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A highlight from Episode 172: Fred Khosravi on Stroke Care and Innovation Acceleration

MedTech Talk Podcast

04:43 min | Last week

A highlight from Episode 172: Fred Khosravi on Stroke Care and Innovation Acceleration

"He has become a master of starting companies and then helping nurture them through development and even commercialization. His career has spanned many different types of technologies as well as medical specialties and he's played a critical role in a host of now well-known and important products that are used throughout medicine. On top of that, Fred has had a fascinating journey coming from Iran to the United States and we'll get to explore that today as well. Welcome Fred. Hi, Jeff. Thank you so much for having me. This is something that I've been very much looking forward to. Well, thank you. It's a real pleasure in honor and we're going to get into a lot of really, I think, fun topics here. But to get started, as I mentioned in the intro, you grew up in Iran and I'd love to hear what your early experiences were growing up in Iran. It was a very interesting period in that country's history and intertwined with our country's history. So tell us what it was like in those days. Well, since you brought the Iran into it first, I wanted to just say women like freedom, zanzi and the guy, or Xinjiang, as I think these are chance that are being shouted by women in Iran, who are tired of living in a despotic environment, basically, and they're essentially demanding equal rights to men and it's an extraordinary occurrence that is happening in the world right now. And we're going to talk about medical devices in a few minutes. But I think it's important. This is just for posterity. This podcast is happening at a time. That I believe the world will realize that this Genie that is coming out in Iran on the streets of Tehran and with lives that are being expended for it, I don't think it's ever going to be put back into the bottle. And I think world, the world will impact the world very similar to what the Ukraine war has really demonstrated to the whole world that democracy is worth dying for is worth protecting, so to speak. It also has ignited these movements and the one in Iran being that it's actually. It sprung up from the women and the women are coming out and basically under this slogan of women like freedom, it's important to say just a couple of words about that as to where did that slogan come from, which I think is going to broadly encompass the whole world soon. It really came from my background by the way I was born in Iran, Iranian, but Kurdish, my background. And this is a chant that the Kurdish movement in turkey came up with 20 years ago. Kurdish leader by the name of Abdullah basically who effectively believed that in the Middle East, men will never be completely free until women are free. And this is where this chant is actually coming from. And so being that this is the time where this important inflection point in the life of humanity, I think, for women, I just wanted to point that out and there's more struggles, but more exciting developments in this process to come. For women across the world. I'm glad you I'm glad you brought that up and indeed an extraordinary moment in time. And it probably doesn't get quite enough attention here in our country, but I'm really glad you highlighted that. What was it like growing up there in the time you grew up in the 60s and 70s? I

Iran Fred Xinjiang Jeff United States Tehran Ukraine Abdullah Turkey Middle East
A highlight from 249 - Caregiving With Love & Joy

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

01:42 min | 8 hrs ago

A highlight from 249 - Caregiving With Love & Joy

"My thought process is, in the beginning, it's a denial of what the person that's now seeing that they're having mental issues. So they still want to keep the control of the independence that they have. So maybe what you would say, the person that they're relying on is the weakest link in a lot of ways. Because they're the person that's going to cover up for you. In the beginning. And the other one, there are the individual that might stay in denial longer. When everybody else is seeing there's an issue. And they're making excuses for you. But that's what that person wanted in the first place because they wanted to keep their independence. For as long as they could. Putting a care team will help you help them maintain their independence. Yes. That's Patricia Boswell. It's an exception when I have the pleasure of chatting with someone who has been in the caregiving game longer than I have. My mom had Alzheimer's from the late 1990s till 2020, but my guest Patricia has been working in the caregiving field since 1976. Who better to learn how to provide care with love and joy than someone like Patricia? This is an excellent episode for many reasons, but if you are not using earbuds, I highly recommend it because Patricia was sitting in her backyard, and there is beautiful songbirds in the background that make this an even more special episode. I'm not a coffee drinker, but man, do I need my tea? Too much tea and I get a real sour stomach. Thankfully, I

Patricia Boswell Alzheimer's Patricia
A highlight from 249 - Caregiving With Love & Joy

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

01:42 min | 8 hrs ago

A highlight from 249 - Caregiving With Love & Joy

"My thought process is, in the beginning, it's a denial of what the person that's now seeing that they're having mental issues. So they still want to keep the control of the independence that they have. So maybe what you would say, the person that they're relying on is the weakest link in a lot of ways. Because they're the person that's going to cover up for you. In the beginning. And the other one, there are the individual that might stay in denial longer. When everybody else is seeing there's an issue. And they're making excuses for you. But that's what that person wanted in the first place because they wanted to keep their independence. For as long as they could. Putting a care team will help you help them maintain their independence. Yes. That's Patricia Boswell. It's an exception when I have the pleasure of chatting with someone who has been in the caregiving game longer than I have. My mom had Alzheimer's from the late 1990s till 2020, but my guest Patricia has been working in the caregiving field since 1976. Who better to learn how to provide care with love and joy than someone like Patricia? This is an excellent episode for many reasons, but if you are not using earbuds, I highly recommend it because Patricia was sitting in her backyard, and there is beautiful songbirds in the background that make this an even more special episode. I'm not a coffee drinker, but man, do I need my tea? Too much tea and I get a real sour stomach. Thankfully, I

Patricia Boswell Alzheimer's Patricia
A highlight from What is the Future of Optometry in Canada? Dr. Daryan Angle Shares his Vision

Defocus Media

04:49 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from What is the Future of Optometry in Canada? Dr. Daryan Angle Shares his Vision

"Join me here to learn and to grow, especially for this series of conversations that I think is going to be invaluable for us as optometrists in Canada to understand where our profession is going. What we need to know that's going well, what we need to be careful of, what we need to change, how we should approach the coming disruption and the changes that are inevitable. In fact, are happening as we speak. And today's interview is the second interview in this series of the future of Canadian optometry with doctor darian engel who's vice president of business development at iris, which is part of the larger new look group. In the last episode, I interviewed doctor Alan also, who's the CEO of FYI doctors. And we really got a good perspective of this large organization, FYI doctors and what their presence is and what their plans are and what Al being at the top of this organization sees our profession in the future. And Darien was no different in that being part of a larger organization being in the leadership of this large organization. Having a very different perspective of the profession as a whole and where we are going and what iris is doing within that profession. Now keep in mind the point of these interviews is not to promote these organizations. It's not to promote FYI or iris or else Laura lens crafters or anyone else. The point is to ask the leaders within these organizations the questions that we don't normally get a chance to ask. We will see a large organization making a move, making an acquisition and say, well, what was the point of that? And what does that mean for me as an optometrist or a profession in the future? And that is exactly what I'm hoping to achieve with this series of conversations to have the 2020 podcast as a platform to ask the hard questions to ask the direct questions. What is your organization doing to support optometry? What is your organization doing to make sure optometry, the profession thrives, and that future optometrists have a strong profession that they are passionate about and want to be part of. And what are you doing about these things that are maybe not so positive? What about this thing that your organization did? That didn't seem like it was actually a step in the right direction. And I hope that you'll see that as I'm asking these questions, we are able to actually draw a lot of valuable insight, especially from guests like Al and the last interview Darien in this interview who are willing to face the questions head on. They're not scared to take on those challenging questions. In fact, they invite them. So we can learn about what their perspective of the profession is. So today's interview is what doctor Darren angle, and again, this is the second installment in the future of Canadian optometry series presented by aqueous pharma. I hope you guys love it. And again, don't forget to share it, put it up on Instagram, LinkedIn, send a text to your friend, let them know that this conversation is happening. So we can all learn and all thrive in the future. Okay, doctor Darien angle, thank you so much for taking the time to join me for this very important, very special series of discussions that we're having on the 2020 podcast. I really appreciate you being here. Oh, it's my pleasure. Thanks for having me. Well, as you know, of course you're here, you know that a couple months ago I kind of put this call out through the podcast to various organizations in the country. You know, to come on, invite them on and to chat about where we're heading, what the changes are that are happening right now in the industry. Since then, you know, since your response and others who have responded to me, I've been reaching out to colleagues across the country to kind of get the temperature collectively nationally. How are we feeling, what's going on? What's on our mind? And of course, there's some obvious things are some elephants in the room and then there's some subtle things that are kind of under the surface that seem to be very consistent. What I'm having these conversations. So a lot of the questions we're going to cover today discussion topics we're going to cover today are those questions that have come from those conversations that I've had with my colleagues, our colleagues. And Darren, yourself and the other guests, most of the other guests that we're going to have on for these conversations are in somewhat of a unique position. You're in a position that most of us are not, right? You're in a leadership position in one of these large organizations. You've been, you've seen, if not been directly involved in a lot of the change that's happened in our country and our professional over the last decade or more, right? So I feel like you have and our guests that are coming on will have this perspective that the majority of us will not. And I hope that we're able to have a candid conversation. I know you're comfortable with this. I hope you'll be able to share as much information as you can from this perspective that the majority of us do not have. And I understand there'll be some things that perhaps you get a hold close to the chest. But as much as you're comfortable sharing, of course, we will all appreciate that. So let's start with this. From your perspective from that perspective, how would you describe the state of optometry and Canada right now?

Darian Engel Laura Lens Darren Angle AL Darien Darien Angle FYI Iris Alan Canada Instagram Pharma Linkedin Darren
A highlight from What is the Best Contact Lens to Fit after a Peripheral Corneal Ulcer?

Defocus Media

05:59 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from What is the Best Contact Lens to Fit after a Peripheral Corneal Ulcer?

"Am thrilled because we are kicking off a new series. I care experts and we're doing this with grand rounds. We're taking that type of approach. So grand rounds with eye care experts. And we have nothing but experts on the panels. From optometrists to student optometrists and we're really going to have a great conversation. We're going to break down a clinical case that's going to help elevate how you practice in your exam lane. So friends and family, I am super excited. I'm super excited to welcome and introduce you to this all star lineup. To begin with, we have really doctor roof. You've been a part of this team. You're like part of the defocus media family. I think you've been on the podcast more than anyone else. So, you know, it's great to have you on the show again. How are you doing this evening? I'm great. Thanks for having me back there. I like to think I'm part of the family too, so. You are part of the community. We have so many things that are in common from the kids to the love of optometry to travel. I mean, I love stalking you on Instagram and seeing all the amazing places and things that you're doing. But we also have another great star with us a rising star are a show. How are you doing today ara? Good, good, excited to be a small part of the family. Hopefully. Well, thanks so much for partnering with us on this podcast and this grand rounds. And then we have the life of the party. Jeffrey foley. How are you doing today? Yes, sir. I am doing great as a pleasure to be here. Very happy here at this talented crew. Awesome, awesome. Well, before we get started, I love for each one of you to just break down, you know, how you got into optometry, where you practice, just give us a little bit about your background if you don't mind. And let's take it from the top with you, Dr. Ruth. Yeah, I'm Erin roof. I am chief of the cornea contact lens services at SEC at Southern California college optometry at Marshall B ketchum university in Orange County. I teach in the contact lens curriculum there. And obviously see patients and do all things contact lens related. My background I went to Ohio State and did a corny contact lens residency and also got a PhD in vision science there. So I kind of do a little bit of everything and really enjoy talking all things contact lenses, which is what we'll do tonight. Awesome. Ara? Yeah, so my name is ara, I am a fourth year optometry right at school that Dr. Ruth teaches at I was born in the states, but I grew up abroad in South America for quite a few years and then I went to UCLA for undergrad. And then I decided to come to SEC and I've been there ever since. I had the fortune, I guess, of doing a dual program right now, something the ode program and then also doing a masters and vision science. Oh, wow, that's fantastic. How is that processing that program been so far? It's good. It's been challenging at times. I think just because when you're trying to balance both, but I think I'm at a really good place right now. I have a great advice. Just kind of helping me along as I'm at the process where I'm writing up my thesis to defend it. Fantastic. Well, the one thing I care will teach you is how to be efficient with time. So I'm pretty sure that program is going to prepare you for the real world and you'll be able to get into that exam lane and help patients day in and day out. Jeffrey, tell us about yourself, man. I've heard nothing but great things. So you got to share the world who you are and where you practice and what you do. I'm glad to hear I've been bribing the right people in that case. I had a lifelong love for contact lenses and like all contact lens specialists I'm sitting here with my glasses and of course. But I was grateful enough to get into the Ohio State university college of optometry where I wanted to go because they had the best faculty the best professors, including, of course, doctor roof, that's why I wanted to go there. And since getting out of work in many modalities worked in MD practices, you know, really medicine focused practices, private practices, and I'm now, I've got three retail locations, and thanks to my great Ohio State training. I've got the interesting designation that being the busiest scleral lens practice in the area, despite being a retail setting. So you can do anything you want there. I guess I'm proven that. You know, and I love that. And I love all the different backgrounds here, right? You have someone in academia. You have a student. You have someone that is practicing all different modes of optometry. We all have to be together in order to really make an imprint or make an impact in the world of eye care. We can all learn from each other. And this is proof here. Tonight, we're really going to dive into a great case. Just to give everyone an overview of what this show is going to look like, what this podcast stream is going to look like. Dr. Ruth and ara is going to actually have a good conversation, a dialog about a case. We're going to have a PowerPoint presentation. And they're going to go through the case. And ara is going to be in a hot seat. We're going to ask her all the tough questions. She's going to walk us through and make sure that we have all the answers when we're done. And after they are done with the case, doctor Faraday is going to come back on and then we're going to have an extra panel and all three are going to have a good conversation and dialog about best practices with the clinical case that we have at hands. So I don't know about y'all, but I'm ready. Myself and doctor Faraday, we're going to drop off and we're going to let these two amazing stars take over. So are you ladies ready to jump into it? I'm ready. You could put those slides up for me, Daryl. We'll get going. All right, let's make it happen. All right, so ara, this will be less of a grilling and more of a conversation. We're not on the clinic floor today. So. Let's get started here. I'm trying to advance this slide. Let's see. There we go. So we want to thank our sponsors tonight. Johnson & Johnson vision for sponsoring this conversation and helping us to kind of get together and talk about some things clinically that especially students see that I found in my practice when I teach and work with students on the floor are confusing topics or sometimes just topics that you feel like you need

Dr. Ruth Jeffrey Foley Cornea Contact Lens Services Southern California College Marshall B Ketchum University SEC Ohio State University College Ohio Erin Orange County Ucla South America Jeffrey Faraday ARA Daryl Johnson & Johnson Vision
A highlight from 248 - Finding The Right Words

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

07:37 min | Last week

A highlight from 248 - Finding The Right Words

"What I also discovered in writing the book kind of ironic that it was very important for me to find these words really important. And yet, words are not all they're cracked up to be. And so it was essential for me to get the words, but in doing that, what I realized was that in dealing with my father and I wish I had done much more of this, words didn't matter. They didn't at a certain point, he always knew who I was and I talk about this. He always knew in the sense that he always knew that I was someone he loved. How he communicated that to me was through his eyes through his body through his touch. Not worse. And so that strikes me as very important to know. And just a deep irony. That's Cindy Weinstein. She is a Professor of English at the California institute of technology. We're discussing her book finding the right words, which is one part journey of coming to terms with her father's Alzheimer's and one part guidebook. Writing gave Cindy one way to talk about her grief, but she knew she lacked the scientific vocabulary to make sense of her father's slow and traumatic decline. Through professional contacts, Cindy found doctor Bruce L Miller, a neurologist at the University of California in San Francisco. After years of collaboration and friendship, they completed finding the right words. This book is an invaluable guide for families dealing with a life-changing diagnosis and it's a conversation that combines memoir, literature, and the science and history of brain health. I'm not a coffee drinker, but man, do I need my tea? Too much tea and I get a real sour stomach. Thankfully, I found the drink that makes you way more productive and helps keep you focused on what you need to get done. It's called magic mind, it's creative with all natural ingredients, which, you know, is important for any of us interested in brain health. So what's in magic mind? It's got adaptogens that help decrease stress totally needed. Nootropics that boost blood flow and cognition and matcha that keeps you focused. The macho will help you crush your to do list while drinking less coffee or tea. The creator of magic mine, James Bashar, he drinks so much coffee, gave himself a heart issue. Looking to find a better alternative, James combined all these ingredients that help him stay productive, and dominate the business world, then a sweetened it up for the rest of us, which, you know, I like. You can take it all in one shot or in sips with your morning meal. It's helping me and I'm sure it'll help you with all your caregiving responsibilities. Learn more or order your own at magic mind dot CO. Welcome back, everybody. Thanks again for joining us with me today is Cindy Weinstein. She is the author of the book finding the right words. There we go. Get it on the screen. And it may not quite be what you're expecting from a book with that title, but I'm gonna let her explain all that to you. So thank you for joining me, Cindy. Thank you, Jennifer. It's really an honor to be here talking with you about this. Well, thank you. So first off, you've written multiple books, right? But not on this topic. Okay. I'm an English professor at Caltech and have written several books on American literature. And edited several books on American literature as well. This is my first book and probably my only book that will be a memoir and it is a book that I wrote with doctor Bruce Miller at UCSF and it's designed to be written for general audience, which is also slightly different from my other books which have a much more academic audience in mind. Interesting. So this book is basically you coming to understand your father's early onset Alzheimer's and it's a bit maybe more than a bit on processing the grief that comes with that. So and you connected with doctor Bruce Miller because because of writing this book, but let's go back to the early 80s when you think your dad started showing signs of Alzheimer's. And what you were doing. So just give us some of your personal history and then we can fast forward to when you and doctor Miller connected. Sure. In the early 80s, 1982 to be exact, I came to California and started a PhD at Berkeley. And I spent 7 years getting that degree and it was during that time that my father was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. At that time, all dementia was Alzheimer's. I have since learned through conversations with doctor Bruce Miller that what my father he definitely had early onset Alzheimer's, which means a diagnosis when one is 65 years old or younger. And based on my description of my father's clinical presentations, Bruce also thought that he had a rare form of pro onset Alzheimer's because memory wasn't sort of the first symptom, but rather were finding was. And so there was a moment when I was at UCSF that I talk about in the book where Bruce tells me what he thinks the more precise diagnosis was and that's early onset Alzheimer's with the logo peanut variant. And logo Punic variant means difficulty with finding words. And I noticed in the 80s that my father became much quieter had trouble finding words, much of my relationship with him while I was in graduate school in California and he and my mother were in Florida, was over the phone. I tried to get to Florida's frequently as I could, especially after the diagnosis. But many times, it was over the phone that I realized something was wrong. And he would respond to my questions in a monosyllabic fashion. We always used to have lengthy conversations and he would hand the phone over to my mother. So she was speaking for both of them. It was at a time when people wrote letters and I noticed that my father's handwriting degenerated. He would sometimes type letters to me. There would be a lot of typos. I just it should be that it to, I don't know. I didn't know what to make of it. I didn't think of it as a symptom looking back, of course, I think these were all symptoms. And in the 80s, I also observed mood change, which was most apparent when I brought my then boyfriend now husband to New Jersey to visit my dad. He was staying there while my mom had moved to Florida. They were in the middle of retiring. And I said to Jim at one point, this isn't my dad.

Alzheimer's Cindy Weinstein Cindy Bruce L Miller Bruce Miller James Bashar Magic Mind Dot Co. California Institute Of Techno Ucsf University Of California San Francisco Onset Alzheimer's Because Onset Alzheimer Jennifer James Bruce California Berkeley Dementia Miller
A highlight from 248 - Finding The Right Words

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

07:37 min | Last week

A highlight from 248 - Finding The Right Words

"What I also discovered in writing the book kind of ironic that it was very important for me to find these words really important. And yet, words are not all they're cracked up to be. And so it was essential for me to get the words, but in doing that, what I realized was that in dealing with my father and I wish I had done much more of this, words didn't matter. They didn't at a certain point, he always knew who I was and I talk about this. He always knew in the sense that he always knew that I was someone he loved. How he communicated that to me was through his eyes through his body through his touch. Not worse. And so that strikes me as very important to know. And just a deep irony. That's Cindy Weinstein. She is a Professor of English at the California institute of technology. We're discussing her book finding the right words, which is one part journey of coming to terms with her father's Alzheimer's and one part guidebook. Writing gave Cindy one way to talk about her grief, but she knew she lacked the scientific vocabulary to make sense of her father's slow and traumatic decline. Through professional contacts, Cindy found doctor Bruce L Miller, a neurologist at the University of California in San Francisco. After years of collaboration and friendship, they completed finding the right words. This book is an invaluable guide for families dealing with a life-changing diagnosis and it's a conversation that combines memoir, literature, and the science and history of brain health. I'm not a coffee drinker, but man, do I need my tea? Too much tea and I get a real sour stomach. Thankfully, I found the drink that makes you way more productive and helps keep you focused on what you need to get done. It's called magic mind, it's creative with all natural ingredients, which, you know, is important for any of us interested in brain health. So what's in magic mind? It's got adaptogens that help decrease stress totally needed. Nootropics that boost blood flow and cognition and matcha that keeps you focused. The macho will help you crush your to do list while drinking less coffee or tea. The creator of magic mine, James Bashar, he drinks so much coffee, gave himself a heart issue. Looking to find a better alternative, James combined all these ingredients that help him stay productive, and dominate the business world, then a sweetened it up for the rest of us, which, you know, I like. You can take it all in one shot or in sips with your morning meal. It's helping me and I'm sure it'll help you with all your caregiving responsibilities. Learn more or order your own at magic mind dot CO. Welcome back, everybody. Thanks again for joining us with me today is Cindy Weinstein. She is the author of the book finding the right words. There we go. Get it on the screen. And it may not quite be what you're expecting from a book with that title, but I'm gonna let her explain all that to you. So thank you for joining me, Cindy. Thank you, Jennifer. It's really an honor to be here talking with you about this. Well, thank you. So first off, you've written multiple books, right? But not on this topic. Okay. I'm an English professor at Caltech and have written several books on American literature. And edited several books on American literature as well. This is my first book and probably my only book that will be a memoir and it is a book that I wrote with doctor Bruce Miller at UCSF and it's designed to be written for general audience, which is also slightly different from my other books which have a much more academic audience in mind. Interesting. So this book is basically you coming to understand your father's early onset Alzheimer's and it's a bit maybe more than a bit on processing the grief that comes with that. So and you connected with doctor Bruce Miller because because of writing this book, but let's go back to the early 80s when you think your dad started showing signs of Alzheimer's. And what you were doing. So just give us some of your personal history and then we can fast forward to when you and doctor Miller connected. Sure. In the early 80s, 1982 to be exact, I came to California and started a PhD at Berkeley. And I spent 7 years getting that degree and it was during that time that my father was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. At that time, all dementia was Alzheimer's. I have since learned through conversations with doctor Bruce Miller that what my father he definitely had early onset Alzheimer's, which means a diagnosis when one is 65 years old or younger. And based on my description of my father's clinical presentations, Bruce also thought that he had a rare form of pro onset Alzheimer's because memory wasn't sort of the first symptom, but rather were finding was. And so there was a moment when I was at UCSF that I talk about in the book where Bruce tells me what he thinks the more precise diagnosis was and that's early onset Alzheimer's with the logo peanut variant. And logo Punic variant means difficulty with finding words. And I noticed in the 80s that my father became much quieter had trouble finding words, much of my relationship with him while I was in graduate school in California and he and my mother were in Florida, was over the phone. I tried to get to Florida's frequently as I could, especially after the diagnosis. But many times, it was over the phone that I realized something was wrong. And he would respond to my questions in a monosyllabic fashion. We always used to have lengthy conversations and he would hand the phone over to my mother. So she was speaking for both of them. It was at a time when people wrote letters and I noticed that my father's handwriting degenerated. He would sometimes type letters to me. There would be a lot of typos. I just it should be that it to, I don't know. I didn't know what to make of it. I didn't think of it as a symptom looking back, of course, I think these were all symptoms. And in the 80s, I also observed mood change, which was most apparent when I brought my then boyfriend now husband to New Jersey to visit my dad. He was staying there while my mom had moved to Florida. They were in the middle of retiring. And I said to Jim at one point, this isn't my dad.

Alzheimer's Cindy Weinstein Cindy Bruce L Miller Bruce Miller James Bashar Magic Mind Dot Co. California Institute Of Techno Ucsf University Of California San Francisco Onset Alzheimer's Because Onset Alzheimer Jennifer James Bruce California Berkeley Dementia Miller
A highlight from Bonus -Avoiding Caregiver Burnout

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

04:22 min | Last week

A highlight from Bonus -Avoiding Caregiver Burnout

"For giving us a little bit of your time today with me is Judy berkel. I hope I got that right, because I forgot to ask her before I had muted. Yep, that's right. Oh, good. Judy and I have a few things in common besides helping caregivers. We also both have daughters named Laura and dogs named Remy, so I always call her the other Remy mom on the other coasts of thank you for joining me, Judy. It's so lovely to be here. Of what, you know, when I started this journey, you were like one of the first people I was like, oh, I gotta make sure I followed her because she seems to know what she is talking about, and she has this cool podcast. So thank you, it's such an honor to be here. Well, thank you for joining me. And Judy's going to talk a little bit about how to avoid burnout, which something I'm kind of dealing with right now. And I'm not even taking care of somebody with dementia, so that's saying a lot. And then she also has a program. It's a weekly program, right? Well, it's a membership if you can think about like a Netflix membership and so you pay a monthly fee and then each week I send you something in your email about that topic for the month and then once a month we get together for a masterclass and so where we really dive down into that topic, but it's really packed full of action steps for you to take to help you know I think to prevent reduce burnout, I think burnout is something that ebbs and flows as caregivers. I don't think we always can be totally in recovery of burnout as a caregiver because an event can happen like mom falls breaks hip, we're back in the hospital and then everything goes out the window. And so we kind of learned these techniques talk about getting a fanny pack full of coping skills and based on the technique that based on what's happening at that time will be the coping skill we pull out for that day and so yeah, so it's a pretty neat program. My desire to really help caregivers stay in it for the long term and provide the care to their parents that I know they want to give, but sometimes just feel so overwhelmed it's hard to do it. You took care of your parents while your kid used to let kids at home. My daughter moved out a month before I ended up responsible for my moms. Oh, I had kind of a month break by dad was still on hospice at the time, but didn't really feel like a break. But I didn't have kids at home. Like you did. So what are a couple of tips that you can share with us that's going to help people right now, but also get them interested in this program because I'm dealing with right now. I may have to sign up. Well, I would love to have you. Let's have you. So one of the best ways to start preventing reducing burnout is through boundaries. And I know we hear about boundaries. I know that we think that they're the end all cure all to most everything, but there is it is very much a must if you're taking care of your parents that you have established boundaries. And so, and when we have boundaries, what we're doing is we're communicating to the world how we expect to be treated, right? And so a boundary could be getting up before everybody else in the morning, and that is your time to do whatever you need to do. A boundary could be, I'm going to the gym, or I'm doing exercising, however long I am because that is my boundary because I am important enough that I'm going to, you know, you feel like you want to focus on your care so you can take care of your parents. I'm only going to say work until 5 o'clock and then at 5 o'clock my boundary, my work boundary ends and then I'm moving to the next part of my life. Or if you go to visit your parents and you say, you know, mom and dad, I can only be here from ten to 12, and then I must leave.

Judy Judy Berkel Remy Laura Dementia Netflix
A highlight from Bonus -Avoiding Caregiver Burnout

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

04:22 min | Last week

A highlight from Bonus -Avoiding Caregiver Burnout

"For giving us a little bit of your time today with me is Judy berkel. I hope I got that right, because I forgot to ask her before I had muted. Yep, that's right. Oh, good. Judy and I have a few things in common besides helping caregivers. We also both have daughters named Laura and dogs named Remy, so I always call her the other Remy mom on the other coasts of thank you for joining me, Judy. It's so lovely to be here. Of what, you know, when I started this journey, you were like one of the first people I was like, oh, I gotta make sure I followed her because she seems to know what she is talking about, and she has this cool podcast. So thank you, it's such an honor to be here. Well, thank you for joining me. And Judy's going to talk a little bit about how to avoid burnout, which something I'm kind of dealing with right now. And I'm not even taking care of somebody with dementia, so that's saying a lot. And then she also has a program. It's a weekly program, right? Well, it's a membership if you can think about like a Netflix membership and so you pay a monthly fee and then each week I send you something in your email about that topic for the month and then once a month we get together for a masterclass and so where we really dive down into that topic, but it's really packed full of action steps for you to take to help you know I think to prevent reduce burnout, I think burnout is something that ebbs and flows as caregivers. I don't think we always can be totally in recovery of burnout as a caregiver because an event can happen like mom falls breaks hip, we're back in the hospital and then everything goes out the window. And so we kind of learned these techniques talk about getting a fanny pack full of coping skills and based on the technique that based on what's happening at that time will be the coping skill we pull out for that day and so yeah, so it's a pretty neat program. My desire to really help caregivers stay in it for the long term and provide the care to their parents that I know they want to give, but sometimes just feel so overwhelmed it's hard to do it. You took care of your parents while your kid used to let kids at home. My daughter moved out a month before I ended up responsible for my moms. Oh, I had kind of a month break by dad was still on hospice at the time, but didn't really feel like a break. But I didn't have kids at home. Like you did. So what are a couple of tips that you can share with us that's going to help people right now, but also get them interested in this program because I'm dealing with right now. I may have to sign up. Well, I would love to have you. Let's have you. So one of the best ways to start preventing reducing burnout is through boundaries. And I know we hear about boundaries. I know that we think that they're the end all cure all to most everything, but there is it is very much a must if you're taking care of your parents that you have established boundaries. And so, and when we have boundaries, what we're doing is we're communicating to the world how we expect to be treated, right? And so a boundary could be getting up before everybody else in the morning, and that is your time to do whatever you need to do. A boundary could be, I'm going to the gym, or I'm doing exercising, however long I am because that is my boundary because I am important enough that I'm going to, you know, you feel like you want to focus on your care so you can take care of your parents. I'm only going to say work until 5 o'clock and then at 5 o'clock my boundary, my work boundary ends and then I'm moving to the next part of my life. Or if you go to visit your parents and you say, you know, mom and dad, I can only be here from ten to 12, and then I must leave.

Judy Judy Berkel Remy Laura Dementia Netflix
US Panel Backs COVID-19 Boosters Only for Seniors, High-Risk

Start Here

02:02 min | 1 year ago

US Panel Backs COVID-19 Boosters Only for Seniors, High-Risk

"September twentieth was supposed to be an important date an approval from the food and drug administration. The cdc's committee of outside experts will be ready to start. These booster's booster program. During the week of september twenty weeks ago. The white house told us that starting september twentieth today americans would likely be able to sign up for a co vaccine. Booster shots visor. Certainly thinks it's vaccine needs a booster. The drug maker itself suggested after six months it's vaccine efficacy could wayne so on friday. Fda advisors met to discuss the idea of boosters but they emerged with a surprise recommendation of their own vote did not have. The majority voted no rather than agreeing with a vaccine maker rather than agreeing with some of the top scientists and the biden administration the fda advisory panel announced. That booster shots should be available soon but only for senior citizens and other select groups some important distinctions. Here let's break it down with. Abc's aimed flaherty who covers federal agencies. And and what is the actual recommendation here like. Who's going to be able to get a booster shot and win right. So i think it's important to remember. The fda actually hasn't decided yet. This is an advisory panel that was looking at the data and they were only looking at data that related to pfizer. So this is the first vaccine that rolled out. It rolled out mostly to nursing homes and health care workers more than nine months ago and what they did was. They looked at a lot of data. That was coming out of israel to determine whether or not people need a booster thaw back. The booster do improved protection by tenfold against confirmed infection and for elderly against superior kobe. Nineteen day said. They don't think boosters for all makes sense they think seniors and people who are at high risk of severe covet those two groups they think should have to go back and get an extra booster and they also said that they support people who are at serious risk because of their job so frontline workers healthcare workers even teachers. They mentioned they think those people might wanna consider getting extra

Food And Drug Administration Biden Administration CDC White House Wayne Flaherty Pfizer Israel
The Ongoing Health Costs Associated With 9/11

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

01:58 min | 1 year ago

The Ongoing Health Costs Associated With 9/11

"To federal funds established after the attacks of september eleven. Two thousand and one have paid around twelve billion dollars over the years. The money went to first responders. The families of those who died or people have gotten sick as a result of the terrorist carnage. Medical claims have been increasing in recent years. Many from people with cancer marketplace's samantha fields reports on the ongoing health costs connected to that day twenty years ago this weekend. Michael o'connell responded to the world trade center as a firefighter on nine eleven and spent the next few weeks working at ground zero five years later he got sick. I know the exact date. It was december thirty first. Two thousand six new year's eve. He went to bed that night filling healthy but when he woke up the next morning i literally had swollen limbs swollen ankles all my joints were inflamed by body kind of blew up to like twice the size. It was a pulmonologist figured out that he had a rare autoimmune disease called sarcoidosis that was attacking his skin and joints and told him he'd gotten it from breathing in toxins. The material that responders and survivors were exposed to when the towers collapsed was quite toxic. Dr michael crane treats a lot of nine eleven first responders through the world trade center health program clinic at mount sinai so huge huge burning buildings collapsing. Everything inside is burning and it collapses down into a pile and then an enormous. Dust cloud a lot of firefighters. Police officers and others at ground zero started getting sick almost immediately. I with what they called the world trade center cough then. Ptsd and depression. And eventually years later cancers this exposure has a really really long tail anyone who develops any kind of illness linked to nine eleven can get free healthcare through the world trade center health program but michael bearish a lawyer for nine eleven survivors says there are likely a lot of people dealing with nine eleven related health problems. Who don't know they're

Samantha Fields Michael O Connell Dr Michael Crane World Trade Center Health Prog World Trade Center Cancer Sarcoidosis Mount Sinai Ptsd Michael Bearish Depression
Idaho Begins Rationing Health Care as COVID-19 Surge Crushes Hospitals

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

01:04 min | 1 year ago

Idaho Begins Rationing Health Care as COVID-19 Surge Crushes Hospitals

"How the front page today of the times news. In twin falls idaho top story above the fold says quote. Hospital rationing begins northern idaho hospitals under crisis standards of care last night. I mentioned at the top of the show. That idaho has now had to do something no state ever wants to have to. They announced that they are implementing crisis standards of care for ten hospitals and medical centers in north idaho due to the overwhelming cova search. There this is the first time idaho's history that the state has ever had to take stuff like this. Here savvy p. describes what this announcement means in practical terms quote those deemed in most need of care and most likely to benefit from it are put on priority lists for scarce. Resources like icu. Bits others in dire need but with lower chances of surviving will be given comfort care to help keep them pain-free whether they succumb to their businesses or recover other patients with serious but not life. Threatening medical problems will face delays in receiving care until resources are

Idaho North Idaho ICU
U.S. Judge Approves Deal Dissolving Purdue Pharma in Opioid Saga

the NewsWorthy

01:07 min | 1 year ago

U.S. Judge Approves Deal Dissolving Purdue Pharma in Opioid Saga

"Drugmaker behind the highly addictive prescription. Painkiller oxycontin is formerly shutting down. We're talking about purdue pharma. Instead of selling opioids the company's resources will be put toward addressing the opioid epidemic mainly with addiction treatment and prevention programs. It will also compensate people and families who have been hurt by purdue products that was just one of the terms laid out in a wide ranging bankruptcy settlement. Judge approved this week. It also says the company's owners the sackler family will have to pay four and a half billion dollars to settle thousands of opioid related lawsuits. Without though this actors will be immune from any more lawsuits about opioids. And they'll still be one of the richest families in the world. They're worth about eleven billion dollars. A lot of states support. This plan saying it's the best way to help pay for a problem. That's only gotten worse. During the pandemic but others like connecticut. In washington planned to appeal saying the settlement shields. The sackler is too much from liability. They say the sackler is downplayed. How addictive opioids are while they aggressively marketed. Those drugs purdue pharma as a company has pleaded guilty twice for that but the sackler is have not been charged with crimes. At least not yet and they say they did nothing illegal or

Purdue Pharma Drugmaker Sackler Connecticut Washington
New York Times Slams Hospital Price Variation After Price Transparency Rule

Clark Howard Show

02:10 min | 1 year ago

New York Times Slams Hospital Price Variation After Price Transparency Rule

"So there's been this deep dive investigative report done by the new york times that i talked about one of the wall street journal back during the early part is summer and now there's this new one from the new york times finding that hospitals are not complying with the law at all like they should on disclosure of prices when you are going to be a patient in the hospital. It is an absolute national scandal. That hospitals have decided. It's better not to comply with the law even if they have to pay the fines then for you to have access to pricing data. Now the crazy thing is this was something that is fully bipartisan. It was originally proposed by the trump administration adopted fully by the biden administration. And there's great support for price transparency on hospital bills and hospital charges from everybody except the hospitals and the nation's health insurance companies. Why because they just flat out don't want you and me as consumers or employers that buy health coverage for their employees to have the information. Well let me tell you the information that the new york times dug up is explosive because they found over and over again that the same procedure could be a completely different price depending on who was paying which ensure was paying or listen to this one. This is crazy. So here's one from a hospital in milwaukee aurora. Saint luke's so an mri. If you have united hmo a thousand dollars and change if you have united's ppo four thousand dollars and change

The New York Times Biden Administration The Wall Street Journal Saint Luke Milwaukee Aurora HMO United
Texas 6-Week Abortion Ban in Effect After Supreme Court Stays Silent

NPR News Now

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

Texas 6-Week Abortion Ban in Effect After Supreme Court Stays Silent

"Texas law banning abortions after six weeks of pregnancy took effect today. The law effectively ends abortion rights in that state long before many women. No they are pregnant. It also allows private citizens to sue abortion providers and anyone who helps a woman enter pregnancy abortion providers had asked the us supreme court to intervene but the justices took no action.

Texas Us Supreme Court
Johnson & Johnson Says Booster Shot of Its COVID-19 Vaccine Increases Immunity

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:59 sec | 1 year ago

Johnson & Johnson Says Booster Shot of Its COVID-19 Vaccine Increases Immunity

"Johnson and Johnson says research shows the second dose of its covid vaccine generates a strong immune response, justifying a booster shot after eight months in a study J and J. Says recipients who got a booster generated virus fighting antibodies nine times higher than those seen about a month after a single dose, CBS News Medical Contributor Dr David Agus. Initially there was slightly less ImmuLogic response to the vaccine. Seeing the Moderna advisor. But what was seen in a small study was that the antibody response did not go down over six months as it had with Pfizer and Moderna. But what they also showed is giving a booster six months later increased significantly almost nine fold The antibody response, which is a surrogate for the overall immunity provided for the vaccine. The study looked at binding antibodies, which tagged the virus for destruction by the immune system. Being looked at J. And J says it's talking with the FDA and other health authorities about recommending a

J. Says Johnson Cbs News Medical Dr David Agus Moderna Immulogic Pfizer FDA
Most Americans Prefer to Work From Home, Survey Says

Red Eye Radio

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Most Americans Prefer to Work From Home, Survey Says

"A new report shows most Americans prefer to work from home. Brian Shook has the details. The survey conducted by background check platform good higher, asked 3500 People ages 21 to 59 about their working preferences. It found that 68% of respondents said they would rather work from home and 45. Percent would be willing to quit or look for a remote job if they were forced to come back into the office. The survey also found that 70% of workers would be willing to give up benefits to keep working from home, including health insurance paid time off and retirement

Brian Shook
Navigating Hormone Replacement Therapy as a Trans Person

Short Wave

01:43 min | 1 year ago

Navigating Hormone Replacement Therapy as a Trans Person

"The us healthcare system can be extremely difficult for trans folks. A lot of transpeople face medical discrimination. A lot of trans people can live in places where they don't have access to affirming providers or might not have insurance. Some trans people might have insurance. But it's might not be able to get procedures covered even if they have quote unquote good insurance. And that's an unfortunate reality. Even finding information about trans healthcare can be a challenge. You know just a lot of reporting on trans stuff. Tends to be by says people and this isn't always the case but a lot of the times that means like from the get go. It's kind of being portrayed in this light. That isn't actually geared towards transpeople. But is really more about centering. Says people that's james factoria a trance journalist who covers queer and trans news culture and health and they recently wrote a piece for vice called a beginner's guide to hormone replacement therapy gender affirming hormone therapy or hormone replacement therapy or each. Rt is basically just when you take hormones by any variety of delivery methods that can mean a shot or like a pill or a gel for example to align what you look like what you sound like to be more aligned with who you already know. You are and More colloquially a lot of trans people refer to it as a second.

James Factoria United States
FDA: Pfizer Vaccine Not for Off-Label Use in Young Kids

WBZ Afternoon News

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

FDA: Pfizer Vaccine Not for Off-Label Use in Young Kids

Overweight Adults Should Be Screened for Diabetes at 35, Experts Say

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Overweight Adults Should Be Screened for Diabetes at 35, Experts Say

"Epidemic in our country, is behind a call for earlier. Screenings. New national guidelines suggest overweight Americans start getting checked for the condition at 35 instead of 40. The government says three out of four U. S. Adults are too heavy, which increases the risk of type two diabetes. 14% of adults aged 18 and older have been diagnosed with it. 33% have been diagnosed with prediabetes. The guidance comes from the U. S Preventive Services Task Force and was published online in the Journal of the American Medalists Medical Association. It is a

U. S Preventive Services Task Diabetes Government Journal Of The American Medali
OxyContin Maker's Lawyer Warns of Long, Expensive Litigation

America's First News

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

OxyContin Maker's Lawyer Warns of Long, Expensive Litigation

"Lawyer for Purdue Pharma says the company's settlement plan is the only way to avoid long and expensive litigation. He made his case Monday to a bankruptcy judge is expected to rule this week on whether to accept OxyContin makers that reorganization plan. It calls for using the company's future profits and more than four billion from members of the Sackler family, who own it to abate the opioid crisis and pay individual victims. Members of the Sackler family would also get protection from lawsuits over opioids. Judge Robert Drain. It will also consider the views he's read in letters from people who lost loved ones to opioid

Purdue Pharma Oxycontin Sackler Judge Robert Drain
Biden: Full FDA Approval of Pfizer Vaccine 'a Key Milestone' in COVID-19 Fight

All Things Considered

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Biden: Full FDA Approval of Pfizer Vaccine 'a Key Milestone' in COVID-19 Fight

The FDA Is Reminding Americans They Are Not Livestock

Atlanta's Morning News

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

The FDA Is Reminding Americans They Are Not Livestock

"All We are not livestock. The agency sent out a tweet Saturday, saying Just that, after reports that 70% of recent calls to Mississippi's poison control center came from people who took ivermectin and anti parasite drug for livestock reporter Mark Mayfield says health officials are fighting rumors. It's an effective treatment for Covid. They say the drug can be lethal in large enough doses. Gwinnett County

Mark Mayfield Poison Control Center Mississippi Covid Gwinnett County
Maven Clinic: First U.S. ‘Unicorn’ Dedicated to Women’s and Family Health

Equity

01:38 min | 1 year ago

Maven Clinic: First U.S. ‘Unicorn’ Dedicated to Women’s and Family Health

"And tasha we are going to start with maven which is around that you're fascinated by a company fascinated by and it's Kind of founded by women and invested in by women. Yeah i mean. It's a women lead company working on women's health that just raised around led by a woman. And it's the first unicorn and the family and children's health space. They work on creating a women's health clinic that sells to employers and kind of embeds in their benefits systems. And the woman can kind of get care anything between preconception to postpartum to even like their kids. Primary care up till ten years old so seeing that billion dollar valuation was a huge win for the women's health space this week. I'm surprised you didn't happen sooner. I mean just thinking about how big the market is that you just described. I mean healthcare in america is worth like forty eight trillion dollars a year and women and children through the asia. Ten is a good chunk of the population. I'm almost shocked that we didn't have the story ten years ago. Yes oh chrissy far. Who reported on the rise of digital health before it was even a beat that we could cover she's now at omar's ventures she hasn't invested in maven but when i talked to her about the round would it compared to when she was covering the company as a reporter. She was saying that she would often hear. Critics say that really horrible line of that women's health tunisia and she feels like it's kind of ironic now to see maven get into a space with new capital where it can actually help navigate through all the fragmented options with women's health. We've gotten to a stage that there are so many point solutions fertility for postpartum depression and now maven is hoping to be the place that brings them together and helps employers. Offer them all at one point. So we've definitely seen like that whole arc happen.

Tasha Chrissy Omar Asia America Tunisia Postpartum Depression
No Booster Shot in Sight for Johnson & Johnson Recipients

Dave Ramsey

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

No Booster Shot in Sight for Johnson & Johnson Recipients

"Peter Seymour Katie Airness, You'll probably have to wait a few more months to get a booster shot if you got the Johnson and Johnson Covid 19 vaccine, and that's even if you're immuno compromised. There's not a recommendation for you to now get another dose of that vaccine or to switch over and get an extra dose of one of the other vaccines. Dr. Melanie Swift leads the Mayo Clinic's vaccination program, She says boosters are only approved for immuno compromised individuals. Who got two shots of the

Peter Seymour Katie Airness Johnson Covid Dr. Melanie Swift Johnson Mayo Clinic