History

History never repeats itself on this fascinating playlist. Whether you're a history buff or buffoon, these historical tidbits will excite and inspire. Sourced from leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

123: The Wright Brothers Fly at Kitty Hawk - burst 02

History That Doesn't Suck

00:49 sec | 3 weeks ago

123: The Wright Brothers Fly at Kitty Hawk - burst 02

"We'll lies down in the prone piloting position and takes control as best he can with his still developing uniquely designed technology. He source up to 400 feet and lands at a speed of almost 30 mph. We'll repeat the flight over and over. What a gratifying payoff for years of work. And yet, these gliding distances are a far cry off from the sustained controlled flight. These flight obsessed siblings really want. Packing up in the days to come to return to Ohio. They know they'll be back. This is but the first of many trips to kitty hawk for the Wright brothers.

Education United States Research Irreverent Podcast History American Ohio Wilbur Kitty Hawk Orville RON North Carolina Gale Bill Tate Devil Hills Kate Wright
A highlight from Peacebuilders: Urvashi Vaid

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:47 min | 8 hrs ago

A highlight from Peacebuilders: Urvashi Vaid

"Hello. From wonder media network, I'm Melton Burak. I'm the host and producer of the podcast sesta. We aim to harness the power of arts and culture to foster conversation and build peace and Cyprus. I'll be your guest host for this month of women. This month, we're highlighting peace builders. In times of conflict, these women have stepped in, bringing their creativity and insight to our facilitate peace across the globe. Today we're talking about a woman who was one of the most prolific LGBTQ organizers in history. She was a Hindu, Indian, and a lesbian, and she took an intersectional approach to her fight for bodily autonomy, sexual liberation, racial equity, and more stable futures for all queer people. Please welcome. For most of us, learning a second language in high school or college wasn't exactly a high point of our academic careers. I took Spanish throughout high school and class itself was fun, but looking back basically nothing stuck. Now, thanks to babbel, the language learning app that sold more than 10 million subscriptions. There's an addictively fun and easy way to learn a new language. Whether you'll be traveling abroad, connecting in a deeper way with family, or you just have some free time. Babble teaches bite sized language lessons that you'll actually use in the real world. I chose French because much of my family speaks fluently, and I previously could barely say hello. With babbel, you can choose from 14 different languages, including Spanish, French, Italian, and German. There are so many ways to learn with babbel. Plus, it comes with a 20 day money back guarantee. Start your new language learning journey today with babbel. Right now, when you purchase a three month babble subscription, you'll get an additional three months for free. That's 6 months for the price of three. Just go to babbel dot com and use promo code will manica. That's BA BBE L dot com, code will manica. Urashi was born in Delhi, India in 1958. She moved to the United States with her parents and two older sisters when she was a child. Not long after that, she got her first taste of political activism. When she was only 11 years old, she got involved in protests against Vietnam War. The activism she became known for centered queer experiences, but she was never narrow minded about it. While she was a student at Vassar college, Shelton found the feminist union, and she organized anti apartheid rallies. In 1979, urvashi started law school at northeastern university. She was one of only four out lesbians in her class. As a young attorney in Washington, D.C., she worked on HIV and aids in prisons for the national prison project of the ACLU. Then, in the midst of the aids crisis, urashi led the national LGBTQ task force as executive director. She was the first woman of color to lead any national LGBTQ organization. In 1990, president George H. W. Bush gave his first address about the 8 epidemic, which had been devastating the globe for the past decade. The gay community in particular was experiencing high death rates, as well as stigma and homophobic violence because of the epidemic. The speech took a compassionate tone, but it was filled with generalities and didn't specify any actionable steps to help. Urvashi, like many other LGBTQ activists, was not satisfied with the president's response. During his address, she was in the room. She held up a sign that said, talk is cheap, aids funding is not. Security officers removed her. But the image of her holding the sun showed up in news reports, the protests highlighted the federal government's inaction. So much of Russia's activism was ahead of its time. She approached the fight for queer liberation with an intersectional lens decades ago, and as she told gay rights activist Larry Kramer in 1994, gay rights, reproductive rights, civil rights, they were all wrapped up together. HIV is an issue for gay men, but there is also racism, reproductive rights, criminal justice. She told him, if the state can say you can't have an abortion, the state can say you can't have sodomy. You can hear versions of that sentiment repeated even today. Collaboration across causes and collective liberation is an idea, activists are still trying to work to work. Throughout her life, or was she led several organizations dedicated to advancing LGBTQ rights. She started the donors of color network, the national LGBTQ anti power action network, and the national LGBT HIV criminal justice working group. She also cofounded the American LGBTQ+ museum of history and culture in New York City. Urashi married her longtime partner, the comedian Kate Clinton on the 25th anniversary of the day they met. They held a party at a friend's house in Brooklyn, but didn't tell the guests why they were gathering. The couple lived part time and provincetown, Massachusetts, where they hosted dinner parties, book clubs, and a bonfire every New Year's Eve. Urvashi and cape were always hosting events that proved community organizing and activism aren't just about fighting against something, but fostering togetherness and joy. In 2009, Kate introduced urashi when she spoke at the national equality march in Washington, D.C.. Urvashi had to stand on a box to reach the microphone, and the moment she started speaking, her conviction and her urgency took over. For 28 of the last 40 years since stonewall, we have lived through their hostility on racial justice. Their opposition to gay and lesbian rights. Their opposition to women's equality and their wacky global fantasies of power. And what exactly are we left with in their wake? The hope embedded in her activism was not for queer people to assimilate into society as it existed. Instead, she wanted to change society into something different and better. This idea was a big part of the two books she wrote, virtual equality, the mainstreaming of gay and lesbian liberation and irresistible revolution confronting race, class, and the assumptions of LGBT politics. In 2015, ubashi was diagnosed with breast cancer. In 2020, it metastasized, like always, her community was there for her and offered support. They drove her between provincetown and Boston for doctor appointments, cooked dinners and sent carts. Urvashi passed away on May 14th, 2022 at 63 years old. Her loved ones celebrated her life at a small private funeral. There was dancing in chanting, evoking arashi's lively spirit. All month, we're talking about peace builders. For more information, find us on Facebook and Instagram at we manica podcast. Special thanks to co creators Jenny and Liz Kaplan for having me as a guest host. Talk to you tomorrow.

Babbel Urvashi Urashi Melton Burak Aids National Lgbtq Task Force President George H. W. Bush Cyprus Vassar College HIV Northeastern University National Lgbtq Anti Power Acti National Lgbt Hiv Criminal Jus Shelton Kate Clinton Larry Kramer Aclu Delhi
A highlight from The Kidnapping of Patty Hearst | The Appeal of True Crime | 5

American Scandal

03:10 min | 10 hrs ago

A highlight from The Kidnapping of Patty Hearst | The Appeal of True Crime | 5

"In 1974, the nation was captivated by a new story that seems stranger than fiction. Patricia Hearst, the granddaughter of publishing magnate William Randolph Hearst, had been kidnapped from her home in Berkeley by a group of radical political activists. The group called itself the symbionese Liberation Army, and although her kidnappers threatened her life and kept her trapped in a dark closet for weeks, Hearst would soon agree to become a member of the SLA. Hearst went on to take part in bank robberies. She trained to be a guerrilla fighter, and after she issued scathing condemnations of her family and their worldview, it appeared that hers to become a different person, a convert to a radical cause. As the saga unfolded, it stirred debate about wealth, politics, and even the nature of free will. But for many, the kidnapping of Patricia Hearst was a story about the media, and the public's appetite for shocking and sensational news coverage. It's a discussion that reemerged decades later, with the rise of true crime, a genre that's forced conversations about the media's responsibilities when telling stories about criminals and their victims. My guest today is journalist and author Sarah weinman, who writes the crime column for The New York Times book review. She's the author of the Rio Lolita. Her latest book is scoundrel, which tells the story of a convicted murderer who grew famous in was set free, only to attempt murder once again. We'll discuss how the coverage of Patricia Hearst was part of a longer lineage of true crime. We'll look at what explains the enduring appeal of the genre. And how true crime can be both a force for good and ill. Our conversation is next. American scandal is sponsored by a new limited series on Hulu, welcome to chippendales. Starring Kumail Nanjiani, Murray Bartlett, annaleigh Ashford, and Juliette Lewis. It's inspired by the dark true events behind the founding of the chippendales male strip club empire and how it all took a sinister turn with multiple murders. There's so much more to this story than just a male strip club. There is partying, there's greed, and then there's murder. And it's all inspired by true events down to the nitty Gritty call to the FBI murder plot. So if you need a new show to get into, this is the one. Welcome to chippendales, has it all. Be sure to check out welcome to chippendales, now streaming only on Hulu. American scandal is sponsored by audible. If you're like most adults, you have chores to do. Commutes to make, waiting rooms to wait in, and time to yourself, you crave. I do too, but I make the most of all of them by listening with audible. Titles like confidence man by Maggie haberman, and like all audible members, I get one credit every month, good for any one of the many classics, bestsellers, and new releases regardless of price to keep forever. Let audible help you discover new ways to laugh, be inspired or be entertained. New members can try it free for 30 days, visit audible dot com slash AS or text AS to 505 hundred. That's audible dot com slash AS or text AS to 505 hundred to try audible free for 30 days. Audible dot com slash

Patricia Hearst Symbionese Liberation Army Hearst Sarah Weinman William Randolph Hearst Kumail Nanjiani Murray Bartlett Annaleigh Ashford Berkeley Hulu Juliette Lewis The New York Times Maggie Haberman FBI
A highlight from Peacebuilders: Sylvia Pankhurst

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:57 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Peacebuilders: Sylvia Pankhurst

"Hello from wonder media network I'm Melton Burak. I'm the host and producer of the podcast sesta. We aim to harness the power of arts and culture to foster conversation and build peace and Cyprus. I'll be your guest host for this month of women. This month, we're highlighting peace builders. In times of conflict, these women have stepped in, bringing their creativity and insight to our facilitate peace across the globe. Today's peacebuilder was a member of a famous British suffragette family known for their militant civil disobedience. A self proclaimed pacifist, she saw the fight for suffrage as universal and became an important figure in opposing fascism and the Italian invasion of Ethiopia. Let's talk about Sylvia pankhurst. For most of us, learning a second language in high school or college wasn't exactly a high point of our academic careers. I took Spanish throughout high school and class itself was fun, but looking back basically nothing stuck. Now, thanks to babbel, the language learning app that sold more than 10 million subscriptions. There's an addictively fun and easy way to learn a new language. Whether you'll be traveling abroad, connecting in a deeper way with family, or you just have some free time. Babble teaches bite sized language lessons that you'll actually use in the real world. I chose French because much of my family speaks fluently, and I previously could barely say hello. With Apple, you can choose from 14 different languages, including Spanish, French, Italian, and German. There are so many ways to learn with babbel. Plus, it comes with a 20 day money back guarantee. Start your new language learning journey today with babbel. Right now, when you purchase a three month babble subscription, you'll get an additional three months for free. That's 6 months for the price of three. Just go to babbel dot com and use promo code will manica. That's BA BBE L dot com, code will manica. Estelle Sylvia pankhurst was born in May 5th, 1882 in Manchester, England. If her name sounds familiar, that's because she comes from a family of social activists. Her father, doctor Richard pankhurst, was a lawyer and legal reformer, and her mother, emmeline, founded the women's social and political union, a militant suffragette group. We were told the stories of both Emily and Sylvia's older sister christabel pankhurst and previous episodes of women. As you might imagine, the pancreas household was full of political discourse. Sylvia's father drafted the first woman suffrage bill in 1869. And he held many political meetings in the family home, encouraging his wife's advocacy efforts. He died in 1898 and Sylvia was devastated. She followed his socialist ideals for the rest of her life. However, Sylvia's first passion was not politics, it was art. She was a talented painter and designer, and attended the Royal College of art for several years. But she was torn between pursuing a career in art and the calls from her mother to fight for women's suffrage. Emmeline's persuasiveness was too strong, and Sylvia eventually decided to use her skills to design signs for the WSPU. By 1906, she was working for the union full-time. Like many suffragettes, Sylvia participated in activist campaigns and she was arrested 15 times. As the First World War broke out, the union shifted its focus from suffrage to supporting the war and conscription. Sylvia was a pacifist and actually complained against the war. Her socialist views were also at odds with her mother's politics. Sylvia saw the fight for suffrage as a broader effort that also included the class struggle. All of this created a rift between the family and Sylvia was eventually ousted from the WSPU. Sylvia continued to fight for equality. She and the East London federation of suffragettes set up mother and baby clinics in London, a toe factory to provide employment and restaurants to feed those that struggled with the rising cost of food. Sylvia's politics drifted further left as she rallied against capitalism. After the 1917 Russian Revolution, she took a trip to see the country, and she became a communist supporter. She even met with Vladimir Lenin on a few occasions. By the 1930s, fascists regimes were on the rise throughout Europe, Sylvia shifted her politics again. She began focusing on anti fascism and anti colonialism efforts. She also helped Jewish refugees from Germany and supported the Republicans in Spain. She openly criticized Italian dictator Benito Mussolini in the left wing paper she published. In 1935, Italy invaded Ethiopia. Sylvia would remain dedicated to advocating for Ethiopia for the rest of her life. Sylvia started a weekly newspaper the new times and Ethiopian news, which became the main English news source for Ethiopian news. Sylvia wrote the weekly editorial as well as articles about Mussolini and Hitler's rise to power. Sylvia's activism put her on a list of people to be arrested if the Nazis were able to occupy Britain. Sylvia also raised funds and became a supporter of Ethiopian emperor Haile Selassie. Throughout the war she took an exiled Ethiopians at her home in the UK. After years of battle, Ethiopian troops with help from Great Britain finally draw out the Italian army in 1941. Three years later, Sylvia made her first visit to the country. Over time, Sylvia and emperor Selassie's friendship grew, and he invited her to move to Ethiopia full-time. In 1956, she and her son Richard left England for Ethiopia. Sylvia would spend the final years of her life there. Sylvia passed away on September 27th, 1960, at the age of 78, in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, because of her tireless support for Ethiopian independence, Sylvia was honored by emperor Haile Selassie with a full state funeral. She was named an honorary Ethiopian and is the only foreign born person to have and buried in the city's Trinity cathedral. All month, we're talking about peace builders. For more information, find us on Facebook and Instagram at will manica podcast, special thanks to co creators Jenny and Liz Kaplan for having me as a guest host, talk to you tomorrow.

Sylvia Estelle Sylvia Pankhurst Women's Social And Political U Babbel Melton Burak Ethiopia Richard Pankhurst Christabel Pankhurst Emmeline Cyprus East London Federation Of Suff Royal College Of Art UK Manchester Emily Apple Weekly Editorial Vladimir Lenin Benito Mussolini
A highlight from ICYMI Encore Episode of The History of the Asian Pirate Shih Yang

Asian American History 101

05:18 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from ICYMI Encore Episode of The History of the Asian Pirate Shih Yang

"You're listening to Asian American history one O one, a podcast about Asian American history from generally known historical happenings to the deeper cuts that we don't hear about in school, where your hosts, Jen and Ted, the daughter and father team. Welcome to episode 49. So we don't watch much tennis, but this year's U.S. open was so exciting. I mean, the women's singles final match featured two unseated teenagers, Emma roto Kano from Britain and Layla Fernández of Canada. Emma rata is half Chinese and Layla Fernández is half Filipino. It was the battle of Asian ethnicity and Emma won with a straight sets victory on Saturday. She was actually ranked 150th in the world and barely known to most viewers. She made history as the first player to win a Grand Slam title after surviving the qualifying tournament and she's the first woman from Britain to win a Grand Slam singles title since Virginia wade won Wimbledon in 1977. Actually didn't lose a set in ten matches. So she was on a 20 set streak when she won on Saturday. I mean, both of them played an amazing match and it's so exciting to see more accomplished Asian athletes and tennis. And now, for a quick transition to today's topic, Asian pirates. Whoo. You may be wondering why we're talking about pirates. And there's great reason. It's because international talk like a pirate day was on Sunday, the 19th. And international opens the door to the whole world, which includes Asia. And that's why we're talking about Asian pirates. Make sense yet? It does to us. I will say that it's interesting how much modern media glorifies pirates, because really they were criminals. I mean, for a lot of women, there's a fascination with both the dress and also how I feel like piracy for women back then sort of meant freedom and autonomy. And an escape from societal rules. And I think that most pirates sort of represent that in some way. And so I wonder if that might have something to do with the international interest in pirates, the fight against the government in some ways. Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. And that's kind of led to so many different movies and such. Yeah. Pirates did sort of represent this rebellion from those governments. And while we shouldn't glorify their methods necessarily, they did create a space that was more accepting. Yeah, I mean, definitely more accepting in some ways. I mean, short research will show you that gay and bisexual men could find solace and safety and pirate cruise. But of course, like all history, there are a ton of facets and pirates like most things aren't all bad and aren't all good. So let's get into the story. Like most westerners, when I think of pirates, I think of men like blackbeard or sir Francis Drake living in pretty filthy ships drinking heavily and writing boats and villages. And while some of that may be true, there's a whole world of piracy that most people never learn about, and while we don't condone piracy, there is one pretty iconic Asian pirate. Of course, there's a ton of history about Asian pirates and pirating in Southeast Asia, East Asia and South Asia, but we don't have time to get into all of the most infamous pirates and cruise from those areas. So today, let's talk about the world of East Asian pirating and more specifically, the most notorious East Asian pirate. But first, let's discuss pirating and the pirate code. Of course, the textbook definition of a pirate is a person who attacks and robs ships at sea. Pirated generally existed since trade on the sea's first started occurring, and the earliest documentation of piracy occurred around the 14th century BC in the Aegean and Mediterranean Sea. So let's do a quick rundown of the pirate code. While pirating seems lawless in some ways, most crews followed a pirate code of conduct, and certain pirate rules. There had to be, since pirating, which once was a single crew on a single ship, started expanding during the golden age of pirating, and in general became a highly organized profession. Often, even sponsored by a government or monarchy. Hundreds upon thousands started seeking wealth and glory between 1650 and 1720. Once this happened, merchants actually started drafting something known as handshake deals with pirates. It was fairly common to see merchant ships offer a portion of whatever wealth was made during the merchant trip. These pirate codes were crucial in keeping pirate crews organized and operational. The pirate code was actually a document cruise would have to sign. Some would refuse, some would write a marking instead of a name, and those who didn't sign their name had a better chance of escaping punishment if caught by authorities. Codes varied from crew to crew. Some people were forced into piracy. There aren't a ton of surviving private codes since most were generally burned or tossed overboard when pirates felt threatened by authorities. In fact, there are only four surviving sets of codes today from the golden age of piracy.

Layla Fernández Emma Roto Emma Rata Tennis Britain Kano JEN TED Emma Wade Sir Francis Drake Virginia Canada U.S. Asia South Asia East Asia Southeast Asia Aegean Mediterranean Sea
A highlight from Past Gas #164 - The History of the Baja 1000

Past Gas

04:22 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Past Gas #164 - The History of the Baja 1000

"I am a stand up comic turned YouTuber actor host and now entrepreneur. I own a matcha store and I also own a clothing brand. Yes, I do it all. I know it sounds like bullshit, but I'm the type of dude that does whatever his heart desires. And that's why I am the product that this said garbage lifestyle. If you're looking for a podcast that is absolutely about everything and nothing at the same time, you tapped into the right place, current topic stupid life stories and completely unfiltered bullshit from a former youth pastor. Did I mention I was a youth pastor as well? Yes, you can catch the U.S. brain on all audio platforms and YouTube all you have to do is look up genius brain one word genius brain and me and a bunch of my friends will keep you company on your commute to work or you know when you're just touching yourself to that's not even a part of the script. What am I reading here? Okay, well, see you guys there. This is awkward, ended. And it now. Xbox is changing gaming forever with their acquisitions of video game publishers, Activision, and zeni max, as well as the surge of Xbox game pass. With the brand making big moves so often, you may need a little show called defining duke and Xbox podcast in your life to stay up to date on all of that and more. Defining duke is one of the most highly listened to Xbox podcasts available, and if I do say so myself, it's for good reason. It's hosted by me, Maddie, a video game critic, and developer with half a million subscribers on my mister Matty plays YouTube channel. Alongside me is my co host, lord cognito, who is the CEO of lords of gaming and integrity obsolete for Oculus VR. We both hold a decade plus workload put into the video game industry and together we discuss and debate the hottest news and releases in the world of video games and other important stuff like the sanctity of onion sandwiches. Defining duke and Xbox podcast is available for free wherever you listen to podcasts. There's a lot going on in the world of pro wrestling these days, and if you're a fan of WWE AEW new Japan impact or all the above and more, you've got to be listening to Steven Larson's going in raw. The only pro wrestling podcast you need. Here at going in raw, we give our take on all the backstage news and gossip from the most trusted pro wrestling news sources and we break down every episode of WWE and AEW and all the biggest international shows. Having been pro wrestling fans for almost 30 years now and best friends for most of that time, we have a unique perspective you don't get at other pro wrestling podcasts. And we have the best pro wrestling community in the entire business. No toxicity, no negativity, just a good time talking wrestling with the friend doze. So check out going in raw, the only pro wrestling podcast you need to be listening to wherever podcasts can be found. It's the year 1976, America was going by Centennial crazy. Two guys named Steve were starting a computer company in their garage, and rocky was just hitting theaters. But south of all that, just over the U.S. Mexican border, American Ivan Stewart was driving in the Baja 1000 by himself. A first in the race's history. Though Stewart had driven the ensenada 300 by himself, this would be a little different. The Baja 1000 is an arduous 1000 mile drive through the remote and desolate Baja Peninsula. For many, it wasn't a question of when you finished, but if you'd finish at all. The route was treacherous, and so was the weather. Stewart would face flash floods and fog, scorching heat and freezing cold. Rocks and boulders and unpredictable herds of animals. If Stuart broke down or got injured, the journey might cost him his life. But it didn't. Instead, the brave driver from Oklahoma won the 1976 Baja 1000. Stewart finished the ensenada loop at 12 hours and 17 minutes. Smashing the record for four wheelers by two hours, a record that would go unbroken by the way for two decades. Stewart quickly became a fan favorite in the sport as he continued to solo race and win even more titles. How did a publicity stunt organized by a Hollywood stuntman grow into such a prestigious race? What has kept drawing races back to the Baja 1000 for the last 55 years? And what makes the Baja one thousand? One of the most

Wrestling Lord Cognito Youtube Steven Larson U.S. Activision Matty Maddie Baja Ivan Stewart Stewart Baja Peninsula WWE Japan Ensenada Steve Stuart Oklahoma Hollywood
A highlight from What Next TBD: The Trap of Buy Now, Pay Later

The Secret History of the Future

08:08 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from What Next TBD: The Trap of Buy Now, Pay Later

"The site seen on EV dot com teaches so much about electric vehicles. Did you know you can charge an EV at home or thousands of D.C. fast chargers nationwide? And the Chargers are in places you'd want them to be. Grocery stores, malls, offices, right along the highway. Electric vehicles are worth watching. Head to scene on EV dot com to learn more. This episode is brought to you by Schwab. Do you ever think about your money? Sure you do. You probably think about it all the time. But guess what? Your money has been thinking about you, too. And it wants you to know that a financial plan can lead to 2.7 times higher net worth on average. That's why Schwab makes starting one easier than ever with one on one guidance from a financial consultant and a complimentary online retirement plan that you can start in as little as 15 minutes. Plus, track your progress with free digital planning tools. So what are you waiting for? Visit Schwab dot com slash plan today to learn more. In the early days of the pandemic, Bloomberg news reporter, paulina cachero, found herself scrolling through TikTok. Yeah, part of it was doom scrolling. But she was also looking for something escapist to watch. And it was kind of fun to see all of these things that people were buying online. Everyone was online shopping. You guys, after payday is finally here. So let's recap all of the outfits. I purchased for vacation. Pauline covers personal finance, and she noticed that more and more of that online shopping was done through apps that let you buy now and pay later. From companies like klarna or afterpay. After pay got me hell is bull. I don't care if it's just $20 Karen. I said split it up into four equal payments of $5. But then I started to see some problematic videos of, you know, younger borrowers talking about, oh, I have this massive balance on after pay that I can't afford. Maybe if I just close my account, no one will find me. Paulina knew she'd found a story. One about Generation Z, and a new kind of debt. While they were joking about it, this seemed to me to be a very real issue, and this was a new trendy niche financial product. You know, that really made themselves out to be made for this younger generation. But to me, as someone who was managed my own credit cards, taken on student loans, I was like, these are loans. And this is debt that you have to pay. And it seemed like they might not understand the consequences. Today on the show, the consequences. Buy now pay later apps exploded during the pandemic. Now, the real cost is becoming clear. Just in time for holiday shopping. I'm Lizzie O'Leary, and you're listening to what next TBD, a show about technology, power, and how the future will be determined. Stick around. Now, not later. It's time to reboot your credit card with Apple card. Apple card gives you unlimited cash back every day on every purchase. It's real cash you can spend right away, no need to wait and wait for rewards. Apply now in the wallet app on iPhone to see your credit limit offer with no impact to your credit score. Subject to credit approval, daily cash is available via an Apple cash card or as a statement credit. See Apple card customer agreement for terms and conditions. Apple cash card is issued by green dot bank member FDIC, accepting an apple card after your application is approved, will result in a hard inquiry which may impact your credit score. The idea of buy now pay later isn't exactly new. It's not unlike paying for your TV with a layaway plan. If you remember those. Except with B and PL as it's called, you get your item immediately, usually only for a small down payment. And the rest, you pay off and installments. One of the biggest BNP companies after pay was started in Australia in 2014. But it was the pandemic that made BNP really take off in the U.S.. It was kind of a perfect storm. These services started to be adopted by these online clothing retailers at a time when consumers were flush with stimulus cash and they had nowhere to go. They were stuck in COVID-19 lockdowns, and they were limited to online shopping. And suddenly, they're going through their checkouts and they're finding this seemingly risk free way to break up their payments for this item on online checkouts. And suddenly, it seemed like by now pay later options were available everywhere. They're available at major retailers. Like target Walmart Home Depot, but they really started with targeting a younger demographic available forever 21 and Urban Outfitters. And stores like that. And now that you can use them virtually online and online checkout, which is where they started to, you know, now they have physical cards. So you can use them in person. One really interesting thing that the consumer financial protection bureau found in their most recent report. They looked at 5 major by now pay later companies, which includes one set, you most likely use a firm after pay, zip, et cetera. And in the U.S., they originated 180 million loans totaling 24.2 billion in 2021. That's a tenfold increase from 2019. So you can see how much that by now pay leader companies really exploded. And if you think about it without really regulation until this year. How is it supposed to work? Let's go through it on a really granular basis. So let's say I buy a pair of shoes that cost $200. If everything went right, how does it work? What would happen? You want to buy this pair of $200 shoes, you can opt in for the buy now pay later option hosted by one of many services in your checkout. You would pay a small down payment, let's say 25% of that purchase. And then from the date of that purchase, you would be charged typically for installment loans over 6 weeks. So every two weeks, you would get charged for that purchase in whatever it's broken up into. And to sign up for these services, all you have to do is put in your credit card information or your debit card information, and that service will automatically charge you. Whenever the date for that installment loan is due. BMP L companies make most of their money by charging retailers a fee for using their services. Usually somewhere between two and 8% of the purchase. The value proposition that they give to merchants is that they have studies or research that they're doing internally that shows that when customers use buy now pay later services on average, their checkout cost. Is bigger. People are spending more using buy now pay later services because there's a sense that I'm not feeling the financial burden of this purchase right now. It's spread out over time and I think that it convinces consumers that they can buy more because they're not going to see that balance automatically. The full amount of that balance automatically deducted from their bank account. So it doesn't feel like I bought a $200 pair of shoes. It feels like maybe I spent 50 bucks and it's okay. Hey,

Schwab Apple Chargers Paulina Cachero Klarna Lizzie O'leary Bloomberg News BNP Paulina D.C. Pauline Walmart Home Depot Consumer Financial Protection Karen Fdic U.S. Urban Outfitters
A highlight from ICYMI: Decoder Ring: The Truth About #TheDress

The Secret History of the Future

01:12 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from ICYMI: Decoder Ring: The Truth About #TheDress

"Hey, do you remember? The dress, capital T capital D, the dress. You know the one. It took over our entire timelines a few years ago, debates about whether the dress was white and gold or blue and black lasted for days. Decades. And I don't know about you, but to me, at first, it was definitely blue and black, but as time went on, I also saw white and gold. And I thought to myself, what is happening? Luckily, we do now know what was happening because our friends over at decoder ring have a whole new episode about it, and I knew that y'all would love to hear it. In this episode, they went deep down the optical rabbit hole. And what they found was both surprising and kind of incredible. You should definitely be already subscribed to decoder ring, but if you're not, we're going to give you a little taste of what you'll find in that feed. I see why my will be back with the new episode next week, but for now, I'm going to hand the mic to my colleague, willa

Willa
A highlight from Peacebuilders: Sunila Abeysekera

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:35 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from Peacebuilders: Sunila Abeysekera

"A premier Christian girl school in Colombo, Sri Lanka. After completing school, sunila pursued a career as an actress, singer and dancer. She appeared in many plays and films before also taking on the role of a drama critic. Sunil worked in the arts until she found herself drawn to the civil rights movement in the mid 1970s. The civil rights movement was a non partisan inter ethnic organization that advocated for the release of the man and women who had been arrested during the revolt led by the communist group. Sunila disagreed with the government's authoritarian response. She got in mold by bringing food and clothing to detainees, while also working on their release. But macho sunil's activism is defined by the 26 year Sri Lankan Civil War. The conflict began in 1948 after Sri Lanka gained its independence from Britain. Still bitter from Britain's preference for the Tamils, the sinhalese government used their newfound independence and power to disenfranchise the tunnels. They made soon all of the official language and Buddhism the nation's primary religion. Tensions between two groups escalated and in 1983 the liberation tigers of tumult alum, ambushed a sinhalese army convoy. 13 soldiers were killed in the attack, but will followed was worse. Violent rides resulting in thousands of deaths and over two decades of Civil War. Although sunila was sinhalese, she condemned the government's treatment of the tunnels. Her philosophy was, as a member of the majority ethnic community, all my life I have taken part in collective actions and creative activities to defend minority rights and to celebrate minority cultures. Sunila stood out because she denounced both the government and the tumults. She was vocal about her disagreement with the state's disenfranchisement of the Tamils, as well as her opposition to the acts of violence committed by the tumult tigers. Sunila wasn't just woke locally, but also internationally. On this issue and many others, she spoke at demonstrations, conferences, and the United Nations. At the center of sunil's fight for human rights were women. In her own words, she knew that women and children are the first victims of any kind of conflict. Sunila founded and got involved in many organizations that promoted women's rights. She was a founder of Sri Lanka's Pacific and Asian women's form. She fought against the state's repression of women through the mother's front organization, and she helped develop the women for peace organization, which put forth political solutions to Sri Lanka's ethnic Civil War. In 1984, she founded the women in media collective in Colombo. The organization works to ensure that every Sri Lankan woman lives an autonomous life. They aim to embed feminist principles throughout South Asia to create more just society where women are treated as equals. Because sunila spoke out against the government, she was targeted as an enemy of the state. The threats that she received were so bad in 1988, she fled to the Netherlands for 6 months, but sunila returned in the face of abuse, threats and discrimination, her courage, propelled her forward. She was a shining example of what it meant to oppose and confront abuse of authority. In 1989, sunila was a founding member of the group in form. The group monitored and documented the governments and tumult tigers human rights abuses, including disappearances. This was a dangerous act of defiance during its time when the government and the tigers were fostering an environment of fear and suppression. This documentation played a crucial role in highlighting the conflict on an international level. In 1990, sunila became the executive director of the organization. Her work expanded outside of Sri Lanka as well. She was instrumental in getting the international world to acknowledge women's rights as human rights at the UN world conference on human rights in Vienna in 1993. Sunila also advocated for the equality of women by helping ensure that the united National Security Council passed resolution 1325. This legislation supports women's participation in peace negotiations and post conflict reconstruction. Other minorities that similar championed included sex workers gay men and women transgender people and those living with HIV and aids. Part of what made her such an effective activist was her refusal to discriminate. No matter the ethnicity, gender, class, religion or political affiliation, Sonoma supported those in need. In 1998, sunila was celebrated for her work when she received the UN secretary general's award for human rights. In the mid 2000s, sunila joined several organizations initiatives that sought to include and protect women. Much of this work led to her nomination as one of the 1000 women for the Nobel Peace Prize. And in 2007, human rights were awarded her its human rights defender award. So nella never stopped using her voice to highlight injustice, and even though it cost her to have to flee her country more than once, she knew it was worth it. In an interview, she said, when everyone is criticizing you, then you are doing the right thing. Sunila Abe Sakura died of cancer on September 9th, 2013 in Colombo Sri Lanka. She was 61 years old. All month we're talking about peace builders. For more information, find us on Facebook and Instagram at will manica podcast. Special thanks to co creators Jenny and Liz caplan for having me on as a guest host. As always, we'll be taking a break for the weekend. Talk to you Monday.

Sunila Sri Lanka Sinhalese Government Liberation Tigers Of Tumult Al Colombo Government Sri Lankan Center Of Sunil's Fight For Hu Britain Women For Peace Organization Sunil UN United National Security Counc South Asia Pacific The Netherlands Tigers Vienna
A highlight from Peacebuilders: Shirin Ebadi

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:00 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Peacebuilders: Shirin Ebadi

"I'm the host and producer of the podcast sesta. We aim to harness the power of arts and culture to foster conversation and build peace and Cyprus. I'll be your guest host for this month of women. This month, we're highlighting peace builders. In times of conflict, these women have stepped in, bringing their creativity and insight to help facilitate peace across the globe. Today, we're talking about a woman of firsts. The first woman in Iran to serve as a judge, the first Muslim woman, and the first Iranian to win the noble Peace Prize. And she might make you think about how deeply connected peace, justice and equality are. Let's talk about Shireen Abadi. Shireen Abadi was born in 1946 in hamadan in northwest Iran. When she was still a baby, Shireen and her family moved to Tehran, the country's capital. The ebadi's valued learning and Shireen, her sister, and her two brothers were all highly educated. In 1965, when she was 19 years old, Shireen earned a spot at the university of Tehran's law school. She graduated in just three and a half years. By 1969, she was serving as a judge for the Justice Department. She became the first woman judge in all of Iran. Shireen continued to shine professionally, earning a doctorate degree in 1971. At 29 years old, she became the head of the city court in Tehran. But the Islamic revolution was on the horizon. And it would change Shireen's life dramatically. In February of 1979, Shireen and all other women judges were removed from their positions. They were labeled as fickle and indecisive and unfit. Just because of their gender. They were reassigned as clerks in the courts that had once run. Shirin was furious. Her protests had some effects. She and her female peers were promoted to experts. But women were banned from the bench. Cheering couldn't bear the idea of helping out in a courtroom that she'd once run. So she left. Shireen says she was essentially housebound for years. She couldn't serve as a judge, and the bar association wouldn't give her a license. But unlike many of her peers, she stayed in Iran. She was determined to fight for her country. In 19 92, Shireen finally got a lawyer's license and opened up her own practice. She was now 46 years old, and a lot changed since she'd last practiced law. Shireen started taking clients whose stories were like hers, women, children, freethinkers, people who had fearlessly taking on the Islamic Republic and those who nobody else would defend. In 1999, a series of murders shook the community university of Tehran. Shireen represented some of the victims families. The killings were later pinned on government officials who had gone rogue. The next year, in June, Shireen was arrested and thrown in jail for three weeks. She and another lawyer were accused of sharing a tape confession from a vigilante militia member. In 2002, she founded the human rights defender center. She'd become one of Iran's most prominent activists. In 2003, Shireen was awarded the noble Peace Prize for her work defending the right to women and children. Shireen was the first Muslim person and the first Iranian to win the award. Shireen hadn't even known she was nominated. When asked about her win, she said there is no contradiction between Islam and human rights. If a country abuses human rights in the name of Islam, then it is not the fault of Islam. For Shireen, fighting for the rights of others is a path to peace. I think that's important to remember that conflict can actually lead to peace, especially if we're fighting towards justice and equality. Shireen finally left Iran in 2009. She lives in the UK in exile, but even from across an ocean she keeps fighting for the rights of all people. She said, just imagine if you're in a boat and it breaks down in the middle of the sea, is there any other way but to swim? If one becomes tired and discontinued swimming, that person will sink. We have to be hopeful. All month, we're talking about peace builders. For more information, find us on Facebook and Instagram at will manica podcast. Special thanks to co creators Jenny on this Kaplan for having me as a guest host. Talk to you tomorrow.

Shireen Shireen Abadi Iran Hamadan Tehran University Of Tehran Ebadi Cyprus Community University Of Tehran Shirin Justice Department Human Rights Defender Center Bar Association UK Swimming Instagram Facebook Jenny Kaplan
A highlight from Political Gabfest: What If Twitter Dies?

The Secret History of the Future

02:33 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Political Gabfest: What If Twitter Dies?

"November 24th, 2022, Happy Thanksgiving. The what if Twitter vanished edition? I'm David plot of city cast. I'm in D.C.. I'm joined. Not in D.C. by John Dickerson of CBS prime time from New York hello John. Hello, David. And from New Haven, Connecticut, Emily basil on The New York Times Magazine and Yale Yale. You'll no longer ranked the no longer ranked by U.S. news, Yale University law school, so now not one of the top law schools in the country. Yes. How does it feel to be at it working in unranked and probably now unaccredited law school, Emily? Righteous, it feels righteous. I don't think we lose our accreditation for the dean pulling out of the U.S. news and World Report rankings, but maybe that will be next. But yeah, no, it was totally righteous thing to do. They're not valuing public service enough and those rankings are just a terrible scourge on the universe as far as I can tell. This week on the gab fest. Could Twitter vanish, what would happen if it did? Then this World Cup was born and squalor raised in sin, can it be redeemed? And then a once prominent anti abortion activist claims justice Alito leaked a key Supreme Court decision some years ago, weeks before it was made public. What does this tell us about the recent Dobbs leak? It doesn't matter if the court is leaky. Plus, of course, we will have cocktail chatter. And reminder, our conundrum show is coming up and we have a great guest who's going to cogitate on the mysteries of the universe with us. Allison bechdel, she, if the bechdel test and who better who better than the writer, cartoonist, I would say part time philosopher Alison bechdel, so if you have conundrums you'd like us to answer or you like Allison to tackle, please send them to us by going to slight dot com slash conundrums. And just a little teaser dear listeners, here are a few that you sent to us already. Should voting be weighted to account for how long the vote would impact your life. For instance, if you're 18, your vote would be worth one vote. But if you're aged 70 7, it would be worth a tenth of a vote. That's a really good question. Then another one, would you rather travel a hundred years back in time to meet your ancestors or a hundred years into the future to meet your descendants? Great question. And this one, fuck marry kill, bread rice pasta, which is an amazing question, amazing.

Emily Basil Yale Yale Yale University Law School D.C. John Dickerson David The New York Times Magazine Alison Bechdel Twitter U.S. New Haven CBS Connecticut Emily Alito New York Dobbs John World Cup Supreme Court
A highlight from Peacebuilders: Rigoberta Mench Tum

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:05 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Peacebuilders: Rigoberta Mench Tum

"With the CUC, the indigenous labor rights organization. She fought for better conditions for farm workers on the coast. And in addition to speaking kiche she taught herself Spanish and other Mayan languages. That way, she could teach different communities across Guatemala about resisting military oppression. We Roberta's activism made her a target for retaliation from the government. She went into hiding in Guatemala and then fled to Mexico. But she continued to organize for indigenous rights from afar. Tens of thousands of guatemalans fled to Mexico in the early 1980s. Most of them were indigenous mines. In 1983, when rigoberta was in her early 20s, she told her life story to an anthropologist. Over the course of 8 days, they are recorded hours and hours of tape. These recordings eventually became the book. An Indian woman in Guatemala. The book captivated readers around the world, it was a detailed, painful telling of her life experiences in war torn Guatemala. And it garnered international support for the Guatemalan resistance movement. In 1992, rigoberta received the noble Peace Prize. At that time she was the youngest person to have ever received the award and the first indigenous person to do so. She used her prize money to create the rigoberta menchu foundation. The foundation is dedicated to education, healthcare, and community development for indigenous guatemalans. After the end of the Civil War in 1996, the foundation helped repatriate refugees. Today, the foundation focuses on civic education and voting rights. In 1998, an American academic published a book discrediting some of the details and rigoberto memoir. His research was featured on the front page of The New York Times, lounging rigoberta into the controversy and forcing her to respond to accusations. She has said she will defend her book to the death. Since then, other scholars have also defended her work. Even a member of the novel comets he noted that memoirs often contain embellishments. And in the end, when someone is arguing over whether a man was burnt alive or murdered them burned, the exact details seem less important. The stories LEGO Berta taught the world to hear due represent the kinds of very real violence and pain many poor indigenous guatemalans face and her activism today has kept these stories and experiences in the spotlight. All month, we're talking about peace builders. For more information, find us on Facebook and Instagram at will manica podcast. Special thanks to co creators Jenny and Liz Kaplan for having me as a guest host. Talk to you tomorrow.

Guatemala Rigoberta Indigenous Labor Rights Organi CUC Mexico Rigoberta Menchu Foundation Roberta Rigoberto The New York Times Berta Instagram Liz Kaplan Facebook Jenny
A highlight from ICYMI: An ICYMI Friendsgiving with Normal Gossip

The Secret History of the Future

01:21 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from ICYMI: An ICYMI Friendsgiving with Normal Gossip

"An annual I see why my tradition and can I just say kind of wild to me that this show has been going on long enough to have annual traditions that have been done more than once. I want to thank y'all. I'm going to be a little sappy for a moment. I want to thank you all for sticking around for the past year and a half. I know that without Madison, the show has been a little all over the place and I too miss having a regular co host, but we are still working on finding the best person for the job and I appreciate y'all's patience. Now I'm a sappy moment is over back to tradition. So much of covering Internet culture is talking about the bad and dumb stuff online in a given week. The Ewan and the depth you heard and the lesbian influencers of the world so today we're going to do the complete opposite and talk about some of the things on the Internet that we are thankful for this year. Last year we had a Friends giving special that featured Christina grace Tucker and el amine Abdel Mahmoud and you all should definitely check it out if you haven't already. But this year we're doing again with new friends. After a short break, I'll be back with Kelsey McKinney, who you all have heard on the show before, and Alex su Jong laughlin. I love both of them dearly, not least because they make one of my

Madison Christina Grace Tucker El Amine Abdel Mahmoud Kelsey Mckinney Alex Su Jong Laughlin
A highlight from Robert Mugabe Part 3: Zimbabwes Tsunami

Real Dictators

08:07 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Robert Mugabe Part 3: Zimbabwes Tsunami

"It's April 18th. In the year 2000. Independence Day. 20 years ago, at a stadium in Zimbabwe's capital Harare. Robert Mugabe proclaimed the birth of a new nation in a moving speech of reconciliation. The former guerrilla leader promising end to the fighting between blacks and whites. Now those words ring totally hollow. 300 miles from the capital city, at a little after 6 in the morning. Martin olds looks out of his window. A hundred men are breaking through the fence that surrounds his farm. They're well armed, the guns and traditional Zimbabwean hunting knives. Three days earlier, another white farmer, David Stevens, was kidnapped. Taken into the bush and murdered by a mob. They claimed to be war veterans. But from the looks of them, most of the men gathered outside Martin O's tin roofed farmstead are too young to have fought in the liberation war. He grabs his shotgun and loads a couple of cartridges into the chamber. At 42, old is a military vet himself, with four firearms of this disposal. A burly man with a thick brown beard, he cuts a pretty imposing figure. But old is no fool. He knows he stands little chance in a shootout. Instead, he attempts to negotiate. Stepping outside his front door, he sees the invaders have taken up offensive positions. And they don't seem willing to parley. Before he can get a word out, one of the men fires olds is hit in the leg, bones, splintering. He staggers back inside and reaches for his two way radio. Grimacing from the pain, he manages to make contact with the farmer's union. He begs them to call him an ambulance. With help on its way, or so he assumes. Olds improvises a temporary splint for his broken leg. He then steals himself for the battle of his life. For the next hour or so, the exchange is fire with the men outside his home. Crawling from room to room to get a clear shot. He manages to hit half a dozen of the intruders. But the others show no sign of retreating. By now, old is desperate for medical attention. But the ambulance still hasn't arrived. Little does he know, it's being held at a police roadblock, along with a group of farmers who are attempting to launch a rescue. Olds keeps the siege going longer than anyone could have expected. But eventually. The invaders flush him out. They hurl molotov cocktails through the shattered windows of the farmstead. Soon the entire building is ablaze. Choking on the fumes, oaks is forced out into the open. The invaders grab him and shoot him twice in the face at close range. For the next couple of hours they remain at the farm, cheering and singing. The farm's name in a twist of irony. Is compensation. By the time the police finally arrive on the scene, they are long gone. Later that day, president Mugabe appears on state television. Far from condemning the murder, he appears to sympathize with the invaders. Zimbabwe's 4000 white farmers, he claims, are stuck in the entrenched colonial attitudes of the past. Thanks to them, the new constitution he proposed was defeated in a referendum two months earlier. Amongst other things, it would have transferred farmland from white to black owners. The whites, Mugabe declares, have proven themselves enemies of Zimbabwe. And by now, everyone knows how he treats his enemies. After two decades in office, Robert Mugabe has already shown himself to be a callous and brutal dictator. From the kakuru hundy genocide, launched against the minority and the bellies. To the vote rigging, corruption, and economic mismanagement by his cronies. There have been plenty of reasons for the international community to abandon him. But only after the farm invasions at the dawn of the 21st century, will the outside world acknowledge Mugabe's true nature. But as Mugabe doubles down, he will drag Zimbabwe into the greatest economic crisis. Since the Wall Street crash. From noise, this is part three of the Mugabe story. And this is real dictators. For Mugabe and his ZANU-PF party, violence and intimidation are long-standing political tools. As the wave of farm invasion sweeps the country from early 2000 onwards, that little doubt, as to his intentions. Doctor chipo Dan dere. We get to 2000 and these are vibrant opposition. Unfortunately, ZANU-PF has learned that they can use violence. They can use military tactics that we used to gain independence and they can use those on the citizens. They realize we don't have the white votes. White farmers are going to support the opposition. So let's embrace all the evil. Journalist Jerry Jackson. It was very controlled. It wasn't a massive paper going on to farms and just massacring people. It almost feels like they had a meeting one day and said, how many white farmers do you think we can kill? Or should kill to bring everybody to heal? They killed every animal they could on the farm. And that was a deliberate policy because it upset white people to see their horses covered in bales of hay and set a light. Or they would chase the horses over the cattle grid, so they'd break their legs and its stone the dogs to death. In early 2000, Mugabe is still smarting from his first ever electoral defeat. A new political party, the movement for democratic change, spearheaded the no vote in the recent referendum campaign. Thanks in part to the efforts of white activists, the MDC succeeded in quashing Mugabe's plans. In large part, the farm invasions of intended to destroy the MDC's base. Just as the kakuro hundy massacres 20 years earlier, targeted the support as a Mugabe's rival. Joshua and como. But it's not just the white farmers who are in the crosshairs. Black farm workers are raped, tortured, and massacred, as the invaders are unleashed. Douglas Rogers author of the last resort, a memoir of Zimbabwe, grew up on his parents farm near the Mozambique border. Up to 1 million people lived and worked on white commercial farms. And they were overwhelmingly supportive the opposition. So in taking out white farmers, he was doing two things. He was targeting a white minority, but he was also destroying black farm workers in that community. Many were killed, many beaten up, left landless, fled to South Africa for fled to Mozambique. And that was to me, that's the overlooked story of that time.

Mugabe Robert Mugabe Zimbabwe Martin Olds David Stevens Harare Zanu Pf Party Chipo Dan Dere Olds Martin Bush Jerry Jackson MDC Movement For Democratic Change Douglas Rogers Como Joshua Mozambique
A highlight from Appendix 9- The Second Wave

Revolutions

03:07 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Appendix 9- The Second Wave

"In this case is somebody who will ignore both the spirit and the letter of any custom law rule or norm in the pursuit of their objectives. The ends justify the means. Radicalism of means is thus measured by a willingness to do things beyond the bounds of what we might consider normal ethical behavior. It involves a flexible imagination, single minded clarity of purpose, and very few compunctions about doing things that other people might consider bad or wrong. If a radical of means is losing a chess match, they might win that match by bashing their opponent over the head with a chair. This is the tactical approach of a radical of means. This kind of radicalism can be deployed towards any objective, so conservatives, liberals, moderates, all of them have radical wings. So a radical conservative is absolutely a thing, even if the words themselves appear to be contradictory. A radical conservative is someone willing to go to any lengths and use any tactic in defense of the status quo. And the other type of radicalism is radicalism of ends. When we talk about ends here, we are talking about how much society will change from the present status quo. A conservative is somebody who wants things to change not at all, or change very, very slowly. A moderate is willing to tolerate some change, but not go too far or too fast. A radical meanwhile wants the complete reordering of society after an apocalyptic year zero. This total reordering of society is often premised on the destruction of old social and political institutions. The goal of such radicals is not remodeling the house, but tearing it down and building something new from the foundation up. Radicalism of ends is not limited to left wing or progressive political actors, a religious fanatic might have the radical end of a theocracy. A nationalist might have the radical end of an ethnically pure society. The point being that the radical end involves a great departure from the present status quo and a greater willingness to toss out institutions of that status quo that are seen as irredeemably corrupt. Now on the other side of our looming confrontation we have moderates. In contrast to the radical, the moderate is going to limit the scope of their imagination, whether we're talking about means or ends. Moderation of means entails having some kind of mental list of things one won't do. That if one can only remain in power if one does X and X is too radical a step to contemplate whether it's assassination, black male or hostage taking, then the moderate will not do it. They will acknowledge defeat and quit the field. Moderation of ends, meanwhile, entails a cautious imagination about what is possible. Change and reform must happen, but it should not go too far or happen too fast. We must proceed one step at a time. They consider calls by radicals to cut the cord and sprint away from the chain to the past as a reckless risk that will provoke a backlash threatening to undo even moderate revolutionary gains, let alone the great dreams

Chess Sprint
A highlight from Peacebuilders: Marii Hasegawa

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:24 min | Last week

A highlight from Peacebuilders: Marii Hasegawa

"Hello from wonder media network I'm Melton Burak. I'm the host and producer of the podcast sesta. We aim to harness the power of arts and culture to foster conversation and build peace and Cyprus. I'll be your guest host for this month of Dominica. This month we're highlighting peace builders. In times of conflict, these women have stepped in, bringing their creativity and insight to help facilitate peace across the globe. Today we are talking about a woman whose life was studded with historical moments. She dedicated her life to diplomacy and social work, though it's unlikely you've heard of her name. Her story is a reminder that a lifetime in the pursuit of peace is a humbling task we must choose to take up every day. Let's meet Marie sagawa. Marie was born on September 17th, 1918. She spent the very beginning of her life in a small village near the seaside outside of Hiroshima, Japan. Her father was a Buddhist priest in their family temple. When Marie was still a baby, the family moved across the Pacific to Los Angeles California. There, her father continued his work supporting the Buddhist Japanese community in the area. Marie spent her formative years of childhood in California, and when it was time for college, she attended the University of California at Berkeley. In 1938, she graduated with a degree in home economics. But in 1942, whatever plans Marie had for her future were thrown to the wayside. The Second World War came to U.S. shores and president Franklin Roosevelt issued executive order 9 zero 6 6. It authorized the immediate evacuation of alleged threats to national security from the West Coast. We know now that this must incarceration campaign was a result of racism that had been brewing since the bombing of Pearl Harbor. In just 6 months, more than 100,000 people of Japanese ancestry were moved to the internment camps inland. Among them, Marie's family. Marie and her family were forcibly taken to the topaz relocation center in Utah. The barracks there were barely ready when the incarcerated Japanese Americans arrived. Many of them actually had to help finish the construction of the buildings and furniture, which included minimal amenities like pot bellied stoves and army cots. Armed guards circled the perimeter. In the dismal conditions of topaz, Marie stroh to create community. She served as a social worker and wrote for the camp's literary magazine. Marie's degree in skills also meant she could find work outside the camp. She was released to Cleveland Ohio and from there moved to Philadelphia, where she moved in with her college roommates. The effects of World War II would linger for Marie. In 1945, the U.S. dropped atomic bombs on Nagasaki and the town near Maurice birthplace, Hiroshima. The violence and loss of life made the tragedy of war even more potent and present. On the east coast, Marie worked in the food tobacco and agricultural workers union. She also met ichiro hasegawa, who had also made his way from another relocation center. They married in 1946 and eventually moved to Richmond, Virginia to start a family. At home, Marie was a girl scout leader, and a PTA president. But she was also seeking peace on an international level. She joined the national board of the women's international league for peace and freedom and served as its president during the final years of the Vietnam War. In 1973, Murray set off on a trip to Hanoi with an international delegation of women. The goal was to understand the extent of damage the war hut wrought on the women and children of Vietnam. It was illegal at the time for Americans to travel to North Vietnam, so Marie used her Japanese passport. It was a risky decision thanks to the ongoing political unrest in the states. There wasn't a guarantee Marie would actually be able to reenter the U.S. when she returned. Even with her family waiting at home, she took the risk. She had to make this trip. And it was a good thing she did. What Murray saw on her trip to Hanoi bolstered her dedication to furthering peace. When she returned home, she was back to work by day. Then, each day, after 8 hours of work, she went home and wrote letters and reports to distribute to allies and organizations. On the weekends, she traveled around the country to spread the information should learn in Vietnam. Everything and anything she could do towards ending the war was vital. It finally ended in 1975, two years after her trip. In 1996, at 77 years old, Marie traveled to Tokyo to receive the new one O peace price. It's usually given out to people who have contributed into religious cooperation and the cause of world peace. Marie gave a Humboldt speech and acceptance. In 2001, Marie moved to a retirement center in Massachusetts, where she stayed active in current affairs, book groups, and the village choir. She died on 1st of July 2012. Much of the information we know about Marie comes from her obituary, lovingly written by her daughter. Marie led a successful career as a peacemaker, and her work was recognized on the international stage. And like many women, she led a full life additionally, a tennis fan, a mystery story of and a mother who traveled with her family. In one article, Marie's daughter described her as quietly steadfast and thank goodness she was, where all the better for her tenacity for peace. All month, we're talking about peace builders. For more information, find us on Facebook and Instagram at will manica podcast. Special thanks to co creators Jenny and Liz Kaplan for having me as a guest host, talk to you tomorrow.

Marie Melton Burak Marie Sagawa Hiroshima Topaz Relocation Center Marie Stroh Vietnam Maurice Birthplace Dominica Food Tobacco And Agricultural Ichiro Hasegawa California U.S. Franklin Roosevelt National Board Of The Women's Cyprus Pearl Harbor University Of California Berkeley Hanoi
A highlight from The Kidnapping of Patty Hearst | Free Will | 4

American Scandal

08:07 min | Last week

A highlight from The Kidnapping of Patty Hearst | Free Will | 4

"It's September 18th, 1975, in a jail in Northern California. Patricia Hearst is curled up in bed in a small concrete cell. The space is no more than 6 feet wide and 9 feet long. In one corner is a combined toilet and sink and at the other end are a set of steel bars. Hearst rolls over, trying to make sense of everything that's happened today. It was only a few hours ago that FBI agents stormed into her apartment guns drawn and placed her under arrest for robbing a bank. The encounter with armed law enforcement left Hearst feeling shaken. But the day took an even more surreal turn when Hearst in the agents arrived at the jailhouse and found a crowd of reporters waiting for her. Hearst greeted them with a raised fist, and during her booking she identified herself as Tanya, her adopted name in the symbionese Liberation Army. She even gave her occupation as urban guerrilla. All the radical posturing earned a few raised eyebrows, apparently people were expecting that after getting arrested, Hearst would stop playing the part of political radical. But Hearst's allegiance to the SLA is complicated. She was, of course, a kidnapping victim, and she had been held captive in a dark closet and her life threatened. But hers grew convinced her family had given up on her. And while living in isolation with the SLA, Hearst publicly gave up on her family. She made recordings of herself condemning her mother and father for their bourgeois lifestyle and calling out the media and labeling her a victim. She was fully aware that the FBI was leading a manhunt, calling her a criminal and trying to place her under arrest. So at the same time that it felt like her world was collapsing, that her family had abandoned her. The members of the SLA started to become something like a new family, even if it was dysfunctional. The radical political group had become her entire world, offering protection, camaraderie, and a sense of daily ritual. But now, Hearst is alone once again. The majority of the members of the SLA died after a shootout with the police. The group is in tatters after she and the remaining members hopscotched around the country, trying to find refuge. And Hearst was dealt the final blow only hours ago. When federal agents stormed her apartment and placed her in handcuffs. Hearst is lying on her side, trying to get comfortable when she hears a pair of heavy boots coming down the hallway. Instinctively, Hearst tenses up. Sin Q M 2 May, the fallen leader of the SLA, always warned what would happen if they were brought to jail. He promised that the SLA would be brutalized and tortured. Hearst believed every word of that terrifying message. And as these footsteps get closer, she begins bracing for violence. The footsteps stop outside her cell and Hearst looks up to see a deputy with a blank expression. It takes out a key and unlocks the cell door. All right, come on, miss Hearst. You've got guests. Her stair suspiciously at the deputy, waiting for his next move. Miss Harris, come on, we don't have all night. First gets up. Still eyeing the deputy. He places a pair of handcuffs on her wrists. And then he leads her down a dark hallway, past rose of other jail cells, and inmates who stand banging against their cell doors and shouting out. Her swallows as she gets closer and closer to what she is sure will be a beating. She's trained for this moment, but still she is afraid. Moment later, Hearst in the deputy arrive in front of a door. Hearst is merely trembling now in fearful anticipation of what comes next. But when the deputy turns the knob and the door opens, Hearst freezes in surprise. In front of her are her mother and father, and her two younger sisters, family members, she hasn't seen in over a year and a half. Catherine Hearst, Patricia's mother, steps forward, cradling a dozen yellow roses. All patty sweetheart. I'm so thrilled to know you're safe and you look what your hair is quite different. Unconsciously, Patricia touches her hair, which she boxed dyed red a few weeks ago. You don't like it. You've been using various disguises. Let's change the subject. Tell me about how they're treating you here. Do you share a cell? No, they have me alone. Said it's for my own safety. But that doesn't make sense. Me and the other prisoners, we are in the struggle together. Ah, of course. Well, here, penny. These roses are for you. To brighten up your space. Well, thank you. No, don't thank me. They're from the reporters who have been visiting the house. They were so happy to hear this was all coming to an end. Catherine holds out the roses, but Patricia doesn't move to take them. After all the outrageous coverage, all the sensational headlines and baseless accusations now reporters are sending her flowers, sweetheart, patty, what's wrong? The flowers are nice, but what is it? Are they not treating you well here? No, nothing bad has happened so far. What do you mean so far? Patricia pauses. Her family, with their mansion and summers at the hearse castle, could never understand the wide gulf that now stands between them. The reality of prison, all the lessons Patricia learned from the SLA about oppression and sexism and racism in America. It's nothing. You wouldn't understand. Patricia, whatever's on your mind, we will understand. No, no, don't worry, mother, huh? I'll be fine. And I didn't mean anything. This is all very new. Yes, and it won't be permanent. We'll see to it that you get out of here soon. Your father's hiring the best attorney money can buy. The deputy signals it's time to wrap up. And don't you worry, patty. We'll get you out of here. And then we'll put all of this behind us. I promise. A minute later, Patricia Hearst is escorted back to herself. As she walks down the hallway, she gazes at the other prisoners. Women who were locked up and promptly forgotten about. Hearst knows her mother has fantasies that she'll beat the charges and everyone will soon get back to their old lives. But it is a fantasy. Hearst is now one of the oppressed, and inmate in America's criminal justice system. And she's about to face a trial that'll be as much about political theater as any real form of justice. American scandal is sponsored by a new limited series coming out on Hulu, welcome to chippendales, starring Kumail Nanjiani, Murray Bartlett, annaleigh Ashford, and Juliette Lewis. It's inspired by the dark true events behind the founding of the chippendales male strip club empire and how it all took us sinister turn with multiple murders. There's so much more to this story than just a male strip club. There's partying, there's greed, and then there's murder. And it's all inspired by true events down to the nitty Gritty call to the FBI murder plot. So if you need a new show to get into, this is the one. Welcome to chippendales, has it all. Be sure to check out welcome to chippendales, which premieres November 22nd, streaming only on Hulu. American scandal is sponsored by audible. If you're like most adults, you have chores to do, commutes to make, waiting rooms to wait in, and time to yourself, you crave. I do too, but I make the most of all of them by listening with audible. Titles like confidence man by Maggie haberman, and like all audible members, I get one credit every month, good for any one of the many classics, best sellers and new releases regardless of price to keep forever. Let audible help you discover new ways to laugh, be inspired or be entertained. New members can try it free for 30 days. Visit audible dot com slash AS or text AS to 505 hundred. That's audible dot com slash AS or text AS to 505 hundred to try audible free for 30 days. Audible dot com slash AS. From

Hearst SLA Patricia Hearst Patricia FBI Miss Hearst Miss Harris Catherine Hearst Patty Sweetheart Northern California Tanya Patty Kumail Nanjiani Murray Bartlett Annaleigh Ashford Catherine America
A highlight from Peacebuilders: Madeeha Gauhar

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:14 min | Last week

A highlight from Peacebuilders: Madeeha Gauhar

"I'm the host and producer of the podcast sesta. We aim to harness the power of arts and culture to foster conversation and build peace and Cyprus. I'll be your guest host for this month of women. This month, we're highlighting peace builders. In times of conflict, these women have stepped in, bringing their creativity and insight to help facilitate peace across the globe. Today we're talking about a woman who challenged censorship in Pakistan and helped to transform theater in South Asia. Let's meet madeja gohar. Maria was born in 1956 in Karachi, Pakistan. She aspired to perform on stage and on television. However, when she was growing up, Pakistan was ruled by a military dictatorship that heavily restricted opportunities for women in art. Marie ha grew up visiting her grandfather in a village near the India Pakistan border. One morning, she awoke to the sound of heavy shelling. An air raid. At the time, she didn't understand the impact a warfare along the border. But that moment, and the midair dogfights between Indian and Pakistani forces that came in the following days would impact her forever. As a young woman, muddy had decided to pursue her dreams of becoming an actor and director. She obtained her master's degree in theater studies at the University of London. Afterwards, madiha moved back to Pakistan, she found work as an actor on PTV, the Pakistani state owned broadcaster. Still, the country was under a military regime. Women's roles on television were heavily censored. The suppression of freedoms and mistreatment of women draw made to leave mainstream media. She decided to create her own path where she would confront the injustices she witnessed and experienced. Maria married a well-known TV director, producer and writer named shahid Nadine. In 1983, madiha and her husband founded ajoka, a theater group created to address bold political and social contemporary themes. It would tackle topics such as women's rights, labor and religious intolerance, and the pursuit of socially meaningful theater. Despite her classical training, she emphasized indigenous styles combining it with contemporary techniques and stage. In Punjabi, a joke a theater means theater off today. The strict censorship laws of the era made it nearly impossible for ajoka to find a venue for their work. So the theater debuted its first theatrical performance on the front line of a house. They chose to give this performance in defiance of the strict censorship laws. The group started out small, operating out of the homes of members in the group and using donations from supporters and audience members. Soon, the organization grew and began attracting larger audiences. Marie had believed in promoting peace between India and Pakistan. She traveled to India frequently and made an effort to have her place performed there. She collaborated with Indian playwrights and directors, had productions featured in Indian theater festivals, and even helped organize transporter festivals to cultivate peace. While working as a director and actor, muddy, also gave lectures. However, she was forced to quit due to her theater activism. Not long after this, she was sent to jail for engaging in women's rights demonstrations. Madeha received numerous honors for her work in theater. In 2003, she was awarded the medal of distinction by the president of Pakistan from improving Pakistani theater, and in 2006 madeha became the first Pakistani to be awarded the prestigious prince Claus award for her leadership of ajoka. In 2007, Mahdi has husband wrote a play that she directed called burqa vaganza. A satirical love story, the script deals and controversial themes while actors dress and burkas. The play highlighted increased pressure on women to wear head coverings in Pakistan. However, the play was met with contention and was banned by the national art council in April 2010 after numerous protests. In defiance of the ban, the theater continued to perform the play. Madiha died on April 25th, 2018 after suffering with cancer for three years. She was 61 years old. Since her death, Madi has legacy lives on in the continued success of a joker, which has become one of Pakistan's leading and most prolific theater groups. All month, we're talking about peace builders. For more information, find us on Facebook and Instagram at will manica podcast. Special thanks to co creators Jenny and Liz Kaplan for having me as a guest host, talk to you tomorrow.

Pakistan Madiha Madeja Gohar Marie Ha Shahid Nadine Ajoka Maria India South Asia Karachi PTV Cyprus University Of London Muddy Madeha Punjabi Pakistani Theater Prince Claus Burqa Vaganza
A highlight from Past Gas #163 - How the 924 & 944 Saved Porsche

Past Gas

12:31 min | Last week

A highlight from Past Gas #163 - How the 924 & 944 Saved Porsche

"Out. Because it's not the same experience if you're not freezing. Right. So I got my long Johns on. But in the back. The little hatch. You're waddling. It's 7 in the morning. Yeah. Carrying a candle in a little holder thing. And I put it all in a hole and I burn it. There you go. Kerosene on it, burn it. So my great grandma's from Sicily, and we grew up speaking like random Italian words. And then at least my whole life, we thought that bacau zu was bathroom in Italian or at least like the Sicilian dialect. And it wasn't until maybe 15 years ago that we found out she was just mispronouncing back house. That's great. Stuff into text. And you can choose the accent. Take the exit last year. Yeah, it's like almost problematic when they say supple Vida. Yeah, that's classic. These are all Los Angeles specific Google Maps. This is the only talk about traffic and how to get around around here. It's true. It's true. Welcome back to past gas everybody exciting day here at the donut office. We're recording this on November 10th, which is when the donut media story on Forza horizon 5 went live. I am overwhelmed. Dude, it's so surreal. I got a little emotional twice. Like yesterday the day before. Like Nolan and I are in a video game. Our faces and versions of our bodies are in we were given the or I was and I spoke on the guy's behalf. We were given the choice between the quote normal body or the chubby body and I chose the normal one because they were like some of the clothes won't fit the chubby one. I was already gonna pick the normal one. So we are a little skinnier than we are in real life. Don't be surprised if you meet us in person and we're a little beef here, but we know. I don't regret my decision. I'd rather shrink into my fours herself instead of growing my real life so. It didn't really hit me until this morning when people were kind of tagging us in Instagram stories and it's just overwhelming. I can't. I don't know. I have a hard time with stuff like this. Because we are so focused on moving forward with stuff, it is sort of hard to be proud of yourself, but I think we should take time, Nolan. Totally. And Joe. And I want to be proud of ourselves, but also thank all you guys for supporting us. Absolutely. It's cool that this is our job and I can't believe we have such an amazing audience that allows us to do. Truly mind-blowing things that I never thought would be possible. So thank you guys for all your support and cool just keep trying to do. New and awesome stuff for you. And it's cool for me because I am in the video game as well, but I had to make my own character. So we can hang out. Yeah. But the good news is I'm the main character. Yeah, yeah, yeah. You're the cool friend. So we're out of town or something. Over Christmas break. You're home. And you're like, man, I really miss Nolan and James. You, as Joe. Can go do a mission? Just like he doesn't work. That's what I call tasks. It makes it more fun around the office. Hey man, I got a mission for you. Can you write a script on? Well, James gave me three gold stars in my script this week. Awesome. Well, speaking of scripts, let's get into this. Let's do it. Let's talk about Porsche. Oh, I'm James pumphrey. Also, the other voice you hear is Joe Weber and the guy from the intro is Nolan's sight. Yes, thank you very much. Big thank you to our returning listeners. And if this is your first time, welcome to the show. Yeah, welcome to the show. Welcome. We're in a video game. Take your shoes off. Yeah. Get cozy, or drive to work. Whatever you're doing, do it. All right. As we all know, the mid 1960s were a wild time. The Vietnam War was in full swing. The Beatles were making music history. And consumer advocate, Ralph Nader released his book unsafe at any speed. Okay, so maybe you haven't heard of Nader's book. If you've listened to anything or watched anything on our channel, you probably heard of it, yeah. But when it came to the auto industry in 1965, this book was a very big deal. Most of unsafe at any speed focused on issues ranging from miserable crash protection to the alarming number of drivers being impaled by steering wheels. But the book also took an especially harsh view of the rear engine sports car. Why attack these cute little speedsters you ask? Well, simply put the Chevrolet corvair had essentially become an unguided missile on the road. Crashing and killing Americans in the early 1960s at a startling rate. Nader's research pointed to the corvair's rear engine design as the primary reason for the carnage, which led executives across the auto industry to fear that the layout could be altogether banned in the coming years. That's something we don't really think about often is like an engine layout being banned. Yeah, but we talked about this before. We've had episodes of Wheelhouse or whatever. It wasn't necessarily just the placement of the engine. It was the suspension, the rear suspension. That made it kind of Wiley. Yeah, so what the engineers did because the rear suspension geometry itself was not super stable. I think it was particularly under, if you let off the gas, like a Porsche in a turn, the rear end had a tendency to step out and spin out and kill you. But what they did to compensate for that was let air out of the tires. And that would make an adjustment to rebound and what have you. But if you didn't know that and didn't stick to your owner's manual and just pumped up to the tires to like whatever thought fit. What would ever was on the tire that stiffened the rear end and thus made it Twitch year and more likely to kill you. We did go kart in yesterday and they actually let the air out of the tires a little bit. Really not hear that? No. Oh, someone asked it as a joke, like what's the PSI in the tires and the guy was like, well, actually 34 and 32 or whatever. And he was saying that people were getting much better times by letting out four or 5 psi. Of course, yeah. Probably wouldn't have been skittering all over the place and under steering like a madman in those days. Yeah, that was a lot of understeer. Dang, dude, I wish we asked earlier anyway. Yeah, man, let's talk about this for longer. Okay. Anyway, one company that was really sweating after Nader's book was Porsche. They released their flagship model, the 9 11, only a year before, and while their rear engine coupe was an immediate hit at the racetrack and with consumers. If the laws changed in the U.S., their most important market, they would be in dire financial straits. I love Dire Straits. Me too. You guys like that bad? Good band. Yeah. But first, let's roll back the clock and get a quick hit of Porsche history. So we have some context. Portia was founded in Stuttgart, Germany in 1931 by Austrian born mechanical engineers slash friend of Adolf Hitler Ferdinand Porsche. After years of working for other companies such as Daimler Benz, the doctor decided to strike out on his own. Despite being an extremely small operation with limited resources, Ferdinand and his firm quickly garnered a reputation as one of the most innovative automotive designers in the country within only a few years. When Hitler came to power in the mid 30s, one of his priorities beyond fascist world domination was working out the kinks in the soon to be mass produced, Volkswagen. Or the people's car. Ferdinand got a call from Adolf to help out and voila. By 1935, Porsche had designed a version of the iconic Volkswagen beetle and by design he kind of copied it from a Jewish designer from a check company called tatra. Hitler was so impressed with Ferdinand's work that he personally saw to it that Porsche designed a Volkswagen racer for the 1939 auto union Grand Prix. Along with a larger wheelbase and a more aerodynamic design, Porsche tinkered with the idea of expanding engine capacity by using different valves and cylinder heads. He also began to zero in on a revolutionary function called fuel injection. Ferdinand had whipped up three prototypes by early 1939, but then Germany made some shall we say aggressive military moves into Poland that same year. And as a result, the auto union Grand Prix was canceled, and further the development of the Porsche race car was brought to a halt. Throughout World War II, Ferdinand remained in cahoots with Hitler. He wasn't involved in any combat, but he continued work on the consumer focused beetle and lent his know how to the Führer for how to increase production of German military equipment. And because of this, Porsche was arrested and thrown in French prison for 22 months after the war. Not a very long sentence. No, not considering. Well, as his father grinded out his prison sentence, Ferdinand's son, doctor Ferdinand ferry Porsche, junior assumed control of the company and moved the firm back to Austria, where they initially stayed afloat as a general repair and service company. But by late 1946, they had regained their financial footing and were considering how to enter the auto market with their own design. This should have called the Boxster the Porsche junior. Yeah. Right? Porsche junior. What a 100%. The junior knew from Porsche. You don't really see Porsche commercials on TV do. They don't have to. I also can't remember the last time I've watched TV. I love when we travel and have to stay in a hotel because then you get to catch up on what broadcast television is like. And it's dire. Yeah, for anyone complaining about the number of ads and a YouTube video, watch cable. Watch deadliest catch gold rush edition. They have to survive on their own and mine gold. Yeah, yeah. With crabs. Try and follow a narrative 45 seconds at a time with 9 minute breaks to watch cialis commercials. Anyway, don't see any Porsche commercials when watching that. You've been in a Porsche commercial. Yes, yeah. Really? Is that why you brought it up? Well, now that you mentioned, I mean, we did Porsche spot. Very Porsche decided that if they're going to go pro, they would need to start small and appeal to a very specific demographic. People, with money, ferry research demand for handmade, high performance machines, and eventually convinced a group of Swiss investors to back his fledgling project. Based on the bones of a VW bug, the Porsche three 5 6 one roadster hit the streets of Austria in March of 19 48 with an adjusted for inflation price of about 42 grand. More like 60 grand with markup today. They're still on a three 5 6 on a 90 $9000 at this dealership in Ohio. The three 5 6 roadster had a 1.1 liter four cylinder VW rear engine that could speed the curvy little coupe to over 80 mph. This thing goes zero to 80. Praised for its fantastic handling and eye catching design. The model was an immediate hit and true to ferry junior's frugal vision, a small scale production of 5 handmade cars per month was off and running by the end of the year. Is the three 5 6 the car that James Dean drove? I was gonna bring it up, I don't think so. So you got 6 is the upside down looking bathtub one. Yeah, yeah. I saw one of these in pretty bad shape at a

Porsche Nolan Donut Office Ferdinand Nader James Pumphrey Joe Weber JOE VW Sicily James Hitler Adolf Hitler Ferdinand Porsche Daimler Benz Ralph Nader Corvair Los Angeles Wiley Google Chevrolet
A highlight from ICYMI Encore Episode of The Bamboo Ceiling and Sticky Floor

Asian American History 101

02:01 min | Last week

A highlight from ICYMI Encore Episode of The Bamboo Ceiling and Sticky Floor

"You're listening to Asian American history one O one. A podcast about Asian American history from generally known historical happenings to the deeper cuts that we don't hear about in school, where your hosts, Jen and Ted, the daughter and father team. Welcome to episode 43. Whoo. It's been a while since we started an episode like this. So how are you? I'm pretty good. I'm pretty good. How are you? I'm doing well. Yeah, busy. Yeah. But I guess that doesn't tell you about how I am physically or mentally. Right, right. Yeah. I am still excited about the Olympics. So that's a good thing. Yeah. Excited about the different wins. I'm actually really looking forward to the Winter Olympics. Me too. Oh man, I just really want to see some skeleton and luge sled. I wonder if there are any Asian Americans and skeleton lose your bobsled. Yeah, we'll have to check. We'll have to see. Gonna have to do some research. Yeah. I don't even think that there are any Asian Americans on the hockey team. Yeah. Unless, unless Jason Robertson happens to make it, which, you know, being a rookie last year, I don't think he'd be selected, but he's a worthy candidate. Someone to look out for probably in the next four years. Yeah. Well, hopefully, one day, at the Olympics, ice hockey. Yeah, we definitely know there are plenty of Asian Americans and figure skating though. Yeah. Which is super exciting. Yeah. I'm excited to see I think Nathan Chen will probably make it onto the Olympic team. I'm excited to maybe see him at the Olympics, which would be really cool. Yeah, and hopefully getting a gold medal this time. Yep. Yep. I mean, he's had a world championship win, I think. I'm pretty sure he has, but you know, use your hand you, the Japanese male figure skater, is really good. And so a lot of the time he'll end up he wins gold. And then I've seen a couple times Nathan Chen will get silver, which is amazing. Yeah. But yeah. Yeah, silver's good. Silver's great. Yeah.

Olympics Jason Robertson JEN Luge TED Winter Olympics Nathan Chen Hockey Olympic Silver
A highlight from What Next TBD: The End of the Tech Boom

The Secret History of the Future

02:36 min | Last week

A highlight from What Next TBD: The End of the Tech Boom

"On the morning that Julia got laid off, she walked out of the gym and checked her email. The actual day, I went to my gym, I come out of the gym. It's like 8 30 in the morning. I've just come out of Pilates class. I just checked my phone as I do, and it's like stripe, HR, your role ad stripe. That's not a note, anyone wants to get, and it was a shock. There were no rumor mill, there was no, there was nothing. Like, I'm telling you, I've been in companies, you know, they're usually some sort of water quote like this was stealth. Absolute stealth. Julia, by the way, is not her real name. But that's what we're calling her today. She knows her way around tech. She's worked at a bunch of the big name companies, including Amazon, and Microsoft. And she joins stripe, the online payment processor, a little over a year ago, to work on company partnerships. Just before a big expansion. It was the highest valued privately held company. I think it was at that time it was like 95 billion. It was a rocket ship. Initially, COVID lockdowns and the subsequent online shopping boom propelled that rocket ship even higher. But then gravity kicked it. Stripe laid off 14% of its workforce earlier this month, including Julia. In a note to employees, the company's founders blamed inflation, rising interest rates, and their own bad business decisions. Julia's worried about her colleagues who were here on work visas. She's already started networking for her next gig. But she's also been around the block enough that she knows that however brutal, this is what companies sometimes do. So I don't really take it personally. And if you go to a startup, I guess this is the chance you take. And at that time, not everybody had jumped on the bandwagon, right? As of last Thursday, it wasn't like the entire industry ended decided to do this. But since Julia got laid off, it kind of feels like the whole industry has decided to do this. Tens of thousands of tech workers, including some of the biggest companies in the industry, have lost their jobs in November alone. So today on the show, we're going to explore why. Because maybe something fundamental is shifting and tech shouldn't be counting on rocket ships anymore. I'm Lizzie O'Leary, and you're listening to what next TBD. A show about technology, power, and how the future will be determined.

Julia Covid Amazon Microsoft Lizzie O'leary
A highlight from ICYMI: What's Going to Happen to Twitter?

The Secret History of the Future

07:43 min | Last week

A highlight from ICYMI: What's Going to Happen to Twitter?

"List of Leary. Hello, welcome back. Hello, it's lovely to be back with you. I'm so glad you're here. Not least, 'cause nothing at all has happened since the last time we spoke. It's been no major breaking tech news. It's been like that's really, it's been quite quiet. Super chill. Yeah, I've been very bored. I haven't done anything. Yeah. It's like a down time for all of us. Yeah, that's about right. We're gonna get to like the slow ruling disaster that is Twitter in a moment, though it's less slow rolling and more everything everywhere all at once. But before we get into that, I feel like I have to bring up your career pivot. Oh my God, my pivot into products of clothes? Yes, exactly. Tell me about this new business. So I got hacked. My Instagram got hacked and for several days, it was being a crypto bro and sending lots of people, including you, DM is about crypto and posting these gains that it had apparently made. Which we're also hilarious, because this is right as crypto is starting to really, really crash. Exactly. My hackers are not paying attention. And then it pivoted into telling everybody that I was starting a clothing line. With like really strange wording, products of clothes. Yeah. Yeah. I gotta say it was a while to watch as an observer, not least because I'm gonna be completely honest. I am trained and is my job to be skeptical of things, but they almost got me. Like, I mean, I covered tech and I got hacked. I fell for a, yeah, I thought that a woman I went to college with really was starting a clothing line. Yeah. But your hacker was kind of brilliant in that one of the photos they used. They used like a screenshot of a phone background to show the deposit of money into their account. And on the background was a photo of your child. And I was like, wait, so they were very, very good. I mean, I don't know. There were moments when they were great and there were moments when they seemed completely inept. They did take photos of my child and doctor them to make them look like a lock screen. That's not what my home, my home screen or lock screen doesn't look like that, but they use those pictures of Sam. They interspersed some of the weird crypto spam with like pictures of him and so some people were convinced. Other people, my husband and some friends of mine were sending them aggressive messages like, give her her count back. So once I did finally get my account back, I had to go in an unblock my husband because the packers had blocked him. But then they also bought things on Instagram because I with the associated card. I mean, this is so dumb. I have two factor authentication on everything and yet I didn't have it on Instagram for some dumb reason. But the things they bought, I sent you pictures, they bought a baseball cap that says puzzle person. Uh huh. Three things of nail polish. There were all the same and an insulated mug that says I'm a cool mom. But all of these things were sent to the address. That Instagram has on file, which is my apartment. So now I have all of these weird items in my house. Yeah, so turn on two factor authentication, everybody. Don't be like me. That is the tip from ICO IMI to y'all turn on two factor authentication except not on Twitter because apparently it's not working right now. Yeah, I know I have two factor authentication on Twitter, but you don't want to log out because you might log out forever. Well, that is, in fact, the pivot for the show because that is what we're talking about. And that's why you are gracing me with your lovely presents to talk about a non lovely present. Elon Musk. And Twitter. The thing is there's like actual implications for what's going on as connoted by the fact that you've done 6 episodes on your show. Right, I mean, it's a strange thing. I will say that this from an Internet culture standpoint, this moment on Twitter, if you are in the United States, is really funny. It's actually incredibly funny to watch people dunk on the richest man alive. It's amazing. It's really funny. We are a funny people. It's been great. It's less funny when you think about how Twitter is used in other parts of the world when you think about the Saudis are now the second biggest owner of Twitter and can they see everything that dissidents are doing? I don't know, but I don't like the odds. It's a very strange thing to be sort of toggling mentally back and forth between those two realities. And you are here to tell me about this the reality is because I've been stuck in one, which is just the funny version of this and trying not to think about the other, but we do need to think about the other. So after a short break, I will be back with Lizzie and with another installment of ask a tech reporter and or tech talk and or tech support, we're working on the name, we'll figure that out when Elon figures out whether or not we need two factor authentication. Oh boy. What's up guys? It's Tori. And Nisa and I are back to host another season of MTV's official challenge podcast and we are so excited to get into this next season because we competed in it. Each week we, along with your favorite challengers, we'll be getting into all the juicy details of season 38 and breaking down our competition journey. Listen to MTV's official challenge podcast on the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. Hey Friends, this is Zach Stafford. I'm Sam Sanders. And I'm say Jones. And we're the hosts of the vibe check podcasts, where we make sense of what's going on in news, entertainment, and culture. And how it all feels. Basically, you'll hear us talk about a little bit of any and everything. It's your new favorite group chat. Come to life. Listen to vibe check wherever you get your podcasts and don't forget to follow the show so you never miss an episode. And we're back. Lizzie, this is my most important question. The rest of them are kind of important. But what's happening? What's happening? What's happening right now? What is happening question question question, Mark, exclamation point. As the new Twitter prompt, I don't know. I don't know. I don't know. It's so crazy. I realize I am looking at this from the slightly jaundiced view of a reporter, right? But watching someone overpay, I think we can confidently say that. $44 billion for this company, and then squash its value, fire people, act like a toddler, and that is an insult to toddlers online. It's wild. I'm not even sure I have the words for it. It's impossible to describe, I think that's why we haven't actually done a full episode on it is I'm just looking at what's happening and my brain is just static because it makes no sense that this not only is happening,

Twitter The Associated Card Leary Instagram Elon Musk Packers SAM Lizzie Baseball MTV Zach Stafford Sam Sanders Nisa Elon United States Jones Apple Mark
A highlight from Peacebuilders: Muriel Duckworth

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:03 min | Last week

A highlight from Peacebuilders: Muriel Duckworth

"I'm the host and producer of the podcast sesta. We aim to harness the power of arts and culture to foster conversation and build peace and Cyprus. I'll be your guest host for this month of America. This month, we're highlighting peace builders. In times of conflict, these women have stepped in, bringing their creativity and insight to help facilitate peace across the globe. Today, we're talking about a woman who worked tirelessly for justice both in her own communities and for other causes. She founded and worked with 17 organizations and integrated the causes of feminism and pacifism. She lived for a hundred years and filled each day bettering the lives of others. Please welcome muriel Duckworth. Muriel ball was born on October 31st, 1908 in Austin, Canada, about 80 miles east of Montreal, on her parents farm. She was a third of 5 children to Ana west over and Ezra ball. Farm life was difficult and not very profitable. To make ends meet, Anna ran a boarding house and as a result, lightning rods. Muriel grew up in a lively methodist home. The family often had people over to gather and sing hymns or debate politics. Anna, muriel's mother, turned their China cabinet into a community lending library. At age 16, muriel entered McGill university in Montreal. At McGill, she joined the student Christian moment, a progressive and at times controversial campus organization. It encouraged students to explore the Christian faith radically and critically. For muriel, that included opposing antisemitism on campus and helping raise money for student relief. Muriel later described it as the beginning of her adult search for truth. She called it unsettling, painful and exciting. It was through the student Christian movement that she met her husband, Jack Duckworth. The couple was married in 1929, the same week as her graduation. Following her time at McGill, both she and Jack went on to study at the union theological seminary in New York. There, they took part in the social gospel movement, which emphasized that being Christian meant aligning oneself with a poor and powerless. Muriel began to internalize these teachings and at a pivotal time. Less than a year into her time in New York, the stock market crash of 1929 plummeted the country into The Great Depression. The city was rife with opportunity to take the teachings of the social gospel into real life. Muriel spent her time volunteering with young immigrant girls in hell's kitchen. The following year, she and Jack returned to Montreal, where they raised their three children. There, she continued advocating for social causes and joined several organizations which promoted living wages, unemployment insurance, healthcare, affordable housing, and more. In 1947, the family moved to Halifax, Nova Scotia. Mariel quickly became a well-known face in her community as a parent education adviser for the Nova Scotia Department of Education. It was through her work in the thick of Halifax community that her eyes were open to more and more social issues. Muriel's list of causes kept growing, each issue she tackled major commitment to social change and justice even more impassioned. About all muriel was invested in peace at a time of acute tension across the globe. In 1960, the United States and the Soviet Union were on the brink of nuclear war. After hopes of peaceful compromise were dashed at the failed 1960 Paris peace talks, women across Halifax began forming the only woman they knew would really champion the pacifist cause. Muriel heeded the call, 25 women huddled in her living room to organize around peace. Within a month of forming, the group had successfully blocked the United States from dumping nuclear waste off the Nova Scotia coast. This was just the beginning. Over the next few years, muriel's chapter joined with women across Canada to become the nationally recognized peace organization, why so women or VO muriel served as the O W's national president from 1967 to 1971 at the height of the Vietnam War. The wise and women publicly opposed the war and muriel took it upon herself to spearhead anti war efforts. She invited three Vietnamese women from the national liberation front to tour Canada, giving talks and meeting delegations of women working toward peace. She also protested Canada's involvement in nuclear weapons testing as she learned about its connection to the United States chemical warfare and Vietnam. In Halifax, muriel also became involved in Quaker faith and found that many friends or members of the religion became active participants in voicer women. Though muriel never faced incarceration for her peaceful protests, she did obtain a federal tax at age 80 for withholding 9% of her federal income tax over several years, the amount she had calculated the country was using for war preparations. Even as she aged, muriel did not stop her activities in person of peace. Muriel became a member of the lively Canadian geriatric group of the raging grannies who used humor and song to bring awareness to social justice issues. While in her cottage, muriel fell and broke her hip. She passed away at hundred years of age in maga Quebec. The Canadian voice of women for peace now presents an annual award for peace activism in muriel's honor. All month we're talking about peace builders. For more information, find us on Facebook and Instagram at podcast. Special thanks to co creators Jenny and Liz Kaplan for having me on as a guest host. As always, we'll be taking a break for the weekend, talk to you Monday.

Muriel Muriel Duckworth Montreal Muriel Ball Ana West Mcgill Halifax Jack Duckworth Anna United States China Cabinet Nova Scotia Department Of Educ Canada Mcgill University Union Theological Seminary Cyprus Jack New York
A highlight from What Next TBD: The Case Against Climate Reparations

The Secret History of the Future

01:06 min | Last week

A highlight from What Next TBD: The Case Against Climate Reparations

"You go ahead and introduce yourself? I'm Vijay by this Warren. I'm the global energy and climate innovation editor at The Economist. How many cops do you think you've covered at this point? Too many is the answer. There's no good number to cover. Cop stands for conference of the parties. It's the UN's annual summit on climate change. This year's cop in Sharm el Sheik Egypt is the 27th one. The most memorable one probably was in The Hague in the Netherlands a couple of decades ago when I was standing near Frank Lloyd, the U.S. negotiator who had a python in his face. And I can still taste the custard. Vijay argues that not all cops are created equal. There are big ones, and there are little ones. So every 5 years or so is a big cop, meaning there's something quite substantial on the agenda, major breakthrough. We can think about the Paris accord, which was reached, of course, in France. That was a big cop. There's a lot that people had to negotiate for.

Vijay Sharm El Sheik Warren The Hague UN Frank Lloyd Egypt The Netherlands U.S. Paris France
A highlight from Peacebuilders: Joyce Sikhakhane-Rankin

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:40 min | Last week

A highlight from Peacebuilders: Joyce Sikhakhane-Rankin

"We aim to harness the power of arts and culture to foster conversation and build peace and Cyprus. I'll be your guest host for this month of women. This month, we're highlighting peace builders. In times of conflict, these women have stepped in, bringing their creativity and insight to our facilitate peace across the globe. Today we're talking about a South African journalist who took a stand against the apartheid system. She was imprisoned for her resistance against the racist government, but remained resilient. She is one of many activists who help pave the way for a democratic South Africa. Let's meet joystick akani rankin. Joyce was born in Johannesburg South Africa in 1943. At the time, the country was governed under the apartheid system, which enshrined racial inequality between black and white South Africans into law. The government banned interracial marriages and severely restricted where black citizens could work, live and attend school. As a result, many black South Africans lived in poverty. Joyce's family lived in Orlando west, a township in Soweto. From a young age, Joyce was surrounded by key figures of the anti apartheid movement, growing up, she and her siblings played with the children of Nelson Mandela and Walter sisulu. High profile members of the anti apartheid African National Congress or ANC. In the early 1950s, South Africa introduced the Bantu education act. This law transferred control of all South African schools to the state, including black schools which had mainly been run by missionaries until that point. In doing so, the act stripped black communities and provinces of the ability to control their education and hand at that power to the upper tight government. The act dictated that schools for black children teach lessons in Africa, the language of the country's colonizers. It also made school compulsory, but didn't provide free education for black children, though many white children enjoyed that privilege. Joyce has scored boycott at the act and the sizzle is open to school in their home instead. While she was still in school, Joyce's parents separated, and she and her sister went to live with their paternal grandfather. He was a member of the ANC and regularly hosted local party meetings at his home. Under her grandfather's roof, Joyce listened in on debates and relate messages to ANC comrades. She had later say it was where her tastes were underground activities started. Once Joyce's parents finalized their divorce, she moved back to her mother's home to attend high school. Many students at her new school were involved with a pan africanist Congress and other anti apartheid group and Joyce continued her political development. She also fostered her talents as a writer, and even won a national essay competition. After graduating, joy started reporting for the world. She quickly grew frustrated with the paper's leadership, which was heavily influenced by the conservative Christian movement and unwilling to challenge appetite directly. Joyce left the world and joined the ramp daily mail, becoming the first ever black woman journalist at that paper. Her new publication was more progressive and she had more freedom to write honestly about negative effects of apartheid. While reporting on the forced removals of African people from their ancestral homes, Joyce witness a black woman giving birth in an open field without proper medical attention. This I deeply disturbed her and motivated her to help displace people in her home country. Shop organized the justice and peace commission, a network of priests against appetite that organized medical care for Africans in need. Through this work, she met ten rankin, a Scottish surgeon who she would eventually marry. They dated in secret, remember their relationship was illegal in South Africa because Ken was white and Joyce was black. The couple made a plan to marry abroad. Ken left South Africa to wake Joyce but she never showed up. On May 12th, 1969, police officers appeared at Joyce's door. They arrested her under the terrorism act and apartheid era act that enabled police to arrest just about anyone who resisted state control. She was dragged from her home, forced to leave behind her young son. She was detained alongside other black female activists, including Winnie Mandela, wife of Nelson Mandela. Joyce's many months in prison were marked by psychological abuse and isolation. She would later testify at a hearing of the truth and reconciliation commission about the cruel interrogation tactics used against her, including officials bringing in a small child to remind her of the son she had been forced to leave behind. She said, I refused to be chiseled into an instrument of apartheid's evils, intelligence, and security design. True, I was longing to be with my son. Just to cuddle him, but the price to pay for that was worth our cruel separation. Joyce was tried alongside 21 other anti apartheid black prisoners. Their legal battle was nationally reported and helped store up anger against apartheid. In 1970, Joyce and her fellow activists were finally released from prison. The ANC advised her that she would be in danger as long as she remained in South Africa. Joyce decided it was time to go into exile. In July of 1973, she traveled in secret and eventually reunited with Ken. After years apart, they finally married. Throughout her exile, Joyce remained an active member of the ANC. In 1977, she published her book, a window on sovereign, the work details her personal experiences with racial inequality and poverty, as well as the many systemic ways in which black citizens were oppressed by the government from employment to public transportation to housing and child care. Joy's close the book by writing, there will be no progress until the whole apartheid system is removed. In the early 1990s, Joyce and Ken returned to South Africa. By this time, years of uprisings, protests and economic sanctions from the United States and European countries had weakened the apartheid government that had arrested Joyce. In 1994, South Africa formed a democratic government. Nelson Mandela became the country's first president. After her return to the country, Joyce worked for the national intelligence agency and the South African broadcasting corporation. Joyce has coverage a racial inequity and underground work for the ANC helped bring about real and lasting change for South Africa. As people across the globe still struggle against oppressive regimes, women like Joyce remind us that, as long as there is still resistance, there is hope. All month, we're talking about peace builders. For more information, find us on Facebook and Instagram at will manica podcast. Special thanks to co creators Jenny on this Kaplan for having me as a guest host. Talk to you tomorrow.

Joyce ANC South Africa Akani Rankin Orlando West Walter Sisulu Nelson Mandela Justice And Peace Commission Soweto KEN Johannesburg Cyprus Winnie Mandela Rankin Africa Truth And Reconciliation Commi Congress Apartheid Government White National Intelligence Agency