History

History never repeats itself on this fascinating playlist. Whether you're a history buff or buffoon, these historical tidbits will excite and inspire. Sourced from leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

A highlight from Is There Justice in Felony Murder?

The Experiment

01:06 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from Is There Justice in Felony Murder?

"Count one malice murder. We the jury find the defendant Travis mcmichael guilty. You're gonna ask whoever just made it out first. Last week, when a judge in Georgia read the verdict, in the trial of three men who killed ahmaud Arbery. An unarmed black man. Count two felony murder. We the jury find the defendant Travis mcmichael guilty. You might have noticed there was a legal principle. Count three felony murder. That was repeated. Count four. Felony murder. Over and over. Account 5. Felony murder. We the jury find the defendant Travis mcmichael guilty. Count 6. Last spring we did a story about felony murder. A legal rule you might not have heard of, that's applied in all different situations. And depending on who you talk to, it's either a tool for reform, or a barbaric rule that should be abolished.

Travis Mcmichael Ahmaud Arbery Georgia
A highlight from Visionaries: Ruth Asawa

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:51 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Visionaries: Ruth Asawa

"Hello from wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is will manika. This month we're highlighting visionaries. Today we're talking about an artist who was known for her geometric woven wire sculptures. Ruth aiko asawa was born on January 24th, 1926, in Norwalk, California. Her parents were Japanese immigrants, and Ruth was the middle child of 7. In her early years, Ruth grew up on a farm. She worked before and after school to help out. Even then, she was practicing art. She later wrote, I used to sit on the back of the horse drawn leveler with my bare feet drawing forms in the sand, which later in life became the bulk of my sculptures. The start of World War II, uprooted Ruth and her family's lives. In February 1942, Ruth's father was arrested and was taken to an internment camp in New Mexico. A few months later, Ruth and her family were forced into an internment camp at a racetrack in Santa Anita California. During World War II, racism and paranoia led thousands of Japanese Americans to be taken from their homes and imprisoned. Ruth and her family lived in horse stables at the Santa Anita race track for 6 months. The stench of horse manure was pervasive. During that time, three Disney animators were also being interned at the camp. Ruth spent much of her time drawing with them. By September of 1942, Ruth and her family were sent to another camp in Arkansas. There she continued to draw and paint and finished high school. In 1943, Ruth was allowed to leave the camp and went to college at the Milwaukee state teachers college. She'd received a scholarship from the quakers to study to become an art teacher. When she graduated in 1946, racism towards Japanese Americans was still rampant. Because of that, Ruth wasn't able to find work as a student teacher. She never graduated, but years later, when Ruth had established herself as an artist, the Milwaukee state teachers college wanted to recognize her as an alumna. She responded, requesting the degree she was denied. She finally received it in 1998. Instead of becoming an art teacher, Ruth was encouraged by some artist friends to study at black mountain college in North Carolina, a progressive art school in the segregated south. Ruth studied with artists like buckminster fuller and Joseph Albers. In 1947, Ruth traveled to Mexico and watched as a craftsman used wire to make egg baskets. Ruth would build upon this repetitive looping method to create her own style of sculpture. During that same period, Ruth also met her husband a black mountain college, Albert Lanier. They got married in 1949 and moved to San Francisco to live in a community that accepted them as an interracial couple. Over the course of 9 years, they had 6 children. Busy raising a family, Ruth worked on her art practice in the evenings at her home studio. She was inspired by the undulating form she found in nature, trying to give structure to what she was painting. Her hanging sculptures became increasingly intricate over the years. The suspended Arri woven structures of Ruth's work blur the lines between internal and external and cast haunting shadows. Always begin from the inside working inside. And I'm working on the surfaces, the things that interest me are the proportions that I see. And that shape by itself is not very interesting, but when I put one next to it, then I look at this shape that is out here. Throughout the 1950s, Ruth's sculptures were shown in group and solo exhibitions in New York, San Francisco and internationally. By 1963, Ruth began working on public artwork and arts advocacy. She believed art is for everybody. One of her early public pieces was a fountain featuring two mermaids in ghirardelli square in San Francisco. It still stands there today. In 1968, Ruth cofounded a public arts program called the alvarado school arts workshop. Without much funding, they cobbled together a hands on curriculum with scraps of yarn, bakers clay, an old egg cartons. At the height of the program, it was in 50 public schools, employing artists, and getting parents involved in their kids education. Ruth was inspired by her time at black mountain college and felt strongly that students would benefit from learning from artists. She expanded on this mission by opening a public arts high school in San Francisco in 1982. In 2010, the school would be named in her honor. In appreciation of Ruth's work as an artist and teacher, the city of San Francisco deemed February 12th, 1982, Ruth asawa day. When Ruth was in her 60s, she revisited her experience living in internment camps. As a memorial, she created a bronze relief, depicting scenes of what life was like for her and her family, as well as for the broader Japanese American population. Ruth died on August 6th, 2013. She was 87 years old. Ruth's legacy of art and education lives on. Her artist featured in galleries and museums around the world, and she's become known as one of the most celebrated artists of the 20th century.

Ruth Milwaukee State Teachers Colle Jenny Kaplan Manika Ruth Aiko Asawa Santa Anita Black Mountain College Disney Animators Joseph Albers California Albert Lanier Norwalk San Francisco Paranoia New Mexico Buckminster Fuller Arkansas Alvarado School North Carolina Mexico
A highlight from 360 | Lets Surfeit

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

04:29 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from 360 | Lets Surfeit

"Objects. That discovery outshines the famous Sutton hoo burial ship, which had only offered up 37 coins to archeologists. By comparison, the massive scale of the lava tube treasure surpasses it all by far. We can start to make sense of that though when we realize just how long it took the hoarders to work their stockpile. It was the work of generations. You see, once archeologists started dating the objects they unearthed from the horde. They found that the oldest was placed there nearly 7000 years ago. In other places, they might not have survived. It was the extremely dry conditions of the lava tube that preserve them. But they're not just old. The most recent items date to about the middle of the 1600s. That means that to create this underground collection in the darkness of the lava tube, it wasn't just the work of generations, but the work of millennia. Not that it's a treasure that would attract anyone though because this is slightly unusual for a horde. It wasn't gold or coins, or even an ancient ship. It was a burial mound though. That's right. The collection was a horde of bones. They were densely packed into the lava tube, stretching away into the darkness. And as the researchers started to pull them out, test their ages, catalogued them and take notes. They began to see that this bone hoard contained pieces from over 14 different species and included the bones of cows, camels, horses, rodents, and a lot more. The study got really serious though when they checked the bones from markings. Sure, they found cuts, and maybe that's what you'd expect, but they also found the marks of teeth. These bones had been chewed. Some were even partially digested. That tells us that these bones weren't just a burial mound for the dead. And here's the thing. It wasn't like these were just the bones of cows and goats. Know what the researchers found gave them a chill. Because some of the bones were human. In fact, it's human skull fragments that were found among the other nod bones. But what archeologists guess about these skulls is even more gruesome than that. If we go by their best guess, they think these skulls were scavenged from graves. After the bodies of the dead were buried, someone from the clan of hoarders came through, sniffed them out and dug them up. Then they lugged them back to the lava tunnel where they added them to a treasure trove. After they gave those skulls a good chew, of course. And one of the archeologists even suggested that these skullcaps with tooth marks are the only thing to survive because the hoarders chewed the rest to splinters. The pieces of skull, candy, only survive because they didn't taste quite as good. All of that would be truly horrifying if the family packing the lava tube with bones for 7000 years was human. But as you may have guessed by now, this family was something else. No, the builders of this massive treasure trove weren't people, but hyenas striped hyenas that is. These days, they're a threatened species, but they used to be a mainstay of the region. So breathe a sigh of relief. But to me, the fact that it's a family of hyenas passing on the work of a major treasure trove from parent to child, that makes 7000 years of stockpiling skeletons, all the more impressive. This episode was made possible by the deadbolt mystery society. Are you a connoisseur of murder mysteries? Do you love the thrill of unraveling the clues, then the deadbolt mystery society is a great way to bring the mystery to life in your own home. The deadbolt mystery society is a monthly subscription box filled with a storyline of immersive scenarios intriguing characters and original compelling stories, and it's all delivered right to your door. Each box features interactive online components that bring each story to life, like puzzles, evidence, and interviews. According to BuzzFeed, it's the closest you'll get to fulfilling your dream of becoming Sherlock Holmes. The deadbolt mystery society boxes contain stand-alone stories, so you don't need to have multiple orders to compete your murder mystery storyline, and you can also choose from three 6 or 12 month subscription options for a greater discount. Ready to prove your skills, visit deadbolt mystery society dot com to get started. When you do be sure to use the promo code cabinet 20 and you'll save 20% on all subscription options plus single one time boxes. That's 20% off all subscription options plus single one time boxes at deadbolt mystery society dot com. Offer code

Deadbolt Mystery Society Sherlock Holmes
A highlight from P.S. I Love You: Rene Fleming Sings Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin

Aria Code

02:12 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from P.S. I Love You: Rene Fleming Sings Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin

"And finally, one day I'm in my little bedroom and I decide I have to call him today and I open up my flip phone and I go through my contacts until I find the name Ben. And I'm pacing back and forth in my bedroom until finally, I don't know exactly what I'm going to say, but I start the call. And I sit in the window of my bedroom looking out at the key food grocery across the street and the answer isn't he says manly. Like it's a full sentence. And I say I have a question for you, and he says, go for it. And I say, do you want to go on a date with me? And there's a pause. There's a bit of a driving sense here. In the strings you hear it's 6 days of and then the wood winds come into kind of answer that in a little call and response there. So I would not give my heart to anyone else but you. She uses the word confession and she comes back to this passion and flaming really strong words, which, you know, when you're young, you're thinking it's life and death in this moment. You're not thinking, this one might not work out. You're thinking, this is it. It's this or nothing. But you can tell she's read a lot because she finds the words that are poetic that are beautiful. And I say, I have this idea of something that you and I could be. You and I holding hands, you and I swapping t-shirts. You and I, together, and I tell him, I'm so grateful that whenever I tell him about my fears and my anxieties, he says back manly. You just have to realize that you're beautiful and everything will be okay. And I wait for him to say it now. She's working through in her mind all the various manifestations of what she's feeling, what she's thought, how much he has opened up her horizon because she's now thinking

BEN
A highlight from Visionaries: Diane Arbus

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:52 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Visionaries: Diane Arbus

"Dan arbus was my mother. And I had an enormous sense that photography was a kind of secret of hers. Hello, from wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is romanica. This month, we're talking about visionaries. Women who made profound contributions to the fields of photography, film, sculpture, and the performing arts. Many of these women were radical artists who pushed conceptual boundaries within and beyond the art world. Today's visionary is one of the most celebrated American photographers of the 20th century. She's best known for capturing subjects who lived on the edges of society. Please welcome dean arbus. Diane was born dean nemerov on March 14th, 1923. She grew up in a wealthy New York City family that owned russeks, a Fifth Avenue department store. Dean's family excelled in the creative. Her older brother Howard went on to become a Pulitzer Prize winning poet, and her younger sister Renee was a sculptor and designer. From a young age, it was clear that dean was a gifted artist. Her father encouraged her to get into painting. Yan studied art in school, but quit painting as soon as she finished high school. Years later, when reflecting on why she stopped painting rather abruptly. She said, I had the sense that if I was so terrific at it, it wasn't worth doing. When dean was 14 years old, she met Alan arbus, a 19 year old aspiring photographer who was the nephew of one of her father's business partners. Despite dean's parents disapproval, the couple married when dean was 18. Together, dean and Allen shared a love of photography. Alan bought dean her first camera and they turned their bathroom into a part time dark room. They started their own fashion photography company and took on dean's family's department store as their first client. During World War II, Alan served as a military photographer. Diane gave birth to their first daughter dune while he was stationed in 1945. The couple would go on to have a second daughter Amy in 1954. When Allen returned from the war, he and dean worked with some of the top magazines and ad agencies. Typically, dean acted as the stylist, while her husband shot the photos. But dean and Allen eventually grew tired of fashion photography. Dean was more interested in art photography, while Allen had dreams of becoming an actor. In 1956, Diane quit their joint business to pursue art photography on her own. At the same time, Alan pursued acting, and eventually landed a role on the television series mash. While photography for magazines was booming at the time, little attention was paid to photos as works of art. Fellow photographers who'd left the art world such as Robert Frank and William Klein were pursuing street photography. A style which aimed to capture ordinary people and unexpected beauty. Some of dean's early explorations and art photography followed the style. It wasn't until she took classes with lisette model that deanne started to find her unique artistic voice. In an interview with D Anne's daughter dune, lisette modal recalled the DN came to her one day and said, I want to photograph what is evil. Dune interpreted her mother's words, saying that what dean was really looking to capture was what was forbidden or had been too dangerous to frightening or too ugly for anyone else to look on. For most of her art photography career, dean would seek out the places and characters on the fringes of society. In 1959, dean and Allen officially separated. Diane moved into a small carriage house in Connecticut with her two children and focused on finding work that would bring in money. That year, dean got her first solo magazine assignment for esquire. She produced a photo essay of New York City portraits. The photos were taken on a 35 millimeter camera with natural lighting, which was in line with the street photography style of the time. In 1962, she started taking photos with a two and a quarter format camera, which brought out bright details and sharper images. Dean had grown tired of the grainier photos that she was taking with the 35 millimeter. She said she wanted to see the difference between flesh and material. The densities of different kinds of things, air and water and shiny. During this time, deanne took to capturing places that most photographers did not step near. She explored dance halls, circuses, wax museums, and more. Through the end of her life, dean made her mark on the world of fashion editorial and art. She went on to publish over 250 photos and magazines. In 1967, she had 32 photos chosen for an exhibition at MoMA, entitled new documents. Among the photos was identical twins, which remains one of her most famous photographs. It's said to be mirrored in Stanley Kubrick's film The Shining. Dean's MoMA exhibition received mixed reviews. One reviewer called her work brutal, daring, and revealing. While another wrote that her work orders close to poor taste. Following the exhibition, dean struggled to book more fashion work. The challenge was likely in part due to the fact that celebrities did not want to be photographed by the woman who'd been dubbed the wizard of odds by one critic. Even as she struggled to bring in more money from her photography, her recognition in the art world grew. In 1971, dean was the first American photographer chosen to represent the United States at the Venice Biennale. Throughout her life, dean struggled with depression. On July 26th, 1971, she took her life at the age of 48. The year after her death, John's our Kowski, the director of photography at the MoMA at the time, curated an exhibit of dean's work. On the wall of the show, he wrote she stuck with her subjects, exploring their secrets and thus her own, more and more deeply. She was surely aware of the danger of this path. But she believed that her bravery would be equal to the demands she made of it. All month, we're talking about visionaries. To see some of dean arbus photographs, follow us on Facebook and Instagram at what manica podcast. Special thanks to Liz Kaplan, my favorite sister and co creator. And special thanks to Alessandra teja, who curated this month's theme. Talk to you tomorrow.

Dean Allen Diane Dan Arbus Jenny Kaplan Dean Arbus Dean Nemerov Russeks Alan Arbus Alan William Klein Lisette Modal Deanne New York City Pulitzer Prize YAN Renee Robert Frank
A highlight from Idi Amin Part 3: Big Daddy Seizes Power

Real Dictators

06:19 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Idi Amin Part 3: Big Daddy Seizes Power

"Of these slopes in the plush suburb of mango hill. The destination is a grand white stone building that sits at the summit. This is a lubiri palace. It's the home of the kabaka. He is the monarch governs buganda with a bee. The 800 year old kingdom within a kingdom, around which the republic of Uganda without the bee is coalesced. Is people revere him? But these soldiers chugging up the hill in their armored cars are not here to pay homage. Standing up in the lead Jeep is colonel, Idi Amin. He's on his way to kick out the kabaka by any means necessary. He can't take him alive, then he'll bring him in dead. This is part three of the Idi Amin story. And this is real dictators. Inside the lubiri palace on the hilltop. The kabaka's personal guard, a 120 or so men, prepare to defend the compound to the death. Throughout the night, from the palace, came the sound of raw buckskin being thumped relentlessly. The sacred royal war drums, the muja guzo drums. It was the Quebec a calling upon the citizens of buganda to rise up and shield their king against the tyranny of Uganda's new prime minister, Apollo, Milton and bote. Having previously maintained an uneasy political alliance, the two men are at each other's throats. But they recently declared that he himself not the kabaka, holds the title of president. The kabaka has responded by demanding the prime minister step down from office and leave his kingdom immediately. There's this prompted about it to dispatch his tooled up henchman, Idi Amin to the royal headquarters. This is high stakes poker. It's a question now of who will fold. For the men of the Ugandan army, professional soldiers. The Caracas makeshift roadblocks present little difficulty. They easily beat off any resistance. Reaching the summit at colonel Amin's command. The military vehicles take up strategic positions around the lubiri palace. Beneath the palm trees all is still. There are bright gold domes crowning the palace towers. The damp red earth of the driveway steams in the afternoon heat. Bright blue starlings flit in and out of the thorny scrub. But, as if part of the script, there are menacing dark clouds forming across Lake Victoria. The air becomes thick, the sky leaden on the verge of another monsoon rain. Then a faint blur within the compound, movement behind the windows. Outside guns raised, I mean soldiers wait for the order. I mean, takes a call on his field telephone. This is it. It's official. Prime minister abode has decreed that the Quebec's antics amount to an act of sedition. The colonel waves his arm. One of the one two two millimeter cannon mounted on the Jeep's looses off around. It punches a hole in the old walls. I mean, then takes a turn to fire on himself. Laughing, a precarious Lizzie does so. The wall caves and crumbles. The battle of mango hill is underway. It'll prove a pivotal moment in Ugandan history. The new country is now at war with the old. Right on cue the heavens open, The Rain lashes in, hard. So thick you can barely see more than a few yards ahead. The red earth churns to mud, the banana trees flat crazily in the howling wind. The kabaka's guards appear lightly armed, darting for cover in the cloud burst, desperate to find a way out. They're mown down at will. Within an hour or so, the defenders are dead, or have surrendered. But their leader is nowhere to be seen. The kabaka himself, in the torrential downpour, some say with outside assistance, has made him a miraculous escape. Somehow he manages to clamber over a real war. Sneak down to the main road and hail a taxi. Screeching away from the battlefield. He heads to a church. The clergy give him refuge. Then they disguise him as a fellow priest and begin the process of smuggling him out of the country. The second king Freddie is spirited away by loyalists, crossing to the relative safety of neighboring Burundi. After brief stays in Nairobi and Addis Ababa, he will travel on to London. The kabaka is one of the fortunate ones. Through the course of the day around 400 of his fellow bogans will be gunned down as the battle of mango hill rages. Amin's men will even block the members of the Red Cross, who are poised to come in and give aid. The bodies will be scooped up into army trucks and dumped into pits. As the red monsoon mud is bulldozed over, it's quite apparent that some are being buried alive. Idi means men head into the palace and loot it, destroying priceless artifacts. Including those sacred muja guzo drums. As the smoke from mango hill wafts over Kampala president Milton abhi addresses Uganda's parliament, the National Assembly. There is nothing to regret, he says. The oneness of Uganda must be assured.

Kabaka Idi Amin Lubiri Palace Mango Hill Uganda Royal Headquarters Ugandan Army Colonel Amin Quebec Buganda Henchman Caracas Milton Lake Victoria Lizzie King Freddie Burundi Ababa Addis
A highlight from Part Seven: The Vaccine Race

Prognosis: Doubt

01:42 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Part Seven: The Vaccine Race

"A different disease catches his interest. An ominous new virus is spreading in China. Medical journal, the lancet has just published the first case descriptions for 41 people who'd gotten sick in the city of Wuhan. Hugo noticed his one thing right away. And your message in this paper was that one of the family members had the disease. Was I was positive, but did not have fever or other symptoms. This was new. The asymptomatic cases meant the virus could spread in secret. The symptoms described in the article are serious. Pneumonia, heart injury, 6 deaths. URL looks up the population of Wuhan. 11 million people bigger than central London. Then he checks flights between the city and the rest of the world. There are dozens of flights every day. It was extremely highly likely that this is going to be a pandemic. And we started to discuss what we can do. The next morning, he turns to the person he trusts the most. His wife and fellow researcher returns them to Richie. She's the one who challenges his big ideas. Forces him to hone his hypothesis. He spends about an hour showing her what he'd found. They both know the best weapon to fight what's coming will be a vaccine. They had been testing a new technology using messenger RNA and experimental cancer therapy. And had done a lot of lab work on a potential flu vaccine. But neither they nor anybody else had ever used the technology in an approved medicine for

Medical Journal Wuhan Heart Injury The Lancet Hugo Fever Pneumonia China London Richie Cancer FLU
A highlight from 359 | Man, Myth, Legend

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

05:45 min | Last week

A highlight from 359 | Man, Myth, Legend

"Medicine is science, oftentimes it can take years of research and trials for a new medication or procedure to make it to patients on a wider scale. Yet, that doesn't stop people from hunting for miracle cures. Those one in a million treatments that bypass the lengthy safety test mainstream drugs undergo before the 1906 pure food and drug act, there were almost no regulations in place to prevent doctors or snake oil salesmen from peddling whatever tinctures they thought might heal someone. And for hundreds of years, the science behind medicine was, well, questionable. King Charles the second, for example, was no stranger to medical curiosity. As a child he'd been tutored by William Harvey, a surgeon on the cutting edge of the field who had been the first person to detail how the heart pumped blood throughout the body. Charles studied many scientific subjects growing up, including chemistry and physics. But when it came to medicine, especially later in life, he rarely turned anything down. Due to his poor health in the weeks before his death, Charles underwent all manner of treatments, including cupping, bloodletting, and something called the king's drops. Kings drops were created by Jonathan Goddard, a physician and surgeon who had developed a unique formula for what he deemed a royal cure all. It could help with fainting, bladder stones, and it was said to be a powerful stimulant as well. Nevertheless, Charles wanted to know what he was putting into his body, so he paid Goddard for the formula. The king learned much about the drop's chemical composition. Among its ingredients were ivory, dried vipers, and hearthstone, an ammonia solution made from deer horns. Everything was ground up liquefied distilled and filtered through a complex process that eventually yielded an alcoholic solution. But there was one ingredient that really pulled the whole thing together. It's effectiveness, however, varied from person to person. What was it that Goddard put in his drops? Human skulls 5 pounds of them crushed into a fine powder, but not just any skulls would do. Goddard sought out the craniums of young men who had been killed violently, like soldiers or recently executed criminals. For lesser ailments, a few drops were administered at a time. For more serious conditions, though, such as a stroke or lethargy, 40 to 50 drops could be ingested at once. Unsurprisingly, this miracle cure didn't cure much of anything, and it might have made the king's health even worse. He died on February 2nd of 1685, and it was believed at first that he'd been poisoned. Today, experts are able to tell that Charles most likely suffered from kidney disease, which led to his passing, whether the drops had contributed to it, however, remains to be seen. It's likely they didn't help. Edward walpole had been a member of parliament for the town of king's Lynn in Norfolk when he took some of Goddard's drops in 1668. Walpole died after suffering a seizure shortly thereafter. But that didn't stop people from believing in the drop's power, especially since they were chock full of human skulls. Skulls had been used in medicinal treatments from the 16th century all the way through the 18th century. In fact, the German man named Oswald crawl developed a concoction in 1643 that was meant to cure epilepsy, and like Goddard, he preferred to use skulls from men who had died under violent circumstances. But corpse medicine, as it was called, extended beyond the bones inside the head. Someone with a sore muscle might have rubbed belly fat on the offending spot to alleviate the pain. People drank blood because they believed it had restorative properties, and the poor who couldn't afford expensive medicines would attend executions and pay for a cup of the red stuff. Freshly squeezed, of course. Other cultures who practice corpse medicine like the Native Americans were vilified and called all kinds of slurs due to what the Europeans saw as uncivilized cannibalism. The hypocrisy was strong back then, and some of those stereotypes have lingered to this day. But times changed, and with them, so did medicine, scientific breakthroughs led to new remedies like penicillin and vaccines for diseases such as smallpox. People stopped eating and drinking skulls to feel better. After all, any cures would have been psychosomatic anyway. You know, all in their head. This episode was made possible by the deadbolt mystery society. Are you a connoisseur of murder mysteries? Do you love the thrill of unraveling the clues, then the deadbolt mystery society is a great way to bring the mystery to life in your own home. The deadbolt mystery society is a monthly subscription box filled with a storyline of immersive scenarios intriguing characters and original compelling stories. And it's all delivered right to your door. Each box features interactive online components that bring each story to life, like puzzles, evidence, and interviews. According to BuzzFeed, it's the closest you'll get to fulfilling your dream of becoming Sherlock Holmes. The deadbolt mystery society boxes contain stand-alone stories, so you don't need to have multiple orders to compete your murder mystery storyline, and you can also choose from three 6 or 12 month subscription options for a greater discount. Ready to prove your skills, visit deadbolt mystery society dot com to get started. When you do be sure to use the promo code cabinet 20 and you'll save 20% on all subscription options plus single one time boxes. That's 20% off all subscription options plus single one time boxes at deadbolt mystery society dot com, offer

Goddard Charles Jonathan Goddard William Harvey Edward Walpole King Charles Oswald Crawl Deadbolt Mystery Society Walpole Kidney Disease Stroke Norfolk Lynn Epilepsy Smallpox Sherlock Holmes
A highlight from Indigenous Women: Sarah Winnemucca

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:57 min | Last week

A highlight from Indigenous Women: Sarah Winnemucca

"Hello. From wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is romantica. Today we're talking about an educator, author and advocate, who worked as an interpreter and fought to protect indigenous rights. When she died, The New York Times called her the most remarkable woman among the piutes of Nevada. Let's meet Sarah winnemucca. Sarah was born to huck newtonia or shell flower around 1844. She was a numa, also known as northern piutes. The name Europeans gave them. Her tribe lived semi nomadic Lea and moved through Nevada and Oregon. Sarah first came into contact with white people when she was a child. Her grandfather, chief truckee was welcoming of white men who invaded their land. He called them his brothers and sisters. And he fought alongside them in wars, surfing as a guide to various emigrant parties as they crossed the great basin. But Sarah's father, chief winnemucca, was more suspicious. One spring day, when Sarah was a child and her grandfather was away from home. They heard that white people were coming. Fear passed over the tribe and they began to run away. But Sarah and her cousin were too small to keep up. So Sarah's mother and ant buried them and placed a sage bush on top of them. Sarah later wrote can anyone imagine my feelings buried alive, thinking every minute that I was to be unburied and eaten up by the people that my grandfather loved so much. Despite her grandfather's fascination and love for the settlers, the tribe remained fearful of them. But it eventually became clear that the settlers weren't going to leave. By the 1850s Sarah worked for white families, and it's likely there that she got that name. Sarah and her younger sister also lived with a white family for a time. By the age of 14, Sarah could speak 5 languages, including English and Spanish. When she was 16, she was sent to a conference school in San Jose, California. Her grandfather, chief Chuck E.'s dying wish. Some of Sarah's wealthy classmates families objected. So Sarah and her sister only stayed there a few weeks. As settlers built towns and mines and increasingly took over what was once native territory. Sarah and her people were forced onto reservations. Life was difficult there. There wasn't enough to eat, and the white people used the reservation land for grazing, while giving the piute nothing in return. The relationship between the piute and the white reservation agents was tense and violent. Sarah's language skills gained her jobs as an interpreter for the bureau of Indian affairs. The job was complicated. Sarah wanted to advocate for her people. But doing so would eventually lose her the job. Sarah witnessed a great deal of pain and suffering at the hands of the U.S. government. In 1879, the paiutes were forced to move to another reservation. 350 miles away in the dead of winter. Sarah was told that the president demanded the move. She later wrote every night I imagined I could see the thing called president. He had long years he had big eyes and long legs and a head like a bullfrog or something like that. I could not think of anything that could be so inhuman as to do such a thing. Send people across mountains with snow, so deep. In 1880, Sarah made it to The White House to meet the president. The meeting was brief and disappointing, and the government's promises of tents and food for her people were quickly broken. Sarah continued her fight. She drew up petitions and traveled around the country, lecturing on the ways in which her people were being mistreated. With the help of her friend and publisher Elizabeth Peabody, she also took to writing. Sarah often wrote critiques of the way white people treated indigenous people. She wrote letters and articles that were reprinted in newspapers and magazines. In 1883, she wrote, life among the piutes, their wrongs and claims. It was the first English book published by an indigenous woman in the U.S.. In 1885, Sarah opened a school for native children in Nevada. It was an innovative and safe space. At the time, the U.S. government was forcing native children to assimilate. Convert to Christianity and forget their customs languages and heritage. Sara would not allow her students to be taken into the boarding school system. She acknowledged the importance and power of education. But not at the expense of losing the piute culture. Sarah's life came to an early end. She died in 1891 at her younger sister's home.

Sarah Jenny Kaplan Sarah Winnemucca Huck Newtonia Chief Truckee Nevada Chuck E. Bureau Of Indian Affairs LEA The New York Times Oregon San Jose Bush U.S. Government Elizabeth Peabody California White House Government U.S.
A highlight from The Clinton-Lewinsky Affair | High Crimes and Misdemeanors | 4

American Scandal

06:14 min | Last week

A highlight from The Clinton-Lewinsky Affair | High Crimes and Misdemeanors | 4

"It's the morning of July 27th, 1998 in Manhattan. Monica Lewinsky stepped out of a taxicab pulls down the brim of a baseball cap. It's an awkward fit. When ski is wearing a blond wig and the hat feels a little too snug. But she has to put up with a discomfort because more important is that no one can recognize her as she stands in the streets of Manhattan. Lewinsky glances at her lawyer and nods, signaling that she's ready. Then they step inside a tall building, where a doorman ushers them in and to an elevator. A minute later, the elevator doors open, and Lewinsky gazes out into a penthouse apartment. The living room is small, but elegant. Winski might have actually felt cozy in this place, except she's not here for a relaxing afternoon. Lewinsky is about to betray the man she believed to be her soulmate. The president of the United States. Lewinsky walks into the penthouse, which belongs to the mother in law of Kenneth Starr, the special prosecutor whose office is investigating president. Today, members of Starr's team have packed into the living room. One attorney with broad shoulders and light hair steps forward to introduce himself. Miss Lewinsky, my name's bob Pittman. I'm one of the lead prosecutors in the office fender then a council. We've been looking at president Clinton's involvement in whitewater, trying to see whether he broke the law when he was involved in the real estate deal. I understand mister Bennet, but give me a moment. I need to get rid of this disguise. Lewinsky takes off the blond wig and baseball cap, and straightens her hair. Miss Lewinsky was smart of you to come prepared. And thank you for traveling all the way from Washington. It's going to save us some grief and protect you from the press. Which I know has been a lot. Lewinsky doesn't think it's funny. She wants to snarl to shout at the top of her lungs. She knows that she broke the law by lying under oath about her affair with the president. With the deal that's on the table, she can't be combative. Still she needs to let these men know what she's been going through. Mister bittman, it has been difficult. 6 months ago, the whole country learned my name. I've been mocked by talk show hosts, they make fun of my weight, the fact that I grew up in Beverly Hills. Republicans call me a loose woman with no morals. Democrats blame me for sabotaging Bill Clinton's presidency. And I'm still facing legal charges. I understand miss lozi, and that's why we're here to talk. So, you ready to get started? I am. Let's talk. Miss Lewinsky has a reminder you have what we call a queen for a day deal. That means we can't hold anything against you that you say today. If at the end of our questioning, we feel you are a credible witness. We'll sign the immunity agreement. You won't face prosecution. In exchange, you'll aid our investigation and testify against president Bill Clinton. Do you understand? I understand. Good. However, if we believe you are lying or withholding information today, we'll tear up that agreement. We'll press charges of perjury, obstruction of justice and witness tampering, tied to your efforts to convince Linda trip to lie on your behalf under oath. Do you understand that? I do. Okay. Then I'll jump right in. Miss Lewinsky, when did you first learn that you were on a witness list in the Paula Jones case? December 17th, 1997, president Clinton called to tell me. And did he discuss how you should respond? While he suggested that I could give my answers in writing. You know, I signed affidavit rather than an oral deposition. Is that all? Miss Lewinsky, he didn't ask you what you would say? No, he didn't. He didn't ask you to lie about the nature of your relationship with him. Lewinsky knows that she has to maintain her composure. She can't pick a fight with the prosecutors, not when they hold her future in their hands. But on this issue, she's going to be very clear. Mister bittman, I want you to the rest of your team to understand something. President Clinton did not ask me to lie. Bitman narrows his eyes with a look of suspicion. And he launches in with another question. In the hours that follow, bittman walks Lewinsky through every encounter she had with the president. It's a grueling interrogation, and Lewinsky grows exhausted. She needs to stay focused if she's going to get this deal, but bittman keeps grilling her with question after question. Finally, Lewinsky's attorney calls for an end to the interrogation. It's time for a decision. Either they're giving Lewinsky immunity or the meeting is over. There's a long pause. Lewinsky grips the edge of the couch, her fingers turning white. Bittman glances at his team, then announces the decision. Their offer stands. They'll give Lewinsky legal immunity. When he cries out a relief, she's not going to prison. But this also means there's no turning back. She is about to betray the president of the United States. American scandal is sponsored by noom. There are no shortcuts to getting in shape, and it isn't just about losing weight. It's about learning healthier habits and feeling better about yourself. This is one thing I learned from noom, the habit changing solution that helps you develop a new relationship with food. Noom's cognitive behavioral approach helps you better understand your feelings about food, how to be more mindful of your habits and gives you the knowledge and support you need for long-lasting change, with new, taking care of your health is empowering. Instead of stress inducing, there's no need to fear ruining the whole program with just one day off. Noon will help you get back on track. So start building better habits for healthier, long-term results. 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Lewinsky Miss Lewinsky President Clinton Mister Bittman Winski Bob Pittman Mister Bennet Manhattan Baseball Monica Lewinsky Kenneth Starr Bittman Starr Whitewater Bitman United States Paula Jones Beverly Hills Washington Linda
A highlight from Introducing: The Log Books: "Please Be Gentle"

Making Gay History

08:06 min | Last week

A highlight from Introducing: The Log Books: "Please Be Gentle"

"Going to be such a big part of the logbooks podcast. We realized that we had to basically spread it over three episodes. Yeah, definitely. Of course, HIV and aids is still very much around today and pervades the entirety of this period of time that we're talking about. But we really want to specifically dedicate those three episodes to HIV and aids directly. It's not going to be chronological or definitive either. Yeah, I guess we should tell listeners that there are some difficult material coming. But there's also stories of life and living and strength and finding power and community through this time. Yeah, definitely. And that's one thing that's really jumped out to us about the stories that we've collected. So you're going to hear some voices from people who talk about their experience of being infected with HIV in the early years of the epidemic, including those who called switchboard for help, we're going to hear from a nurse and a doctor and of course former switchboard volunteers who heard about it all before anyone else. So let's start as always by listening to the stories of those who lived at. Pay yourself in Matthew shoes, a young guy just going out for the first time. I'm Matthew Hudson. I plus went to a gay club in 1983 when I was 15. And I was still 6 years below the age of consent for gay men at that point. So I lied about my age and told people I was 16. I thought that was a bit better. And I went in and they were playing this incredible music. It was high energy music and I'd never heard anything like it. And I had almost anticipated the place to be full of people who were like John inland or people wearing long overcoats or something like that. Flash on max, but instead it was full of gorgeous men with mustaches and check shirts and tight jeans, dancing to this incredible pounding rhythmic music and it was the sexiest thing I'd ever seen. And I met this guy, he was 32. He was American. He was a photographer. He was working on an assignment in London. And we got chatting in the investment back to his hotel. And we did what we did. And that was fine. And I thought, okay, tick I've done that now. I was living in a little village near strapped upon a vern. I was at home at my parents. Hello, my name's Lee chislet. It was a program on the tally called killer in the village. It was like horizon or panorama, one of those. And it was showing, I think it was San Francisco and New York, showing these gay men coming in with these purple lesions, these couples sarcomas, and their bodies had lost so much weight and difficulties breathing. And again, I remember feeling very, very impacted by it and sort of scared, but also intrigued. Little 16th century daughter. How long have you had those stomach pains all together? Actually, I started we could go Winston. I see. The doctor suspects that John has an unusual form of pneumonia. This horizon documentary was really good at reflecting the confusion about what was going on. John is the latest victim of a widespread epidemic of bizarre infections, all connected with aids. Are they high fevers? 102. In fact, it was this rare pneumonia that first alerted the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, Georgia that something very odd was going on. I even think I might have watched it with my mom being there. And of course, I wasn't out as gay at the time, or didn't really know about that. So I remember slightly feeling as you do at that age slightly and comfortable because I knew they were talking about people like me and so yeah, so I remember being slightly aware of it, but I just, I don't know that there was something about watching that documentary that really one I was intrigued, but even then I thought, you know, something's got to be done. This was just, yeah, so that was what it was like. And you put in this, you know, this was 1983 84. Things were different times of countries. And in America, this new disease has already become an epidemic. Watching this intriguing documentary today, we can experience something of the fear that viewers like Lee must have felt. In New York, this is Greenwich Village. Centered in and around Christopher street on the west side of this traditionally bohemian district of Manhattan is a vast community of gay men, said to be hundreds of thousands. Here, the killer disease has taken its greatest toll of death. And of fear among those who walk in its shadow. So the same week that I went to heaven the same week that I first had consensus sex with a man. One evening, that same week, there was a documentary on horizon documentary called kilo in the village. And it was the first documentary as far as I'm aware that was broadcast on British television about HIV. And it said it was a disease, which for which there was no treatment, which there was no cure. Which was fatal. And it was something which you could catch from having sex with an American. And I've just had sex with an American. And I thought. Just so many people, you know, young people, people of all different ages coming out coming out onto the scene and immediately facing aids. Yeah, it must have been so difficult and confusing. And then also having those stories in the media, like the killer in the village, documentary, the BBC horizon thing that we played a little clip from, which made this correlation with what was going on in America and especially New York. Didn't you say there was another story that you wanted to tell me about Lee? Yeah, so he also told me that he remembers being in a bar, basically a village pub, and he overheard these two older gay guys, I guess Lee was only like 16 or 17 at this point anyway, so basically anyone was older. And they were talking about that they had heard of this disease, and they thought that it was an American thing, and they were just like, oh, it's going to be an American thing. We don't need to worry about it. It's just not sleep with any Americans. Basically. It's really interesting to hear Lee tell that story from the early 80s and the very, very early days of the epidemic because that was actually something that was really, really pervasive as the documentary killer in the village shows. It was perceived from the British point of view at the time to be this American thing, and then as you can hear in this next logbook entry, that was actually a wider perception as well, this fear of Americans. This is a logbook entry from January 15th, 1986. The volunteer who took the call was David. Man phone to say he had an American friend over. Aged 23 years, who was refused at the golden Lion and asked to leave by the landlord. It wasn't because he was thought to be younger, and therefore under age, he had drunk only half a pint, then asked just for a Coke. Person who found, feared it was an anti American aids fear. Can't be verified as such, but it might be worth bearing in mind for U.S. visitors. Well, it was definitely 1984. I saw my very first copy of gay times lying around the house of a guy who was publishing my computer games. And the headline at the time was gay plague overtakes America or words to that effect. John gott aids through homosexual contact in America.

HIV Aids Matthew Hudson John Inland Lee Chislet Pneumonia New York LEE John Matthew Winston Centers For Disease Control Greenwich Village San Francisco Confusion America London Atlanta Georgia Manhattan
A highlight from 10.77- Brest Litovsk

Revolutions

05:16 min | Last week

A highlight from 10.77- Brest Litovsk

"10.77 breast litovsk. We need to start this week with a couple of short corrections. First I'm not quite sure how I did this, but it was general cream off, who was with kerensky at the battle of pulkovo, I said it was some guy named general krill loff, who there is no general krill. That was just some mistaken mishmash of sounds I made because there are so many generals in the Russian Civil War whose name starts with Kay. Cornelia, calendar creme off cold check. It's not a big thing, but I completely invented a general named krilov. He didn't exist. The second thing is speaking of one of those K generals. Nikolai, krien, was an Ensign when he became commander in chief of the Russian army, not a lieutenant. So again, it was Ensign, cried lenko, who became commander in chief of the Russian army, not lieutenant, sorry about that. I get things wrong sometimes. Now we spent the last two episodes on the Bolsheviks initial consolidation of power on the homefront. This week, we are going to turn our attention to what was happening on the war front. What did the October Revolution mean for Russia's place in the great war, and beyond that, what did it mean for their standing among the other great powers? And what we will find today is that as the old stately quadrille continued to swirl around to polite classical music with everyone wearing tuxedos and sequins, the Bolsheviks are about to come charging onto the dance floor like they're diving into a mosh pit. And while technically it was a kind of dance, they were also there to just kind of trash the scene. So let's go back to the night of October 26th. And remember the very first thing the Bolsheviks did after seizing power. Issue the decree on peace. The Bolsheviks had been the anti war party going back so long it was arguably the single most distinguishing feature about them going all the way back to 1914. Lenin and the Bolsheviks were the most cohesive block in the Zimmer vault left, and they consistently attacked the war as nothing more than a small greedy click of capitalist imperialists, feeding the people of Europe into a meat grinder. What Lennon wanted to do was reorient the war. To stop make it people's fighting against peoples, and instead make it the people rising up to overthrow their common enemy, the ruling classes of Europe. Lenin wanted to turn foreign war into Civil War. And a huge amount of Bolshevik strategy tactics and ideology rested on the belief that World War I represented the final crisis of the old world of capitalism, and from its ashes would be born a new world of socialism. Now that they held power in Petrograd, the Bolsheviks planned to strike out boldly to bring their international socialist dreams to fruition. But they got off to a rocky and sometimes comical start. Trotsky took over the foreign office as kamisar of foreign affairs, but was immediately faced with the consequences of the white collar strike that had greeted the October Revolution. None of the functionaries, bureaucrats or clerks who staffed the ministry office showed up for work. tracking down the people who had the keys to the doors and the safes of the building. Now he responded to these insulting hitches with a kind of breezy disdain. Trotsky said that one of the consequences of the revolution would be an end to all this old style European diplomacy where fat cats congregated behind closed doors and treated the people of the world as expendable and exploitable ponds over brandy and cigars. What sort of diplomatic work will we be doing anyway? Trotsky said, why shall issue a few revolutionary proclamations to the peoples? And then shut up shop. But despite this posturing, it was going to be a wee bit more complicated than all that. On November 9th, the Soviet government transmitted the decree on peace to all the other belligerent powers, inviting everyone to take it as the starting point for a general peace. But if you will recall, it also aimed itself over the head of the government of Europe and spoke directly to the people. Lenin had very few illusions about the response from the other powers. The proposal of peace will be met with resistance on the part of the imperials government, he said, we don't fool ourselves on that score. But we hope that revolution will soon break out in the belligerent countries, and that is why we address ourselves to the workers of France, England and Germany. By issuing this call to all the belligerent powers, Lenin was also engaging in a little bit of public relations work. Because while Len did not expect the governments of France or Britain to respond favorably, he absolutely expected the Central Powers to jump at the chance to sign a peace treaty with Russia. One of the things that had dogged Lenin and the Bolsheviks for all of 1917 was the accusation that they were a bunch of paid German agents. That they had been delivered to Petrograd in a German train car, with instructions to wreck Russia from the inside. Now, Lennon did absolutely take from the Kaiser what the Kaiser offered in 1917.

Russian Army Kerensky Pulkovo Krill Loff Krien Lenko Lenin Trotsky Cornelia Nikolai Kamisar Ensign Europe KAY Bolsheviks Petrograd Russia Lennon Foreign Office Imperials Government
A highlight from Indigenous Women: Annie Dodge Wauneka

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:21 min | Last week

A highlight from Indigenous Women: Annie Dodge Wauneka

"John Andre asked Annie Wonka. Why the navajos seem to welcome new ideas so much more readily than other Indians. Well, the changes are so fast, and I'm quite sure and now who's her real love that we can not stand still. We've got to live this black, it can go along with other people. Hello. From wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is a manica. This month we're covering indigenous women from around the globe. Today, we're talking about a woman who was a prominent leader in the Navajo community and a voice for Navajo people in the U.S. government. She worked to improve her people's health while respecting and preserving Navajo culture. Let's talk about Annie Dodge juanita. Annie was born in 1910 on a Navajo reservation. Her father, Henry Q Dodge was a prominent leader in their tribe. Annie grew up herding sheep on his ranch. When Annie was 8 years old, an influenza epidemic swept across her community, killing thousands of Navajo people. Annie witnessed many of her peers fall sick and die. Later, Annie enrolled the university of Arizona and graduated with a degree in public health. Then in 1951, Annie ran for a seat in the Navajo tribal council and won. Becoming the second woman ever to be elected. Two years later, a tuberculosis epidemic struck the Navajo reservation. Annie was appointed as the chair of the health and welfare committee. She began learning everything she could about tuberculosis. She would drive alone across the reservation, which stretched through Arizona, Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico, visiting hospitals and tuberculosis patients and studying the disease and treatment options. During her research, Annie began to observe that many Navajo tuberculosis patients distrusted government run hospitals, and wouldn't complete treatments in those spaces. So Annie launched health education campaigns to specifically target Navajo populations. She created a Navajo English dictionary of medical terms. She helped produce short films narrated in Navajo about health education, and she launched a weekly radio program. She even organized a baby contest, where physicians would screen babies health and offer medical advice. On top of all that, Annie traveled around the reservation, explaining to people how tuberculosis worked, and how western medicine, like x-ray machines could help. While Annie was doing this work, she also observed the living conditions of many of the people she was visiting. What she witnessed led to the development of other programs in the Navajo reservation to provide adequate sanitation vaccinations and infant care. Annie was always conscious of Navajo culture and traditions, and her programming always considered the existing practices of the Navajo people. She focused on integrating modern medicine into existing Navajo traditions. During her time on the tribal council, she connected government physicians and volunteer doctors with traditional Navajo medicine men, so they could all work together to improve the health conditions of the Navajo people. But Annie's influence expanded beyond the reservation. During her career, she also was a member of advisory boards of the U.S. Surgeon General and the U.S. public health service. At a time when Congress was overwhelmingly male. Annie regularly walked the halls to confer with presidents, heads of government agencies and U.S. representatives to be a voice for the Navajo people. Annie served 7 terms on the Navajo tribal council, from 1951 to 1979. At one point, she ran against her husband and won. In 1963, Annie was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom for her groundbreaking work in public health. In 1984, she was designated by the Navajo people are legendary mother of the Navajo Nation. Annie passed away in 1997 at the age of 87. All month were highlighting the legacies of indigenous women.

Annie Navajo Tuberculosis John Andre Annie Wonka Jenny Kaplan Annie Dodge Juanita Navajo Tribal Council Henry Q Dodge Health And Welfare Committee U.S. Government University Of Arizona Influenza New Mexico Utah Arizona Colorado U.S. Public Health Service Tribal Council U.S.
A highlight from The Auto Zillionaire Who Escaped Japan In A Box

Past Gas

07:55 min | Last week

A highlight from The Auto Zillionaire Who Escaped Japan In A Box

"Try new Christopher mild to moderate eczema. It works at and below the skin surface and can be used on almost everybody, like on the dimples of a diva. Yeah, yeah, where would you vote? Yeah. Well, you both. Or the shoulders of a chef. Look, mom, I made jelly beans on toast. Steroid for you Chris oaks at and below the skin's surface. It blocks piggy for enzymes, which is believed to reduce inflammation, even on the wrist of a rebel. What did you do to your hair? What? The specific way you Christa works is not well defined. Prescription you Christ for mild to moderate eczema is for topical use only in ages three months and up. Do not use if you are allergic to you Christa, Chris aboro ointment 2% or its ingredients, allergic reactions, including hives itching swelling and redness may occur at or near the application site. The most common side effect is application site pain, such as burning or stinging. Come on, moms and dads. Check out you Chris a dot com. And ask your doctor about you, Chris. Can I sing more and more song? This holiday season, you could run around to 5 different stores looking for toys for the kids on your list, or you can get the brands they love for less at Dollar General. Find Christmas morning favorites like Fisher price, LEGO, Disney, hot wheels and LOL surprise, plus everything you need to wrap them up too. So running around like a maniac, or grabbing it all at once. I think you know what to do. Stop by your neighborhood, DG. And let's make gift crabs happen. On a cold December night in 2019, the now infamous Carlos ghosn left his Tokyo apartment around 6 30 p.m. and joined two men at a nearby hotel. The three men took a bullet train from shinagawa to Osaka and arrived at a hotel near the kansai international airport just after 8 p.m.. VR is later, two men left the hotel, carrying several large containers, including an audio equipment box that was later determined to be too big to fit inside the x-ray machine at kansai airport. The two men boarded a bombardier global express private jet, took off at 1110 p.m., heading towards Turkey. Within an hour of the plane landing, a separate private jet took off for Beirut. And then, Carlos ghosn, a former Titan of global car industry was free. But why did it go down like this? Forbes once called ghosn, the hardest working man in the brutally competitive global car business. Japanese referred to him as 7 11, because he would work very hard from early in the morning till late at night. There was even a popular manga comic about his life, and his face had been printed on both Lebanese potion stamps and Japanese restaurant bento boxes. So how did a man nicknamed mister fix it and list it as one of fortune's top ten most powerful international business leaders end up on the run from the law? Today on past gas, it's the epic rise and fall. Of Carlos ghosn. Past ass podcast is not yours. It's not about ports. I wish I had a Tokyo apartment. Yeah. What would you put in it? My butt, your butt in the couch, just a lawn chair. What are those like kneeling chairs? You remember those weird kneeling chase chairs from the 90s where you're leaning forward? Oh, yeah. I'm glad that didn't catch on because that sounds awful. Yeah. I'd heard my knees for sure. They had spikes on them. Oh, do people still turn their chair around backwards in like a bid to look like a bad boy? Speaking of bad boys, I'm recording at the donut studio today. And the vibes around here are surreal. We have ten ten Vin Diesel lookalikes of varying authenticity. In the office today, by the time this podcast airs, this will already have happened, but we're doing a live event next week with ten Vin Diesel look likes. Two of them look a lot like Vin Diesel. 8 of them don't. But they're all bald. One of them is 70, must be 7. I mean like three vin diesels would be funny, but I can't even imagine ten. Well, it's funny. It's funny you say that joke because we started with three, like we were like, that was the joke I pitched, was like, all right, and now here's three Vin Diesel Singh family 100 times. That's a funny bit. And then over the last two weeks during while we were developing this thing, it became ten Vin Diesel's and now the title of the live show is we hired ten vin diesels and the whole thing is about Vin Diesel, basically. You should get them to flip a car over. Do we have them fit the Jetta? Yeah. Yes. Do we have a forklift yet? No. Keep an eye on the old one, because we don't want to have him get a hernia or anything like that. Yeah, that would be bad press. Yeah, it would be bad. Welcome to past gas, everybody. This is not a Vin Diesel show. Every show is in diesel. So I wish it was. I do wish it was. A man is returned to the franchise brother. I'm your host Nolan Sykes, joined as always, by my two co hosts. We got James pumphrey. Maybe maybe two, two. And then we got Joe Weber, Joe's back from Ireland. I'm back. Guys, I'm calling upon wink wink nation to keep it juice today because I'm very low on energy. I am jet lagged as hell. I've been up since three in the morning because I couldn't sleep. So I call upon you to harness the energy of wink wink nation and funnel it into me. Yeah, we need a captain planet Joe today. Yeah, I'm like immortan Joe of this nation. I heard you got diarrhea in a castle. Yeah. I won't dwell on that though. I'll talk about the cool stuff. The Irish car scene is cool as hell. There's a ton of AE 86s and I saw you know how your driver on Los Angeles and see like takeover spots in the middle of an intersection with just donut marks. There was like the smaller version of that because the roads are so small, but I did go on like the equivalent of an Irish two gay. Which was just this tiny little mountain road and I saw some one had been drifting on it and I was like, dad. I'm tiny little mountain road. Let's go to the tug. The tiny little mountain room. That's awesome, man. I love Irish people, and I'm counting in the days till I can go back. I'm pretty sure I'm Irish. Oh, I bet you got some menu. Yeah, because I'm so red. And I love whisky. My accent is just like built in. Like, you know, it's so authentic. A tiny little mountain root. We are entry into the accent. Because obviously we were doing bits the whole time was traveling with some comedians. We did the accent a fair bit and our entry into it when you're like, can't remember how to do it is ego tea tatar. That's all you gotta do and then you're in it. Tea totor.

Carlos Ghosn Kansai International Airport Chris Oaks Chris Aboro Allergic Reactions Eczema Shinagawa Chris Tokyo Christa Fisher Price Ghosn Christopher Vin Diesel Singh Osaka Lego Beirut Forbes Disney
A highlight from Indigenous Women: Maria Tallchief

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:50 min | Last week

A highlight from Indigenous Women: Maria Tallchief

"Hello, I'm Jordan Marie brings three white horses Daniel. I'm Chloe Tasha Lakota and I'm the founder and organizer of rising hearts, a professional runner and also a filmmaker. And today I'm excited to introduce Maria tall chief. Maria stands out to me because she was the first native to hold rank as one of the first major prima ballerinas and really revolutionized ballet. And I'm really happy to see that she's on this list because she just really helped pave the way for representation for native peoples, but also as a native woman doing what she loved what she was passionate about. I'm really excited for you all to learn more about her and now here's host Jenny caplan to tell you all about Maria tell chief. Hello. From under media network, I'm Jenny caplan, and this is a manica. Today we're talking about the first indigenous ballerina in history to receive international recognition. She was the highest paid ballet dancer in her time and gave new life to the American ballet scene. Let's talk about Maria tall chief. Maria was born Elizabeth Marie tall chief on January 24th, 1925 in fairfax, Oklahoma. Her father, Alexander, was a member of the osage tribe, and her mother Ruth was of Scott's Irish descent. Maria had an older brother George and a younger sister, Marjorie. Growing up, Maria lived in affluent life. When her father was a boy, oil was discovered on osage land, and the tribe became quite wealthy. Maria recalled in her memoir that she felt her father owned the town. From the local movie theater to the pool hall, he had a lot of property. Her family also owned a summer house in Colorado Springs, where Maria had her first ballet lesson at the age of three. The arts were important to Maria's family. She and her sister learned concert piano alongside dance from a young age. But dance quickly became their focus. When Maria was 8 years old, her family moved to Los Angeles. The day they arrived, Maria went to a drugstore with her mom and sister to get some snacks. While waiting for their order Maria's mom asked the clerk if he knew of any dance teachers in the neighborhood, he recommended Ernest belcher, the father of famous TV star Marge champion. Maria's mom took his recommendation, and from there, Maria's future began to unfold. Maria later recounted in her memoir an anonymous man in an unfamiliar town decided our fate with those few words. At 12 years old, Maria began rigorous training under the tutelage of the renowned Polish dancer, bronislaw and nijinska. Maria received special encouragement from her teacher. During the height of World War II, Maria signed on to join the ballet Rus de Monte Carlo in New York. Her colleagues often tried to convince Maria to change her name to sound more Eastern European. But Maria refused to change tall chief to Tulsi Eva. She was proud of her osage surname. Instead, she changed Marie to Maria, and called it a day. Maria danced in several ensembles and musicals. She made a name for herself as she pioneered poetic Americana. She began to catch the eye of George Balanchine, a famous Georgian choreographer. Their fondness of each other's genius led the two to marry in 1946. Their relationship wasn't necessarily steamy or passionate. Maria said passion and romance didn't play a big part in our married life. We saved our emotions for the classroom. Together they were an unstoppable force. Balanchine created several noteworthy roles for Maria. Her most celebrated performance was perhaps as the title role in firebird, an elaborate dance based on Russian folklore. Still, the relationship didn't last. Within four years of marriage, the couple divorced. They maintained a working relationship. From 1954 to 1955, Maria returned to the ballet Russ de Monte Carlo. There she received a $2000 per week salary from the company, the most any ballet dancer had ever been paid. Though she was earning a lot of money. Maria grew disappointed with the company, and left after one season. She moved instead to the New York City ballet, where she remained for another decade. In 1956, she married Henry passion, a wealthy construction executive. The couple had one daughter together named elisa. In 1965, Maria thought she'd retire completely from ballet. But 9 years later, the lyric opera of

Maria Maria Tall Jenny Caplan Jordan Marie Chloe Tasha Lakota Elizabeth Marie Tall Ernest Belcher Marge Champion Bronislaw Nijinska Rus De Monte Carlo Marjorie Daniel Fairfax Tulsi Eva Ruth Colorado Springs Alexander Oklahoma Scott
A highlight from What Next TBD: Best of 2021 | Inside the Subreddit That Blew Up GameStop

The Secret History of the Future

01:28 min | Last week

A highlight from What Next TBD: Best of 2021 | Inside the Subreddit That Blew Up GameStop

"Make sense anymore. We made this episode back in January when GameStop stock was on a crazy ride thanks to a bunch of investors on Reddit. It seemed like it couldn't last. But now it's November. And the ride is still going. And a quick heads up. There is some swearing in this episode. Well, tell me a little bit about yourself. I guess as much as you're comfortable telling me. Sure, I'm a software engineer in the southwest. This guy, we're going to call him Jason. He's a 36 year old dad. Jason is not his real name, but we agreed to give him a pseudonym because we're talking about a subreddit he's on, called WallStreetBets. A subreddit that is at the center of the chaotic last few days in the stock market. And he didn't really want his employer to know about all of this. I asked him what he thought. The first time he went on WallStreetBets. My impression was that these guys are absolute doofuses and it's hilarious. It's difficult to describe without swearing because they swear about themselves so much. It's okay, it's a podcast, you can swear. WallStreetBets is like a lot of Reddit in that there are a bunch of people with screen names like doctor blunt, or my mom looks at this. But these people are there to talk about investing. Mostly day trading. Okay, well, lately, this deep fucking value guy has been posting really in depth due diligence. This guy clearly knows what he's doing,

Reddit Gamestop Jason
A highlight from The Wandering Soul

The Experiment

05:27 min | Last week

A highlight from The Wandering Soul

"That these people were hearing was not a ghost. It was actually a weapon. A weapon designed and deployed by the U.S. Military and their South Vietnamese allies to target the deepest fears of the Vietnamese people. It was only used for a brief moment during the war, but rather than fade away into history. It was one of the shrapnel in the neck and mouth. This ghost. Bleeding rather badly. Has refused broken over the word the body's word. To die. You have to admit, there's something a little sinister about all of this. Okay, just to back up. This is historian Eric B villard. I am at the U.S. Army center of military history in Washington, D.C., and I am a Vietnam more specialist. And Eric says this strange weapon was created in part because of the Korean War. During the Korean War, just over a decade prior, a number of American soldiers and marines were captured by the North Koreans, and soon after you can imagine the surprise. Heard on communist radio stations. Exhorting us in their own normal voices. Sounding like communists. Fellow Americans. Don't go on with a senseless war. Stop being the tools of the rich capitalists who start wars for profit. Join us as guests of the Chinese people's volunteer army. It really spooked a lot of people on the battlefield and at home. This anxiety that the communists could brainwash good, solid decent American sons and noddles. And there was this feeling that we've got to get ahead of this. And so during the Vietnam War, the United States became very interested in what motivated the enemy to fight and then figuring out what can we do to convince those people to not fight. This was Sia. Psychological warfare. The warfare of the mind. Its mission is to influence the thoughts of the enemy soldier. Idea was if you could persuade people using words and ideas. To put down their weapons, you could win the war while killing fewer people. That's the essence of psychological warfare. And who's the best in the world at convincing people to do stuff? Eyes cold. The ad folks of Madison Avenue. At that particular moment, there was, you know, this madman advertising and now it's Pepsi. Explosion. With TVs and radios now in living rooms across the country. All of a sudden there were all of these opportunities. To understand what makes us tick. What can I do about my hair? Exploit it. You halo shampoo. And get us to buy things. Want anything special for your birthday? Just a decent cup of coffee. And the military took note of this. What and do we know where they're actually add folks that joined the armed services? Yeah, absolutely. That was one of the areas where they were, you know, look for talent. They would go to people and say, boy. Lucky strike filters will show you plenty of smooth flavor. You're lucky strike campaign was really effective. Maybe you can tell us something about how to convince someone to turn in their weapon. And so all these admin began to search for a weakness in their target audience. The Viet Cong in North Vietnamese soldier. My name is wingman so. I joined the military when I was 18. In the year 1971. Your body tinting up. Big deal. In India. We hired vo Tron dong and new in van ha. You're right. Reporters in Vietnam to interview a few North Vietnamese and Viet Cong soldiers for us. When you think about these soldiers, they were far far from where they were born and raised. Most of these kids would be farmers or fishermen or maybe living a place like Hanoi. Boy, not only had not. I was a Hanoi. In my sophomore year at the university of industrial art. I was the first of the university to join. My college principal even drove me to the army station. And the students lined up on both sides of the gate clapping hands. Conveniently. At that time, I didn't think much. But I thought that the war wouldn't be too terrible. But when I had been in the army for a while. I was mentally broken. I mean, your average northern soldier, they're not they never lived in the jungle. They never lived in the mountains. That was crazy. And so here they are, squatting in the jungle, hundreds of miles from home. Haven't seen their family in 6 months a year, two years. My mom took the link in Europe. I was hoping that I could get out of the war and go home. I felt

Eric B Villard U.S. Army Center Of Military H Washington, D.C. Chinese People's Volunteer Arm Vietnam U.S. SIA Eric Vo Tron Dong Pepsi Viet Cong Hanoi University Of Industrial Art India Army Europe
A highlight from The Model Citizens Edition

The Promised Podcast

01:06 min | Last week

A highlight from The Model Citizens Edition

"There was a dress made just of discarded pages from discarded Ikea catalogs. There were lovely, high heeled shoes, fashioned of cigarette butts. There was a trash bag tank top. There were hair bands made from yogurt containers, a necklace made of plastic clothes pins designed by jewelry designer erit gross. There was a necklace that seems to have been made from the tops of the plastic hammers kids bunk each other over the head with on Independence Day, and there was much, much more. A young model maybe 8 years old were a dress made of the plastic drains at the bottom of pota cheese containers. She held a sign that read in English say no to plastic. A teenager in the clothespin necklace held a sign that read in a hybrid mishmash of Hebrew in English, quote, because we have no planet be in lanu planet B it read. The trash fashion runway walk started at the comb ill foe definitely not fast fashion haute couture boutique in the port, which to celebrate the event posted a post on their Facebook page that read, quote, they say that by 2050, there

Erit Gross Ikea Facebook
A highlight from Indigenous Women: Bartolina Sisa

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:42 min | Last week

A highlight from Indigenous Women: Bartolina Sisa

"Hello. From wonder media network, I'm Jenny caplan, and this is a manica. This month we're highlighting indigenous women from around the globe. This episode is depictions of violence. If you're listening with young children, you may want to sit this one out. Today we're featuring a woman who became a symbol for the Latin American anti colonial movement of the 18th century. She led several uprisings against Spanish rule. Please welcome bartolina sisa. Bartolina sisa was likely born on August 24th, 1753. She came from a well off, aymara family that traded coca leaves. The aymara are an indigenous people from the central Andes in Peru and Bolivia. Their language is also called Amara. Bertolina was from the imperial province of La Paz. Back then, La Paz was considered upper Peru. Today, it's part of Bolivia. La Paz was founded by a Spanish colonizer or conquistador in 1548 on the site of an Incan village. Soon after the Spanish conquest, much of the indigenous population of what's now Bolivia was forced to labor in mines by the Spaniards. Some cities, including La Paz supplied the food and other necessities for this labor. The Spanish invasion introduced violence and exploitation to the continent. It was under the suppression that bartolina grew up. She set out to fight back and organize grassroots battalions against the Spanish Empire with the help of other women and her partner, Tupac Qatari. Tupac was an insurgent leader and the Inca king of the aymaras and vice king of the Incan empire. Bartolina was responsible for recruiting fighters, organizing supply logistics and controlling movement around the rebel territory. In 1781, she took part in the first siege of La Paz. She organized camps and other towns and parts of the capitol. On March 13th, the group set up in the eastern part of L aalto, a city adjacent to La Paz and closed off all access to the capitol. They maintained their occupation until June when the army intervened. Some sources say that bartolina was tortured and brutally interrogated. But that she didn't divulge any information to her Spanish captors. There are also reports that say that her fellow organizers hosted a party of sorts, for her birthday. They made noise outside the prison where she was being held to demonstrate solidarity and offer strength. Bartoli's husband tried to rescue her, and may have offered himself an exchange for her freedom. He was unsuccessful and was captured and sentenced by Spanish forces. On November 14th, while bartolina was still in prison, she was forced to watch the public dismemberment of her partner Tupac Qatari. The aymara tradition credits him with speaking these words before his death. They will only kill me, but tomorrow, I shall return, and I will be millions. While the uprisings of 1781 were difficult to maintain, and were challenged with suppression and violence. It's clearly played a key role in the fight for independence. According to an investigation by historian Pilar mendieta, who looked into the journals of a judge and member of the local elite. He was surprised by how indigenous women played a primary role in political actions usually regarded as valid only in the male realm. As they fought side by side with their husbands, throwing stones and even leading armies. Indigenous women were taking action outside the walls of the city under siege. Bartolina sisa was brutally murdered on September 5th, 1782. While her death was used to instill fear. Her legacy lives on and continues to inspire. September 5th marks international indigenous women's day. In 2005, bartolina was declared a national imara heroin by the Bolivian Congress. Many anti imperialist and anti colonial indigenous groups bear her name to this day. All month, we're honoring the legacies of indigenous women.

La Paz Bartolina Bolivia Bartolina Sisa Jenny Caplan Tupac Qatari Central Andes Bertolina Peru Aymara Amara Coca Tupac Bartoli Pilar Mendieta Army Congress
A highlight from 358 | Forgotten

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

01:10 min | Last week

A highlight from 358 | Forgotten

"Our world is full of the unexplainable, and if history is an open book, all of these amazing tales are right there on display. Just waiting for us to explore. Welcome. To the cabinet of curiosities. Newcomers to a community are often intriguing, especially when that community is small and everyone knows one another. For example, new neighbors can either be a blessing or a curse, depending on how loud they play their music or how rambunctious their children are. Change is difficult to accept, and what is new is often mistaken for bad. But sometimes a fresh face is just what a sleepy town needs to jolt it awake, and that's exactly what one small English town got in 1817 when almondsbury welcomed a certain royal figure. It began when a local cobbler found a strange young woman on his doorstep. Her clothes made it clear she was not from around town. She wore what people of a time had described as exotic, including a turban, which had been wrapped around her head. The cobbler asked if there was anything he could do

Almondsbury Cabinet
A highlight from Indigenous Women: Angela Sidney

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:04 min | Last week

A highlight from Indigenous Women: Angela Sidney

"Hello, from wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is romantica. This month we're highlighting indigenous women from around the globe. Today's a mannequin was a remarkable storyteller in the Yukon territory of Canada. As one of the last members of the tag ish. She recognized the power and importance of preserving native culture and traditions. Please welcome Angela Sydney. Angela Sydney was born in care cross in Yukon, Canada on January 4th, 1902. Originally known as Caribou crossing, care cross was home to the care cross, tagged, first nation. Angela's parents, John and Maria were of tagish and clink at ancestry. They were both members of the day shitan clan. When Angela was a baby, she was given a tagged and clink at name in addition to her English name. It's been said she was given the name Angela because her godfather said she looks like a little angel. Before Angela and her brother and sister were born, their parents had four other children. Tragically, these children died at the hands of various illnesses, including German measles, dysentery, smallpox, and jaundice. Angela's mother was not immune to these diseases and suffered from long-term side effects for the rest of her life. As the eldest surviving daughter, Angela was responsible for taking care of her mother. Angela took advantage of their mother daughter time. She asked question after question about the traditions and culture of their people. She heard many colorful stories about the way things used to be. One of Angela's favorite activities was listening to her elders share ancient stories that had been passed down through many generations. Growing up, Angela learned three languages. Click it, tagged and English. She learned clink it and tagged from family members while earning English at an Anglican mission school and care cross. When Angela was just 5 years old, she stopped regularly speaking tagged. As she grew older, she noticed that the tagged language and culture was starting to fade. Throughout Angela's childhood, her tagged community was going through a significant transition. For hundreds of years, the tag ish and clink at people lived harmoniously side by side, trading goods and intermarrying. By the mid 19th century, the tagas people had started adopt and clean kit language and customs. Tag culture slowly began to disappear. It became almost obsolete in the 1900s, a decline perhaps hastened by white prospectors who came to Yukon in search of gold and disrupted the tagged way of life. When Angela was 14 years old, with her parents support, she married a section worker named George Sidney, who was twice her age. They married in a traditional clink at ceremony. When one of Angela's white school teachers learned of the marriage, the teacher told George that they needed to marry the white man way. George and Angela obliged and had a second wedding in the Anglican church. Shortly after their marriage, Angela gave birth to their first child in 1917. In the years to come, she would have 6 more children. Four of whom died young. When it came to passing her knowledge down to her children. Angela embraced the old and new ways of her world. She wanted her children to be progressive without forgetting the ways of their ancestors. Angela herself had feet in both worlds. She learned the traditional healing methods of her clan, while caring for her mother, and also studied modern medical textbooks as an adult. Because of this dual wealth of knowledge, Angela served as the unofficial nurse of care cross. Angela's husband George became the chief of care cross after chief Patsy Henderson died. In this new position of power, he and Angela made it a mission to maintain mixed race schools of white and first nation kids. After her husband passed away in 1971, Angela dedicated her life to preserving the language and stories of the tag ish, as well as the history of the Yukon. She was one of the last fluent speakers of the tagish language, and one of the few people still telling in passing down old stories. Angela was intent on not letting Yukon tradition and customs disappear. She was all too familiar with the disappointment of feeling like the stories she was told growing up. Didn't match her lived experiences. For example, when it was time for her to receive a potlatch name, there was no clan elder to give it to her because those with the knowledge had passed without sharing it with their descendants. In the last 17 years of her life, Angela worked with anthropologists and other elders to keep the tagged language and traditions alive. In collaboration with anthropologist Julie cruikshank. Angela published two books. My stories are my wealth in 1977 and tagged sluggy, tagged stories in 1982. She also published a book that archived place names for tagged and clink at locations around the region's southern lakes. In 1983, Angela and Julie produced a record of Angela's family tree that encompassed 6 generations starting in the mid 1800s. Angela made history in 1986 when she became the first native woman from the Yukon to become a member of the order of Canada. She was recognized for her contributions to northern linguistics and ethnographic studies. In 1988, Angela's niece and a fellow storyteller created the Yukon international storytelling festival in honor of Angela and her stories. Angela Sidney died on July 17th, 1991. Her contributions to preserving her language and culture are commemorated with the bust in white horse Canada. Underneath the statue lies a plaque inscribed with her words. I have no money to leave for my grandchildren. My stories are my wealth. All month, we're talking

Angela Angela Sydney Jenny Kaplan Yukon Anglican Mission School Canada George Sidney Dysentery George Jaundice Smallpox Patsy Henderson Maria Anglican Church John Julie Cruikshank Julie Angela Sidney
A highlight from Idi Amin Part 2: End of Empire, Rise of Amin

Real Dictators

07:29 min | Last week

A highlight from Idi Amin Part 2: End of Empire, Rise of Amin

"To show her face in this, one of the tens of territories that make up the Commonwealth. But despite the pomp and ceremony that will accompany Queen Elizabeth's arrival those gathered to greet her on the tarmac, know that the times they are changing and power here is slipping from Britain's grass. The monarch touches down at entebbe airport. A place which years later will play host to one of the most dramatic scenes of Idi Amin's dictatorship. But right now, in 1954, Idi Amin is miles away from power. Well, in one sense. In another, he's within touching distance of it. He's a soldier, and his regiment will play host to the queen. Uganda's head of state, during her visit to the British protectorate. In fact, Amin will even be singled out the commendation for his appearance on parade. In decades to come, as the strongman leader of an independent Uganda, Amin will delight in running rings around the former colonial overlords, because this soldier, perhaps more than anyone else stands to benefit from the turbulence that is about to shake Uganda to its core. This is part two of the Idi Amin story. And this is real dictators. The protectorate of Uganda has been under the heel of the British since at least 1894. But things are changing now. Uganda, like neighboring Kenya is on the road to self determination. Kim musisi is associate Professor of history at the university of Toronto. She grew up just outside Kampala, and was a student there during Idi Amin's rule. Originally given an English sounding for name as a child. Gave it up in favor of her historic family name. My parents, we are born during the colonial era. My mother was born in 1929 and my father in 1824. My parents they don't know anything else. The education system, the cuisine, the dress, what their aspirations are. So my parents were not critical of colonialism. So I had no critique of colonialism growing up. My parents were really wanted to upgrade. And the new, if you worked hard, if you planted coffee and cotton and raised cows and did dairy and all of that, then you become rich. Everything British we liked, we wanted the education. We wanted the goods. We wanted everything. I knew that the colonists came. They took over countries. They partitioned Africa. I was so proud of being an Anglican. I was so proud of not having gone to the ability and because we knew that there were billions cut off people's hands. But then the university environment, I came to be more critical. And that and settled me and made me question my anglicanism and made me question my angry connect and make me question who I was. And I just decided no more. I am not this English name. I am not an Ike. The Suez Crisis of 1956 is a rude awakening for the mother country. Britain is forced to rethink its role in the world. It is certainly not a superpower. Its international cloud pales in comparison to the vast military might of the United States and the Soviet Union. The colossal debt built up during World War II, has made Britain's colonies economically unsustainable. In the United Nations and elsewhere, there is a new mood music and a new concept decolonization. On February 3rd, 1960, British prime minister Harold macmillan, on a visit to Cape Town, makes a landmark speech. He announces that independence will be awarded to all Britons African possessions. The wind of change is blowing through this continent. And whether we like it or not, this growth of national consciousness is a political fact. And we must all accept it as a fact. And our national policies must take a counterfeit. The cry resounds in Swahili across East Africa and beyond. Uhuru, freedom. It's even felt in Hollywood. A producer named Jean roddenberry is planning a new science fiction show, Star Trek, about a spaceship bringing liberty to far flung planets. The ship's communications officer will be one of American television's first significant black female characters. A name? Lieutenant uhura. In Uganda, democratic elections are set for March 1961. Full self governance will commence the following year. This will set the stage perfectly for idi means ultimate assault on power. But right now, to him, Ugandan independence seems like a setback. A means success thus far has come entirely under British patronage, and within the structure of the colonial armed forces. It is not just the country. The army, too, will be handed back. The fourth battalion king's African rifles will become the Uganda rivals. The complicated ethnic makeup of the military will have long-term implications for this fledgling nation. Professor Derek Peterson. Both in Kenya and Uganda, the British feud northerners as a kind of more masculine, more warlike, more simple category of person who could be recruited, therefore into the colonial military. So that's why, at the time of independence, both in Kenya and in Uganda, the military was made up of people who came not from majority tribes or majority peoples who were more fully vested in the civilian governance of the place, but rather the military's generally came from places that were on the periphery. In July 1961, in keeping with the transfer. Amin is made a lieutenant. He is one of only two black commissioned officers in the entire army. Along with someone who will turn out to be a long-term rival, a man called shaban apolo. The timing of a means promotion is extremely convenient for him. For there is a threat to security once again. This time, trouble comes not from rebels, but from cattle rustlers in the karamo Zhang borderlands of Uganda and Kenya. In March 1962, it is lieutenant Amin, who is sent to sort out the problem.

Uganda Idi Amin Amin Entebbe Airport Kim Musisi Britain Queen Elizabeth Kenya Kampala University Of Toronto Jean Roddenberry Lieutenant Uhura Harold Macmillan IKE Soviet Union Africa Professor Derek Peterson Cape Town United Nations East Africa
A highlight from 10.76- Liberty or Victory

Revolutions

05:36 min | Last week

A highlight from 10.76- Liberty or Victory

"Last time we covered the Bolsheviks first week in power. A week most of their enemies and rivals assumed would not be their first week in power, but their only week in power. But the Bolsheviks issued a flurry of proclamations explicitly crafted to win mass popular support while they fended off what turned out to be a pretty feeble political and military counter attack. As we also saw, however, while the Bolshevik government in Petrograd publicly chased the legitimizing power of mass popularity, they also laid the groundwork for a highly centralized one party state, so that the dictatorship of the proletariat would become synonymous with the dictatorship of the Bolsheviks. Now, because so many of the dramatic events shaking the world have taken place in Petrograd, that is where we have been spending a lot of time. But let's be real. We're talking about a couple of thousand hardcore Bolshevik party members backed up by tens of thousands of sympathetic red guards, soldiers and sailors in one single city. But the Russian Empire was quite literally the largest political landmass on earth, stretching from Helsinki to Vladivostok from arkangel to Tbilisi. The total population was somewhere north of a 120 million people, encompassing more than two dozen nationalities. Successfully taking over and assembly hall with the small ne institute in downtown Petrograd starts to look awfully small compared to that context. This is why the Bolsheviks knew it was so vital to do everything in the name of the Soviets. Because after 6 months of war, chaos, disappointment and disillusionment since the February revolution, the Soviets as an institution were probably the one thing left in the Russian Empire that had any political legitimacy at all. There were local Soviets scattered everywhere. Hundreds of them. Inside army garrisons and naval bases, factories and mines, big cities, small towns, tiny villages, each of those local Soviets enjoyed a great deal of local support. And so when word spread either by telegraph or railroad or word of mouth, that the October Revolution stood for all power to the Soviets, the news was greeted with enthusiasm. Now, none of this was about people cheering the ascendancy of the Bolshevik party mind you. It was about cheering the ascendancy of the Soviets. Especially, as news of the October Revolution in Petrograd was often accompanied by news of the decree on peace, the decree on land. The new worker regulations, and the declaration of rights for national minorities. The October Revolution appeared to mean that the Russian Empire would finally undergo a real political and social revolution. It stood for mass empowerment and individual rights and dignity, replacing the hated centralized bureaucracy with its secret political police and huge military apparatus, only serving a tiny click of out of touch officials. but though the verdict of the October Revolution was initially accepted, it was hardly uncontested. The most immediate example was in Moscow. As soon as Moscow learned the events of October 25th, political leaders split into two hostile camps with the Bolsheviks on one side and a coalition of SRs, mensheviks, moderate socialist cadets and army officers on the other. Inner Moscow turned into a war zone during the last week of October, as both sides raised armed detachments to fight for control of the city. This street fighting in Moscow, along with the little battle of pulkovo outside Petrograd, we talked about last week. Count as the first shots of the Russian Civil War. At both ended almost the same way. Just as the cos were surrendering outside Petrograd on October 31st, the Bolshevik dominated Moscow Soviet went on the offensive and declared victory the following day. The two biggest and most important cities in the empire were now in the Bolshevik Soviet camp, but only after expending a lot of bullets and a lot of artillery. There were a couple of other big regions that resisted the Bolsheviks and Petrograd. One of them, Ukraine, I'm going to set aside until next week because that requires more discussion and ties more directly to post October Russia's relationship with the rest of the world, which we're going to talk about next week. But another was the Cossack regions in the south along the lower Don river. This area would become the original home base of the white armies, which were already well on their way to being formed in November 1917. For centuries, the coss had enjoyed semi autonomy and special privileges from the Tsar in exchange for their fearsome military service. And because of that long history of service to the Tsar, the cos were major boogeyman for the Russian socialists and revolutionaries, and specifically, as Lenin and the Bolsheviks made plans to seize power in October 1917, they harped on the counter revolutionary threat posed by Cossack general Alexei kaladin. Caledon had been implicated in the corneal off affair. But then he refused in order to resign, and instead headed back to his home territory where he sat at the head of three armies and dared anyone to tell him what to do. Bolshevik newspapers in the fall and winter of 1917 consistently raised the specter of the three K's of counter revolution. Kerensky, kornilov, and kaladin.

Petrograd Bolshevik Government Arkangel Moscow Small Ne Institute Vladivostok Assembly Hall Tbilisi Helsinki Pulkovo Soviets Bolshevik Soviet Camp Coss Army Don River Ukraine Russia Alexei Kaladin Lenin Caledon
A highlight from 357 | Over a Barrel

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

08:11 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from 357 | Over a Barrel

"Niagara Falls isn't the tallest waterfall in the world. There are roughly 500 others that are taller, but Niagara stands out from all of them for a few specific reasons. First it churns a lot of water with over 6 million cubic feet going over the crest line every minute. And with it, also goes 60 tons of minerals that are dissolved into a fine powder, giving the water its unique green color. Though over 8 million people visit the falls each year, it's much more than just a tourist site. The Niagara river provides drinking water and hydroelectricity to over a million people in both the United States and Canada. The falls draw many people to their majestic and breathtaking waters. These are folks who come to admire what the earth has naturally created, and what has endured for thousands of years. But Niagara also attracts attention seekers who want nothing more than to go down in history for dangerous and foolish stunts. And down is exactly where many end up, including one Charles Stevens. Stevens was born in 1862, and he was from Bristol, England, where he worked as a barber to support his wife Annie and their 11 children. However, despite his steady employment and family obligations, the hair cutter longed for fame and fortune. When he wasn't in his barbershop, the 58 year old Stevens could often be found leaping from tall points with a parachute on his back, or high diving into a pool of water. His nickname, the demon barber of Bristol, most likely due to his daredevil nature and not because he liked to kill clients with straight razors or anything like that. Eventually, England felt like small potatoes for the kind of stunts that Stevens wanted to perform. He needed bigger, more exciting places with bigger, more exciting audiences. And so in 1920, he packed this thing and hopped across the pond to America, where a new opportunity awaited him. You guessed it. Niagara Falls. His plan was simple, Stevens was going to travel down the Niagara river in a barrel until he reached the horseshoe falls, where he would go over the edge and emerge from below victorious. Of course, he wouldn't have been the first person to accomplish this that honor belonged to Annie Taylor, who had performed her own version of the stunt two decades earlier. In 1911, Bobby leitch did it in a metal barrel of his own design. This time, however, Stevens was going to do it his way. He would travel over the falls in a modified Russian oak barrel. Bobby leitch tried to advise him, telling the would be daredevil that he shouldn't attempt the drop until his barrel design was just right. Stevens ignored him, however, believing leach just didn't want him to have any of the spotlights. Leech then reached out to another performer named William hill senior who went by the nickname red and had traversed the Niagara river in a steel barrel himself. Red knew the falls well and encouraged Stevens to literally test the waters with an empty version of his Russian oak barrel to see how it would fare. The demon barber still wouldn't listen. Instead, at 8 15 in the morning, on July 11th of 1920, Charles Stevens loaded himself into his barrel. It had been outfitted with arm straps so that he could brace himself inside. He also tied an anvil to his feet for better steering, and despite his protests, he agreed to take along with him a portable oxygen tank. 40 minutes later, after traveling down the river, the barrel went over the edge of the falls. Bobby leach left just before it did. Choosing not to witness the inevitable. The barrel hit the water hard and sent the anvil, still tied to Steven's feet straight to the bottom. The barrel had blown apart. A rescue team looked for any sign of the daredevil but couldn't find him. Instead, they found one of his arm straps that had been affixed to the inside of the barrel. How did they know that it had belonged to Stevens? Because they also found his arm still attached to it. Bearing a tattoo that read, forget me not, Annie. My guess is that she never did. It's probably safe to say that nobody who witnessed Charles Stevens go over the falls that day. Would have forgotten him either. Air travel has often been positioned as a way to get people from one place to another as quickly and as safely as possible. Of course, some people don't see it that way. For those brave souls, airplanes are meant for endurance, Amelia Earhart and Charles Lindbergh made waves for their transatlantic solo flights. And the current record holders for the longest endurance flight traveled around the world in 9 days on a single tank of gas. But one airplane had them all beat. It was designed to spend as much time in the air as possible without ever having to land, a feat that was seen as a gamble, which was probably why one man decided to try it in the first place. It started back in the late 1950s, while bob Tim was working at the hacienda casino in Las Vegas. He repaired slot machines during a time when the hacienda was fairly unpopular compared to other places on the strip. It had positioned itself as a family friendly resort amid a sea of mobster run hotels and casinos. The hacienda lacked glitz, it lacked glamour, and most of all it lacked customers. There was a reason it had earned the nickname the haste heaven. The owners Judy and Doc Bailey were often on the hunt for new ways to drum up business, and they were not particular about where those ideas came from. If anyone at the hacienda be it the cooks or the maids, came up with a decent plan, the baileys were always ready to hear it. Tim had been a pilot in the army and brought an idea to dock. What if the hacienda sponsored a record setting endurance flight? At the time, the record was held by two former navy pilots who managed to stay in the air for 46 days in 1949. Tim thought that he could do better. Bailey was worried that the flight would be viewed unfavorably in the press, given that it was being done on behalf of a Las Vegas casino. Instead, he promised him that he would fund the whole project under the condition that any money it generated go to a cancer fund instead. Bailey even came up with the way to let people get in on the action. Donors could mail their checks along with a guess as to how many days the plane could stay airborne. The person who guessed the closest would win $10,000 and the hacienda would get some much needed attention. So Tim brought on a co-pilot and a mechanic and the three of them got to work modifying a cessna one 72 skyhawk. The one 72 came as a four seat single engine plane, but its paltry fuel tank only capable of carrying about 47 gallons of fuel needed some serious help. Tim affixed a 95 gallon tank to the plane's belly, bringing the total capacity to 142 gallons. The men also tweaked the engine system to allow for midair oil and filter changes as necessary. They then removed much of the interior to reduce weight and install the platform on one side that allowed the co-pilot better access to the gas tank when refueling. In fact, the refueling process was the trickiest part of the whole plan. It had to be done while the plane was still in the air, landing was out of the question, so the men rigged up a hook attached to a rope that they could lower to a gas truck driving below. Someone would attach a hose to the hook, which was then winched up to the plane so that the co-pilot could fill it. The hook was also used to bring up other things like food and a change of oil. The two pilots had basically built a flying treehouse. Unfortunately, their first few attempts to stay in the air were met with turbulence. The engine suffered exhaust problems, the men got on each other's nerves and constant mechanical issues meant the cessna could only stay in the air for a handful of days at a time. Meanwhile, two other pilots, Jim hef and Bill burkhart had made news by keeping their cessna airborne for 50 days, breaking the original record by four days.

Stevens Charles Stevens Bobby Leitch Niagara River Niagara Falls Niagara Annie Taylor Bristol Annie Bobby Leach England United States Bob Tim Hacienda Casino William Hill Leech Doc Bailey Leach TIM
A highlight from Indigenous Women: Evelyn Scott

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:21 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Indigenous Women: Evelyn Scott

"Hello. From wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is romantica. Today we're talking about one of the most celebrated voices in the battle for indigenous rights in Australia. She was a lifelong political activist, and the leading force in the historic 1967 referendum for Aboriginal rights. Please welcome Evelyn Scott. Evelyn was born Evelyn Ruth back in 1935 in income Queensland. Her father was the son of an enslaved person from Vanuatu. Evelyn's desire to fight injustice may have stemmed from him. While we don't know much about Evelyn's childhood, many authors and journalists have suggested she took inspiration from her father's motto. If you don't think something's right, then challenge it. When Evelyn was in her mid 20s, she moved to townsville, a city in northeastern Queensland. It was there in the 1960s that she was called to action. She joined the townsville Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander advancement league, where she organized to fight widespread injustice against Aboriginal people. At the time, the Queensland government was enforcing many discriminatory practices in housing, employment and education under the aborigines protection act. Under this law, Aboriginal rights were almost entirely controlled by Aboriginal protectors. Protectors were classified as European civil servants, police and missionaries. These so called protectors had full legal right to remove Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander people from their homes, and relocate them to reserves. Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander people's civil workplace and political rights were diminished, if not totally nonexistent. In 1967, Evelyn was a major leader in a campaign to turn back those protection laws. She campaigned for a yes vote on the 1967 referendum, which called for changing two sections of Australia's constitution. As it then stood, the Australian constitution stated that the federal parliament could not make laws for Aboriginal people. Instead, that responsibility fell to individual states, which enabled the creation of sporadic, unjust laws like the protection act in Queensland. The constitution also omitted Aboriginal people from the federal census. The 1967 referendum asked Australians if they supported including Aboriginal people from every state in these constitutional provisions. The result was historic, more than 90% of voters voted yes, making it the most successful referendum in Australian history. Afterwards, Evelyn joined the federal council for the advancement of aboriginals and Torres Strait islanders as its vice president. A few years later, in 1973, she helped the council become indigenous led and became its general secretary. She would say in an interview years later, we have to determine our own agenda if we're going to address the issue right. Evelyn was dedicated to the importance of women's voices in the fight for indigenous rights. Throughout the 1970s, she was active in the cairns and district Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander corporation for women, as well as the national Aboriginal and islander women's council. She also campaigned for the protection of the Great Barrier Reef and believed in involving more indigenous voices and land and sea conservation. Evelyn was awarded the queen's silver jubilee metal for her activism in 1977. She also received two honorary doctorates and was appointed as an officer of the order of Australia in 2003. She continued her advocacy work into her 60s. From 1997 to 2000, Evelyn acted as the chair of the National Council for Aboriginal reconciliation. She worked in opposition to prime minister John Howard, who was resolute on cutting reconciliation funding. Evelyn's efforts culminated in the corroborate 2000 bridge walk where more than a quarter of a million people marched across the Sydney harbor bridge in support of an official government apology. In 2015, Evelyn moved to a care facility. And on September 21st, 2017, she died at the age of 81. Her contributions to indigenous rights in Australia were widely lauded at the time of her death. She became the first Aboriginal woman to be honored by the Queensland government with a state funeral.

Evelyn Jenny Kaplan Evelyn Scott Evelyn Ruth Queensland Townsville Aboriginal And Torr Federal Parliament Australia Vanuatu Queensland Government Townsville Federal Council For The Advanc Cairns And District Aboriginal National Aboriginal And Island National Council For Aborigina Prime Minister John Howard Great Barrier Reef Sydney Harbor Bridge