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A highlight from Peacebuilders: Urvashi Vaid

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:47 min | 7 hrs ago

A highlight from Peacebuilders: Urvashi Vaid

"Hello. From wonder media network, I'm Melton Burak. I'm the host and producer of the podcast sesta. We aim to harness the power of arts and culture to foster conversation and build peace and Cyprus. I'll be your guest host for this month of women. This month, we're highlighting peace builders. In times of conflict, these women have stepped in, bringing their creativity and insight to our facilitate peace across the globe. Today we're talking about a woman who was one of the most prolific LGBTQ organizers in history. She was a Hindu, Indian, and a lesbian, and she took an intersectional approach to her fight for bodily autonomy, sexual liberation, racial equity, and more stable futures for all queer people. Please welcome. For most of us, learning a second language in high school or college wasn't exactly a high point of our academic careers. I took Spanish throughout high school and class itself was fun, but looking back basically nothing stuck. Now, thanks to babbel, the language learning app that sold more than 10 million subscriptions. There's an addictively fun and easy way to learn a new language. Whether you'll be traveling abroad, connecting in a deeper way with family, or you just have some free time. Babble teaches bite sized language lessons that you'll actually use in the real world. I chose French because much of my family speaks fluently, and I previously could barely say hello. With babbel, you can choose from 14 different languages, including Spanish, French, Italian, and German. There are so many ways to learn with babbel. Plus, it comes with a 20 day money back guarantee. Start your new language learning journey today with babbel. Right now, when you purchase a three month babble subscription, you'll get an additional three months for free. That's 6 months for the price of three. Just go to babbel dot com and use promo code will manica. That's BA BBE L dot com, code will manica. Urashi was born in Delhi, India in 1958. She moved to the United States with her parents and two older sisters when she was a child. Not long after that, she got her first taste of political activism. When she was only 11 years old, she got involved in protests against Vietnam War. The activism she became known for centered queer experiences, but she was never narrow minded about it. While she was a student at Vassar college, Shelton found the feminist union, and she organized anti apartheid rallies. In 1979, urvashi started law school at northeastern university. She was one of only four out lesbians in her class. As a young attorney in Washington, D.C., she worked on HIV and aids in prisons for the national prison project of the ACLU. Then, in the midst of the aids crisis, urashi led the national LGBTQ task force as executive director. She was the first woman of color to lead any national LGBTQ organization. In 1990, president George H. W. Bush gave his first address about the 8 epidemic, which had been devastating the globe for the past decade. The gay community in particular was experiencing high death rates, as well as stigma and homophobic violence because of the epidemic. The speech took a compassionate tone, but it was filled with generalities and didn't specify any actionable steps to help. Urvashi, like many other LGBTQ activists, was not satisfied with the president's response. During his address, she was in the room. She held up a sign that said, talk is cheap, aids funding is not. Security officers removed her. But the image of her holding the sun showed up in news reports, the protests highlighted the federal government's inaction. So much of Russia's activism was ahead of its time. She approached the fight for queer liberation with an intersectional lens decades ago, and as she told gay rights activist Larry Kramer in 1994, gay rights, reproductive rights, civil rights, they were all wrapped up together. HIV is an issue for gay men, but there is also racism, reproductive rights, criminal justice. She told him, if the state can say you can't have an abortion, the state can say you can't have sodomy. You can hear versions of that sentiment repeated even today. Collaboration across causes and collective liberation is an idea, activists are still trying to work to work. Throughout her life, or was she led several organizations dedicated to advancing LGBTQ rights. She started the donors of color network, the national LGBTQ anti power action network, and the national LGBT HIV criminal justice working group. She also cofounded the American LGBTQ+ museum of history and culture in New York City. Urashi married her longtime partner, the comedian Kate Clinton on the 25th anniversary of the day they met. They held a party at a friend's house in Brooklyn, but didn't tell the guests why they were gathering. The couple lived part time and provincetown, Massachusetts, where they hosted dinner parties, book clubs, and a bonfire every New Year's Eve. Urvashi and cape were always hosting events that proved community organizing and activism aren't just about fighting against something, but fostering togetherness and joy. In 2009, Kate introduced urashi when she spoke at the national equality march in Washington, D.C.. Urvashi had to stand on a box to reach the microphone, and the moment she started speaking, her conviction and her urgency took over. For 28 of the last 40 years since stonewall, we have lived through their hostility on racial justice. Their opposition to gay and lesbian rights. Their opposition to women's equality and their wacky global fantasies of power. And what exactly are we left with in their wake? The hope embedded in her activism was not for queer people to assimilate into society as it existed. Instead, she wanted to change society into something different and better. This idea was a big part of the two books she wrote, virtual equality, the mainstreaming of gay and lesbian liberation and irresistible revolution confronting race, class, and the assumptions of LGBT politics. In 2015, ubashi was diagnosed with breast cancer. In 2020, it metastasized, like always, her community was there for her and offered support. They drove her between provincetown and Boston for doctor appointments, cooked dinners and sent carts. Urvashi passed away on May 14th, 2022 at 63 years old. Her loved ones celebrated her life at a small private funeral. There was dancing in chanting, evoking arashi's lively spirit. All month, we're talking about peace builders. For more information, find us on Facebook and Instagram at we manica podcast. Special thanks to co creators Jenny and Liz Kaplan for having me as a guest host. Talk to you tomorrow.

Babbel Urvashi Urashi Melton Burak Aids National Lgbtq Task Force President George H. W. Bush Cyprus Vassar College HIV Northeastern University National Lgbtq Anti Power Acti National Lgbt Hiv Criminal Jus Shelton Kate Clinton Larry Kramer Aclu Delhi
A highlight from Peacebuilders: Sylvia Pankhurst

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:57 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Peacebuilders: Sylvia Pankhurst

"Hello from wonder media network I'm Melton Burak. I'm the host and producer of the podcast sesta. We aim to harness the power of arts and culture to foster conversation and build peace and Cyprus. I'll be your guest host for this month of women. This month, we're highlighting peace builders. In times of conflict, these women have stepped in, bringing their creativity and insight to our facilitate peace across the globe. Today's peacebuilder was a member of a famous British suffragette family known for their militant civil disobedience. A self proclaimed pacifist, she saw the fight for suffrage as universal and became an important figure in opposing fascism and the Italian invasion of Ethiopia. Let's talk about Sylvia pankhurst. For most of us, learning a second language in high school or college wasn't exactly a high point of our academic careers. I took Spanish throughout high school and class itself was fun, but looking back basically nothing stuck. Now, thanks to babbel, the language learning app that sold more than 10 million subscriptions. There's an addictively fun and easy way to learn a new language. Whether you'll be traveling abroad, connecting in a deeper way with family, or you just have some free time. Babble teaches bite sized language lessons that you'll actually use in the real world. I chose French because much of my family speaks fluently, and I previously could barely say hello. With Apple, you can choose from 14 different languages, including Spanish, French, Italian, and German. There are so many ways to learn with babbel. Plus, it comes with a 20 day money back guarantee. Start your new language learning journey today with babbel. Right now, when you purchase a three month babble subscription, you'll get an additional three months for free. That's 6 months for the price of three. Just go to babbel dot com and use promo code will manica. That's BA BBE L dot com, code will manica. Estelle Sylvia pankhurst was born in May 5th, 1882 in Manchester, England. If her name sounds familiar, that's because she comes from a family of social activists. Her father, doctor Richard pankhurst, was a lawyer and legal reformer, and her mother, emmeline, founded the women's social and political union, a militant suffragette group. We were told the stories of both Emily and Sylvia's older sister christabel pankhurst and previous episodes of women. As you might imagine, the pancreas household was full of political discourse. Sylvia's father drafted the first woman suffrage bill in 1869. And he held many political meetings in the family home, encouraging his wife's advocacy efforts. He died in 1898 and Sylvia was devastated. She followed his socialist ideals for the rest of her life. However, Sylvia's first passion was not politics, it was art. She was a talented painter and designer, and attended the Royal College of art for several years. But she was torn between pursuing a career in art and the calls from her mother to fight for women's suffrage. Emmeline's persuasiveness was too strong, and Sylvia eventually decided to use her skills to design signs for the WSPU. By 1906, she was working for the union full-time. Like many suffragettes, Sylvia participated in activist campaigns and she was arrested 15 times. As the First World War broke out, the union shifted its focus from suffrage to supporting the war and conscription. Sylvia was a pacifist and actually complained against the war. Her socialist views were also at odds with her mother's politics. Sylvia saw the fight for suffrage as a broader effort that also included the class struggle. All of this created a rift between the family and Sylvia was eventually ousted from the WSPU. Sylvia continued to fight for equality. She and the East London federation of suffragettes set up mother and baby clinics in London, a toe factory to provide employment and restaurants to feed those that struggled with the rising cost of food. Sylvia's politics drifted further left as she rallied against capitalism. After the 1917 Russian Revolution, she took a trip to see the country, and she became a communist supporter. She even met with Vladimir Lenin on a few occasions. By the 1930s, fascists regimes were on the rise throughout Europe, Sylvia shifted her politics again. She began focusing on anti fascism and anti colonialism efforts. She also helped Jewish refugees from Germany and supported the Republicans in Spain. She openly criticized Italian dictator Benito Mussolini in the left wing paper she published. In 1935, Italy invaded Ethiopia. Sylvia would remain dedicated to advocating for Ethiopia for the rest of her life. Sylvia started a weekly newspaper the new times and Ethiopian news, which became the main English news source for Ethiopian news. Sylvia wrote the weekly editorial as well as articles about Mussolini and Hitler's rise to power. Sylvia's activism put her on a list of people to be arrested if the Nazis were able to occupy Britain. Sylvia also raised funds and became a supporter of Ethiopian emperor Haile Selassie. Throughout the war she took an exiled Ethiopians at her home in the UK. After years of battle, Ethiopian troops with help from Great Britain finally draw out the Italian army in 1941. Three years later, Sylvia made her first visit to the country. Over time, Sylvia and emperor Selassie's friendship grew, and he invited her to move to Ethiopia full-time. In 1956, she and her son Richard left England for Ethiopia. Sylvia would spend the final years of her life there. Sylvia passed away on September 27th, 1960, at the age of 78, in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, because of her tireless support for Ethiopian independence, Sylvia was honored by emperor Haile Selassie with a full state funeral. She was named an honorary Ethiopian and is the only foreign born person to have and buried in the city's Trinity cathedral. All month, we're talking about peace builders. For more information, find us on Facebook and Instagram at will manica podcast, special thanks to co creators Jenny and Liz Kaplan for having me as a guest host, talk to you tomorrow.

Sylvia Estelle Sylvia Pankhurst Women's Social And Political U Babbel Melton Burak Ethiopia Richard Pankhurst Christabel Pankhurst Emmeline Cyprus East London Federation Of Suff Royal College Of Art UK Manchester Emily Apple Weekly Editorial Vladimir Lenin Benito Mussolini
A highlight from How Illustrator Andrea Campos Is Using Art to Spread Positivity

Latina to Latina

00:57 sec | 1 d ago

A highlight from How Illustrator Andrea Campos Is Using Art to Spread Positivity

"Thank you so much for doing this. Thanks for having me. I'm so excited. You're a triple cancer, which I don't know that I've ever met a triple cancer before. I feel so exposed. Yes, I am a dribble cancer. It's not something I normally tell people 'cause I think cancers get a bad rep for being too sensitive. And I'm that times three, but I've learned to live with it. And I feel like I'm finally in a position to work wise, where being soft is a good thing. So I feel like, okay, universe, you led me to probably one of the 5 career paths where being super sensitive and soft can actually be a good thing. So here we are. Well, I say it as a fellow cancer, though not a triple cancer because what I see your artwork, it is so upbeat, and it is so positive that I'm like, is this a reflection of Andrea or is this Andrea psyching herself? Her emo self out. That's interesting. I think with my art,

Cancer Triple Cancer Andrea
A highlight from Peacebuilders: Sunila Abeysekera

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:35 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from Peacebuilders: Sunila Abeysekera

"A premier Christian girl school in Colombo, Sri Lanka. After completing school, sunila pursued a career as an actress, singer and dancer. She appeared in many plays and films before also taking on the role of a drama critic. Sunil worked in the arts until she found herself drawn to the civil rights movement in the mid 1970s. The civil rights movement was a non partisan inter ethnic organization that advocated for the release of the man and women who had been arrested during the revolt led by the communist group. Sunila disagreed with the government's authoritarian response. She got in mold by bringing food and clothing to detainees, while also working on their release. But macho sunil's activism is defined by the 26 year Sri Lankan Civil War. The conflict began in 1948 after Sri Lanka gained its independence from Britain. Still bitter from Britain's preference for the Tamils, the sinhalese government used their newfound independence and power to disenfranchise the tunnels. They made soon all of the official language and Buddhism the nation's primary religion. Tensions between two groups escalated and in 1983 the liberation tigers of tumult alum, ambushed a sinhalese army convoy. 13 soldiers were killed in the attack, but will followed was worse. Violent rides resulting in thousands of deaths and over two decades of Civil War. Although sunila was sinhalese, she condemned the government's treatment of the tunnels. Her philosophy was, as a member of the majority ethnic community, all my life I have taken part in collective actions and creative activities to defend minority rights and to celebrate minority cultures. Sunila stood out because she denounced both the government and the tumults. She was vocal about her disagreement with the state's disenfranchisement of the Tamils, as well as her opposition to the acts of violence committed by the tumult tigers. Sunila wasn't just woke locally, but also internationally. On this issue and many others, she spoke at demonstrations, conferences, and the United Nations. At the center of sunil's fight for human rights were women. In her own words, she knew that women and children are the first victims of any kind of conflict. Sunila founded and got involved in many organizations that promoted women's rights. She was a founder of Sri Lanka's Pacific and Asian women's form. She fought against the state's repression of women through the mother's front organization, and she helped develop the women for peace organization, which put forth political solutions to Sri Lanka's ethnic Civil War. In 1984, she founded the women in media collective in Colombo. The organization works to ensure that every Sri Lankan woman lives an autonomous life. They aim to embed feminist principles throughout South Asia to create more just society where women are treated as equals. Because sunila spoke out against the government, she was targeted as an enemy of the state. The threats that she received were so bad in 1988, she fled to the Netherlands for 6 months, but sunila returned in the face of abuse, threats and discrimination, her courage, propelled her forward. She was a shining example of what it meant to oppose and confront abuse of authority. In 1989, sunila was a founding member of the group in form. The group monitored and documented the governments and tumult tigers human rights abuses, including disappearances. This was a dangerous act of defiance during its time when the government and the tigers were fostering an environment of fear and suppression. This documentation played a crucial role in highlighting the conflict on an international level. In 1990, sunila became the executive director of the organization. Her work expanded outside of Sri Lanka as well. She was instrumental in getting the international world to acknowledge women's rights as human rights at the UN world conference on human rights in Vienna in 1993. Sunila also advocated for the equality of women by helping ensure that the united National Security Council passed resolution 1325. This legislation supports women's participation in peace negotiations and post conflict reconstruction. Other minorities that similar championed included sex workers gay men and women transgender people and those living with HIV and aids. Part of what made her such an effective activist was her refusal to discriminate. No matter the ethnicity, gender, class, religion or political affiliation, Sonoma supported those in need. In 1998, sunila was celebrated for her work when she received the UN secretary general's award for human rights. In the mid 2000s, sunila joined several organizations initiatives that sought to include and protect women. Much of this work led to her nomination as one of the 1000 women for the Nobel Peace Prize. And in 2007, human rights were awarded her its human rights defender award. So nella never stopped using her voice to highlight injustice, and even though it cost her to have to flee her country more than once, she knew it was worth it. In an interview, she said, when everyone is criticizing you, then you are doing the right thing. Sunila Abe Sakura died of cancer on September 9th, 2013 in Colombo Sri Lanka. She was 61 years old. All month we're talking about peace builders. For more information, find us on Facebook and Instagram at will manica podcast. Special thanks to co creators Jenny and Liz caplan for having me on as a guest host. As always, we'll be taking a break for the weekend. Talk to you Monday.

Sunila Sri Lanka Sinhalese Government Liberation Tigers Of Tumult Al Colombo Government Sri Lankan Center Of Sunil's Fight For Hu Britain Women For Peace Organization Sunil UN United National Security Counc South Asia Pacific The Netherlands Tigers Vienna
A highlight from Peacebuilders: Shirin Ebadi

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:00 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Peacebuilders: Shirin Ebadi

"I'm the host and producer of the podcast sesta. We aim to harness the power of arts and culture to foster conversation and build peace and Cyprus. I'll be your guest host for this month of women. This month, we're highlighting peace builders. In times of conflict, these women have stepped in, bringing their creativity and insight to help facilitate peace across the globe. Today, we're talking about a woman of firsts. The first woman in Iran to serve as a judge, the first Muslim woman, and the first Iranian to win the noble Peace Prize. And she might make you think about how deeply connected peace, justice and equality are. Let's talk about Shireen Abadi. Shireen Abadi was born in 1946 in hamadan in northwest Iran. When she was still a baby, Shireen and her family moved to Tehran, the country's capital. The ebadi's valued learning and Shireen, her sister, and her two brothers were all highly educated. In 1965, when she was 19 years old, Shireen earned a spot at the university of Tehran's law school. She graduated in just three and a half years. By 1969, she was serving as a judge for the Justice Department. She became the first woman judge in all of Iran. Shireen continued to shine professionally, earning a doctorate degree in 1971. At 29 years old, she became the head of the city court in Tehran. But the Islamic revolution was on the horizon. And it would change Shireen's life dramatically. In February of 1979, Shireen and all other women judges were removed from their positions. They were labeled as fickle and indecisive and unfit. Just because of their gender. They were reassigned as clerks in the courts that had once run. Shirin was furious. Her protests had some effects. She and her female peers were promoted to experts. But women were banned from the bench. Cheering couldn't bear the idea of helping out in a courtroom that she'd once run. So she left. Shireen says she was essentially housebound for years. She couldn't serve as a judge, and the bar association wouldn't give her a license. But unlike many of her peers, she stayed in Iran. She was determined to fight for her country. In 19 92, Shireen finally got a lawyer's license and opened up her own practice. She was now 46 years old, and a lot changed since she'd last practiced law. Shireen started taking clients whose stories were like hers, women, children, freethinkers, people who had fearlessly taking on the Islamic Republic and those who nobody else would defend. In 1999, a series of murders shook the community university of Tehran. Shireen represented some of the victims families. The killings were later pinned on government officials who had gone rogue. The next year, in June, Shireen was arrested and thrown in jail for three weeks. She and another lawyer were accused of sharing a tape confession from a vigilante militia member. In 2002, she founded the human rights defender center. She'd become one of Iran's most prominent activists. In 2003, Shireen was awarded the noble Peace Prize for her work defending the right to women and children. Shireen was the first Muslim person and the first Iranian to win the award. Shireen hadn't even known she was nominated. When asked about her win, she said there is no contradiction between Islam and human rights. If a country abuses human rights in the name of Islam, then it is not the fault of Islam. For Shireen, fighting for the rights of others is a path to peace. I think that's important to remember that conflict can actually lead to peace, especially if we're fighting towards justice and equality. Shireen finally left Iran in 2009. She lives in the UK in exile, but even from across an ocean she keeps fighting for the rights of all people. She said, just imagine if you're in a boat and it breaks down in the middle of the sea, is there any other way but to swim? If one becomes tired and discontinued swimming, that person will sink. We have to be hopeful. All month, we're talking about peace builders. For more information, find us on Facebook and Instagram at will manica podcast. Special thanks to co creators Jenny on this Kaplan for having me as a guest host. Talk to you tomorrow.

Shireen Shireen Abadi Iran Hamadan Tehran University Of Tehran Ebadi Cyprus Community University Of Tehran Shirin Justice Department Human Rights Defender Center Bar Association UK Swimming Instagram Facebook Jenny Kaplan
A highlight from Peacebuilders: Rigoberta Mench Tum

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:05 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Peacebuilders: Rigoberta Mench Tum

"With the CUC, the indigenous labor rights organization. She fought for better conditions for farm workers on the coast. And in addition to speaking kiche she taught herself Spanish and other Mayan languages. That way, she could teach different communities across Guatemala about resisting military oppression. We Roberta's activism made her a target for retaliation from the government. She went into hiding in Guatemala and then fled to Mexico. But she continued to organize for indigenous rights from afar. Tens of thousands of guatemalans fled to Mexico in the early 1980s. Most of them were indigenous mines. In 1983, when rigoberta was in her early 20s, she told her life story to an anthropologist. Over the course of 8 days, they are recorded hours and hours of tape. These recordings eventually became the book. An Indian woman in Guatemala. The book captivated readers around the world, it was a detailed, painful telling of her life experiences in war torn Guatemala. And it garnered international support for the Guatemalan resistance movement. In 1992, rigoberta received the noble Peace Prize. At that time she was the youngest person to have ever received the award and the first indigenous person to do so. She used her prize money to create the rigoberta menchu foundation. The foundation is dedicated to education, healthcare, and community development for indigenous guatemalans. After the end of the Civil War in 1996, the foundation helped repatriate refugees. Today, the foundation focuses on civic education and voting rights. In 1998, an American academic published a book discrediting some of the details and rigoberto memoir. His research was featured on the front page of The New York Times, lounging rigoberta into the controversy and forcing her to respond to accusations. She has said she will defend her book to the death. Since then, other scholars have also defended her work. Even a member of the novel comets he noted that memoirs often contain embellishments. And in the end, when someone is arguing over whether a man was burnt alive or murdered them burned, the exact details seem less important. The stories LEGO Berta taught the world to hear due represent the kinds of very real violence and pain many poor indigenous guatemalans face and her activism today has kept these stories and experiences in the spotlight. All month, we're talking about peace builders. For more information, find us on Facebook and Instagram at will manica podcast. Special thanks to co creators Jenny and Liz Kaplan for having me as a guest host. Talk to you tomorrow.

Guatemala Rigoberta Indigenous Labor Rights Organi CUC Mexico Rigoberta Menchu Foundation Roberta Rigoberto The New York Times Berta Instagram Liz Kaplan Facebook Jenny
A highlight from A Thanksgiving Toast to Joy

The Suburban Women Problem

07:12 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from A Thanksgiving Toast to Joy

"We all see our country, I think, is divided, and even after this election, we still see it as divided. But the way that we combat that is through connection, right? We gotta address the suburban women problem because it's real. Welcome to the suburban women problem. A podcast for red wine and blue. Hi everyone, thanks for joining us. I'm Amanda Weinstein. I'm Jasmine Clark. I'm Rachel vindman, and you're listening to the suburban women problem. This week is Thanksgiving, so we don't have a regular episode instead we want to share what we are thankful for and place a messages from you about what you're thankful for too. It's kind of like we're all sharing a big community Thanksgiving toast to joy. I love it. Yay. All right, so I'll start us off. So I am especially thankful, especially coming off a campaign for grandparents. Man, do I love me? So grandparents. They are the secret sauce that helped us manage our lives and campaign from Grammy grampy, grandma Bonnie. Grandma bat, a grandma Barbara right there are so many grand parents. That support are just general lives that deal with so much stuff from last minute sleepovers, pickups for ninja class, dinners with kids, taking kids to Sunday school. I mean, I could go on and on and on. The list of unpaid work that they help us with is pretty long. So I have definitely thankful for grandparents. I love that. Me too. Bobby, wanna come say hi? Acting my mother in law here right now. Oh, that's so cute. This is grandma Bonnie grandma Bonnie you want to say hi. Hi everyone. How are you? Hi. I'm a high grandma Bonnie. How's it been like with the kids? Good. Slow paced relaxing. Oh, yes. She's ready for a vacation. I've had lots of sleep, lots of sleep, no interrupted sleep at all. No kids in my bed. She's ready for a vacation in Amanda. I love that. It's been so fun. And I love listening to a man podcast. She's been listening to us. Thanks, grandma. I love that. Super cute. That's a nice cameo. Grandparents were such a huge part of my life. We lived in the same town as my dad's parents and my mom's parents lived not very far away and we saw them often and they were such a huge part of my life growing up and it's really one of my biggest regrets that Ellie didn't get to know my parents. I get it. I mean, that's really hard. They're a part of you and they're a part of your family and even who Ellie is. Yeah, you know, I mean, it's hard. I think so many times we envision things like the good parts. We want to always replicate that, but get rid of the bad. And life just doesn't like that. I mean, you know, it's not possible to only keep the good and get rid of the bad as much as we want to. So her life is full and different and many other ways she lives just on the street from Alex's twin brother and they're a huge part of our lives and eventually, you know, I keep threatening, but eventually we will move somewhere else and there will be other people in her life and I think it's important to remember that even though we don't have exactly what we want it doesn't mean that it's not rich and full at the same time and that's something that's really hard for me. And I think when I was thinking about what I'm thankful for for this episode this morning basically celebrating three years since Alex's public testimony and or not celebrating, but the anniversary of that. And I think if you know just how dramatically our life changed and I talk a lot about how I'm worn that life because I miss so much or being a military spouse and the predictability and everything but then in the mornings when we're both home with Ellie when she's gonna go to school and when she comes the carpool comes to pick her up and she says to Alex, are you gonna go outside with me? And he was like, of course I am. And just I can tell just that joy that comes to her. So there's still beauty in the different, even if it's not what you want it to be. And it's taken me at the plan. Almost 49 years to embrace this. I will also say like you find your family and your family might be uncles and grandparents or it might be cousins, right? But it also might be your neighbor. So we also, I mean, the same thing, you know, the same thing about we have some neighbors here that I consider to be family and moving away from them would be devastating. Yes. I've had that a lot of times. And I've moved away from because of the military, but they're still part of our lives. The same. Look back at that season of your life and how special those people were to you. And they might cycle back into your life at different times, but I think that's just something that comes with age and embracing those things. But I've definitely learned and I'm very thankful for this lesson that it doesn't have to be exactly what you wanted for it to still be beautiful and wonderful. And you can mourn something and still be happy with where you are at the very same time. And it sounds a little confusing, but if you let yourself and you sit with it for a minute, you can see that you can hold both those things at the same time and still be tremendously satisfied and happy and I think getting to that place and kind of just being okay with all of it is really what I'm most thankful for. I feel that. I feel that about the military people we know too that leave the military was really hard for us that it was a different kind of family community and we do miss that. I'm sure similar to a way Rachel and your husband do that. That's hard. But we connect to it in different way now and have made different connections. Right, absolutely. All right, so I'm trying to think of what I'm thankful for last week I talked about how I'm thankful for winning my election. For today though, I think I want to focus more on my family as well. I am thankful for quality time with my family and that's just because I genuinely do not have a lot of time. Like time is not something that I can I just have laying around on the kitchen counter, you know, waiting to waiting for me to pay attention to it. No, I really don't have it. And so I really cherish the moments where I get to watch my daughter play in her basketball game. And she's been doing very well, by the way. She's been having an excellent season. My daughter Nora started playing basketball and she absolutely loves it. She is not good at it. I want, you know, if you meet her, don't tell her this. She's not going to be. That was me a child. But she loves it, and she is not like any other sport she's tried, so it is so fun to see her face light up when she gets out there, even when she misses the shot. She's like,

Amanda Weinstein Jasmine Clark Rachel Vindman Grammy Grampy Grandma Bonnie Ellie Bonnie Grandma Bonnie Alex Barbara Bobby Amanda Rachel Basketball Nora
A highlight from Episode 84: Modern Loss with Rebecca Soffer

Can We Talk?

05:41 min | Last week

A highlight from Episode 84: Modern Loss with Rebecca Soffer

"We talk? The podcast of the Jewish women's archive were gender, history, and Jewish culture meet. When Rebecca sofer was in her 20s, she never would have guessed that one day she'd be writing books about grief and loss. She was living in New York City working full-time in TV when her life was upended. My mom was killed when I was 30 and my dad died four years later. So between the ages of 30 and 34, I lost both my parents and I felt like I was snipped loose from everything that had tethered me to a foundation in my life. And I did not understand how to be honest and open about what I was going through in a world that kept making it very clear that it was not particularly interested in that. Rebecca was frustrated by the stigma that seemed to surround death and loss. So she decided to do something about it. In 2013, Rebecca launched the website modern loss, along with her friend Gabrielle berkner. The site's tagline, candid conversations about grief, beginners welcome. In the beginning, modern lost mostly published essays about grief. These were raw, deeply personal reflections on the death of a loved one. Often said, but also with an unexpected twist. Like the one where a woman uses her late husband's life insurance money to buy a fancy diamond ring. Their how to guides were also offbeat, with headlines like disrupting the funeral, 7 innovations you should know about, and yes, you should binge watch Netflix on Mother's Day. In all of these pieces, people faced loss head on without platitudes or saccharine sentimentality. I stumbled on the site in its early years. It was over a decade after my mother had died, and I was still struggling. It was especially hard to find people who understood what I was going through. Reading the modern loss essays, I felt like I finally had. In fact, I started occasionally writing and even editing essays for the website. Putting words to my grief and reading other people's words was really therapeutic. Over the years, modern loss grew. People started sharing their reflections and experiences on the site's Facebook and Instagram pages. There were mindfulness and yoga retreats, live storytelling events, even swaps, modern loss had become more than a website. It was a community. And then COVID hit. And all of a sudden, the entire modern loss community, which had learned to, yes, very much lean on the community online and in person, but also lean on coping mechanisms that it had developed along the way, such as going to therapy. You know, like having brunch with friends, taking that walk, finding soulless in your office as a break. Volunteering at your kid's school as a respite. People didn't have that anymore. And that was very overwhelming, because I felt this enormous responsibility to be there for so many people who suddenly had not only feelings of grief that were newer, but resurfaced feelings of older grief that were being triggered in this pandemic. Rebecca had been hoping for a while to create a resource that would guide people through grief and loss. Now the need seemed especially urgent. So she wrote the modern loss handbook, an interactive guide to moving through grief and building resilience. The book came out earlier this year. In this episode of can we talk, Rebecca and I talk modern loss. Trigger days bespoke holidays, Jewish grief rituals, and what to say, and not to say, to someone in mourning. I've read my share of books on grief, and one of the things that sets the modern laws handbook apart is the interactive element. In one section, the book includes space for readers to write down the reflections about what Rebecca calls their person. The things they loved most about that person, but also the things they found most annoying or infuriating. Their favorite memories and the ones they wish they could forget. In another section, readers are invited to describe and draw the early stages of their grief as an island, and their current grief as a city. There's even a sad lib for readers to complete. You know, instead of a mad lib. I asked Rebecca why she decided to make the book so interactive. Because I feel like what people suddenly didn't have was interaction. They were just alone with their thoughts and very, very lonely and scared and not understanding how to move through grief in a world that was suddenly incredibly socially isolated where even just the calming self of a physical touch was something that we were scared of. And so I wrote this in such a way that it would be like a friend guiding you through a really, really hard time, but one who was like, listen, there is no one size fits all for this. And so why don't you just try some of this stuff and see if any of them can be tools in your toolbox, and if something works, that's amazing, put it in the box, something else doesn't work. Fine. Doesn't work. That's cool. Something else. I really appreciated about the book, is that it includes some elements that are a little bit more lighthearted than you might expect in a grief and loss book. So one that I really liked was this bingo card where readers are invited to color in all the experiences you've graced with your tears either intentionally or unexpectedly. Things like at a Disney property at karaoke to a kind or shockingly unkind customer service agent.

Rebecca Rebecca Sofer Gabrielle Berkner New York City Netflix Instagram Facebook Disney
A highlight from Peacebuilders: Marii Hasegawa

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:24 min | Last week

A highlight from Peacebuilders: Marii Hasegawa

"Hello from wonder media network I'm Melton Burak. I'm the host and producer of the podcast sesta. We aim to harness the power of arts and culture to foster conversation and build peace and Cyprus. I'll be your guest host for this month of Dominica. This month we're highlighting peace builders. In times of conflict, these women have stepped in, bringing their creativity and insight to help facilitate peace across the globe. Today we are talking about a woman whose life was studded with historical moments. She dedicated her life to diplomacy and social work, though it's unlikely you've heard of her name. Her story is a reminder that a lifetime in the pursuit of peace is a humbling task we must choose to take up every day. Let's meet Marie sagawa. Marie was born on September 17th, 1918. She spent the very beginning of her life in a small village near the seaside outside of Hiroshima, Japan. Her father was a Buddhist priest in their family temple. When Marie was still a baby, the family moved across the Pacific to Los Angeles California. There, her father continued his work supporting the Buddhist Japanese community in the area. Marie spent her formative years of childhood in California, and when it was time for college, she attended the University of California at Berkeley. In 1938, she graduated with a degree in home economics. But in 1942, whatever plans Marie had for her future were thrown to the wayside. The Second World War came to U.S. shores and president Franklin Roosevelt issued executive order 9 zero 6 6. It authorized the immediate evacuation of alleged threats to national security from the West Coast. We know now that this must incarceration campaign was a result of racism that had been brewing since the bombing of Pearl Harbor. In just 6 months, more than 100,000 people of Japanese ancestry were moved to the internment camps inland. Among them, Marie's family. Marie and her family were forcibly taken to the topaz relocation center in Utah. The barracks there were barely ready when the incarcerated Japanese Americans arrived. Many of them actually had to help finish the construction of the buildings and furniture, which included minimal amenities like pot bellied stoves and army cots. Armed guards circled the perimeter. In the dismal conditions of topaz, Marie stroh to create community. She served as a social worker and wrote for the camp's literary magazine. Marie's degree in skills also meant she could find work outside the camp. She was released to Cleveland Ohio and from there moved to Philadelphia, where she moved in with her college roommates. The effects of World War II would linger for Marie. In 1945, the U.S. dropped atomic bombs on Nagasaki and the town near Maurice birthplace, Hiroshima. The violence and loss of life made the tragedy of war even more potent and present. On the east coast, Marie worked in the food tobacco and agricultural workers union. She also met ichiro hasegawa, who had also made his way from another relocation center. They married in 1946 and eventually moved to Richmond, Virginia to start a family. At home, Marie was a girl scout leader, and a PTA president. But she was also seeking peace on an international level. She joined the national board of the women's international league for peace and freedom and served as its president during the final years of the Vietnam War. In 1973, Murray set off on a trip to Hanoi with an international delegation of women. The goal was to understand the extent of damage the war hut wrought on the women and children of Vietnam. It was illegal at the time for Americans to travel to North Vietnam, so Marie used her Japanese passport. It was a risky decision thanks to the ongoing political unrest in the states. There wasn't a guarantee Marie would actually be able to reenter the U.S. when she returned. Even with her family waiting at home, she took the risk. She had to make this trip. And it was a good thing she did. What Murray saw on her trip to Hanoi bolstered her dedication to furthering peace. When she returned home, she was back to work by day. Then, each day, after 8 hours of work, she went home and wrote letters and reports to distribute to allies and organizations. On the weekends, she traveled around the country to spread the information should learn in Vietnam. Everything and anything she could do towards ending the war was vital. It finally ended in 1975, two years after her trip. In 1996, at 77 years old, Marie traveled to Tokyo to receive the new one O peace price. It's usually given out to people who have contributed into religious cooperation and the cause of world peace. Marie gave a Humboldt speech and acceptance. In 2001, Marie moved to a retirement center in Massachusetts, where she stayed active in current affairs, book groups, and the village choir. She died on 1st of July 2012. Much of the information we know about Marie comes from her obituary, lovingly written by her daughter. Marie led a successful career as a peacemaker, and her work was recognized on the international stage. And like many women, she led a full life additionally, a tennis fan, a mystery story of and a mother who traveled with her family. In one article, Marie's daughter described her as quietly steadfast and thank goodness she was, where all the better for her tenacity for peace. All month, we're talking about peace builders. For more information, find us on Facebook and Instagram at will manica podcast. Special thanks to co creators Jenny and Liz Kaplan for having me as a guest host, talk to you tomorrow.

Marie Melton Burak Marie Sagawa Hiroshima Topaz Relocation Center Marie Stroh Vietnam Maurice Birthplace Dominica Food Tobacco And Agricultural Ichiro Hasegawa California U.S. Franklin Roosevelt National Board Of The Women's Cyprus Pearl Harbor University Of California Berkeley Hanoi
A highlight from Peacebuilders: Madeeha Gauhar

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:14 min | Last week

A highlight from Peacebuilders: Madeeha Gauhar

"I'm the host and producer of the podcast sesta. We aim to harness the power of arts and culture to foster conversation and build peace and Cyprus. I'll be your guest host for this month of women. This month, we're highlighting peace builders. In times of conflict, these women have stepped in, bringing their creativity and insight to help facilitate peace across the globe. Today we're talking about a woman who challenged censorship in Pakistan and helped to transform theater in South Asia. Let's meet madeja gohar. Maria was born in 1956 in Karachi, Pakistan. She aspired to perform on stage and on television. However, when she was growing up, Pakistan was ruled by a military dictatorship that heavily restricted opportunities for women in art. Marie ha grew up visiting her grandfather in a village near the India Pakistan border. One morning, she awoke to the sound of heavy shelling. An air raid. At the time, she didn't understand the impact a warfare along the border. But that moment, and the midair dogfights between Indian and Pakistani forces that came in the following days would impact her forever. As a young woman, muddy had decided to pursue her dreams of becoming an actor and director. She obtained her master's degree in theater studies at the University of London. Afterwards, madiha moved back to Pakistan, she found work as an actor on PTV, the Pakistani state owned broadcaster. Still, the country was under a military regime. Women's roles on television were heavily censored. The suppression of freedoms and mistreatment of women draw made to leave mainstream media. She decided to create her own path where she would confront the injustices she witnessed and experienced. Maria married a well-known TV director, producer and writer named shahid Nadine. In 1983, madiha and her husband founded ajoka, a theater group created to address bold political and social contemporary themes. It would tackle topics such as women's rights, labor and religious intolerance, and the pursuit of socially meaningful theater. Despite her classical training, she emphasized indigenous styles combining it with contemporary techniques and stage. In Punjabi, a joke a theater means theater off today. The strict censorship laws of the era made it nearly impossible for ajoka to find a venue for their work. So the theater debuted its first theatrical performance on the front line of a house. They chose to give this performance in defiance of the strict censorship laws. The group started out small, operating out of the homes of members in the group and using donations from supporters and audience members. Soon, the organization grew and began attracting larger audiences. Marie had believed in promoting peace between India and Pakistan. She traveled to India frequently and made an effort to have her place performed there. She collaborated with Indian playwrights and directors, had productions featured in Indian theater festivals, and even helped organize transporter festivals to cultivate peace. While working as a director and actor, muddy, also gave lectures. However, she was forced to quit due to her theater activism. Not long after this, she was sent to jail for engaging in women's rights demonstrations. Madeha received numerous honors for her work in theater. In 2003, she was awarded the medal of distinction by the president of Pakistan from improving Pakistani theater, and in 2006 madeha became the first Pakistani to be awarded the prestigious prince Claus award for her leadership of ajoka. In 2007, Mahdi has husband wrote a play that she directed called burqa vaganza. A satirical love story, the script deals and controversial themes while actors dress and burkas. The play highlighted increased pressure on women to wear head coverings in Pakistan. However, the play was met with contention and was banned by the national art council in April 2010 after numerous protests. In defiance of the ban, the theater continued to perform the play. Madiha died on April 25th, 2018 after suffering with cancer for three years. She was 61 years old. Since her death, Madi has legacy lives on in the continued success of a joker, which has become one of Pakistan's leading and most prolific theater groups. All month, we're talking about peace builders. For more information, find us on Facebook and Instagram at will manica podcast. Special thanks to co creators Jenny and Liz Kaplan for having me as a guest host, talk to you tomorrow.

Pakistan Madiha Madeja Gohar Marie Ha Shahid Nadine Ajoka Maria India South Asia Karachi PTV Cyprus University Of London Muddy Madeha Punjabi Pakistani Theater Prince Claus Burqa Vaganza
A highlight from How Kate del Castillo Built (and Rebuilt) Her Life

Latina to Latina

08:30 min | Last week

A highlight from How Kate del Castillo Built (and Rebuilt) Her Life

"Castillo has built and rebuilt her life over and over as a successful actress, making the crossover from Mexico to the United States as a woman who chose to leave an abusive marriage and then again most recently following the very public fallout of her meeting with former cartel leader Javier Guzman El Chapo. Part of that rebuilding includes Kate's return to telemundo's la Reina del Sur, where she plays her favorite anti hero that is some. More than ten years have passed since the show's original release, and we talk about the lessons Kate has learned in that time. Her other projects, including her production company jola wood and her new peacock dark comedy, about four women who band together after the police arrest their husbands for being tied to the same criminal organization. And of course, hurrah insights on messing up, living with the consequences, and how she learned to trust her gut. Kate, thank you so much for being here. Of course, thank you, Alicia for having me. I was thinking in preparing for this interview with you of the interview I did for Latina to Latino with Eva Longoria. And Eva talks a lot about the fact I know your Friends. Yes. She talks a lot about the fact that she became famous at 30 years old. And that meant she was a fully formed adult when she became famous and that really gave her a ton of perspective. So to think of you at 19, becoming this huge celebrity, were you ready for it? I don't think anybody can be ready for fame. I knew about it because of my dad. So it was nothing new for me. And I think thank God that's why I keep my feet on the ground because I've known this for all my life. That's all we lived out of, you know, out of acting. And I think that's also why I respect and I admire everybody who's in the industry because it's so hard. But that's so, so I've been pretty famous or living with fame, my entire life. I think one of the reasons that we all find that asa so fascinating, I think especially those of us who are Latina, is that she's operating in a man's world. Absolutely. And she is operating in a world where a certain point she has not taken seriously where she is diminished where she needs to prove and then prove herself again. And it's sort of like no matter where you work or what you do, we have all, I think, had that experience, and I wonder for you in your own life when you have run up against that type of misogyny or expectation that you are not as competent as you are. Oh my God, yes, well, I think to be honest and sadly, unfortunately, I don't know a woman that hasn't been abused in one or another way, which is really sad. So yes, I've been abused in many ways in my life. I still feel like I'm a struggling actor still in America, you know? Which is crazy, but I still struggle with stereotypes in America. I still struggle with being a Latina in one of them me to wear tight dresses and sexualize me. I think there's a lot in the same industry to learn about us. That is kind of, you know, sometimes we're in 2022 and this is getting there, maybe, but in a very low slow way. There's kitaka actor, there's also queer Castillo businesswoman. And I want you to take us back if there was a moment or a series of moments where you said it's not enough for me to act. I need to begin to own these stories. I need to be able to produce these stories. And the genesis of chola would. Yes, of course, well, it's because of that, we have to change the narrative in only the people who are in these key positions can do that. And for me, it's producing. So if I'm going to produce, I'm going to produce something that I think it's not stereotyped is great for not only Latinos to see because I don't want to label that labeling myself. I want to do mainstream. And as an actress, I can't still wait sitting down with my arms crossed to have this amazing role to come to me. I have to do something. So that's why I created chola with productions with my two other friends. Also, it was out of a moment in my life where I had a no jobs, the contracts I had because of the whole chapel thing. They took them. So I found myself with a lot of bills. With a house and with everything that I couldn't pay for. So we started chola and we trying to help each other, the three of us, women, latinas, smart, powerful in so many ways. We said, this can happen to us. You know, we have so much with smart. We have all the know how we are creative women. So let's do something. And that's why we created chorla wood. Did you know that there's a diaper with a stretchy waistband and no fillet tubs you gotta mess with? Forget having to mess with fiddle diaper tabs. Cruisers 360 stretchy waistband is quick and easy to pull on your little wiggly one and easy to remove with easy tear sides. And for easy disposal simply rip, wrap and roll the diaper, then secure with the attached disposal tape. But the holidays upon us and the long days of traveling, you want to make sure you can avoid those messy leaks. That's why pampers cruisers 360 is the best fit in protection for your active baby, providing up to 100% leak proof fit. Unlike regular tape diapers, the 360 gap free fit stretches around your baby's waist and moves with them, so they can live wild and free. To keep your baby skin healthy, cruisers 360 locks wetness away from skin for up to 12 hours and is hypoallergenic. Free of elemental chlorine bleaching, parabens and latex. I am always on the go and it is why I love the ease of pampers cruisers 360 from pampers, the number one pediatrician recommended brand. Download the pampers club app today, start earning rewards with every diaper and wipes purchase. I really enjoyed it from Albert the Latino business action network. An am dual Antigua, founder of LBC studios and proud alum of elbow and business scaling program at Stanford. We invite you to join us on scale to Latino business story. The first podcast from elven, where we speak with Latino entrepreneurs. I'm so many brilliant Alban alums. They talk about starting now pivoting and innovating in their fields. Is it the standard playbook doesn't work for you? Then do your own game. That's why we are here. Otherwise, we'll get a job. As they share their scaling stories, these Latino leaders embody the fastest growing group of entrepreneurs in the country. Follow and subscribe to scale the Latino business story anywhere you get your favorite podcasts and connect with lban on social at lban strong. You just said ten different things that I have questions about. So I'm going to start with this, which is, what are the roles that you wish you were offered or you wish you were considered for? That you're not. Well, something that is not only for Latina. You know, I can play whatever. Why label people from where they come from. You know, unless it was an amazing, I could be, you know, harrowing a Latina herring in a marvel movie for I'm just thinking out loud. You know, something like that. And it's hard to find something like it was hard for me to find something like that reyna del Sur, you know? Like there is some in those others. Amazing character of this woman living in a man's world and having to think and strategize and without sexualizing her. So it's a lot of things and on the other hand, I need to work because I still have the house and I still have the bills. But now in a different position, thank God, where I can be a little bit more peaky about what I do and what I accept. And also I'm producing now so that's really great because I not only producing for me to lead on everything that I produce. So I think it's really cool. And also, I think that those mixes intertwining between actresses that they do a lot in America. You know, let's Witherspoon with Nicole Kidman with Jennifer Aniston and all this amazing women that they come together and they say yes, that's what I want to do with amazing

Kate Javier Guzman El Chapo La Reina Del Sur Jola Wood Castillo America Chola Telemundo Eva Longoria Alicia EVA ASA Mexico Lbc Studios Alban Alums Antigua Albert Stanford Reyna Del Sur
A highlight from Peacebuilders: Muriel Duckworth

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:03 min | Last week

A highlight from Peacebuilders: Muriel Duckworth

"I'm the host and producer of the podcast sesta. We aim to harness the power of arts and culture to foster conversation and build peace and Cyprus. I'll be your guest host for this month of America. This month, we're highlighting peace builders. In times of conflict, these women have stepped in, bringing their creativity and insight to help facilitate peace across the globe. Today, we're talking about a woman who worked tirelessly for justice both in her own communities and for other causes. She founded and worked with 17 organizations and integrated the causes of feminism and pacifism. She lived for a hundred years and filled each day bettering the lives of others. Please welcome muriel Duckworth. Muriel ball was born on October 31st, 1908 in Austin, Canada, about 80 miles east of Montreal, on her parents farm. She was a third of 5 children to Ana west over and Ezra ball. Farm life was difficult and not very profitable. To make ends meet, Anna ran a boarding house and as a result, lightning rods. Muriel grew up in a lively methodist home. The family often had people over to gather and sing hymns or debate politics. Anna, muriel's mother, turned their China cabinet into a community lending library. At age 16, muriel entered McGill university in Montreal. At McGill, she joined the student Christian moment, a progressive and at times controversial campus organization. It encouraged students to explore the Christian faith radically and critically. For muriel, that included opposing antisemitism on campus and helping raise money for student relief. Muriel later described it as the beginning of her adult search for truth. She called it unsettling, painful and exciting. It was through the student Christian movement that she met her husband, Jack Duckworth. The couple was married in 1929, the same week as her graduation. Following her time at McGill, both she and Jack went on to study at the union theological seminary in New York. There, they took part in the social gospel movement, which emphasized that being Christian meant aligning oneself with a poor and powerless. Muriel began to internalize these teachings and at a pivotal time. Less than a year into her time in New York, the stock market crash of 1929 plummeted the country into The Great Depression. The city was rife with opportunity to take the teachings of the social gospel into real life. Muriel spent her time volunteering with young immigrant girls in hell's kitchen. The following year, she and Jack returned to Montreal, where they raised their three children. There, she continued advocating for social causes and joined several organizations which promoted living wages, unemployment insurance, healthcare, affordable housing, and more. In 1947, the family moved to Halifax, Nova Scotia. Mariel quickly became a well-known face in her community as a parent education adviser for the Nova Scotia Department of Education. It was through her work in the thick of Halifax community that her eyes were open to more and more social issues. Muriel's list of causes kept growing, each issue she tackled major commitment to social change and justice even more impassioned. About all muriel was invested in peace at a time of acute tension across the globe. In 1960, the United States and the Soviet Union were on the brink of nuclear war. After hopes of peaceful compromise were dashed at the failed 1960 Paris peace talks, women across Halifax began forming the only woman they knew would really champion the pacifist cause. Muriel heeded the call, 25 women huddled in her living room to organize around peace. Within a month of forming, the group had successfully blocked the United States from dumping nuclear waste off the Nova Scotia coast. This was just the beginning. Over the next few years, muriel's chapter joined with women across Canada to become the nationally recognized peace organization, why so women or VO muriel served as the O W's national president from 1967 to 1971 at the height of the Vietnam War. The wise and women publicly opposed the war and muriel took it upon herself to spearhead anti war efforts. She invited three Vietnamese women from the national liberation front to tour Canada, giving talks and meeting delegations of women working toward peace. She also protested Canada's involvement in nuclear weapons testing as she learned about its connection to the United States chemical warfare and Vietnam. In Halifax, muriel also became involved in Quaker faith and found that many friends or members of the religion became active participants in voicer women. Though muriel never faced incarceration for her peaceful protests, she did obtain a federal tax at age 80 for withholding 9% of her federal income tax over several years, the amount she had calculated the country was using for war preparations. Even as she aged, muriel did not stop her activities in person of peace. Muriel became a member of the lively Canadian geriatric group of the raging grannies who used humor and song to bring awareness to social justice issues. While in her cottage, muriel fell and broke her hip. She passed away at hundred years of age in maga Quebec. The Canadian voice of women for peace now presents an annual award for peace activism in muriel's honor. All month we're talking about peace builders. For more information, find us on Facebook and Instagram at podcast. Special thanks to co creators Jenny and Liz Kaplan for having me on as a guest host. As always, we'll be taking a break for the weekend, talk to you Monday.

Muriel Muriel Duckworth Montreal Muriel Ball Ana West Mcgill Halifax Jack Duckworth Anna United States China Cabinet Nova Scotia Department Of Educ Canada Mcgill University Union Theological Seminary Cyprus Jack New York
A highlight from Peacebuilders: Joyce Sikhakhane-Rankin

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:40 min | Last week

A highlight from Peacebuilders: Joyce Sikhakhane-Rankin

"We aim to harness the power of arts and culture to foster conversation and build peace and Cyprus. I'll be your guest host for this month of women. This month, we're highlighting peace builders. In times of conflict, these women have stepped in, bringing their creativity and insight to our facilitate peace across the globe. Today we're talking about a South African journalist who took a stand against the apartheid system. She was imprisoned for her resistance against the racist government, but remained resilient. She is one of many activists who help pave the way for a democratic South Africa. Let's meet joystick akani rankin. Joyce was born in Johannesburg South Africa in 1943. At the time, the country was governed under the apartheid system, which enshrined racial inequality between black and white South Africans into law. The government banned interracial marriages and severely restricted where black citizens could work, live and attend school. As a result, many black South Africans lived in poverty. Joyce's family lived in Orlando west, a township in Soweto. From a young age, Joyce was surrounded by key figures of the anti apartheid movement, growing up, she and her siblings played with the children of Nelson Mandela and Walter sisulu. High profile members of the anti apartheid African National Congress or ANC. In the early 1950s, South Africa introduced the Bantu education act. This law transferred control of all South African schools to the state, including black schools which had mainly been run by missionaries until that point. In doing so, the act stripped black communities and provinces of the ability to control their education and hand at that power to the upper tight government. The act dictated that schools for black children teach lessons in Africa, the language of the country's colonizers. It also made school compulsory, but didn't provide free education for black children, though many white children enjoyed that privilege. Joyce has scored boycott at the act and the sizzle is open to school in their home instead. While she was still in school, Joyce's parents separated, and she and her sister went to live with their paternal grandfather. He was a member of the ANC and regularly hosted local party meetings at his home. Under her grandfather's roof, Joyce listened in on debates and relate messages to ANC comrades. She had later say it was where her tastes were underground activities started. Once Joyce's parents finalized their divorce, she moved back to her mother's home to attend high school. Many students at her new school were involved with a pan africanist Congress and other anti apartheid group and Joyce continued her political development. She also fostered her talents as a writer, and even won a national essay competition. After graduating, joy started reporting for the world. She quickly grew frustrated with the paper's leadership, which was heavily influenced by the conservative Christian movement and unwilling to challenge appetite directly. Joyce left the world and joined the ramp daily mail, becoming the first ever black woman journalist at that paper. Her new publication was more progressive and she had more freedom to write honestly about negative effects of apartheid. While reporting on the forced removals of African people from their ancestral homes, Joyce witness a black woman giving birth in an open field without proper medical attention. This I deeply disturbed her and motivated her to help displace people in her home country. Shop organized the justice and peace commission, a network of priests against appetite that organized medical care for Africans in need. Through this work, she met ten rankin, a Scottish surgeon who she would eventually marry. They dated in secret, remember their relationship was illegal in South Africa because Ken was white and Joyce was black. The couple made a plan to marry abroad. Ken left South Africa to wake Joyce but she never showed up. On May 12th, 1969, police officers appeared at Joyce's door. They arrested her under the terrorism act and apartheid era act that enabled police to arrest just about anyone who resisted state control. She was dragged from her home, forced to leave behind her young son. She was detained alongside other black female activists, including Winnie Mandela, wife of Nelson Mandela. Joyce's many months in prison were marked by psychological abuse and isolation. She would later testify at a hearing of the truth and reconciliation commission about the cruel interrogation tactics used against her, including officials bringing in a small child to remind her of the son she had been forced to leave behind. She said, I refused to be chiseled into an instrument of apartheid's evils, intelligence, and security design. True, I was longing to be with my son. Just to cuddle him, but the price to pay for that was worth our cruel separation. Joyce was tried alongside 21 other anti apartheid black prisoners. Their legal battle was nationally reported and helped store up anger against apartheid. In 1970, Joyce and her fellow activists were finally released from prison. The ANC advised her that she would be in danger as long as she remained in South Africa. Joyce decided it was time to go into exile. In July of 1973, she traveled in secret and eventually reunited with Ken. After years apart, they finally married. Throughout her exile, Joyce remained an active member of the ANC. In 1977, she published her book, a window on sovereign, the work details her personal experiences with racial inequality and poverty, as well as the many systemic ways in which black citizens were oppressed by the government from employment to public transportation to housing and child care. Joy's close the book by writing, there will be no progress until the whole apartheid system is removed. In the early 1990s, Joyce and Ken returned to South Africa. By this time, years of uprisings, protests and economic sanctions from the United States and European countries had weakened the apartheid government that had arrested Joyce. In 1994, South Africa formed a democratic government. Nelson Mandela became the country's first president. After her return to the country, Joyce worked for the national intelligence agency and the South African broadcasting corporation. Joyce has coverage a racial inequity and underground work for the ANC helped bring about real and lasting change for South Africa. As people across the globe still struggle against oppressive regimes, women like Joyce remind us that, as long as there is still resistance, there is hope. All month, we're talking about peace builders. For more information, find us on Facebook and Instagram at will manica podcast. Special thanks to co creators Jenny on this Kaplan for having me as a guest host. Talk to you tomorrow.

Joyce ANC South Africa Akani Rankin Orlando West Walter Sisulu Nelson Mandela Justice And Peace Commission Soweto KEN Johannesburg Cyprus Winnie Mandela Rankin Africa Truth And Reconciliation Commi Congress Apartheid Government White National Intelligence Agency
A highlight from Peacebuilders: Ingrid Washinawatok

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:23 min | Last week

A highlight from Peacebuilders: Ingrid Washinawatok

"I'm the host and producer of the podcast sesta. We aim to harness the power of arts and culture to foster conversation and build peace and Cyprus. I'll be your guest host for this month a woman. Today we're talking about a woman who took on the federal government to reinstate recognition for indigenous nations. Her story will show you how a peaceful relationship with earth directly connects to peace among people. Let's talk about Ingrid Maschine avatar. Ingrid was born on July 31st, 1957. She was a descendant of celebrated menominee leaders. The menominee name her grandfather gave her translates to flying eagle woman. Ingrid grew up in Chicago, but she spent her summers visiting family on the menominee Indian reservation in northern Wisconsin. That was where her heart rate Ingrid enjoyed Viking down alt logging roads, walking in the forest, and swimming in menominee lakes and rivers. Ingrid grew up during the time of Indian termination. During the 1950s and 60s, the federal government tried to end their obligations as trustees to native tribes, obligations which were outlined in hundred year old treaties between sovereign tribes and the federal government. Termination essentially put an end to existing protections, cutting off the little government support that existed and revoking tribal sovereignty. The result disintegrated infrastructures and tribal communities and collapse their economies. Many people were plunged into poverty. The government targeted tribes that were economically successful. In high school, Ingrid became involved in efforts to push Congress to repeal these policies and reinstate recognition of tribes. In 1973, the menominee nation succeeded. Ingrid continued her activism at the university of Minnesota, where she joined the American Indian movement. While studying in Cuba, she met her future husband, a young Palestinian man named Ali Al Issa. They married in Syria and raised their son in New York City where Ingrid worked for the international Indian treaty consul. In a new city with her young family, Ingrid found strength in community and memory. She wrote about the night of October 12th, 1992. The native community in New York was celebrating an hour of silence for mother earth. In their house, Ingrid and Ali, unplug their electric appliances, turn off the lights and spend the night telling stories around the dinner table. With our stories, we carried our son in another epoch, she wrote, my husband and I told stories about our childhood, I decided to narrate the funny ones. I think this will keep alive his bond with the older aunts and uncles whom he met, but doesn't necessarily have a continuous relationship with. This makes them more alive and present. Now my son has a link, a threat that connects him to our posts, which are a part of him. As a peace builder, Ingrid looked to the past for lessons on how to build the future. She knew peace required constant work. That philosophy guided her while cofounding the indigenous women's network, which educated younger generations on the historical struggles of women. She also worked as the executive director of the fund for four directions to revitalize indigenous languages. In an essay on peace, she denounced the theft of indigenous land in the name of better use. Ingrid believed the wealth of the world comes from the earth. As we destroy the ability of the earth to sustain us, we'll lose the ability to address the chronic needs of the poor, the hungry and the landless. Until we make peace with earth, she wrote, there will be no peace in the human community. In 1999, Ingrid was invited to Columbia with three other activists to help the indigenous uwa community establish an education program for children and help fight a bit for oil exploration in the area. On February 25th, they were kidnapped. In early March their bodies were found on the Venezuelan border. The Colombian farc rebel group later took responsibility for the killings. Ingrid was 41 years old. Ten years after her death, the uwa people sent a letter of remembrance to the families of activists. It read, for us, they're not dead. Their life work and their memory live on. We thank them for their dedication and time offered for our culture for a spiritual leaders and for the balance of Planet Earth and mother nature. Uva children and elders remember them at every sunset. Their shadows still walk with us, accompanying us along the path

Ingrid Federal Government Ingrid Maschine Menominee Lakes Ali Al Issa Cyprus American Indian Movement Wisconsin University Of Minnesota Fund For Four Directions To Re Swimming Chicago Cuba Syria Congress New York City ALI UWA New York Colombian Farc Rebel Group
A highlight from Session 284: ICYMI, Understanding Seasonal Affective Disorder

Therapy for Black Girls

07:45 min | Last week

A highlight from Session 284: ICYMI, Understanding Seasonal Affective Disorder

"My archive that not only matches the literal season we're in, but also reflects the world we're still trying to figure out how to navigate. Growing up, you might have heard that people's moods change with the season. But did you know that there's actually some science behind that? Despite fall and winter being a time for family traditions and celebrations, it's also a time when more people may experience feelings of sadness, irritability, and fatigue. In this conversation with doctor Ellison Powell hicks, we talked about seasonal affective disorder or sad tips for managing depressive symptoms. How we can tell if symptoms are something we should be concerned about. How to support ourselves in this reimagined holiday season. And some of the relationship challenges that arose during the pandemic and how to manage them. If something resonates with you while enjoying our conversation, please share with us on social media using the hashtag TPG in session or join us over in the sister circle to talk more in depth about the episode. You can join us at community and therapy for black girls dot com. Here's our conversation. Thank you so much for joining us today, doctor alley. Well, thank you for having me. Yes, it feels like we are overdue for a conversation. So I'm very glad we were able to get you on the schedule. So you may have seen this meme floating around social media with all the Spider-Man's pointing at one another, right? With seasonal affective depression meets COVID depression means normal depression, right? And it kind of feels like that is where many of us are, right? Like it just feels like there's been so much going on this year. And now we are hitting peak winter season. Let's start off by defining what seasonal affective disorder is. Well, what it is is it's an increase in depressive symptoms around specific seasons. Most commonly those seasons would be the beginning of fall through winter. Some people do experience some seasonal effective disorder in spring. That is very rare. The average person experiences this decrease in affect, this increase in sadness, maybe even some thoughts of suicide, low volition, low desire to do things that they used to live to do sleep, alterations, changes in diet, and maybe even some level of irritability. The experience some of those symptoms normally starting in fall or winter. There really isn't any difference in what those symptoms look like versus you just had depressive disorder, not otherwise specified or something like that. So can you talk about what people might be expecting or experiencing this year given what 2020 has been like? I think you said it perfectly. It's the too many Spider-Man like model. We have too many overlaying issues. There's a lot of issues happening right now because I mean we also have Black Lives Matter. We also have people concerned about their health insurance. We have people worried about their jobs. We have people worried about their rights on multiple different groups that are doing the threats from DACA people to people dealing with LGBT issues. There's so many co occurring stressors right now. It's something that I think we haven't seen in a hundred years. And so most of us were not alive and those of us who are a hundred weren't alive enough to have done anything a hundred years ago. And so what people can expect and what is a really typical is maybe some increased sadness, right? A level of sadness may be some slight changes in rhythm, like for example, people really haven't been getting out of bed at the same time that they used to when they used to have a job that they had to go to every day, so they had to be up at 5 30 in the morning to get ready. Maybe you're waking up at 7 30 instead or 8 o'clock or 9 o'clock. And some of those things are kind of expected, when you want to begin to get concerned is when these alterations begin to damage or alter the function of your life. So if now your diet and your appetite has changed so much that you're either gaining weight without trying to or losing weight without trying to. That's something to be concerned about if you notice that your sleep is changing so much that now you're sleeping throughout the whole day or you're not sleeping at night at all when you used to. These are the types of changes that you want to keep an eye out for. And how would we know though doctor Ellie, I mean, because so much of that already changed because of the pandemic, right? And so how would I know whether my functioning looks different now than it might have? Would I be comparing it to last year this time? What marker should I be looking for? I say we might need to narrow the comparison window now compare it to two months ago. It's a three months ago because we do have a baseline COVID function. And I think that we've kind of reached a point, at least here in California, I can only speak to. We've been in a level of quarantine since March 19th. And so we've all had a number of different experiences, like for me, the first two weeks I was petrified. Utterly petrified, I didn't sleep. I was in bed all day though. I was sad. I was anxious. I had so many emotions. It was really difficult for me to function. And then I started to kind of lift and everything started to kind of smooth out. Am I the same way I was last year at this time? I don't think so. But I think we begin to identify a rhythm that we have for COVID. So if you, let's say, I don't know who's doing this, but if you like showered every day during COVID, I don't know who's doing that. Maybe I'm telling them myself. I did shower today. But if you showered every day and now you notice you're showing once a week. Or you're showing every third day or you're showing every other day. That's something you can notice. So comparing your current functioning to where it was a few months ago. I think is the way we have to treat it now. That's a good idea. And let's back up a little bit. So what is it about the change in season that causes this difference in functioning? Yeah, it is all about sunshine. It is all about sunshine is that humans need sunshine in order to create vitamin D it's one of the best ways we create vitamin D obviously now we have vitamins and things that we can take supplements. But vitamin D from the sun is so important it helps to elevate mood. It helps to regulate circadian rhythms as well. So we also have melatonin that's impacted by our access to the sun and as well as serotonin and serotonin is something we're all very familiar with when it comes to people with depression, one of the first medications they take is an SSRI, which is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. So serotonin is really important in the way that we process emotions. And so when we have these two chemicals and one vitamin or mineral that are off, it can really change our behavior, the way that we feel in our own skin and the way that we relate to others. And so it is key to try to get as much sunlight as possible if you're in a state that has any California has some right now. But other states are under cloud cover. And so a lot of people have been getting those lights. Those are some nights, and it's really important because as we have more nighttime, we just have less hours in the day. One of my best friends with the Sweden, and I think they're getting like 5 hours of sunshine a day now. And winter hasn't even fully hit. Right, right. So can you talk more about the lights I know a lot of people do like the light boxes, right? And I love that they have become so much more accessible because ten years ago, I remember we would rip them out to students in the counseling center, right? Because it wasn't something that you could individually afford. But it feels like now there are lots of affordable versions. Can you talk a little bit about how the light boxes work? Yes. I release the same type of wavelength that the sun would. And so you can sit near these lights sitting upon what kind of light you have. You can turn it up as high as you can. You can get some of the benefits that you would have had from sunshine from these lights. And it's particularly important for people of color because melanin helps to protect us from the light from UV rays by reflecting more of the UV rays back. And so what it does is it

Depressive Symptoms Depression Ellison Powell Hicks Daca Depressive Disorder Ellie California Sweden
A highlight from Election Recap: Dont Underestimate Us

The Suburban Women Problem

05:58 min | Last week

A highlight from Election Recap: Dont Underestimate Us

"It was really awesome when I saw Lindsey Graham say, this is no red wave. No. Suburban women problem confirm. Yeah. I know, yes, yes. Fact check true. We gotta address the suburban women problem because it's real. Welcome to the suburban women problem. A podcast for red wine and blue. Hi everyone, thanks for listening. I'm Jasmine Clark. I'm Amanda Weinstein. I'm Rachel vindman, and you're listening to the suburban women problem. So we're back together for the first time since the midterms and there is so much to talk about. First, Jasmine, congratulations. That's the most important thing. It was so excited to hear that. So I think we found out about yours a little bit after my husband, so my husband, Casey won, too. And then I was just like, yours is the next one. I was just like waiting to you. I was like, come on, Jasmine. Come on, jazz. I know. It was actually a really long night. My Friends were texting me like, have you heard from your from Jasmine and Amanda? We were in London, so we went to sleep and then we woke up and we were watching and it was like good, but we didn't get the really good information to the next day, I think, but we were, you know, Alex, I have talked about it so much, and that both you, Jasmine, and Casey, you put in the work. I mean, you went out and talked to the voters and pressed upon people how important that was. And I know before the election, I was so banking for Georgia. And it seems silly you call and you're like, just wanted to remind you tomorrow's election day. And you know, even my daughter was like really who doesn't know that. And but you know, people were, they were nice. I only talked to a few people because most people don't answer, but I just, that's what I'm most proud of. It's just that example of you guys putting in the really, really hard work. And it's such a privilege to be able to watch what you do that. And I think Jasmine, you and I know Casey change a lot of minds just by meeting people that you don't have to change who people are, but you connect with people and how you connect with them and that maybe changes who they vote for. we exceeded all expectations. You know, we were really expecting it to be a lot closer than it was. And I think a lot of that can be attributed to number one, amazing, amazing, amazing, volunteers and grassroots efforts. But also, as you said, just one on one conversations, you know, but when I would talk to people, I will say this. When I would talk to people, there were lots of people that said, oh, I know who you are because you have been in the community, or I know who you are, because you tell us what's going on on next door or Facebook or this or that. And so I think some people just want to have a representative that talks to them. That isn't just sitting on a hill somewhere, like a king, but that's in the community, just talking to them. Oh yeah, that's such a good point. You show up for us and we'll show up for you. Exactly, exactly. If I love. It makes sense. It just is so complicated. I mean, it really does make sense. But a lot of people don't do that. No, of course. I mean, so we have a lot of good news. We have good news all over the place. I don't think anyone was prepared for the level of I'll say I was not prepared for the level of good news we would have from this not red wave more like the mid cycle spotting. Can I confess something? My head was telling me, you know, Rachel, you went out and talked to all those women and you met all those women at events and literally zero people said, hey, Rachel, the most important thing to me is the economy. No one said that. And everyone, it was extremism of some kind, is what every single person said. But I was like, you know, my heart rate is still pretty nervous. But you know, I was still putting like, I don't know, because all the polls, and I know I kept preaching that we shouldn't listen to the polls, but it was there, you know? And it was just still looms. Yeah, and everyone kept talking about it. And it's better than I could have imagined, but also it is exactly what the people told me. And I'm sure it's the same that people told you, Jasmine and Casey, as they were out talking to people that this is the case, but it really, it's hard not to let it get into your decision, but the thing is, is no matter what, we all hold up power to vote. When you see something like Ron Johnson and that 23 or four billionaires gave $29 million to spend on his race and I was very disappointed that Mandela Barnes lost. That is so much money. Right. But it doesn't buy anything. I mean, the buys a lot of advertising. They did win the race. But I'm just saying that it's still the people who voted still determined that. And I think we really lose sight of the power that we have. And I really hope that this election reminds people. And I've already seen, I've already seen some bad takes where people are even like, well, it was maybe the economy and reproductive rights. And I already don't like that taken here's why because it comes out and you know that it's the economy stupid. Here's my thing. Reproductive rights are the economy stupid. And so I've already, I don't like that take. I think women know that when you're talking about, is it the economy reproductive rights are absolutely the economy for us. Right. And if you look at some of these super competitive races, so I love to peek in, especially the competitive races, like what did they do? So one of them was pat Ryan, who is a veteran and a dam and a really competitive house in New York, and he said that his message was consistent the whole time.

Jasmine Casey Jasmine Clark Amanda Weinstein Rachel Vindman Lindsey Graham Amanda Rachel Alex Georgia London Mandela Barnes Facebook Ron Johnson Pat Ryan New York
A highlight from Tuning Into Your Energy with Rebecca Ahmed

Women Worldwide

06:47 min | Last week

A highlight from Tuning Into Your Energy with Rebecca Ahmed

"Today's episode, all about energy. And there was a lot of energy between me and today's guest. I sat down with Rebecca Ahmed, who is a coach, consultant, speaker, and she's also a chief energy officer. Rebecca and I, we talked about defining energy and being aware of it because energy is all around us, whether it's personal energy, mental energy, physical energy, energy, and the environment. And she shared that there are different levels of energy and different principles and where you start. How to be aware of your energy and what that means. And then we pivoted a little bit into motivation and knowing your worth and having the energy behind that to even go into a conversation, not a negotiation around equal pay and what that looks like in the workplace for women. I really enjoyed this episode and I felt the energy is still feel it and I know you'll do the same. So rather than me going on and on about Rebecca, it's time for you to hear a little bit about her journey and the advice that she shares. Hi, I'm dear to brackenridge. I've spent an entire career helping women to share stories, nurture relationships, grow their brands, but most of all, to find their voices so they can make a difference. Do you feel stuck? Do you want to power up your own voice? Women worldwide features a stories of passionate women who have navigated big career challenges and some of the toughest changes. These professionals offer deep insight and advice to inspire you and to help you uncover what's holding you back. Let women worldwide ignite your passion so you can excel in life. Rebecca, welcome. Welcome to women worldwide. Thank you. Thank you for having me. Excited to be here. It is such a pleasure. Let's just dive right in because I find it interesting that you have the title chief energy officer. How does one get on the path to becoming a chief energy officer and learning how to shift energy? Yeah, I'm sure there's tons of different ways, but I can tell you about my path. I come from hospitality and primarily human resources or people services depending on what type of organization you worked for. And through that coaching and working with people in general, it led me to join the coaching community. So I went to iPad and they specialized specifically in teaching you about leading with energy. And it's a yearlong program and you become certified in this and from there, I've really taken this work that I've learned into organizations that I've previously worked for or newer organizations. And also built it within a coaching business with my individual clients. Well, that's fascinating because we are energy. Ways that we can use it. I believe we're made up of energy. You can't kill energy. And I think the question is, is it going to be frenetic energy or stressful energy that doesn't serve us sometimes? Or can you harness it? So maybe you could explain some of the ways that you help professionals to understand the energy and how to better tap into it. Yeah. So it's your personal energy. That can be mental that can be physical, that can be even environmental. So you're exactly right. We are energy. And there are 7 levels of them. And so when you learn about energy, you learn what is serving you or what is not serving you. So that stressful frenetic energy that you just mentioned, that's part of there's always advantages and just advantages to every single energy level. But learning how to harness them, learning how to understand them and create shifts is where you can really start saying, oh, this is serving me versus this isn't serving me. And that's the power that professionals and individuals get to learn when they work with someone like myself because they're like, oh, I have this choice. And I've taught people I have 5 successful energetic principles. How to use those. Because that really creates that shift. So the 5 energetic principles. If someone was going to start off, if they recognize that their energy isn't serving them, they're going into the workplace every day. They're feeling stressed. They're doing a lot, but nothing really is getting done, would they start or the 5 principles are they linear where you have to do one first, then the next? Where do you actually start? Yeah, so you start with an energetic assessment. So I provide an assessment and I debrief and what I'm able to show within this assessment is how are you using your energy in a day to today, where is that serving you? And then where is stress coming in? Where is that frenetic energy that you talked about? And how was that serving? Is that leaving you exhausted? Is that leaving you angry? Those are different levels. And based on how you're using your energy, then we start pulling in these different successful principles to say, this will help serve you better. And I can give just an example, for instance. Yes, that'd be great. Perfect. So I know a lot of women they love to serve, right? So care is just something that comes naturally and I see that consistently in the women that I work with. And so when you're constantly giving, giving, giving, giving. And you don't prioritize your own needs. Where do a lot of people go? They go to exhaustion. And they're like, I can't handle anything anymore. Or they get frustrated, right? They're like, I'm being taken advantage of. And then usually a lot of times, especially when I'll be like, it's not that bad. You got this. And so this hamster wheel effect. On the hamster wheel. This is a really good example. Yeah, and teach people how to get out of that hamster wheel. How can you add energetic moments throughout your day to basically recharge your battery? Think of it as a phone. I don't think of this as self care. This is actually recharging yourself. And when you do that throughout the day, the same way you do your phone, you break that hamster wheel. And that's one way to do it. That's just a really specific example that I know so many women resonate with because they're like, oh my gosh, I'm so exhausted. And

Rebecca Rebecca Ahmed Brackenridge
Against White Feminism With Rafia Zakaria

Woman's Hour

02:14 min | 1 year ago

Against White Feminism With Rafia Zakaria

"Yesterday we spoke to the writer and campaigner. Julie bendel who in her new book is against type of feminism that she sees as most benefiting men today. I joined by raphael sakaria. Any american feminist. Who in her new book is arguing against type of feminism most benefits white women on behalf of domestic violence victims as a lawyer and a human rights activists years. She sees the issue of race as the biggest obstacle to true solidarity among women and she is calling for a moment of reckoning. Halbrook is called against white feminism rafi. Good morning welcome to the program. Good morning how are you. Thank you for being with us. I'm against white feminism. It is a very striking title at anew. Say you've taken a risk in writing this book. Why did you do it well off to be really blunt. I did it. Because i was quite tired. Like women Saying all the right things pretending to be low end even committed to Quote unquote intersectional. Feminism Where they recognize the importance of considering race and gender But when it comes to their actual lines were actually seating any space four women of color. It's an absolute no can do you. Now so you know for instance if you know if if if if a group of say why an women of color line for to be the top parson organization had in the book i say National organization of women They face tremendous marginalization personal attacks and all sorts of harassment. Honestly so i was just honestly tried to. I was i was done with it. You know i was done with. This pretends that women of color have to engage in to be sort of accepted into a system that's been created by white women and four white women

Julie Bendel Raphael Sakaria Halbrook Rafi Parson Organization National Organization Of Women
Activist Barbara Rose Johns Profoundly Impacted Her Community as a Teenager

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:20 min | 1 year ago

Activist Barbara Rose Johns Profoundly Impacted Her Community as a Teenager

"Barbara faced stark disparities in education quality. Her small one story school building had no gym and no cafeteria but it was forced to accommodate over four hundred and fifty students. On insulated shacks were built outside to hold additional students and learning out. There was particularly difficult in cold weather. One january in nineteen forty prince. Edward county had particularly frigid temperatures with readings of sixteen degrees below zero. In contrast to barbara school the nearby white school had two stories. Great facilities and fewer than four hundred students. Barbara shared her concerns about the conditions of her school with her music teacher. Who responded why. Don't you do something about it. At first barbara felt discouraged. She was just a student. What could she do. But the final straw for barbara came one april morning. She was helping her for younger siblings. Get to the bus stop. When she realized she forgot her lunch she ran back home to fetch it when she returned. She realized she'd missed her bus. And she was forced to try hitchhiking for a ride. She stood on the curb for an hour and no one stopped to help then. She saw the so called white bus drive by it was half empty. Barbara's bus was always packed to the brim. She leader wrote in her diary right. Then and there. I decided that indeed something had to be done about this inequality so. Barbara's sprung into action. On april twenty third nineteen fifty. One barbara forged note from the school principal to the teachers telling them together. All four hundred fifty students in the auditorium when the students sat down they were shocked to find barbara on stage. She delivered a speech and shared her plan. All the students would walk out of the school until a new building was under construction. Some students were afraid they'd get in trouble or end up arrested. Barbara replied the farm bill. Jail isn't big enough to hold us.

Barbara Edward County Barbara School Nearby White School
The Catholic Church: Scandal in the Shadows With Margaret Mary OConnor

Beyond Picket Fences

01:44 min | 1 year ago

The Catholic Church: Scandal in the Shadows With Margaret Mary OConnor

"We are excited to have margaret. Mary o'connor with us today. How are you armed doing real good ladies having a year. Yes for so thrilled. Where would you like your story to begin. Well i guess it begins back in the nineteen fifties. When i was a young girl and i was raised in an irish catholic family and there was one incident in particular that regard a birthday gift that my brother paul received that actually brought out the inequality of woman in the catholic church and my mom had bought my brother Replica was a rural cardboard replica of church altar. So i remember bob were so excited. He immediately went behind the altar and assume the row of playing the part of a priest and he told myself and my twin sister pat Bring some chairs in here so we both got a share for ourselves and put him down right in front of the altar in we were like playing the role of parishoners. Well everything was fine until a certain point one. I remember. I stood up. And i told paul basically I wanted to play. The ro as appraised. And i'll never forget what he said he said can't be appraised. Your girl only girl only men. Can you know play their part saw. I basically learned a young age very quickly. That there definitely was a difference As far as you know assuming such a position in our

Mary O'connor Pat Bring Margaret Paul Catholic Church BOB
How Do We Reconcile Our Love of Works by Problematic Creators?

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

02:04 min | 1 year ago

How Do We Reconcile Our Love of Works by Problematic Creators?

"Snow. We'll know that we often refer to harry potter. Buffy the vampire slayer and they are not the only texts. We mentioned that. Have problematic creators. Many of the axes. From the harry potter films have come out to reassure fans that it is irc as to love the prophecy while not supporting the message of hate. It's creative preaches but is it really so easy. How connected are creators to that creations and has it changed in recent years with the rise of the cult of celebrity. Let's start things off a discussion of just weeden severe. A long time. He was held up. As as a great feminist icon. Making all these showers female leads and and really strong women. Do you think his feminist messages have been tarnished by his recent fall from grace or are there still valuable feminist messages to be gleaned from buffy firefly dollhouse and more. You're honest. I've actually only familiar with buffet. I not really watched file a house if you knew is so. I can't really speak from the buffy. Sound point and i am still puffy fat. I think it would be really hard not to be. I was pretty shocked when the allegations came out. And also it's extremely depressing when you read off because anything that you've held close to halt and that you've big doppler on shows like this in to other people as a standard to aspire to and then you realize that this create a really things let us a bit of a you know a knife in the heart but i feel like i think we'll be talking about this later about separating the creative from the often the artist. I think there's still a lot of stuff in buffy. Maybe not so much in the later episodes electing later seasons even but in the early stuff. I feel that for its time. It still very groundbreaking. Yeah

Harry Potter
Turning the Spotlight on Ballet With Author Chloe Angyal

Burn It All Down

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Turning the Spotlight on Ballet With Author Chloe Angyal

"Clothing angel. And i am a journalist and autho and the author of the new book turning point how a new generation of dances is saving ballet from itself which is a reported work about ballet and about the future of ballet about what has to change to make sure that bali is safe and fair and relevant an equitable off foam that can survive and thrive in the twentieth century. Yes steve written this new book that pulls a curtain back on the ballet world. And now i'm going to do the thing that i always hate when people do to me from doing it to you and i'm going to read the first paragraph of your book at you i can also i can also recite it for you. Buy hot. i'm not going to. But i could do to events so i think i could probably do it do verbatim. It's perfect. so this is. I mean you set it up really quickly for the reader. Write quote every day and dance studios all across america legions of children lineup at the bar and take a ballet class. This book is about what they learned. They're not just about dance but about gender race and power about the value of their bodies and minds about their place in the world. Both in and outside of dance. We're definitely going to get to some of that in a minute but first khloe. Let's get the tough question out of the way because you're here. Burn down feminist. Sports podcast is ballet sport. It doesn't matter this is a this is a debate that periodically royals. The dance world is dance. A sport is at an is it bones it somehow some of the food category and what i usually say is whether or not ballet is. A sport is kind of irrelevant because dances get injured like athletes and get paid as well as artists. They sustain the kind of physical toll that athletes do with none of the support and very little the cultural respect and resources that athletes get and so whether or not they full into either categories. Really irrelevant. I'm sort of more interested. In what their experiences are rather than what label we should be slapping on them

Bali Steve Khloe America
What's Next for TV's White Guys?

Slate's Double X Gabfest

02:27 min | 1 year ago

What's Next for TV's White Guys?

"We're going to try this episode to critique the position of white guys on television without sort of repeating the problem that white guys on television currently present. they're not the point and yet they're the point. I want to dive in by talking about this great piece that catherine wrote for vulture about the crisis. That white guys are going through. Maybe it's not really an emergency so bad so white guys are still of course all over television as they are in the world but they are on television in a different way in certainly in some new shows and they have been in the past. And you can see that in shows like peacocks. Sitcom rutherford falls. Amc's genre bending. Kevin can f- himself and the two big hits of summer. Hbo is hotel drama. The white lotus featuring a bevy of white guys. we're going to get into. And of course ted lasso. Basically the white guys who used to be. Tv's default protagonists are not but who are they. And what does it say about them. And us catherine have. We're going to keep talking now. I would just shamelessly poach from your piece. So why don't you tell us central argument. Yeah for what i think the framing of it as a crisis it has been really interesting to see responses from two different sides of sort of people who look at the headlines immediately. Put off by people who are like. I don't wanna hear about a crisis for white guys like i'm done. We talked about them too much. And then of course from the other like terrifying side of white guys being you know extremely mad at me and sending me all kinds of emails but it was in response to something. I started noticing as a pattern in new television shows that were coming out this summer and it was something i saw in. Rutherford falls and kevin can f- himself in particular. I had this sudden realization that they're like the same show at the core and the idea is that there used to be this white guy who was the obvious default protagonist of the show. He would be like the dad figure he'd be the beloved buffoon he might be like the chosen one character or the love interest or this charismatic. Anti hero figure and now that we have begun to look at the stories that we put on television and say like what if we had other kinds of people in the world who are the main characters that white guy figure no longer works as the

Rutherford Falls Ted Lasso Catherine AMC HBO Kevin
The Life and Work of Mamie Phipps Clark

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:12 min | 1 year ago

The Life and Work of Mamie Phipps Clark

"Me was born on april eighteenth. Nineteen seventeen in hot springs arkansas. Her father was a well to do physician. His position gave the family comfort. Rarely afforded to black people at the time especially in the jim crow south while mamie attributed her later career successes to growing up the she did. She was not shielded from the stark racial realities outside her home. When she was six years old she witnessed a lynching in an interview in nineteen seventy six. She described knowing she was black at a young age. She said i became acutely aware of that in childhood. Because you had to have a certain kind of protective armor about you all the time. After graduating from high school. Mimi received a scholarship to attend howard university. A historically black college in washington. Dc she intended to study math which she loved but the professors proved uninspiring. Then she met a student. Named kenneth clarke who encouraged her to try out psychology. Kenneth suggestion led to me means lifelong career and to their forty six year. Long marriage the summer after mamie graduated. She worked in the law office of the prominent. Acp lawyer charles hamilton. Houston it was there that she witnessed preparation for racial segregation cases. When she went back to howard in the fall for her master's degree in psychology she planned to address racial disparities in her work. Mimi's thesis surveyed one hundred fifty black preschool age children and set out to understand at which age black children became aware that they were black for the study. She and kenneth presented the children with different photographs including of white boys black boys and images of animals and other objects. They asked the boys to pick which picture looked like them and then asked the girls to pick which picture look like their brother or other male relative mamie and kenneth concluded that the boys showed a racial awareness at three or four years old which kenneth described as disturbing mamie and kenneth were on the forefront of a shift in the field

Mamie Jim Crow Mimi Arkansas Kenneth Clarke Howard University Charles Hamilton Kenneth Washington Houston Howard
Unlearning the Patriarchy With Andrea Owen

UnF*ck Your Brain to Create Feminist Confidence

01:29 min | 1 year ago

Unlearning the Patriarchy With Andrea Owen

"I really like concrete. Kinda actionable gangsta spokane us. I'm really big about that. So you have the end of every chapter you. Walk your readers through something you call the une learning which i also love. 'cause it's kind of something mystical quest a little bit like an sounds like or like a little bit of like a cult initiation like i'm just i'm into the title this term and therefore steps so i'm hoping obviously she get the and read it for themselves but just as a little preview. Can you tell us what those four steps are. Kind of. Why importance such. They're in every chapter. Yes it is like a secret. You know little justice league that we have secret handshake and all that kind of thing check engine. You just can't see them. The reason i wanted it to be called the learning is because as you well now and all your listeners know like we've been conditioned socialized to be a certain way for decades and it's not just about learning new tools which are great in which we all should do but it is about learning the conditioning that we've all been taught so there's forceps in the first one is and this is really great for people who are just starting out on their personal development journey or seasons people to kind of go back to brass tacks. The first one is to pay attention. You can fix what you don't know is messy for lack of a better expression so it's about paying attention to your thoughts paying attention to your own internalised misogyny paying attention to where you're not showing up out of fear and looking at is that your conditioning and then the next step is to just get

Spokane
What Does It Mean for the UK To Warmly Welcome Afghan Refugees?

Woman's Hour

01:39 min | 1 year ago

What Does It Mean for the UK To Warmly Welcome Afghan Refugees?

"Morning. The government has set out more details of operation warm welcome the scheme to resettle thousands of afghan refugees all of those who've arrived on the afghan relocations and assistance policy. The scheme are helping. Those who helps schemes gives me helping those who helped the british military in uk. Government in afghanistan will be given immediate indefinite leave to remain the government's pledging twelve million pounds for additional school places. Three million pounds to support. Nhs access and a five million. Pound top fa- councils in england wells and scotland to support the and meet the costs and help meet the cost of renting properties. Here's mr for overseeing. Afghan resettlement victoria atkin speaking earlier on the today program. We ten thousand people who are in quarantine hotels that moment This is the largest ever evacuation scheme in living memory and so it is going to take off and local of an charges local communities a bit of time to put this framework in place. But that is what we're working on and so today's announcements not just indefinitely to remain but also our determination help children Start their education again. The extra funding for them to support them a school the funding for adults to learn english. Those who don't speak english well also The promises in relation to housing the discretionary funding. We're giving to councils. This is all part of enormous Exercise in integration. And just remember that the of the twenty thousand who will come here over. The coming years will be women and children.

England Wells Victoria Atkin Afghanistan FA Scotland UK Government
Ignite Your Creative Spark With Marneta Viegas

Beyond Picket Fences

02:22 min | 1 year ago

Ignite Your Creative Spark With Marneta Viegas

"Her first podcast mar netto talk to us about relaxed kids and then toward the end of the podcast. She talked a little bit about her. New passion called. Ignite your creative spark where she works with women. And i when she told me about this. I lit up. Because i think this is absolutely fabulous and it goes right along with why we started beyond picket fences. About how as as women specifically we get trapped in kind of a the monotony of life. And what we should be doing what we're told to do and we just kind of go through the motions and then eventually we kind of lose ourselves. And we've talked about that quite a bit and lots of other podcasts with other women and with with each other so when you said you have this program i just. I'm so interesting. And i'm sure a lot of people are so. Can you talk to us about why you started. Ignite your creative spark and what it is. Yes so it was just literally at the beginning of this year. I thought i wanted to create a membership club. And i wasn't really sure what i wanted to do. I thought it would be something to relax. Kids and the more. I just sat down very quietly. I my actual thing. You know why. I'm here on this. Earth is my main value would be creativity. That is the thing that has driven me all the way. Through all my work. I used to for twenty five years. Direct to children's pantomime. And do the costumes and i wrote the show's sa- creativity at writing. The books has been my thread. And so i felt it wouldn't be so nice to have a club with other women where we could just be creative. Almost like unite like ago guide club for women. And so i still. This is what i'm going to do and it's ignites your creative spot club. And the idea is that encouraging women to make that make an ordinary life because our lives are ordinary magical special extraordinary and colorful

Mar Netto
Girls Who Code CEO Tarika Barrett Creating a Path for Equity

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

02:10 min | 1 year ago

Girls Who Code CEO Tarika Barrett Creating a Path for Equity

"The gender gap in tech starts pretty early. Look at computer. Science students. Roughly four out of five bachelor degrees in that field. Go to men. That's where the nonprofit girls who code aims to get girls interested in the field at a young age as early as third grade since it was founded in twenty twelve. Hundreds of thousands of girls have gone through its clubs and summer immersion programs. Winco vid meant more in person classes. They moved totally online than that actually allowed them to grow. Enrollment went up two hundred percent rica. Barrett took over as ceo of girls who code this year. She said they had to design their new model with the hardest to reach girls in mind. We knew our girls for driving too fast food parking lots to get wifi so we thought about life. We thought about hardware. We thought about living circumstances right often are girls. Couldn't even turn their cameras on because they were sharing a computer with other siblings and we tried to bring best practices in digital learning so shorter days live and asynchronous instruction small group work office hours and project based learning. Because we knew that we'd have to do that for our students and that we were doing the kinds of outreach and really being responsive to the needs of our community how did you design your courses specifically for slow internet connections so we sent out a survey to our participants asking everything. What do you need do need us to send you a computer. Do you have brought them. And even as they answered those questions. And we fill those gaps. We still had things happen in real time. We have teaching assistants. Who are former girls. Who code students. Who went through the summer immersion program there there with the facilitators in this virtual classroom to step in and trouble shoot at any given moment and so that coupled with both synchronous and asynchronous instruction meant that even if a girl got stuck with some tech thing that happened that could always be made up in office hours or there was always someone following up. And saying what do you need. And frankly we have to bring some of that thinking back into the fall even if we're in person because it really made the difference for so many students that we don't want to lose that kind of innovation.

Barrett Rica
This Is Why Britney’s Conservatorship Is So Toxic

Unladylike

02:12 min | 1 year ago

This Is Why Britney’s Conservatorship Is So Toxic

"Now. Usually california law requires at least five days. Notice that you might be placed under conservative ship. But in brittany's case a judge determined that her mental health was dire enough to go ahead and make her father jamie spears her conservative or right than in their britney's conservative ship has never been a secret but a lot of us never batted an eye on it like after all in the six years between her breakup with justin timberlake and the start of her conservative ship brittany was painted as reckless drugged out and crazy like surely such drastic intervention was warranted right but then in late june of this year britney publicly testified for the first time about how she really feels about the conservative ship after lied and told the whole world. I'm okay and i'm happy. It's a lie. I thought i just. Maybe i said that enough. Maybe i might become happy. Because i've been in denial. I've been in shock. I am traumatized. Britney's testimony was a bombshell. We learned that. She feels used and abused that she was forced to get an ud that this thirty nine year. Old woman isn't even allowed to ride in her long term boyfriends car without permission. But arguably the bigger bombshell in this whole story is that brittany's conservative ship also known as guardianship is not an outlier an estimated one point. Three million people in the us are also living under various types of conservative ships. Which means that they and brittany are legally unpersonalised. And it really does mean that your civil rights your autonomy to make legally binding choices as simple as deciding where you're going to live or deciding who you're going to spend time with. We take for granted if we're not under conservatives that we can make those choices and they will be respected. But if you're under a conservative ship or guardianship another person has the power to make those choices for you. Your person hood is in a lot of ways taken from you.

Britney Jamie Spears Brittany Justin Timberlake California United States
What Can Afghan Women Do To Get out the Country?

Woman's Hour

02:15 min | 1 year ago

What Can Afghan Women Do To Get out the Country?

"You're a young woman in afghanistan who doesn't have joel nationality doesn't have particular money but is desperately concerned. What maybe wants to leave. What can what can you do right now. Well i spoken amin recently. Yesterday i spoken to three of them. One one of them already escaped to iran. And she's supposed to come back to afghanistan and she's absolutely desperate to go somewhere else because iran is refusing to keep her in the country and she has got relatives were in the taliban group and she has already been warned so many times to stop her activities as a women's activist and as a human rights activists at a but she didn't and she's a famous a women's rights activists and and she has been told that if you return you and your eleven year old daughter will be killed how huron she just escaped from the neighboring province herald in the west end western afghanistan and Now that's one example. Another example is another woman that i've interviewed her on numerous occasions and she's very active. She used to be very active in the northern city of mazaar-i-sharif and she told me yesterday and she sent me some voice messages on saying that To taunton have a blacklist. Oath all these People who were active and were Promoting women's rights and lgbt rights or a human rights and and they go door to door knock on the doors and search for these people but the taliban are say no. That's not true. Thus they use propaganda does the wisden propaganda against us. And we are not doing that. But what we to saint from the ground songs ghanistan from these provinces and from the eye witnesses and they are telling us a totally different story. They're saying note they even send us some video clips and images that they take secretly and On the ground the situation is different. is a chaos panic and every woman wants to were active. Wants to leave

Afghanistan Iran Amin Taliban Mazaar Joel Herald Sharif Taunton
Sex Worker Lorelei Lee: Sex Work is Work

Call Your Girlfriend

02:27 min | 1 year ago

Sex Worker Lorelei Lee: Sex Work is Work

"Lord. I thank you so much. For being on the podcast. You so much for having me. We've been wanting to have a more in depth conversation about legislation related to sex work for quite some time on the show. Kamala harris was a guest. We had on last spring believe and when we asked her about it she said a lot of things that we really wanted to go back and examine and have frankly like not gotten around to it until now so i really appreciate you being here and engaging in this conversation with us yeah. I'm happy to do it so in this article that you publish and plus one recently you return to in a couple of different ways. This idea of there being a kind of binary in terms of how sex work and sex workers are framed by people with different opinions and stakes sometimes not very strong stakes in the issue. And i'm wondering if you could kind of outline a little bit about what that binary is kind of two views are. Yeah so. I think it's complicated. There seemed to have developed in the last twenty years these public conceptions of sex work and trafficking as being dichotomies. And i think this originates with the conversations in two thousand around the passage of the tv. Pa which is a the main sex trafficking law and try and labor trafficking as well In the united states also the palermo protocols were passed in the same year and that's an international trafficking protocol and there were arguments there between the various groups about whether trading sex with something that could be done consensually or whether it was always coerced. And so that sort of i think merged with carol lee coined the term sex work in one thousand nine hundred eight or seventy nine as a way of talking about her own feeling of having agency in the work and actually as a response to language that she felt was object defying that was being used by feminists at the time so describe all sex work as the use of women's bodies and so she wanted to use the word work to sort of push back talk about agency

Kamala Harris Palermo PA Carol Lee United States
What We Learned From the Andrew Cuomo Scandal

Slate's Double X Gabfest

02:26 min | 1 year ago

What We Learned From the Andrew Cuomo Scandal

"Today we're going to be talking about andrew. Cuomo who left the governor's mansion in new york this week after a month long investigation into accusations of sexual harassment from several former. Staffers that investigation yielded a report that was so damaging the even cuomo who has been weathering scandals by simply toughing them out for years and years couldn't keep doing it. I'd like to talk through. Wyatt took so long until all of a sudden it didn't for him to leave. Step down and i'd also really liked to talk about what this particular sequence of events could and should teach us about where me too is right now and lastly we're going to talk about a part of this scandal that i actually think is the most interesting and fascinating aspect of all of this. Which is the effect that cuomo's exit has had on time's up which is named pretty glitzy organization that launch soon after the metoo movement itself and is headed by many famous women one of whom had to step down in the wake of the cuomo's scandal and we're going to get into all of that in a minute so i think the reason i've been interested in this case specifically is because i think that we'll be able to unpack some of the questions that i've had for a while like is journalism still enough to take down a bad man. Should it be. And how much are women. Getting blamed for their efforts to further. Meet you even though. Men are obviously much more universally the perpetrators of sexual violence and harassment christina. Why did you wanna talk about andrew. Cuomo i feel like we've talked a lot personally about the more thorny questions around me to which is basically what happens now when accusations come up what comes next but i've also been kind of stuck in a thought spiral about this cuomo stuff Because no one is walking away from. That governor's office unscathed. And i think that is true of a lot of instances of workplace sexual harassment. It implicates everyone. Everyone who's victimized by who is left wondering did they provoke. Did they respond firmly enough to stop it. Everyone who witnesses it. There are always people in the workplace who have to decide whether they want to risk their own careers to try to. Hold the perpetrator accountable. Especially in politics. It implicates everyone who has been an ally to the perpetrator which politicians always have plenty of allies.

Cuomo Andrew Wyatt New York Christina