift in Holland and remain Belgium, and of course, the war stock that my father had asked to get as well to Holland because in a war board as will be closed and view may not be able to see. So in in forties ewing's a wall that in February nineteen forty because visas to for three months to visit by Fassa in in Holland. So relief like you say on the same Dressy not an apartment block, it was a hold area of. More than it'll buildings and there was eleven years old. But of course, you know ahead on trust French said ahead to Dutch Andam. difficult to accept that Baz also children and even by the teaches and. So lost all my confidence. became shy Biz stone but friendly and eventually settled down. But of course, the Nazis invaded. And, of course, a measures Jewish people started to come. And for two years VI IN FIA to be arrested. And in nineteen forty two, then southbound young people go to call up notice have to come to a place respect pex given exactly start Schefter Blake to deported to Germany to work in German factories. But Zach to him benighted forty-two most of German Jews had been deported to get us or two camps. So why on Earth should your one more young Jewish be to Cup to Germany? So Zet sit time when Anna's Fazah auto frank and my father and many other Jewish feminists is cited civil send Sam young people, but we would go into hiding. While I was just sit at ten years old. And my father called us together. And he said, hence, you not going to set you we going to hiding. But we couldn't find a family who was to take it for people. So we have split up. I go visit my Mazda enhance feel bismuth files. And that started to cry. And did not want to be separated the game.

Holland Jeremy Corbyn Germany Australia Amsterdam Bihar Belgium Israel Sicily Frank Zach Anna Vienna Labor Party Auschwitz France Fassa Schefter Blake Ewing
Early childhood sex education

The Joy of Text

06:12 min | 4 months ago

Early childhood sex education

"So so much to talk about when it comes to sex education that we really need a split this topic up into two smaller episodes. So this episode we're going to be talking about sex ED with younger kids. This is part one, and then you can stay tuned for part to in the future when will discuss sex education teens and young adults. So sex education with younger kids. So I feel like the number one question with this topic that I actually have heard people ask me people I feel like like this is just everyone's like top question is when should you start speaking to your kids about sex? Right? How young is too young or how old is too old I love this question my favorite question and there is no such thing as too young and I think that comes from people understanding that when you the moment you are holding touching, kissing your baby, you are teaching them about Zack's like that is the most critical thing like to understand that teaching A. Child, about sex is teaching them about their body feeling comfortable with their body understanding that loving touch could be really amazing as they get older using the correct body parts and needs for body parts talking about sex super comfortably when they're really young when it's not comfortable and then it develops as time goes on and getting books for kids even at age two or three about like body parts and taking care of their bodies and ready five or six and a little bit where babies come from. So you'll people are often shocked when I say start really on the are so many reasons to start young the younger you start. Better. Could I just ask a question though about the use of the term sex education in all of those areas because When you talk about hugging and kissing out of affection for your child to me that's not sex or that's something to be distinguished from sexual touch or body parts even though their sexual organs there they have other functions as well. I'm wondering why this all put under the heading of sex education because sex education starts with a really good sense of her own. Body and sexuality like that is just it's a basis for being able to have the tax and so understanding your body being comfortable with your body being able to talk about your body picking up the fact that those aren't things are not shameful at touch is important. Part of all this that is that is the building blocks the underlying building blocks for sex education. I think another super important point is that at the very young age often kids getting talks about like stranger danger and about like who who is it appropriate to? Reveal your body in front of WHO's allowed to touch your body. So all of these things which are really age appropriate for very young kids are like really the fundamentals of Lake consent and body autonomy which is not usually how we think about it but I think that's also like a like a real fundamental of of sex ed I'm really glad you raised that because I think it's the most understandable to people. You WanNA teach consent when they're older as the consent that we think of as consent. But already when you have a three year old and you insist that three year old kisses, uncle, Harry you're sort of giving a masjid may not want to. You know one of my favorite sex educators. That from day her children are born basically they have a choice. It's like wave hogger kiss or something or shake hands wave or kiss like an every time they meet somebody they get to choose how they interact with that person and that is she believes the bottom line of sent in the end I think that she's right and so it's the same kind of thing if. They grow up feeling comfortable saying the giant and Penis and vulva any no their body parts don't feel shame with them back is going to be one of the building blocks that helps them have a good healthy sex life. It's very hard to kind of go back and age you know fifteen or eighteen or twenty-one and say, well, you shouldn't have shame about those things because. They're not sample when you've been treating them shameful since the day they were born. Another really important thing. Sorry guys I'm really passionate about this topic. I think another really important point when kids are very young as like the first time you see your kid touching their own private parts, right unlike how that's like such an opportunity for parents to really address that in like in open affirming healthy way, I'll pose it as a question for Chevra. Like if you're a parent your three year old. Daughter is touching her vulva. How do you handle that conversation? So that's such. A common question might cause your kids are going to masturbate. You have raised the not to be ashamed of their body they're gonNA try touch their body does it's GonNa feel good to them, and the way you respond is completely setting the stage for how they're gonNA react to their bodies and even if you just sort of your lips and the big deep oh my God and then don't see anything that's a message getting press breast your children it's almost like. Messages are given even if you're not copying need to be aware of that. So it's absolutely essential that you are super comfortable with this which honestly I almost we jumped the gun because I feel like the most important thing about sex education for parents especially with little kids is to start becoming comfortable themselves. If you are lucky enough to be addressing this when your kids are really little, you're lucky enough to say, okay, I'm GonNa get past the hump of feeling uncomfortable with this. And you need to really be honest with yourself because I cannot tell you how often I see parents groups and they say, well, how many of you are comfortable time at and everybody raises their hand and then I how many of you actually talked about sex you gives none of them, raise your hand or of them raise their hands and I'm like well, why not amazing what we could ask and the kids are going to ask you need. To start this conversation and you need to be really comfortable and it's much easier when your child is two or three or four, or five or six to have these conversations and

Zack Chevra Harry
Alone, Together

Israel Story

04:39 min | 5 months ago

Alone, Together

"I was born burst shave I grew up in Beersheva that's God defeats new today. God. These a fifty years old but forty years ago when Gandhi was just ten UA sent out on an errand that basically landed him where he is today. Major said to buy milk. Find the puppy and just take the puppy, bring it to my mother and she said, no, no. No, he's not going to stay here. Sorry and she took me together with the pappy today shelter. Bersheva the SPCA or southbound clean is the society for the prevention of Cruelty to animals. They mainly give shelter to abandoned an injured cats and dogs and try to find homes for them. They also have a lot of educational activities and raise awareness for the wellbeing of animals. The Israeli chapter was actually founded long before the state. In, one, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty, seven during the British mandate. With route anyway God the mother stepped into the local bill chef branch in God couldn't believe his eyes. Remember was shopping so so many dogs barking and barking and I was so sad like I understood it's a good place for them. was begging begging to be they want to say come in and play with them and talk to them, and maybe hug them. So dennehy I realized that I. Need to come almost every day, and then I start to come almost every day after school instead of school. Saturdays and holidays. That was my oldest childhood. Gaddi became extremely committed volunteer leaving the shelter working with the dogs around. Selling cookies and lemonade to make. Sense for the dogs and cats everything everything. Really, see my heart I don't know something that I always say Kenneth See animals suffering and they need help and not to do anything and did you convince your mother to Let You keep the dog I try to but didn't success but after. A she they agreed that the we have a dog, we adopted a dog. A in Bursch Chevron and we have a dog but. The first one that you said, no, it's changed my life. I think. I think she today's vca. You knows maybe take me there got the ultimately left bill ship and moved to Tel Aviv. But one thing hasn't changed from then I did leave the. For the last twenty years he served as the organization's spokesperson and let's just say he's been pretty busy since the pandemic struck into Gerona time. It's starting very bad. A lot of people start to abandon. The animals was scared at what what's going to be now going to have so many animals that people want to throw away people are scared if they can bring this to them, you know the Koran they the Koran out they I don't know just Keb ages not contagious people. Emphatically, it'll be the number of abandoned animals spiked and amid all the uncertainty and chaos of those early days. Got The and his colleagues tried to reassure the public retell. The people don't be afraid it's not contagious from. To human beings and for you. Don't be afraid. And then something happened suddenly spca shelters around the country were packed but not with abandoned animals instead, they were packed with people. Seeking to adopt a quarantine companion, you know people want to adopt dogs and cats in the time I think the virus Gerona did something great for the abandoned animals almost all day shelters in Israel are M. T. now adoption adoption adoption option option adoption, everyday adoption, lot corruption I. Never See before never never never seen before unbelievable it's something that. I don't know what to say thanks Kona while it's very good for those indicates that they don't want the corner state for sure I. Don't want say they want the dogs cats find good place

Gandhi Beersheva Tel Aviv Major Bursch Chevron Gaddi Dennehy Kenneth M. T. Gerona Israel
Interview With Stephen Lamonby

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

05:11 min | 6 months ago

Interview With Stephen Lamonby

"As an engineer Steven Lamb designed navy torpedoes satellite carrying Rookus oil rigs special effects for Hollywood blockbusters films like saving. Private Ryan. Ryan's just to name. Finding him. So even though homes that earns me the right to get back to my wife and. That's my mission. To. Remove your helmet and tell me Your name. Name is gladiator. I will have my venues. Generous with his time he proved that so many times when he was working at solar giving up his time for free. After the lectures were over. With students who needed that extra tuition, he joined university as a part time lecturer in special effects and mechanical engineering. And he really does turn dry boring lectures because I've definitely sat through some lectures which are quite boring into exciting practical demonstrations. And is it true that you constructed a fake Russian tank and it was used on the streets of Saint Petersburg James Bond movie. Goldeneye? Yes, we did. Yeah. We did that. How did that come about? Because the Russians didn't WanNA. Wheel tank driving over the cobblestones. Smashing cobblestones up around the Mojica Palace. So we built a tank like a kid's toy which rubber tracks and underneath had wheels. So we'll take but not break anything and how did you get into the James Bond movie. To supply. Thanks. Okay, the power of tanks they you got the PUTT supplied. All, the military vehicles for Saving Private Ryan. Was Elvis choice for the James Bond Films. Thank you a sexist misogynist dinosaur relative to. James. WAISTBAND. Like boys with toys. I wouldn't single. Chatting, sophisticated secret agent shaken but not to stir, we're actually by the river. In Winchester as the people won't buy on a sunny August stay. And a lot of people didn't about you. Thank you very much for joining us software pleasure because of that private lunch last year. So perhaps you could set the record straight firstly in what context did you say the words Jewish people are among? The cleverest in the world. It came up in conversation. About Physics I've always an interest since I was a boy in astrophysics. because. I couldn't believe that one hundred years ago almost. Albert Einstein we're talking about such abstract subjects as light being affected by gravity. And he works out the speed of light, which was a phenomenal thing to do in the nineteen twenties. How did this man come to realizations about what actually control the will then what does control the world? And the whole universe that we live in? So. My interest was based on this philosophy. On physics. And when the lady Mico sleater told me that she was a qualified physicist and she was American. It was almost involuntary question for me to Oscar. She was Jewish and again, this was a private lunch at a private lynch over Cup of coffee. Now, it was also reported to say that you said that black men on the privileged needle help that they can get. Yes. I did say that. Because I've worked all over the world of work in Africa I worked in South Africa Mozambique worked in North Africa. And I realized that a lot of people in Africa are culturally disadvantaged. Cheaper to anybody else. But. The coach or they grow up in doesn't give them the advantages that we have in the West. And therefore, I was always prepared to give them extra help. In addition to this, it was reported in the Times by Phillips that you told Dr Burner. Most Nigerians did not have it in their DNA to be engineers. Is this true? Absolutely not true. This was one of the spiteful comments made by my course. Lita. In a fifth of of temper to get me set knowing. It would certainly get me ten. She also alleged other city things. Like that I was a totalitarian. Does, one become a totalitarian over coffee break. Did you say anything about DNA and African students I said nothing about ten not not an area of expertise of mine. I know nothing about it I only know that gets us by the police. In various reports, you read in the papers on I know nothing about DNA.

Africa Ryan Physicist James Bond Times James Bond Films Albert Einstein Dr Burner Winchester Engineer Steven Lamb Mojica Palace James Rookus Lecturer Mico Sleater Saint Petersburg Lita South Africa North Africa
Arielle Korman, Mira Rivera

Judaism Unbound

04:58 min | 6 months ago

Arielle Korman, Mira Rivera

"Reo is the CO founder and executive director of a mood. She's a Jewish educator performer and perpetual student who is a former Fulbright research fellow and has taught at the national hoverer institute door to door tutoring and was the two thousand nine. Hundred thousand feature teacher at the Jewish singing retreat. Let my people sing Mirror Rivera is a board member of a mood where she also serves as resident rabbi. She has rabbinic ordination from the Jewish, theological seminary and services a rabbi at New York's Roman Nu- She has also board certified Chaplain Mirror. Rivera is also co chair of the Rabbinical Council of Jews for racial and economic justice. Jay. Fridge. And the CO founder with Rene L. Hill of Harlem. Have Ruta a brave space for Jews of Color Allies and co-conspirators in partnership with the Community of Saint Mary's Episcopal Church a professional dancer with the Martha Graham Dance Company before rabbinical school she taught hundreds of New York City Public School children through the National Dance Institute Arielle Cormon Mirror Rivera, welcome to Judaism unbounded. So great to have you. Here, thank you. We're really excited to talk about a mood. It's such an interesting and important project. I'll give a little bias in that. I'm really interested in this in particular because I've been on the board of Sfar for many years, which is the issue of the Torah Academy, the Talmud Academy for lgbtq folks are that comes out of the Experience Lgbtq Q. Folks. It's probably a better way to say it and. When I first heard about a mood I was so excited to hear that there was something that seemed similar from edge use of color perspective. So it's something that I've really wanted to explore for a long time that both of us have and and we're really thrilled to finally have this opportunity. So Mirror I was wondering if we could start with a little bit of the origin story of a mood. In, two, thousand, eighteen, I was invited to be in the Selah Cohort fifteen of bend the arc four juice of color by Jews of color and there I met Ya McCoy will meet her the year previously. And part of that training. Was a study that we that she called. J O C. Tour Academy. And it was several afternoons where we would look text from an anti oppression lands, and at the end of that hurt I was sitting with you who the webster was hard the cohurt. We looked at each other and I said, why does this have to be only part of this training? We need this to be real, and so we started talking with start talking about that. So that was may of two, thousand eighteen. By June or July. Are Corman had come back from Israel at, pass it to you. I did a fulbright year in Israel I live in. Jerusalem and when it came back, I became involved in. J. Fridge which is to cherish on economic justice. And Colored. Caucus. Part of my involvement. J.. Fridge I was connected to Huda Webster An. I approached you Huta saying that I wanted to teach a small class on the politics of Hebrew pronunciation and I wanted to teach it for Jews of color of an Alexi that you're smiling because acid is immensely nerdy deeply nerdy. Added belts deeply important but you huda one up to me and he said what if instead of just having your class, we actually create a container for this kind of learning to happen more often. and. So that really launched the idea of. Jesus, Colored Tour Academy, which became a mood colored tour academy and we started out by a every other week having a person in the community, a Jewish person of color in a community teach whatever they wanted and we we started her first Beta run I'm really got to see what what kinds of topics were interesting. How did the groups of people showed up for different topics differ in and we basically got to conduct all this research We launched our first full year after the high holidays. This past fall in two thousand nineteen. And we just completed our first full year of classes. We got here because for as long as there have been Jewish. People color navigating predominantly white Jewish space the roots have been growing and deepening. People like you. Huda. Myself were able to found something like this because of all that work that had been happening. JESSOP. Color entering wet Jewish is being Jewish spaces and also getting to know one another.

Mirror Rivera Co Founder Arielle Cormon Mirror Rivera Colored Tour Academy Israel Rabbinical Council Of Jews Ya Mccoy Huda Webster J O C. Tour Academy National Hoverer Institute Research Fellow Alexi REO New York Huta Martha Graham Dance Company Harlem Torah Academy Jerusalem JAY
Alone, Together

Israel Story

03:40 min | 6 months ago

Alone, Together

"So you'll high, what was working on this piece like for you, what? Did you learn first of all I learned how difficult it is for community that so knit to separate itself all of a sudden like what valiant effort. They did to actually do that once they realize what was going on. And the price is heavy prices. They paid I learned how lockdown affects people very differently lockdown, not the same for a young couple with the one kid or a bachelor living alone or with some roommates, as it is for a mother of you know six seven thirteen kids. Another thing I learned. Is You know these people are very positive? Even when I talked to them, and I talked to remember, I talked to people who had very strong complaints. That's that's how I reached them. Even those people at the end. All of them felt it was very important to end with a positive message. Hopeful message that we can all learn to get along better and. They'll never complain. They'll say you know. It's very very hard, but So. That was really inspiring for me. Being myself stuck with three kids at home and much. Full of. Self pity. That story was produced by High May. Together with our amazing production intern Marie Huda. Ari Jacob wrote and performed the original music. We don't usually think the interviewees in our stories, but this times different since for many of them, talking to the media, especially to non Hundred d media isn't a trivial matter. So. Thank you willy. Dick Mantova Henny Judy near Hyme Teitelbaum. You the elite Menachem Tokyo Shag leak and many others who preferred to remain anonymous, a special thanks to a wicked Zana the national anti-racism coordinator for the Department of Justice, who was incredibly helpful throughout the process of putting this piece together. Before we sign off. Let's check back in with sergeant. Alex Smith the Home Front Command squad leader patrolling the streets of. His assignment like that of many other soldiers was really a bit strange. After all the deem, don't buy large. Go into the army. In fact, some of them are quite hostile towards the arm. So Alex wasn't sure how it would all go down I. Thought I would be getting things thrown at me or like getting shouted from the other side of the street stuff. Like what is the army doing? Hugh, get out of place. I can tell you that as soon as they see us coming there like and they put on the face mask or go to another place. So what do you do you go and knock on people's doors or where? How'd you? How'd you convey this information? No, we do not going to people's homes. We are going close to supermarkets to hospitals. Two clinics in how the hundred received the soldiers so far so good. We have not had any problems set. Like what are you doing you or what? Why is your army coming into a neighborhood? Not all. You're not the right I. Am not I am a secular you I I would say. And is this the first time that you've had significant interaction with with him? Yes, and say that it's nothing like I would have expected I. Not all the like for real are taking us the way we are and leading. Do what we are intending to do, which is to help them and they're cooperating. Also which I think is fantastic

Alex Smith Hugh Menachem Tokyo Shag Department Of Justice Home Front Command Ari Jacob Hyme Teitelbaum Marie Huda Dick Mantova Intern Henny Judy Coordinator
Immigrant pride in Britain

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

04:54 min | 6 months ago

Immigrant pride in Britain

"Trevor Phillips talked about a sense of mission creep in diversity and heroin Hera Dane distinguished between power and influence, arguing that the trump and Johnson were in power. Many of our institutions were influencing against him. Scroll back after this episode to hear the first part of this twin podcast on Johnny Gould's Jewish state. Today Catherine, verbal on the unifying goal of Britishness for those of US lucky to live here and Nyah philomen Iman on how humanity and its possibilities should always be counted about identity. Listen for those who are willing to listen. This is Johnny. Gold's Jewish state of Richard Kim joked with me. The Jews actually more patriotic than the general population. I mean most Jews. I've met in this country. Patriotic, the most non rights hunter, yes, and if you you just you just take for example in a synagogue on Friday A. Press for the Queen and their press listeners now. Donna very much doubt you'll find those in the church. Of England and multi million selling record producer Trevor Horn quoted Leviticus Jewish faith, it says seek the Fortune on. Successive the city to which you have. No I think that's I think that's the way. That's what they do. Jews try and make things better that. The country and and they you know the gross like you separate religion. You need them to help with an. Amazing Resource. You know scroll back for these two amazing views earlier. You'll have expressed today which chimed from within Jewish family. Catherine Bob I'll saying came to prominence ten years ago. When at that is conservative? Party conference speaking support the Party's education policies. She slated a culture of excuses of low standards are see bureaucracy and the chaos of classrooms because it keeps poor children poor. After huge rows and barriers put up in front of her. As she confronted a prevailing culture, she sets up the Michaela Secondary, school in Wembley. Her pupils read five. Shakespeare plays in three years that told a culture of kindness which includes helping each other and their families and offering adults there seats on buses in the tube. She also has an incisive word about how black a nation kids are subtly told, then, not British. Do you feel you've had to prove yourself more than most because of your philosophies on education? Yes we take a slightly different way of doing things. God behavior got teaching methods got the ethos, and so it's been a bit of A. Bite to persuade people that this is an option that's worth trying may now with our outstanding off stead, and with our grizold Jesus last year. It seems pretty obvious that this is a a valid way of doing things. But when we started, it was far from being valid. People thought we were a bit crazy frankly to to be doing what we were doing. There is a prevailing wind in education. Still blows against you, Catherine sued. You still are people. They're trying to trip you up all the time. If there are any sort of dropping of standards, I know, that will be disciplined, standards are central to your ethos, but but there's a lot of people not on your side. Yeah, that's true although I have to say many of them have owned by the wayside over the years and not I do feel in a way. Many of them have just given up because we kept on going and it is hard to. To argue against the school that is giving city children chances that they wouldn't otherwise have had. That's teaching them so well. They're you know they really are just defying all the expectations, and also we get over six hundred businesses every year. Mainly Teachers Knoll is teachers. Say My goodness. They're so well behaved. They're so curious there so independently minded. They're so nice, you know. The children are just nice, so when when you got anecdotal evidence like that and you've also got kind of data that shows that we're doing very well. It is hard to argue against it so. People who do argue against it tends to just be. Personal attacks. You know they just don't like me or they don't like. Is They? Don't like school. Stands for an tend to say things like all. No, not at school again. They don't really have any off because there are no arguments, so they dislike as without. Prejudice basically

Catherine Bob Michaela Secondary Johnny Gould Richard Kim Party Johnson Trevor Phillips United States Heroin Trevor Horn Iman Donna Producer Wembley Shakespeare Leviticus