Judaism

Listen to the latest audio content relevant to the Jewish community. This playlist features Jewish individuals having great conversations on relevant topics through a cultural lens. Grow your faith with cultural reflection, history and current events. Sourced from premium podcasts.

A highlight from Hanukkah 2.0: Ep. 296

Unorthodox

01:18 min | 15 hrs ago

A highlight from Hanukkah 2.0: Ep. 296

"Hanukkah season, we get an influx of new listeners, and so this message is for those of you who've just discovered our podcasts who are brand new to the podcast unorthodox, which is a production of tablet magazine. First of all, welcome. Second, let me just give you a quick primer on what you're about to hear. This show is try hosted co hosted try hosted. I'm not sure by the three of us. Me, Mark Oppenheimer, and my co host Leah leibowitz and Stephanie botnick, Leo grew up in Israel, though he sounds totally American now. And Stephanie grew up in great neck on Long Island, though she sounds perfectly comprehensible now as well. And we do a bunch of stuff on this show. We interview a Jewish guest every week. We interview a special gentile of the week whom we put in the gentile hot seat and we asked questions about them and they ask questions about things about Judaism that may have always confused them. And then we also share the news of the Jews. We do a roundup of Jewish news from Tel Aviv to Telluride from beersheva to Beverly Hills to Brookline all over the world, just interesting, funny stories about what's going on with jewelry. We take a lot of listener mail, and you'll hear some of that, and then we conclude by giving some mazel tov, some farewells, some shout outs to people who are having milestones in the world around us. So anyway, it's a great time. We're so happy to have you on board. You are now a member of our listener body, the audience that we lovingly call the j.crew.

Mark Oppenheimer Leah Leibowitz Stephanie Botnick Beersheva LEO Stephanie Long Island Israel Telluride Tel Aviv Brookline Beverly Hills J.Crew
A highlight from The Model Citizens Edition

The Promised Podcast

01:06 min | Last week

A highlight from The Model Citizens Edition

"There was a dress made just of discarded pages from discarded Ikea catalogs. There were lovely, high heeled shoes, fashioned of cigarette butts. There was a trash bag tank top. There were hair bands made from yogurt containers, a necklace made of plastic clothes pins designed by jewelry designer erit gross. There was a necklace that seems to have been made from the tops of the plastic hammers kids bunk each other over the head with on Independence Day, and there was much, much more. A young model maybe 8 years old were a dress made of the plastic drains at the bottom of pota cheese containers. She held a sign that read in English say no to plastic. A teenager in the clothespin necklace held a sign that read in a hybrid mishmash of Hebrew in English, quote, because we have no planet be in lanu planet B it read. The trash fashion runway walk started at the comb ill foe definitely not fast fashion haute couture boutique in the port, which to celebrate the event posted a post on their Facebook page that read, quote, they say that by 2050, there

Erit Gross Ikea Facebook
A highlight from Bonus: Israel Story's "Pigging Out"

Unorthodox

07:54 min | Last week

A highlight from Bonus: Israel Story's "Pigging Out"

"AJ crew it's Stephanie but Nick, we are off this week for Thanksgiving, but our friends at Israel's story are putting out some amazing episodes and we wanted to share one of them with you. This one appropriately is called pegging out. Hope you enjoy. A few years ago, LIDAR sapir, Azul archeologist from Tel Aviv university. Got a call from two of her colleagues. Jose, in hotel halaf. They were in the middle of a dig in Jerusalem city of David, an had just made an unusual find. I think the send me a picture and I said, okay, this small animal is a pig. So excavated carefully and we want to see exactly how it was positioned when it died and what happened to it and don't just take out the bones. Following her instructions, they carefully unearthed a complete skeleton of a young piglet. Who 2700 years ago was in the wrong place. At the wrong time. The Finn fell on it, and it was cut between the vessels on the floor. Do you happen to have that pig here? Yeah, I have it too. Can I see? Yes, sure. Um. But if this car. Yeah, that's the skull. So this is the pig. Yeah, that's the it's divided here to box. It box has different part of the body. This is the box with the skull. You can see it's very, very it's a very small. This summer, when the discovery was published, the piglet became something of a media sensation, a piglet that was found, the discovery of the skeleton of a piglet in a first temple period home in Jerusalem. So what's the big deal you ask? Why all the headlines? Well, this 8th century BC pig was proof of what LIDAR has been saying all along that pork was consumed in Iron Age Jerusalem. Now we all know that the Torah explicitly says Jews shouldn't eat pork. You shall not eat any detestable thing. In fact, it says it twice. And this one. Once in leviticus, though he divide the hoof and the other time in deuteronomy, so the swine is unclean for you. For centuries that biblical prohibition baffled scholars. After all, wild wars are abundant in the land of Israel. In pigs were domesticated here about 10,000 years ago. So why would the Torah ask us not to eat them? Because it has cloven hooves yet does not chew the cud. I mean, in the past, unlike today, you didn't just go to the supermarket and decide whether you were in the mood for beef or chicken. You basically ate what you could hunt or raise. And for millennia upon millennia, that included pigs. Yes, while Bo was always hunted to, it was always eaten while ball was just about of the diet. It was available everywhere. And after it was domesticated, they raised its near the house and ate it. So why on earth did a group of people, people we'd ultimately come to call Jews decide that they were going to take a perfectly good source of nutrition and stop eating it? Researchers from many different disciplines. Anthropology, sociology, history, folklore and mythology, even medicine, have weighed in and offered up all kinds of theories as to why pigs became taboo. But despite all those theories, it remained a mystery. And then, in the 90s, it seemed as if archeology solve the puzzle. The data basically showed that size that we identified early Israelites did not eat any pork. There were no pig bones in the archeological assemblages in them. And sites that we identified as a Philistines did have a larger amount of pigs. So the idea was that early as well, it did not eat big Philistines egg peg. So probably added decision not to it. Pigs anymore was based on self identity decision saying we are not like them. They eat pigs. But we do not. It's an ethnical marker. The Philistines were outsiders who started arriving in the 12th century BC, probably from the Aegean islands or the Turkish coast. And when they came, they brought over their culinary traditions in which pork was apparently. The main ingredient. So for the early Israelites to abstain from pork, it was the local people way of saying, this is what defines us apart from the new population. And that made a lot of sense. I mean, it's not for nothing that we say that you are what you eat. We sat in many cultures, even defining yourself as a vegetarian and over again. It's not only defining what you eat, but it also defined your ideology. Your perception of the world, your symbolic world, who you are, how do you defer from other people? I mean, it's all set of values that comes with this. So it appeared as if the question had been resolved. The reason many Jews today in the 21st century don't order a side of bacon is because more than 3000 years ago, our ancestors wanted to differentiate themselves from the philistine newcomers. That was the origin of the pig prohibition. Case closed. Except it wasn't really. Well, looking back, there were there were some faults in the data. In 2013, lidao, then a young postdoctoral fellow decided to review all the data once again and assign clearer dates to the various different bone assemblages. And what did you do start to discover? I started to discover that the patterns of pork consumption avoidance are very complex. The model you have, you see that people behavior is a complex behavior don't work according to what you expect them to work. In other words, it wasn't the clear picture of Philistines munching away on pork chops and disgusted early Israelites, deciding to eschew the animal altogether. Rather thou found. There were periods when no one ate much pork or when everyone ate some pork, or periods in which pork was eaten mainly in rural areas or mainly in urban centers, or in the northern kingdom, but not in Judea, and so on and so forth. So it wasn't an identity issue if you eat or not. There was some reason for people not to eat it. It was economic opportunities. Pigs, according to LIDAR, might have become less appealing at various different periods for all kinds of reasons. They can't be herded, they don't plow fields, they don't produce milk or wool. They can go on the field and eat all of the potatoes and everything that you had there. But still, it seems that even if pigs weren't a main staple, it wasn't completely avoided. LIDAR's research showed that even in Jerusalem, right next to the holy temple, and at the time of Isaiah and Amos. People kept an 8 pigs in every house in the U.S. alone from that period. They had wanted 2% pigments in every house. There was no place that there was completely pocket audience. But when you find a completely in the house, it was bigger and they

Lidar Sapir Jerusalem City Jerusalem Tel Aviv University Israel AJ Stephanie Jose Nick Turkish Coast Aegean Islands BO David Lidao Northern Kingdom Judea Holy Temple Amos Isaiah
A highlight from Episode 68: Beyond the Count: Talking to Jews of Color

Can We Talk?

06:08 min | Last week

A highlight from Episode 68: Beyond the Count: Talking to Jews of Color

"Being a black American Jew means that no matter what I'm doing, the first thing people see is that I'm black. I am from an interfaith Muslim Jewish family, growing up in a post 9 11 post second intifada, America, I grew up a racialized Jew. For me, being a first generation immigrant to by choice means that I most often find myself on the outside looking in of multiple spaces and places. Koreans see me as being more American than Korean Jews see me more as being non Jewish as a convert than really and truly Jewish. For me being mixed ethnic, queer, Jewish person is both about being part of something vast and communal and also something that's isolating because it's the pie is getting cut into very small slices and it's hard to find others like yourself. That was Cassandra housley, maruchi zalal, tsuji men Miranda, and gage gorsky, who all identify as Jews of color. The Jews of color initiative, a nonprofit based in San Francisco, estimates that between 12 to 15% of American Jews are Jews of color. The Pew Research institute has a similar if slightly lower estimate. The Jews of color initiative recently released a survey of over a thousand self identified Jews of color from all over the United States. The survey respondents were a diverse group of Jews who also identify as African American, Hispanic or LatinX, Native American or indigenous, Asian American, Pacific Islander, Middle Eastern, mizrahi, and beta Israel or Ethiopian Jewish, and multiracial. Ilana Kaufman is the executive director of the Jews of color initiative. I spoke with her about the survey's findings, and the Jewish communities growing awareness of its own diversity. As this conversation has continued to gain momentum. There's been some very sincere wondering about our experiences as Jewish people of color. Our perspectives, what happens to us when we're communal spaces? Do we really have experiences or racism or not? How and in what ways do we engage Jewish life and why? The survey respondents report engaging in Jewish life in many of the traditional ways. Going to synagogue, celebrating Shabbat and holidays, passing on Jewish identity to the next generation. Three quarters of them said that engaging in tikun olam or social justice was an important expression of their Jewish identity. And an overwhelming majority report facing racism and discrimination in majority white Jewish communal settings. In this episode, ilana and I talk about the survey and its implications. You'll also hear from Cassandra morocha gage and suji about their personal experiences. So elana, this is an engaged group of Jews. That's right. And yet the survey shows that the vast majority, 80% report they faced discrimination, especially in Jewish congregational settings. I mean, I don't imagine that came as a surprise to you or did it. I mean, what was your reaction to that finding? This number is jaw dropping. And while it's not surprising, because each one of us who's a Jewish person of color who engages in community life, experiences racism on a daily basis. What does it mean that a group of a collective group of people who again have different experiences based on our own racial ethnic backgrounds, but a collective experience of racism in this context, what does it mean when a group is so highly engaged and enduring so much so much injustice and pain and what would it be like if we could just dive in and just engage in Jewish life without having to into a racism? My name is Cassandra housley. I'm originally from Terre Haute Indiana, but I've been in Bloomington now for quite a long time. I'm hyper aware that I'm the only black woman in this space. There's no way around that. And all of that subconscious like performance like I have to be awesome because if I do anything wrong, it's not just because I'm, you know, I had a bad day or because, you know, I tripped on my way here and it threw up my mojo, 'cause, well, she's black and she's this, and she's that. And she's the affirmative action hire that we didn't. Or whatever, you know? And I just not wanting to go down that road because once you go down that road, you don't have brain space left to think about what it is you're there to do. I'm suji men Miranda. I live in Ann Arbor, Michigan. I am an immigrant first generation was born in Seoul Korea, converted to Judaism as an adult on my own, and I am currently the executive director of the aleph alliance for Jewish renewal. I was in a waiting room and happened to come across a woman from a synagogue that I was the executive director of for 6 years. I was very, very involved in this synagogue for 6 years. And she mistook me for another Korean woman who belongs to the synagogue. So they're really is, you know, this feeling that Asians, we all look alike. I mean, that's what resonated or made me real. My name is Miro Shah. I also go by Mira. I'm 22. And I grew up on the northeast coast

Jews Of Color Initiative Cassandra Housley Maruchi Zalal Tsuji Gage Gorsky Pew Research Institute Ilana Kaufman Suji Cassandra Morocha Gage America Miranda Ilana San Francisco Elana Israel Terre Haute Bloomington
A highlight from 87 Ways to Fight Antisemitism: Inside the EU's New Plan to Combat Jew Hatred

People of the Pod

03:36 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from 87 Ways to Fight Antisemitism: Inside the EU's New Plan to Combat Jew Hatred

"Committee. Each week, we take you beyond the headlines to help you understand what they all mean for America, Israel, and the Jewish people. I'm your host. This week, AJC summoned global experts on anti semitism to meet with the United Nations special repertoire on freedom of religion or belief. Among those experts was caterina vons norbertine, the European Commission coordinator on combating anti semitism, and the woman behind the European Union's first strategy on combating anti semitism and fostering Jewish life. Katarina is with us now to discuss the European government's efforts to lead by example and eradicate anti semitism. Katarina welcome. Thank you very much. It's pleasure to be with you. So I will start with a more personal question before we start talking about the strategy. What prompted the creation of your position and what led you to take it on? So basically we had seen, I think, throughout the 2000s and in fact, AJC was one of the leading organizations that had Warren European leaders of rising anti semitism and we saw lethal attacks in some countries coming from right wing extremism and from Islamist side. And in 2015 in January, Islamist attacked the Charlie Hebdo magazine in Paris. And a cautious supermarket and several other lethal attacks that took place in that year and shortly before and after. And I believe that this was a situation and a clear sign that threats against Jews are threats towards society at large towards our values such as, for example, media freedom, freedom of speech, democracy. And the European Commission rather quickly then decided to have a coordinator on combating anti semitism in fostering Jewish life. By the way together with a coordinate on combating anti Muslim hatred because we saw that rise as well following these attacks as many people were generalizing, their feelings towards the Islamists and their opposition right opposition towards Islamists towards Muslim population at large. So it sounds like you're saying that anti semitism, anti Muslim hatred is a side effect or a rather a symptom of greater dangers facing democracy. In other words, anti semitism is not just harmful to juice. It's harmful to other people as well, yes? That is absolutely true, but I think we have to be aware that anti semitism is the oldest hatred and therefore I think we have to recognize that whenever in the past, in particular, it now looking at a European perspective to felt unsafe in Europe. It was always bad for Europe. Whether we were already in a democracy or not, you know, but I think this is important. This aspect is important. Anti semitism targets Jews first, but the effects it has on society at large are dangerous for all of us. You talked about the far right sources of anti semitism and also Islamist extremism there in Europe have other sources developed such as from the far left or from other directions. Are there other sources of anti semitism? Yes, indeed. For the European Commission, we've been very clear that any form of anti semitism is regarded as equally pernicious. Anti semitism has mutated over time.

Katarina AJC Caterina Vons Norbertine European Government European Commission Charlie Hebdo Magazine United Nations European Union Israel Warren America Paris Europe
A highlight from The Getting Rid and Holding On Edition

The Promised Podcast

08:08 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from The Getting Rid and Holding On Edition

"Edited at the time by tomi la Pete, who later became minister of justice and was already at that time the father of la pied, who later became foreign minister and who is slated in a bit under two years to become Israel's 14th prime minister and in fact continues through to today. Rosanne lived and worked and lives and works in Tel Aviv. She has always been drawn to what she calls street fashion just what folks put on and how folks put ourselves together when we go out and she has an archive of tens of thousands of pictures from which lately she's taken to posting on her Facebook page, which Facebook page caught the eye of someone at the city, which someone phoned her up and proposed that a few dozen of her old decent goth photos be blown up to poster size and hung on the light posts on the street itself, and that's just what happened this week. Now to understand the photos of decent golf street in the 1970s, one needs to understand diesel golf street in the 1970s as Joseph judge the great travel writer wrote in 1972 in a National Geographic spread called Israel the 7th a, quote, on any evening in Tel Aviv, the finest entertainment in town is free, a stroll down tree shaded diesel golf street, select the cafe like a seat, a rendezvous for artists and intellectuals take a seat and a coffee as I did one evening and you will soon find that the city's fame for its chic beauty is well deserved. A few years ago, a man in a beard said, everyone on the street wore khakis and shorts. Now it's more fashionable. These were years when des and golf was not just a proper noun, but also a verb with the meaning to doll yourself up, stroll the fashionable street, seeing and being seen. Among Roseanne's pictures, celebrities turn up the musician's shmoe Krause of blessed memory and is then wife singer Josie Katz, the actresses Khanna laszlo and Rachel Dobson, who later started her own theater company. There is a bi Natanz California cafe where the idea was born to buy a ship and load it up with studio equipment and transmitters for a pirate radio station that would broadcast about peace, a marquee above the sidewalk reads join the peace march, but mostly there are just plain people in flashy patterned clothes, mostly looking amazing. One of the photographs shows two older women on the sidewalk in front of a market with ads for frozen dinners and tell much hummus feeding a coin into an old fashioned, your weight and your fortune scale when the city posted the image on its Facebook page, someone named goni Bernstein wrote in the comments, quote, wow, wow, wow, my mother Sita pfeffer may her memory be for a blessing. The one on the right died 11 years ago, your el rosene, you moved our entire family insanely, a warm wash from the past from the smartest, most loving woman I have ever met whom I miss so much. Then someone named Gabi Bernstein is tagged and there's a heart emoji and it goes on ima. It's safta. Then there are various exclamations of joy by various bernsteins, including Gabby Bernstein, who writes, quote, my high school was nearby. I would need done gift a lot in those days. And then there's a comment by someone named rina horn, who is a director, and it reads, quote, imola, did you see what they wrote? Quote, and the comment tagged the el rozanne because Reno Horan is yeah el Roseanne's daughter who, when you go to her Facebook page, has a photo of mayor Ron hudai and it says, quote, hi Ron, thanks for the kind words about my mother, the champion. She deserves it. Another photograph shows two 20 something women crossing at a Tiger striped crosswalk wearing the most belisha bottom the bell bottoms and high platform shoes and Roseanne told the journalist, quote, I don't know the two women in this picture and I'm not even sure that they knew I was taking their picture, but I hope that the comments on Facebook will bring them out to the exhibit, so I will be able to photograph them again, especially because bell bottoms are now back in style. So that would be nice. Quote. And then the day before yesterday, rosanne posted the picture of the 20 somethings alongside it a new picture of the same women now 60 somethings crossing the same zebra stripe crosswalk and she writes two women passed by on des and golf, and I happen to photograph them in 1975. After I put the picture on my Facebook page, they recognized themselves. Their friends, they both worked at the passage hood on the corner of fishermen sipa agi worked at the paper house and was a student at the keyboard seminar and miri Golan was the manager of the Nani shani bridal boutique shared the post on her Facebook page where there were many comments about how she has just gotten more beautiful with time. And arguably nothing captures the cosmopolitanism, the small town world city ism of this city. We love so well, Tel Aviv felt better than a street in a way these street adorning itself with images of its golden age and then finding that it's not quite true what LP hardly wrote that the past is a foreign country. They do things differently there instead the past is like the present filled with friends just some of whom you haven't met with us here in tlv one studio just 1500 meters from these in golf is a woman who left a crowd of hundreds and hundreds odd and inspired when she spoke at the start of the standing together national convention. And taiba last Friday, including many of us who don't know enough Arabic to have followed what she was saying. And I know you're thinking well, he's not objective. Sally is his friend. But I swear to you that the woman sitting next to me leaned over and asked, who is that woman? And it was just then that Sally switched to Hebrew and her voice cracking just a little said, quote, would I have just said was, it is truly not something I can take for granted. What we have here, it's not something I can take for granted that we all feel hope. It's not something I can take for granted that we all feel that we belong. We talk about peace about liberty about social justice gender, justice environmental justice. And it's not something that I can take for granted that here, it's not just talk here, we are doing together end quote, and what she meant by the Wii and what she meant by together, I think, was people who are really different from one another women and men, Christians, Muslims, Jews, secular and religious queer and straight, people who worry about making rent and people who never worry about making rent who see not so differently at all, the world we live in and not so differently at all, the world we want to live in and when she was done speaking, people clapped and clapped and clapped and clapped. And the woman next to me leaned over and said again, who is this woman? Maybe you've guessed by now that the woman is Sally Abed tally is the resource development director and one of the newly reelected cadre of leaders of standing together a grassroots political movement that is changing in the face of Israel for the better organizing Jews and Arabs locally nationally around campaigns for peace equality and economic and social justice. Sally's written for the nation and majority magazine Sally's also the co host with Tina craft of the podcast groundwork about Palestinians and Jews refusing to accept the status quo and working together for change. Sally, how you doing? Wow. I'm always just so happy to hear you introduce me. I think everyone who needs a boost just of their day and of their month and life in general. So thank you. I'm so happy to be here. I'm so happy that you're here. I should at this point be introducing it was going to be a technological miracle, oh had zelter zubaida, who, as many of you know, since the beginning of the academic year has been in the Boston area and we finally found a way with him being up in the middle of the night to include him in the show, and then for reasons that probably have something to do with Ohio probably haven't fallen asleep at two in the morning in Boston. But we're not sure we're still checking it out. He is not here with us. Hopefully maybe he will join us. We will wait and see. As for me, my name is no Efron. I don't mean to boast but the other day I popped up when the alarm rang, it was still dark, and I got dressed quick, and I gathered up Lucy the dog for a before sunrise walk.

Facebook Golf Tel Aviv Tomi La Pete La Pied Shmoe Krause Josie Katz Khanna Laszlo Rachel Dobson Roseanne Goni Bernstein Sita Pfeffer Gabi Bernstein Bernsteins Gabby Bernstein Israel Rina Horn El Rozanne Reno Horan El Roseanne
The Jews Settle in Cuba

Cuban Family Roots PODCAST

02:09 min | 3 months ago

The Jews Settle in Cuba

"Jewish settlement in cuba the first jewish inhabitants were known as morales in fifty eight. The bishop of cuba wrote to spain declaring that every ship back in havana was filled with hebrews new christians. These were jews recently converted to christianity in fifteen o to inquisition proceedings. Began against the merano's in cuba. The secret juice of cuba arranged for trade between the thirteen colonies. And the use of jamaica barbados and other caribbean islands. This unable the colonies to sell goods and by military and civilian supplies. The spanish constitution of sixty nine removed all restrictions on the settlement of juice in latin america and at that time over five honda spanish jews engaging commerce in cuba and five to six jewish families were amongst the wealthiest in cuba jews were among the founders of the commercial king sugar fields and the first refineries in eighteen sixty two through eight thousand ninety five many american us join cubans in their fight for independence. The first jewish cemetery in cuba was established by the united states. Army for the american jewish soldiers who died during the spanish american war in eighteen ninety eight in nineteen six. The cemetery were sold to the united hebrew congregation primarily by american jews. Most of the members of this congregation which was later named temple. Beth israel where americans who fall in cuba or came from key west and other parts of southern florida. After the end of the war between nineteen too many sephardi jews began to come to cuba amongst them young turks who had participated in the earlier revolt against the sultan of the ottoman empire other cames from mexico north africa and the mirrored iranian. They spoke spanish and had olive complexion and blend that well with the rest of the

Cuba Morales Havana Caribbean Islands Barbados Spain Jamaica United Hebrew Congregation Latin America Honda United States Army Israel Florida North Africa Mexico
What is The Shmita Year?

Judaism Unbound

02:10 min | 3 months ago

What is The Shmita Year?

"We're so excited to jump into this topic of the sh- meter for the series. And for this year so hannah nib henza. Sarah's l. young welcome to judaism unbounded so great to have you here great. Severe here yeah really lovely to be joining today. I think you. I want to start just by understanding. What is your take the shumita projects take on the schmidt. And what it's all about. And how how are you moving forward with that. Take into practical reality at has own. We talk a lot about the jewish calendar rate like e cycles of time that we we're so familiar with going through every year right our holiday structure and the the weekly cycles of work and rest but one of the things. We don't talk that often about. Is this bigger seven year cycle. This this gift that comes around every seventh year called the schmidt a year in which we really get to take a step back and ask bigger systems wide questions around The way that these biblical concepts might have something to say for our our life today so traditionally if you read the original source tax the the original torah on what schmead to is. It sounds an awful lot lake. Will you were just talking about farmers or well. We're just talking about the way that we treat our land or harvests or You know it's a very place based thing on the surface but if you really look at the context there if you really start to have conversation with a about what what issue to. What is its relevance what is what are the rabbis trying to say the commentary around this this concept You really start to understand that. It's it's not just about agricultural rules and regulations. It's really about the way that we are living in relationship to land to the natural world to the cycles of the world that are around us to one another to debt to The the trappings of sort of modern life. And this is the thing that We really understand to be dynamic and fluid and constantly relevant

Hannah Nib Schmidt Sarah
Deborah Lipstadt Picked as Biden's Antisemitism Envoy

People of the Pod

02:05 min | 4 months ago

Deborah Lipstadt Picked as Biden's Antisemitism Envoy

"Alarmed by a wave of attacks on american jews tied to the recent violence between israel and hamas american jewish committee and others in may press the white house to address a glaring void in the us state department the absence of a special envoy to monitor and combat anti-semitism around the world. This week president biden. Fill that vacancy. With one of america's preeminent jewish historians and holocaust scholars emory university professor. Deborah lipstadt professor. Lipstadt joined us on people at the pod shortly after the release of her latest book anti-semitism here and now a series of letters to an imagined college student and imagined colleague. Both of whom are perplexed by contemporary expressions of the most ancient hatred. We discussed whether the world is sufficiently aware of this ever present. danger professor. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me so tell me what did inspire you to write this book wind. Did you start writing it. Was there a catalyst. The catalyst was a lot of things that happen amazingly enough now. It sounds like h industry a in two thousand fourteen. The shooting in brussels the the murderer in brussels of visitors to the jewish museum there and a lot of the anti-semitism that emerged around the war in gaza. But it was clear to me that it wasn't just related to the war in gaza that there had been enough other things happening that to just say. Oh this is all about. Gaza was a simplistic view. I wrote an op. Ed for the new york times got a tremendous amount of attention. Discussion and Finally i didn't. I thought that would be the end of it. My agent set me deborah. There's a book here. Where's the proposal. I said i have wallowed in the sewers of anti semitism and holocaust and office so much in my life. I really don't want to write about this. But he wouldn't give up. So i wrote the proposal. He presented to a publisher. They were interested in. I had to write the book. I mean a flip about that really. But as the time where i really started writing the book i would say two thousand fifteen amid to end two thousand fifteen and by that point. It was clear that the book was to me. It was clear that the book was

Hamas American Jewish Committe Us State Department President Biden Deborah Lipstadt Lipstadt Emory University Brussels White House Gaza Israel America The New York Times ED Deborah
Finding the Meaning in the 2020 Pew Study With Tema Smith

Judaism Unbound

01:58 min | 4 months ago

Finding the Meaning in the 2020 Pew Study With Tema Smith

"To some extent the genesis of judaism unbound in a bit of roundabout way as the previous pew study. That came out in two thousand thirteen. Took us a few years to our act together and start the podcast but it was kind of jumping off that understanding of the jewish community as looking different from the way a lot of people thought it did and facing that optimistic way in a lot of people were reading about it and we were whatever. The opposite of fretting is we were. We were ready to embrace this and figure out what it all means and we wanted to have you on starting to talk based on the two thousand twenty p study because he wrote this great piece or put together this great piece to think about how the data of the study could be presented in a way that would give it a different reception. Let's say within the jewish community. So could we start with you just describing a little bit about some of the examples of what you put out there and also like what motivated you to do this. Yes shera so one of the things that really stuck with me. After the last few study was how the data was presented where there was actually what it was showing was actually an increase in for example jewish identification for children of interfaith families and things like that but the data was being presented as doomsday scenario. That you know Children of interfaith families are less likely to be jewish and so when this time around the study came out. That was the first chart i looked for. And guess what it said the same thing but the chart had said intermarried parents much less likely to be raising their children jewish and i looked at it and actually it looks like the numbers had gone up from the previous time and yet we were still telling the doomsday narrative and it was very clear to me. They're the majority of jews who have married somebody of a different background or raising their children. Jewish this is a very different picture than comparing to a jewish jewish couple

The Battle Raging Over Antisemitism and Israel in the Kids’ Literature World

People of the Pod

02:41 min | 4 months ago

The Battle Raging Over Antisemitism and Israel in the Kids’ Literature World

"A few weeks ago. I did a chabad table. Talk segment about a statement condemning anti-semitism released by the society of children's book writers and illustrators. And the apology that followed but there's much more to the story in fact. A battle has been brewing over anti-semitism israel in the children's literature world for quite a while. Gabby deutsche the reporter for jewish insider who wrote about the wider issue is with us now to discuss. Gabby welcome to people of the pod. Thank you excited to be here. So let's first talk about that apology. Did all of this come to light. Share so in the world of As these writers all kids literature is shorthanded. Everybody uses there has been a movement toward diversity calling out racism and all forms of aid and several months years as there has been of course in american society has evolved and about a month ago the beginning of june this organization the society of children's but writers illustrators put out a statement unequivocally condemning antisemitism was a very strong statement it was not political at all. It's not mention. Israel did not mention the politics of the u. s. or elsewhere in the world and jewish writers in fields. Were excited to see it and it was actually. I found my reporting the results of a lot of work by jewish writers. There was an open letter sent around urging this organization to put out a statement. It's an organization that you have to be a part of what you are starting your career. As a writer of children's books and young adult novels it helps people find agents. It helps them promote books. It helps them get bite to give talks. And we'll a lot of influence so when they put out a statement condemning. Assumpta cemetery to wait what happened after that was a lot of controversy on a statement that on the face of it looked very positive which writers in the jewish community ultimately agreed that it was so about two weeks after that statement semitism issued the same organization. Put out another statement. That looked in part to be walked that back. It seems sort of like an apology for their statement on anti-semitism. It's we apologize. The people we've heard you know specifically palistinian american writers muslim writers and many people. The jewish community got the sense that they were saying we can't condemn anti-semitism unless we also condemned islamophobia and other forms of pay and of course the jewish writers also scab against other forms of paid as well. But they were surprised to see the statement following what had been said about anti semitism which did not mention israel. It did not even mention the recent conflict between israel from us it was purely referring to the rise memphis is in the united

Society Of Children Gabby Deutsche Israel Gabby Assumpta Cemetery American Society Memphis United
IDF Paratroopers Head to Europe to Jump for Hannah Szenes's 100th Birthday

The Promised Podcast

02:02 min | 5 months ago

IDF Paratroopers Head to Europe to Jump for Hannah Szenes's 100th Birthday

"We learned this week that next sunday as we recorded on july eighteenth another delegation of one hundred fifty or so idea of soldiers code-named the lightning of the heavens will leave israel on a mission marking. What would have been the hundredth birthday of hannah. Censh- mayor memory for blessing. Hana sanish the budapest born poet and soldier in these secret british special operations executive who on march fourteenth nineteen forty four. When she was just twenty two parachuted with others into yugoslavia where she joined a partisan group and was soon captured by nazi soldiers at the hungarian border and then tortured and murdered by firing squad on monday. To a f- hercules transport. Planes will fly over the forests of eastern slovenia. Where sanish made her last. Jump and one hundred soldiers mostly from the idea but also hungarian. Slovenian and croatian soldiers were reenact sandwiches. Jump the purpose of the reenactment. According to colonel yuval guys the commander of some hueneme the idea paratroopers brigade is to strengthen the ties between the idf and local countries and to try to recreate the heroism of the shoe paratroopers and quote the name of the mission. The lightning of the heavens is taken from his most famous poem. Highly colicky sorry. I walked the case. Aria which goes my god. My god may these never end the sand and the see the rush of the water the lightning of heaven. The prayer of man among the soldiers travelling to slovenia is one who was called up for reserve duty to serve as an educational officer for the mission tel aviv university professor of jewish history. Lieutenant colonel seem Golden husan lieutenant. Haddara golden may refer blessing was killed at twenty three in the two thousand and fourteen gaza war and whose body has been held by hamas for the seven years since and again like mariam said it would take hours months even dissect and elucidate the historical religious and political currents that converge in. This baffling act of symbolism

Hana Sanish Sanish Colonel Yuval Paratroopers Brigade Slovenia Hannah Yugoslavia Hueneme Israel IDF Mission Tel Aviv University Golden Husan Haddara Golden Gaza Mariam Hamas
Speaking to the Senators Behind the Senate Caucus on Black-Jewish Relations

People of the Pod

02:22 min | 5 months ago

Speaking to the Senators Behind the Senate Caucus on Black-Jewish Relations

"Last month. Three us senators announced the launch of the bipartisan senate caucus on black jewish relations. I sat down with senators. Jackie rosen of nevada. Tim scott of south carolina and cory booker of new jersey to discuss the mission of the new caucus. Here's a portion of our conversation senators. Welcome thank you. it's good to be with you. You very very much reinvigorating. The black jewish alliance is that was at the bedrock of the civil rights movement. And it's key to combating racism rising anti-semitism both here in america and around the world. And that's why today's announcement is so critical. The three of you have joined us here on the global forum stage to announce the first ever senate caucus on black jewish relations which you share with our audience fees each of you. What you hope to accomplish. During this caucus i would suggest the wisdom to i yielding. Jackie i it sounds good. Well thank you. I appreciate that. And i want to tell you that. I'm so proud to be here with tim and corey because when i went and talked to them about this idea there wasn't a hesitation for a second and i'm just so excited to do this first time it's ever happened in the senate and i just know that we are going to have so many good conversations positive things going forward and we're going to show real leadership in this issue and just very excited to announce this those senators white. Why didn't you hesitate for me. It's been a lifelong journey in many ways. understanding appreciating the parallel tracks that the jewish community in the black community have been on if you think about it from a biblical perspective for centuries of slavery in egypt and you think about the four centuries. African americans were enslaved. There are tracks that are parallel and pain. That creates promise an opportunity. The tragedies that became triumphs. it's a story that continues on and for my life For me it seems. It's just personal in that. By some of my first mentors larry freudenberg. Who helped me become a part of his insurance agency. And then it gave me a piece of the pie and taught me not to work for someone but worked for yourself

Jackie Rosen Black Jewish Alliance Senate Tim Scott Cory Booker South Carolina United States Nevada New Jersey Jackie Corey TIM Egypt Larry Freudenberg
Boston Rabbi Stabbed Outside Synagogue, Suspect in Custody

WBZ Afternoon News

00:39 sec | 5 months ago

Boston Rabbi Stabbed Outside Synagogue, Suspect in Custody

"Developing news tonight out of Boston's Brighton neighborhood. That's where rabbi was stabbed today in broad daylight right outside the shallow house on Chestnut Hill Avenue. Boston. Police say one person is under arrest. As of now, we do not know who they are or their motive for that attack. Now. The center's executive director, Rabbi Dan Rodkin, says the rabbi who was stabbed is Rabbi Schlomann against key. He says he was attacked outside the house during a day camp for Children the campus into a lockdown for a time, But Rabbi Rodkin says at no point where any of the Children in danger, Rabbi Nijinsky is reportedly being treated for stab wounds to his arm. He has apparently in stable condition tonight.

Boston Rabbi Dan Rodkin Rabbi Schlomann Brighton Rabbi Rabbi Rodkin Rabbi Nijinsky
Anita Diamant Talks Menstrual Justice

Can We Talk?

01:39 min | 5 months ago

Anita Diamant Talks Menstrual Justice

"Tough to be stranded without period products but the stigma around periods can be even tougher and neither diamond wants to help. You should put please everybody put in your bathroom. The one that you that guests use a container with pads and tampons even if nobody needs them it is a sign. It signals the fact that is an amenity. It's not a luxury that needs to be out just like toilet papers so and towels in your bathroom. Anita diamond is the author of many books. Her most recent out this may is called period end of sentence. A new chapter in the fight for menstrual justice the book shares its title with documentary film about a women's collective in rural india that makes and sells pads. The film won an oscar in two thousand nineteen when they announced that this movie had one. I jumped off the couch. Fist bump in the air they as the director said. I can't believe a movie about periods. Just want to ask. That's when anita got involved. The film's producers reached out to her. Because she's well known for her period positive attitude her nine hundred ninety seven bestselling novel. The red tent was named for the imagined retreat. The biblical matriarchs went to during their periods. We discussed the red tent in a live taping. Can we talk several years ago. Anita's fictionalized vision of ancient menstruation. Practices struck a chord with readers around the world now with period end of sentence. Anita is exploring contemporary menstrual justice activism globally and here in the united states.

Anita Diamond Oscar Anita India United States
Tzipi Hotovely: Israels first female ambassador in the United Kingdom

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

02:07 min | 5 months ago

Tzipi Hotovely: Israels first female ambassador in the United Kingdom

"Of the battle. He's not just east rail. Your jewish we all need to fight together. And i think the fact that old people were arrested. I know that the british government and the british police been very active around. It is a good place to start but this is not the end we need. We need to do more in order to fight. Antisemitism and i know the jewish communities very much concerned because no one experienced anything like that in britain and we need to make sure that britain will be the free democratic country that it stands for its values and not a country where jews are afraid to go to school or go to synagogues or to look lectures should be hotter valley as israel's first female. Uk ambassador she was born in recovered in nineteen seventy eight. The daughter of soviet georgian emigrants ardent zionists as with previous ambassador gavin episode thirty. He one about social mobility in israel. The dynamism of the economy tragically. There's anti zionism among young jewish people across the west in the us and he two heads are being turned by media and peer pressure. And while seventy five percent of american jews support israel as a jewish state eighty. Five percents say it's important or very important to stand up for the oppressed or marginalized hundreds of jewish google employees rejected. What they call the conflict of israel with the jewish people overbearing anti-israel narrative makes bias out of balance palestinian. Ism chant along by half wit football. Whoa korie and tv celebrities and her excellency has a message for those in the diaspora who are less than supportive of the jewish state. The young generation in britain can sometimes be very critical but israel's policy in certain fields in areas. But i think that most israelis have their own opinions like as you know. We're we're a country that everyone can criticize the government But i think by criticizing policy. You cannot just go and not support israel. Supporting

British Police Israel Britain Gavin Episode British Government Whoa Korie UK Google United States Football
Rachel Gross on her book The Deli is My Synagogue

Judaism Unbound

02:39 min | 6 months ago

Rachel Gross on her book The Deli is My Synagogue

"Rachel gross welcome back to judaism unbounded so great to have you. It's so great to be back. Thanks for having me so. I wanted to start with a question that i feel like lexin. I were debating for a while a couple of years ago. And then we kinda stop debating it. And i think we should be debating it again which is basically. What does religion mean you know. What do we mean when we're talking about religion because the subtitle of your book as jewish nostalgia as religious practice. And i think it's really important to start by understanding. What do you mean when you say religion or religious practice. I think religion as really important relationships so those relationships can be relationships between humans and the divine or other sacred figures between living humans in community with one another or between humans and their ancestors all kinds of meaningful relationships and then the practices attacks the stories that we use to build those relationships and coming to this definition. I'm building on many other scholars of religious studies and particularly religious studies scholar robert or see who thinks about religion as relationships. And i'm i'm building on that to think about these three hypes of relationships. I think we're jews. We might think about how some jews might be interested in a relationship with god for other jews. The relationship with god may really be in the background and we might be thinking about relationships with the people around us or with our ancestors. And i think that those types of relationships are as important that we can understand religion as as those relationships too. I guess i'm really just struggling with this question of like okay but you know in common use people say well. I'm jewish but i'm not religious. You know they mean some version of like. I'm not into the god stuff for the praying and we could redefine. I mean this is what. I was really struggling with this. I was reading your book. It's like we could redefine religion so that everybody's religious now it's okay. Why is it better to redefine the term religion than to just find a different word. Capture this loyalty. This interest in judy judaism jewishness that you have but also being able to distinguish it between what the people who go to synagogue. Chabad and pray for three hours. What they're doing. So the question is why does defining religion matter and white is redefining. It matter

Rachel Gross Robert Judy Judaism
How Interfaith Relations Helped Drive the Abraham Accords

People of the Pod

01:48 min | 6 months ago

How Interfaith Relations Helped Drive the Abraham Accords

"For years many have seen a religious diversity in the middle east as an obstacle to resolving conflict there but american jewish committee is international director of interreligious affairs. David rosen believes the contrary the shared religious heritage embodied by the prophet. Abraham should pave the way to peace with us now to discuss. How leaders have already begun to make this ideal. A reality is rabbi rosen. And dr ali rashid new amy founder and chairman of the world council of muslim communities. Gentlemen welcome to people love the pod. Dr l. new. We'll start with you. Welcome last year. We watch the historic. Signing of the abraham accords between the united arab emirates and bahrain and soon israel was welcoming relations with morocco and sudan some of said to expand arab israeli peace in the middle east. It's not only important for countries to normalize relations with israel. Which of course is what the accordance did it's also important for diplomats to foster interreligious relationships in the name of abraham. What does that mean. And why is that so important. Well first of all thank you for inviting me to be a part of this event and to speak to such an outstanding audience well from our perspective in the uae. we don't look at mcchord as we're of dividends and stay within the diplomatic arena way. We see that the accord actually bring to nation together. And what i say to nation. I see that you know what happened. Actually on august their teams that we started making history in this area. Where i so that engagement of gold sector of all stakeholders from the east inside and from israeli side.

Rabbi Rosen Dr Ali Rashid New Amy Abraham World Council Of Muslim Commun Dr L David Rosen American Jewish Committee Middle East UAE Israel Bahrain Morocco Sudan Mcchord
JIMENA: Mizrahi and Sephardi Voices

Can We Talk?

02:49 min | 6 months ago

JIMENA: Mizrahi and Sephardi Voices

"Ovid is a dancer and choreographer from aden yemen. She moved to israel as a girl in nineteen forty nine and became a founding member of the inbal dance. Company marguerite recorded her oral history for the gemina oral history project. In two thousand eleven gimenez stands for jews indigenous to the middle east and north africa region that jewish communities thrive in for over two thousand years until the twentieth century. When a million mizraki sephardi jews fled and were forced out of the land of their ancestors. The san francisco based gemina is working to preserve that rich heritage and history producer. Asala sunny poor recently sat down with sarah levin gimenez executive director to talk about some of the stories in the archive as well as their own family histories. A saw worked with sarah on the archives many years ago sayre you and i worked really closely together while i was in college My very first internship ever was with jim messina and working on this oral history project. I like to think that it's what really launched my love of storytelling. I wanted to start by asking you. Why do you think it's important to preserve these stories as told in the words of those who lived it. So i am so happy to be doing this with you a saul. I think that judaism as grounded and stories like that is the legacy of our people. That's the foundation of haha. That's the foundation of what it means to be jewish as passing on stories Were the combination of thousands of years of stories and in regards to gimenez oral history project We collected stories of communities of people who who hadn't been given a platform to share. They hadn't been given a microphone. They hadn't been given an opportunity to talk about what happened to them when they lived and fled countries throughout the middle east. North africa and their stories are an incredibly critical part of contemporary jewish history. And where we are. Today with establishment of the state of israel nineteen forty eight posts showa post arab nationalism and uprisings in the middle east and north africa there was a major disruption of over two thousand years of continuous jewish life in the middle east north africa. Kinda came to an end and that is a huge part of the jewish story. And we have this very unique opportunity to collect the stories from the people who lived through this historical moment in time and it was an honor to collect these stories and hopefully add them to the record of jewish

Gimenez Aden Yemen Gemina Sarah Levin Gimenez Ovid Middle East North Africa Marguerite Foundation Of Haha Jim Messina Sayre Israel San Francisco Sarah Middle East North Africa
Trans Jewish Fiction - Leiah Moser

Judaism Unbound

02:13 min | 6 months ago

Trans Jewish Fiction - Leiah Moser

"Lay moser welcome to judaism unbounded so great to have you thanks. It's really nice to be here well. I'm excited to have this conversation. I was poking around your blog recently. And i came across the blog post. That was actually from about a decade ago. So i don't specifically necessarily what ask about the post i in the case. You don't remember post from ten years ago but the particular blog plus that you wrote. That's one about how their are similarities between coming out his trends and converting judy them and i found that really interesting because it was a connecting topics that i think people don't necessarily tend to connect and when i've been thinking about it i've been thinking a lot about the idea of trends these days helping people understand that the gender binary is not necessarily a binary. And maybe that's also true. Judaism maybe it's just not jew and non jew. There's more interesting stuff going on there. And i was wondering if you could talk a little bit about some of those connections and also others that that you've seen on this journey if i'm remembering correctly the post you're referring to like a like a list of a number of ways in which he ing transgender is similar to being a garrett setting a convert to judaism and i think that that's a comparison that you know that really has hit me early on in my transition process and stayed with me throughout the process really because i myself am emit convert to judaism right. That's my own story And also because i've ended up you know over the years working quite a bit with other folks who are either converts or who are in the process of converting that that's kind of a big meaningful thing to me. In both cases the whole journey is structured around the idea of there being sort of a point of arrival not for everybody but for at least many folks who are transitioning. There's sort of a sense that one has of. This is the place that i wanna get to you know. Many people's gender transition journey involve a movement toward something right and the eye. An implicit in the idea of a movement toward is the idea that there's a destination to get to.

Moser Garrett
The Mystery of Esther Brandeau

Can We Talk?

02:11 min | 6 months ago

The Mystery of Esther Brandeau

"This story starts in the seventeen thirty s. Seventeen thirty three to be precise and this historical figure who i call esther brando shacklock. This figure is being sent to family in amsterdam on a dutch ship but this dutch boat runs aground. She's rescued and then ensues a five year journey. She doesn't go back to her family. She stays for time in beats which is a coastal town nearby for a little while and then sets off as a young man and travels all along coastal france working on boats between bordeaux and don't for example deserting at not continues onto a han in brittany where they work for taylor then for a time in semi lower. They work for a baker and then they work for a time in a religious order and they work for a retired soldier and then ultimately at some point. they're arrested and suspected as a thief but then released twenty four hours later and then eventually they board a ship at lower shell a typical starting point for transatlantic voltages to what the french empire called new france. What we today call quebec quebec city in particular. Which is when dot territory. There is only one account written by a woman about the story from that time period written by a nun in a letter to a friend in which she says. This happened in canada. This person arrive to turned out to be a jewish young jewish girl. Aleve the new cetinje on canada. In fiji we've dc matlock look on soup. Sonar came this year to canada. A jewish girl disguised as a sailor. She was suspected of being a person on the ship but she did not admit to it. Monsieur de don don interrogated her. She told him the truth and that she had fled from her parents because she was less loved by them than one of our sisters.

Esther Brando Shacklock Amsterdam Bordeaux Brittany New France France Taylor Quebec City Canada Quebec Fiji Monsieur De Don Don
Upheaval: The Journey of Menachem Begin With Director Jonathan Gruber

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

02:23 min | 6 months ago

Upheaval: The Journey of Menachem Begin With Director Jonathan Gruber

"Jonathan gruber a warm. Welcome to johnny gould's jewish state. Hey johnny thanks for having. I've been looking forward to this interview for some time and indeed i've been waiting for a movie like this for what i'm unashamedly proud to say is my favorite israeli of the modern era. This was a man with a massive heart and for those of us who appear to understand him a little bit more a bit more gracious in their memory of him. I don't think he's quite as controversial or indeed as contradictory as people say interesting. I think he is pretty complex. The i i don't think he's one side or the other i think that's you know like most people they have different opinions on different Different topics he just happened to be in charge of lots of things and i found a tremendous amount about that. I never learned before. I own web Very young during the ad the peace accords egypt and understand his history in sort of the scope. Israel's history and even going back to world war two was was fascinating. Let's go back to belarus because he talked about his upbringing. His father was very learned. Torah scholar and his mom was the best mom in the world like older that jewish mothers. And that's kind of what chills me in a way jonathan because here we are in washington. Dc and in london living. What looked like a very similar life and then an absolute disaster prevailed for him sheild started jewish or hebrew. Education are very devoted parents. Our father was a very educated man. Mainly sage in judaism and mother was as any sun can save perhaps the best in the world it sounded to me that there was prevailing antisemitism. Grow out so he might have had a lovely family life. Things were not so great at school in the film talks about anti semites that would fight stick up for themselves so there certainly were issues than and sad to say. There are issues In in the uk in the united states anti semitism

Jonathan Gruber Johnny Gould Johnny Belarus Egypt Israel Jonathan Washington London UK United States
Allyship Fundamentals - Mike Moskowitz

Judaism Unbound

02:29 min | 6 months ago

Allyship Fundamentals - Mike Moskowitz

"Moskowitz welcome to judaism unbounded so great to have you. He's still for so. I'd love to start with a question that i'm sure you've been asked a million times. But basically how did an ultra orthodox rabbi come to be the scholar and residence for trans and queer studies at a progressive judaism synagogue that is actually the largest lgbt synagogue in the world. And i think what are the first so how did that happen. Rabbi hyman and i met in the back of a police wagon where we both got arrested for civil disobedience over daca. It was in dc about three and a half years ago and in the back of this police wagon. We are all in handcuffs. And there's five melded a vying folks on one side makita a metal partition in the middle of this police. Dan and then five defying rabat's on the other side and rabbi climate says you know bunch of to share toronto share and it's a captive audience role in hand and i just read an article in gender and clothing and so i share these thoughts with her and through the course of the afternoon where we were massive warehouse in also separated by gender. She a little bit of my story. How is a rabbi in harlem at columbia and was now working at a deli lakewood new jersey. I've taken off the day to get arrested. And she got together and created this position for me. Because i wasn't able to find a job in the radio world anymore because of the positions taken very publicly Those positions for me came about As it does most people as a function of proximity someone in my family transitions at a student. Congregation who had transitioned really wasn't kind of authority and also works representation within the rabbinate to create a sacred space for people to be who they are without having to choose between a gender identity and religious identity. In so i kind of started the occupying that space void and cdc showed up as as my ally to give me the platform in the agency to able to do that. It's been a fantastic relationship. That's i think has been surprisingly simple. It actually lacks the complexity of what i think. Most people would assume would be awkwardness of being in both of those spaces. Because i think. Cbs team particular frames. Judaism as being in relationship with tradition. And god it really allows for the commonality of individuality where we're all struggling were journeying. Were also exploring And that way were all equal

Rabbi Hyman Daca Moskowitz Rabat DC Harlem DAN Lakewood Toronto Columbia New Jersey CDC CBS
Being Heumann with Judy Heumann

Can We Talk?

01:58 min | 6 months ago

Being Heumann with Judy Heumann

"Judy. Human is a legend in the disability rights movement. The fruits of her labor everywhere. Sidewalk curb cuts accessible public transportation. Equal access to public services from fighting for the right to live in her college dorm. To leading major initiatives at the world bank and state department. Judy has been a lifelong activist. Her activism often includes telling her own story her book is called being human an unrepentant memoir of disability rights activist. Judy was born in brooklyn in nineteen forty seven. She got polio when she was eighteen months old and it left her. Unable to walk we spoke over zoom about her activism. In her early years growing up in a world she had to fight to be included in. She started telling me about the time when she first realized that people saw her differently. It was an incident that happened. When i was about eight years old in my neighborhood and at that point when no motorized wheelchair so that's why people were having to push me and my next door neighbor arlene and i were going to the store to the candy store and on our way to the candy store some boy came over and asked me if i was sick and that incident really made me feel quite undressed in as much as i really had not seen myself until that moment as being consciously different from other people and the word that this boy used with me was are you sick and so the use of the word sick still today And now we're talking sixty. Some years later is still. I think a prominent where that people think about and use his

World Bank And State Departmen Judy Polio Brooklyn Arlene
Rhythms of Sacred Protest - Koach Baruch Frazier

Judaism Unbound

02:05 min | 6 months ago

Rhythms of Sacred Protest - Koach Baruch Frazier

"Wanna talk about somebody coming to to do what you're doing which is to be in rabbinical school after a career in another field. I'm just curious about that because up until relatively recently being a rabbi was like something that people did more or less out of college and as somebody who's now on the old side. I kind of feel like i actually have learned a lot in the last thirty years and if i were to become a rabbi which i've got rid would never be but if i if i did today audi much better at it than i would have been thirty years ago and so i'm wondering just could you talk a little bit about how you made that decision to become a rabbi. After having done something else for a long time. And how has that influenced the way that you experience being a rabbinical student. One of the things that was on my mind. When i decided that i wanted to go to rabbinical school was as a leader Leader in community already in saint louis missouri. Which is where most recently from people were already assigning the title. Rabbi to me. It felt very strange. A i that was one thing that propelled into rabbinical school. The other thing is that. I spent a lot of time as an audiologist and i was starting to notice that some of the people who were coming to me weren't necessarily coming to me for their physical. Let's say a problems or their physical situations that they were actually coming to me. And i was more so as chaplain than i. Was there. audiologist in as that started to shift. I say you know what. I think i should go to school. So that I've gone to school for a audiology. And i felt of my career was great and i also knew that there was foundational learning. That made that career great along with the experience in so i decided that i needed to go to rabbinical school to get some foundational learning so that those moments in time when i'm spending with people as their rabbi that the foundation is there

Audi Saint Louis Rabbi Missouri
The Jewish Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo

Can We Talk?

02:39 min | 7 months ago

The Jewish Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo

"In nineteen seventy six argentina. A military dictatorship seized power in what came to be known as the dirty war. The regime systematically kidnapped tortured and killed anyone suspected of including priests teachers and members of labor unions and protest movements bodies were thrown into the river plate and never recovered hundreds of pregnant. Women were kidnapped allowed to deliver their babies and then killed their babies were given to military families. The thirty thousand victims. Who were never heard from again are known as the disappeared. Twelve percent of them were jewish even though jews accounted for only one percent of the population of argentina a year into the dirty war a group of mothers whose grown children had been disappeared began demonstrating in the plaza de mayo in buenos. Id's many of them were jewish women during this time of tremendous fear and terror. These women were the only ones who are really standing up publicly and demanding that something happened and their children be returned. Natasha's arete ski is an anthropologist who focuses on human rights memory and justice. She writes about the jewish mothers of the plaza de maggio injectables updated encyclopedia of jewish women. Natasha says the movement began with a group of mothers publicly demanding to know what had been done to their sons and daughters. So you have women who started standing every thursday afternoon in the main public square in argentina which faces the presidential palace. They were simple white headscarves into which they stitch the names of their children and the dates of their disappearance and they would hold pictures of their children as well and they did this every thursday afternoon battle and at first they were kind of ignored and no one really paid attention to them and there was no retribution from the authorities and there was almost a certain sacredness to the fact that they were mothers and then as they received more international attention. That's when they started being targeted as well. There were a number of others who were kidnapped and tortured and detained and yet they remained in that plaza putting their own bodies at risk in order to try to find some kind of

Argentina Natasha Plaza De Mayo Main Public Square Buenos
Police Investigating Vandalism at Chicago-Area Synagogue as Hate Crime

Chris Plante

00:20 sec | 7 months ago

Police Investigating Vandalism at Chicago-Area Synagogue as Hate Crime

"Police in north suburban scope here investigating a report of vandalism at a synagogue is a hate crime. Police say. Someone smashed a window at the Persian Hebrew congregation Sunday afternoon and left a flag and a pro Palestine sign outside. There is surveillance video of the crime. No one was at the synagogue at the time. No one was injured, and now security has been

Persian Hebrew Congregation Palestine
Beyond Binaries, Beyond Orthodoxies - Jericho Vincent

Judaism Unbound

02:21 min | 7 months ago

Beyond Binaries, Beyond Orthodoxies - Jericho Vincent

"We are really thrilled to be having this conversation. So jericho vincent welcome to judaism unbound. It's so great to have you on the. I'm really excited to talk to you. Because i just finished reading your book cut me. Loose was yesterday or this morning. I just finished it. So i was hoping just that. Because i'm always conscious about like spoiler alert that you could tell a little bit of your story just to get us started here in the way that you you tell it so that people understand you know who you are and where you've come from and where you're going sure. So i published my memoir back in two thousand fourteen skuld comey loose and it tells the story of my upbringing in an ultra orthodox rabbinic family. And what happened. When i started pushing back against some of the rules of that lifestyle Spoiler i can tell you what happened was pretty dreadful things. My family basically pushed me out. I was totally unprepared as an ultra orthodox teenager to live on my own in new york city which is what i ended up doing a lot of trauma. I'm as i try to survive before. Finally starting to pull myself out of that. And trying to rebuild a life the stable safe and that's sort of the ark of the book the ark of life stories much larger than that. Yeah we've had guests on this show. Who have left ultra-orthodox judaism and in that book. We if we were having this conversation some years ago. I think that's the conversation that we would have been having but in the time since you published that book you came out as trans and i'm not sure exactly when that was in the timeline so you can help us understand where we're sitting today and then down the road when i'm really also really interested in. Is this connection or maybe it is. Maybe it isn't a way to understand judaism differently in light of the way that we are now understanding gender differently. So i came out publicly about tune half years ago and i came out as gender queer which is under the umbrella of trans identity and will the thing about writing a memoir is that you discover when you sit down to write. It is that human life is so massive and contain so many narratives. You can only fit very small. Sliver that into a book. And when i actually sat down to write my memoir i didn't know that i was gender queer

Jericho Vincent Skuld Comey New York City
American Judaism Beyond the Synagogue with Rachel B. Gross

Jewish History Matters

02:01 min | 7 months ago

American Judaism Beyond the Synagogue with Rachel B. Gross

"Is really. I think fantastic to have you join us and talk to us about your book which is just such a fun book. It's such an interesting approach and it might be great to start out by talking about the title of the book which is to say that this is like the best title where you look at the title and you understand immediately what the book is about and what the argument is from the beginning. You talk about jewish religion beyond synagogue. Can you say a bit about what is the meaning of the big idea here. Know the the comes out in this idea that you're talking about religion outside of the synagogue and what is powerful example. That really illustrates this trend. That you're thinking about so. The book is about american. Jews nostalgia for eastern european immigration to the united states around the turn of the century and how american jews have represented and institutionalized that nostalgia. I look at four case studies from the nineteen seventies to the present and i making an argument that nostalgia has become a way of american jewish religious practice so i'm not saying that traditional forms of jewish religion and community organization aren't important. I really like the term beyond. Because i think it encompasses the synagogue and also includes things beyond it. I'm not saying that synagogue practice is over in any way. I think the forms of religion. That i'm looking at in. This book are compatible with traditional forms of jewish religious practice so building on many american religious history scholars. Basically i think of religion as things that are meaningful to people. I think about religion as texts and practices and even emotions that connect us two big

United States
Playing Fair with Eve Rodsky

Can We Talk?

02:20 min | 7 months ago

Playing Fair with Eve Rodsky

"I wanted to talk to eve because even for me. A professional feminist this balance has been elusive. And it's humbling. Because feminists have been trying to address this. For many decades nineteenth century feminists created a professional field of home economics to bring value to domestic labor second way feminist tried renegotiating the terms of marriage and coined the phrase the politics of housework recognizing that was often seen as a personal struggle is part of a whole system that doesn't value or support caregiving and domestic work. Today many women in higher paying jobs outsource chelsea karen housework but that work is still being done by other women lower paying jobs who are often women of color. Covert has really laid bare. How imperfect and unjust the system is but as. We re emerge rebuild. That insight may give us an opportunity to renegotiate the terms or as eradicate would say. Reveal the deck. You've created a system that recognizes the true value of caregiving and seeks to redistribute it like all feminists revolutions. It started with a very personal moment. And that's where we began our conversation. I did have a series of experiences. That sort of changed. The course of my life and one of those experiences was a text. My husband sent me nine years ago. That said i'm surprised you didn't get blueberries and the passenger seat of my car. I had a diaper bag and a breast pump at a newborn baby at home and amidst all this chaos racing to get my older son zach at the time he was three. I had a client contract in my lap. And every time i would hit the brakes. Penn would serve stabbed me in the vagina making me completely. Saban pullover to the side of the road. I live in la now and so we don't take traffic lightly so for me to pull over and be laid to pick up zach. Something was really wrong in my marriage. And that was a the fact that i was the fulfill his smoothing needs and literally every single other task for my family was seemingly falling in my lap at the time but more importantly i did not have the career marriage combo i thought i was going to have all those realizations. Were sort of raining down on me that day. When sesame that tax

Chelsea Karen Zach Saban Penn LA
Why Jewish Fiction? With David Hirshberg

Judaism Unbound

02:12 min | 7 months ago

Why Jewish Fiction? With David Hirshberg

"Hershberg welcome to judaism unbounded so great to have you. Thank you very much. It's nice to be we both of you. Well where starting this kind of series which is distributed through the next few months where we're talking to a number of authors of fiction from a jewish perspective or from a jewish point of view or about the jewish experience Last week we talked to some folks who are earlier in their lives who are writing fiction and this week. We're talking with you. Who is somebody who came to write fiction after a long career as moore. I'm wondering a little bit if you could talk about where that impulse to write. Fiction comes from at this stage of your life and you're trying to do by now becoming a novelist. I spent a career in in biotech developing drugs and about four or five years ago. I decided that i needed something. A second act in. I always wanted to write and fishing was what i wanted to write so i decided to do something i wrote. I wrote it off. And when i was finished with our very proud and then did probably the best thing i've ever done. I deleted it. It was one hundred. Twenty four thousand words and out of that between fifteen. Eighteen hundred words were preserved and those preserved words went into my first book called my mother son which came out three years ago. The decision to to write was one that. If i didn't start doing it. I would have one of these regrets. Later on rai would say. Oh i could have done this. I'm so disappointed. I didn't do that. And the worst thing would happen. Since i did on my own was it wouldn't be very good and no one else would no. I wouldn't suffer any of the negative consequences. I was lucky when i sent chapters around to people who said they likely very much and they continued to push me to write at. That was at the same time. I was leaving last. Ceo job in biotech. And so now. I have more time to write. Although i'm advising a few companies now it doesn't take too much.

Hershberg Moore
What You Should Know About the Iran Nuclear Talks

People of the Pod

02:08 min | 7 months ago

What You Should Know About the Iran Nuclear Talks

"Earlier this month six world powers reopened negotiations with iran over the two thousand fifteen nuclear accord or joint comprehensive plan of action. From which the united states withdrew into thousand eighteen officials have described the initial discussions focused on bringing iran into compliance and lifting. Us sanctions as constructive here to discuss. The implications of these talks is a longtime friend of american jewish committee. Patrick clawson director of research at the washington institute where he directs the Turbie program on iran and us policy. Dr clawson welcome back to people of the pod. Thank you for having me. So let's start with the current state of the two thousand fifteen. Nuclear agreement at this point is iran and compliance with any of its restrictions. A few okay which ones and which ones has violated will iran is largely in compliance of the not entirely with the commitments made about providing access to the international inspectors the international topic energy agency. Even there it's not full. In compliance and iran is also in compliance with some of the restrictions on one of the reactors that he uses so the most important restrictions however were on the enrichment of uranium and they're iran is across the board noncompliance. The situation is even worse than it looks because the original agreement required iran not to do research on how to enrich to a higher level and how to use more advanced centrifuges. We'll iran has done that research and you can't undo that research once you've done it so iran is allowing the inspectors still to come in but hasn't iran threatened to limit the inspectors access to its research facilities correct in may will come up with a deadline. Set down by runs parliament saying that if there's been no progress in the negotiations than the access for the inspectors will stop. The widespread expectation is that iran will say well. I guess there's enough progress. We can keep on going for a little while longer

Iran Patrick Clawson Dr Clawson International Topic Energy Age American Jewish Committee United States Washington Institute Parliament
The Great Jewish Refugee Crisis of the Seventeenth Century

Jewish History Matters

02:05 min | 7 months ago

The Great Jewish Refugee Crisis of the Seventeenth Century

"Today i'm joined by adam teller. Who's going to be speaking with us about the century jewish refugee crisis following the sixteen forty eight on. It's key pogroms. Aman how it helps us to understand the transnational transformations of jewish life in early modern times as well as when we want to think more deeply. Broadly about refugee issues on water scale both in history and also this is something which is still very relevant today. Adam teller is a professor of history and judaic studies at brown university. He has written widely on the economic social and cultural history of the jews in early modern pulling lithuania and his most recent book. Which we're going to talk about today is titled rescue the surviving souls the great jewish refugee crisis of the seventeenth century. This is going to be the starting point for our conversation today but in many ways it's not just about the book we're gonna be talking about the big issues that surrounds it. It's really an exciting book. It was recently a finalist for the national. Jewish book award in history is a pleasure to have adam here with us. Thank you so much. Adam for joining us on the podcast. Welcome really glad to have you. Here it's a real pleasure. Thrill pledged to be here. Jason absolutely i want to get us started by thinking about kind of what is this history in the first place when we look at the story of the malinowski pogroms and aftermath in the mid seventeenth century. What is going on here. And why does it matter when we wanna think about early. Modern jewish history well in the early period poland lithuania which was then called. The police between commonwealth was the largest wealthiest most develop jewish center in europe with in world terms. It was only rivaled by the ottoman empire and had gone through about one hundred fifty years very strong social economic cultural development. Making it this powerhouse. In the history of european jewry and the place where all of your looked in a number of different fails perhaps most particularly in terms of the jewish law. But not only that

Adam Teller Aman Lithuania Brown University Adam Jason Poland Europe
Jewish Stories We Need: Aimee Lucido, Sofiya Pasternack

Judaism Unbound

02:16 min | 7 months ago

Jewish Stories We Need: Aimee Lucido, Sofiya Pasternack

"Pasternak aimee lucido welcome to judaism unbounded so great to have you. Thank you so much. We're excited to be here. Is thanks for having us well. I'm really excited to have you as somebody who thinks a lot about writing fiction. And i'm not really sure i have it in me. I have a story to tell. But i don't really know if i have it meteoroid fiction so i'm therefore always excited an admiring of anybody that's actually written fiction so i would love to start by just hearing a little bit of the story of how each of you came to get in this. I'm sure highly lucrative business of ratings jewish fiction for young people. I wrote my first story. Think when i was six or seven years old i have always just liked making up stories and then one day i figured out like oh you can get paid for this like oh okay. And that became my dream job. And i didn't pursue that because why would i got a bunch of other league medical related jobs instead but writing the whole time and anya and the dragon was. I don't like my exploration of my own judaism because i wasn't raised jewish. Not really like. It was very vague in the old country type of thing. But we don't do that anymore. And then when. I became an adult and i started getting into genealogy and i realize like okay like my mom's side my moms moms dads cider all jewish or they were and i thought well i wanna i wanna get more into that and the writing of onion. The dragon was my own kind of as i was learning about my family's religion. I was putting together this book as well so her experience is very similar to my own kind of that like 'isolation and not really having a community and that kind of thing because like it's a joke. I'm i'm in my thirties. It's hard to make friends now and it's also hard to get involved in other communities. You just feel weird so it has been very isolating. And i have a great community. I live in utah. So it's a great community. It's a small community but it is really

Pasternak Aimee Lucido Anya Utah
Habima to Be Owned by Tel Aviv Municipality Following Financial Crisis

The Promised Podcast

02:00 min | 8 months ago

Habima to Be Owned by Tel Aviv Municipality Following Financial Crisis

"Come to promised cast brought to you on t. v. One the voice of the city that this week announced that it is taking ownership of the national theatre habima and in so doing taking on one hundred million shekels in debt that habima has run up over the past years and in doing all this bringing to a happy conclusion a crisis that we first became aware of a year and a half ago in november twenty nineteen when a man named core case safron sued demanding that the company liquidated its assets and use the proceeds to pay the four million. It owed him for telemarketing services provided to habima by his company. Power dialing at the time the press made saffron out to be a grinch like figure shutting down the world's oldest hebrew theatre for something as unexhausted money filthy lucre. But the fact is you have to do a lot of power dialing. Run up a tab of four million shekels and it's like the old saying goes don't the cold call if you ain't got the windfall. It's the saying. I've heard a lot of people say that anyway. During the hearing it came out that the national theatre was much worse debt than anyone knew so much that that it was like an iceberg and the four million telemarketing chuckles. Were only the small little point. You see above the waterline. Which debt of course only got lots worse during the pandemic and of course the national government has an approved a budget since march twenty eighteen. Meaning that it would be complicated. And maybe even impossible for the treasury and ministry of culture in jerusalem to bail out the theater even if they were of a mind to do it and finally tel aviv mayor room the stepped up and negotiated a deal whereby the theater would become a municipal corporation like the art museum and the land of israel museum in the cinematheque and the camera theater. The director general of habima. A man named noam semel who was hired just over a year ago to steer the national theatre through its financial crisis said quote the tel aviv. Municipality is the mother and father that the bima has never had and quote

Habima National Theatre Habima Safron National Theatre National Government Ministry Of Culture Camera Theater Treasury Tel Aviv Jerusalem Noam Semel Israel Museum Aviv