Feminism

Get woke and expand your idea of what it means to be a feminist today. Listen to insightful audio content on trailblazing women, feminism and gender equality. Broadcast from premium podcasts.

A highlight from Reading the Signs of your Body

Bodies

02:55 min | just now

A highlight from Reading the Signs of your Body

"No one talks to girls about their cervical fluid. It's like denying semen exists. It's denying that you sneeze and blow your nose. So your cervix do you know what your cervix is? This is me about four years ago. It's like taking a lesson with a woman named Tammy Rubin. She's a certified fertility awareness and reproductive health educator. I can't guarantee anything for you. I can just tell you the science and what I've learned and what I want to touch on. So the events leading up to finding Tammy a chronicled in the first episode of bodies, sex hurts. You can listen back if you want all the details, but to summarize, when I was 24, sex became painful. I told my doctor, but I was dismissed. And I was having a really negative impact on my relationship with my then boyfriend. And then, through a friend, I learned that it could be the birth control pill that was causing the pain. I'd been on the pill since I was 18 and never given a second thought. But then I started looking into it more and yes, painful sex, as well as low sex drive and trouble lubricating were all potential side effects of the pill. So I went to an o-b-gyn specialist who confirmed that it was indeed the pill that was causing my issues. He told me to stop taking the pill, use a topical hormonal gel to get my hormone levels back to normal and go to pelvic floor physical therapy. I did all three things and after about 6 months, the pain went away. And honestly, my sex drive was better than it had ever been. And so after I got off the pill, I did not want to take hormonal birth control again. But I didn't want to get pregnant either. Condoms are fine contraceptives for the time being, but they didn't seem like a sustainable solution for the rest of my reproductive life. I started researching and came across this thing called the fertility awareness method. And at first I was like so the rhythm method that very unscientific way of guessing where you're at in your cycle. But as I learned during my sessions with Tammy, it's not the same thing as the rhythm method. Once you see that fluid, the fertile window is opening. And the change in cervical fluid marks the beginning of your fertile time. Turns out my body and the body of anyone with a menstrual cycle since two major signals over the course of a cycle. And if you can learn to read those signs, you can figure out on your own when you're fertile and when you're not fertile. This truly blew my mind. And so for the final episode of season three, I wanted to devote this episode to the fertility awareness method. How it works, how it can be used for contraception, why it's vital information for people trying to get pregnant and why it especially matters for people with polycystic ovarian syndrome or PCOS. I'm Alison berenger and from KCRW, this is bodies. And a heads up,

Tammy Rubin Tammy Pcos Alison Berenger
A highlight from Visionaries: Ruth Asawa

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:51 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Visionaries: Ruth Asawa

"Hello from wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is will manika. This month we're highlighting visionaries. Today we're talking about an artist who was known for her geometric woven wire sculptures. Ruth aiko asawa was born on January 24th, 1926, in Norwalk, California. Her parents were Japanese immigrants, and Ruth was the middle child of 7. In her early years, Ruth grew up on a farm. She worked before and after school to help out. Even then, she was practicing art. She later wrote, I used to sit on the back of the horse drawn leveler with my bare feet drawing forms in the sand, which later in life became the bulk of my sculptures. The start of World War II, uprooted Ruth and her family's lives. In February 1942, Ruth's father was arrested and was taken to an internment camp in New Mexico. A few months later, Ruth and her family were forced into an internment camp at a racetrack in Santa Anita California. During World War II, racism and paranoia led thousands of Japanese Americans to be taken from their homes and imprisoned. Ruth and her family lived in horse stables at the Santa Anita race track for 6 months. The stench of horse manure was pervasive. During that time, three Disney animators were also being interned at the camp. Ruth spent much of her time drawing with them. By September of 1942, Ruth and her family were sent to another camp in Arkansas. There she continued to draw and paint and finished high school. In 1943, Ruth was allowed to leave the camp and went to college at the Milwaukee state teachers college. She'd received a scholarship from the quakers to study to become an art teacher. When she graduated in 1946, racism towards Japanese Americans was still rampant. Because of that, Ruth wasn't able to find work as a student teacher. She never graduated, but years later, when Ruth had established herself as an artist, the Milwaukee state teachers college wanted to recognize her as an alumna. She responded, requesting the degree she was denied. She finally received it in 1998. Instead of becoming an art teacher, Ruth was encouraged by some artist friends to study at black mountain college in North Carolina, a progressive art school in the segregated south. Ruth studied with artists like buckminster fuller and Joseph Albers. In 1947, Ruth traveled to Mexico and watched as a craftsman used wire to make egg baskets. Ruth would build upon this repetitive looping method to create her own style of sculpture. During that same period, Ruth also met her husband a black mountain college, Albert Lanier. They got married in 1949 and moved to San Francisco to live in a community that accepted them as an interracial couple. Over the course of 9 years, they had 6 children. Busy raising a family, Ruth worked on her art practice in the evenings at her home studio. She was inspired by the undulating form she found in nature, trying to give structure to what she was painting. Her hanging sculptures became increasingly intricate over the years. The suspended Arri woven structures of Ruth's work blur the lines between internal and external and cast haunting shadows. Always begin from the inside working inside. And I'm working on the surfaces, the things that interest me are the proportions that I see. And that shape by itself is not very interesting, but when I put one next to it, then I look at this shape that is out here. Throughout the 1950s, Ruth's sculptures were shown in group and solo exhibitions in New York, San Francisco and internationally. By 1963, Ruth began working on public artwork and arts advocacy. She believed art is for everybody. One of her early public pieces was a fountain featuring two mermaids in ghirardelli square in San Francisco. It still stands there today. In 1968, Ruth cofounded a public arts program called the alvarado school arts workshop. Without much funding, they cobbled together a hands on curriculum with scraps of yarn, bakers clay, an old egg cartons. At the height of the program, it was in 50 public schools, employing artists, and getting parents involved in their kids education. Ruth was inspired by her time at black mountain college and felt strongly that students would benefit from learning from artists. She expanded on this mission by opening a public arts high school in San Francisco in 1982. In 2010, the school would be named in her honor. In appreciation of Ruth's work as an artist and teacher, the city of San Francisco deemed February 12th, 1982, Ruth asawa day. When Ruth was in her 60s, she revisited her experience living in internment camps. As a memorial, she created a bronze relief, depicting scenes of what life was like for her and her family, as well as for the broader Japanese American population. Ruth died on August 6th, 2013. She was 87 years old. Ruth's legacy of art and education lives on. Her artist featured in galleries and museums around the world, and she's become known as one of the most celebrated artists of the 20th century.

Ruth Milwaukee State Teachers Colle Jenny Kaplan Manika Ruth Aiko Asawa Santa Anita Black Mountain College Disney Animators Joseph Albers California Albert Lanier Norwalk San Francisco Paranoia New Mexico Buckminster Fuller Arkansas Alvarado School North Carolina Mexico
A highlight from Um Hello, Save Roe!

Hysteria

03:03 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Um Hello, Save Roe!

"Let me say holidays are upon us. And Joe Biden is now president and doctor Biden First Lady of the United States. Unveiled her holiday decorations for the season yesterday. What did we think? Okay, so overall, I would say 8 out of ten, okay? Okay, fair. Yeah, you know, I was gonna with 7 and a half, but there is this one Christmas tree that has different color ornaments on it and it like to me that Christmas tree says feliz Navi there. I don't know what and that was like, I love that Christmas tree so that pushed it up to an 8 out of ten. My favorite thing about the decorations though was that there is this one Christmas tree that has a portraits photos of all the past first families. Yeah. And tucked in the back of one of those trees is a small picture of Trump and Melania and I was like, yes, that's what they deserve to be tucked in the back and it's like the smallest picture possible of a first family. So that was my favorite part. I was like, yes. Go back there with a little jab. Okay, so I didn't even see that part, and I love to know that even doctor B can be a little petty. Yeah. And again, my favorite thing is that after four years, so when you work in The White House and you come back after Thanksgiving and all the decorations have been put up and they're usually they're put up by volunteers who it's like their favorite thing and you have to usually sign up for some lottery and you get to come in and decorate and it's like literally elves in The White House. And there was always something to be like, oh, it smells like pine. It's so wonderful, but for the past four years, we've been in a nightmare of handmaid's tale meets Grimm's fairytales Christmas decorations in this White House. So I was very happy to see the tree with all the doves and the state's names on them. And to see general potential merriment or at least an environment that's like, Christmas revelers who are coming from everywhere for tours, assuming they're doing tours this year. Enjoy yourself. Don't leave with like night terrors. Yeah, for sure. There's definitely nothing like controversial about the Christmas decorations this year. So we can just sort of like enjoy them for what they are. I wish there would have been more. But I don't know what they're called in English. I just pointed us. Okay, so point set us total side note and because it's my last week co hosting point set us originated from my hometown in Mexico. No share, basketball, I don't, yeah, that's where they're from. They're called notch awareness, and then they got genetically engineered to look bigger and brighter. And so now we have what we have today, but they are originally from my little corner of the world in Mexico. Okay, so you need to find a link so we can put it in show notes and see what the OG points that is really look like. Yes, I will do that for sure. Today

Feliz Navi Melania White House Joe Biden Biden Donald Trump United States Grimm Mexico Basketball
A highlight from Mississippi abortion law at the Supreme Court; Poet Kim Moore; England women's football win

Woman's Hour

04:56 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Mississippi abortion law at the Supreme Court; Poet Kim Moore; England women's football win

"Now we're going to be hearing from the U.S. shortly where the Supreme Court is set to rule on whether to ban abortion in one state after 15 weeks. The ruling could have implications across the whole country. Poet Kim Moore is going to join us to talk about her collection of poems about men she had relationships with but never married. And this morning I want to hear from you about the ones who got away. Those you admired from afar but yours or their situation never allowed it to become more. Those you were in a relationship with, but it didn't go the distance. You can text me now on 8 four 8 four four texts will be charged at your standard message rate on social media can get in touch. It's at BBC women's hour, or of course you can email us through our website. I in fact remember making a pact at school with a boy in my year who I had liked four years that if neither of us were married by the time we were 30, we'd get together. It obviously didn't happen. But I want to hear your stories this morning, you can text me 8 four 8 four four. Now football is also bubbling through our program today. We'll be celebrating the incredible England women's result against Latvia in their World Cup qualifier 20 nil, yes, you heard that right. Ellen white becomes England's all time top scorer in the women's game. And we're going to look at how the game has improved in recent years and also it calls for pre qualifiers as a way to address that huge golf between some teams. And we're also going to hear about the TV journalist who had her bottom slapped live on air whilst interviewing football fans post match in Italy. We're going to look at how typical it is of male behavior towards women in that country. But let's begin in the U.S. because today the Supreme Court will hear arguments on a Mississippi abortion law, which would ban most abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, except for some medical emergencies or severe severe fetal abnormality. Now, the right to an abortion has for decades been a controversial and fiercely divisive issue in the country. But in recent months, tensions have reached a new high in two states in particular in Mississippi and in Texas. Well, today's case, many say is momentous and could shape the future of American abortion rights. Mississippi's proposed law was signed back in 2018 by the states then Republican governor Phil Bryant. But the law was blocked by several lower courts, so it didn't come into effect. Now the state of Mississippi is petitioning the Supreme Court to rule in favor of its law and overturn that landmark case from 1973 of roe versus wade, which legalized abortion nationwide. The former U.S. vice president Mike Pence spoke in Washington yesterday ahead of the hearing. I came here today to speak about right and wrong. To say life is a human right and urge the Supreme Court of the United States to choose life. As we stand here today, we may well be on the verge of an era when the Supreme Court sends roe versus wade to the ash heap of history where it belongs. Well, let's speak now to Amanda tall, who's a reporter for The New York Times to look at this case. And what it means across America. Good morning Amanda. Good morning. So let's begin by talking about the law currently in Mississippi, just explain that to us. So right now, in Mississippi, as in the rest of the United States, with the possible exception of Texas as I'll get to in a moment. The law is roe V wade, which says that in effect women have the right to women and other pregnant people have the right to seek an abortion until the fetus becomes viable. Meaning that it's able to live outside of the womb. The that has been settled law with some tinkering around the edges for decades in the United States. But this Mississippi law is a very square challenge to roe versus wade. And presents an opportunity for the court to do anything from upholding the legal standard to tightening it, limiting it to overturning it entirely. And so many people will look at this, they may well remember how president Trump nominated three justices to the Supreme Court during his tenure. And that really swung the views of the judges towards a more conservative nature. Is a lot of this to do with how the Supreme Court is now made up. Definitely. So there have been very regular legal challenges to abortion law in the United States, effectively ever since roe V wade was decided. This is something that comes before the court every few years, but the reason why this case is seen as a particularly significant turning point is because of those conservative justices appointed by president Trump, which have really swung the court to the right.

Supreme Court Mississippi Kim Moore United States Phil Bryant England Football Roe Versus Wade Ellen White Latvia Amanda Tall Roe V Wade BBC World Cup Mike Pence Texas Italy Golf President Trump The New York Times
A highlight from Visionaries: Diane Arbus

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:52 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Visionaries: Diane Arbus

"Dan arbus was my mother. And I had an enormous sense that photography was a kind of secret of hers. Hello, from wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is romanica. This month, we're talking about visionaries. Women who made profound contributions to the fields of photography, film, sculpture, and the performing arts. Many of these women were radical artists who pushed conceptual boundaries within and beyond the art world. Today's visionary is one of the most celebrated American photographers of the 20th century. She's best known for capturing subjects who lived on the edges of society. Please welcome dean arbus. Diane was born dean nemerov on March 14th, 1923. She grew up in a wealthy New York City family that owned russeks, a Fifth Avenue department store. Dean's family excelled in the creative. Her older brother Howard went on to become a Pulitzer Prize winning poet, and her younger sister Renee was a sculptor and designer. From a young age, it was clear that dean was a gifted artist. Her father encouraged her to get into painting. Yan studied art in school, but quit painting as soon as she finished high school. Years later, when reflecting on why she stopped painting rather abruptly. She said, I had the sense that if I was so terrific at it, it wasn't worth doing. When dean was 14 years old, she met Alan arbus, a 19 year old aspiring photographer who was the nephew of one of her father's business partners. Despite dean's parents disapproval, the couple married when dean was 18. Together, dean and Allen shared a love of photography. Alan bought dean her first camera and they turned their bathroom into a part time dark room. They started their own fashion photography company and took on dean's family's department store as their first client. During World War II, Alan served as a military photographer. Diane gave birth to their first daughter dune while he was stationed in 1945. The couple would go on to have a second daughter Amy in 1954. When Allen returned from the war, he and dean worked with some of the top magazines and ad agencies. Typically, dean acted as the stylist, while her husband shot the photos. But dean and Allen eventually grew tired of fashion photography. Dean was more interested in art photography, while Allen had dreams of becoming an actor. In 1956, Diane quit their joint business to pursue art photography on her own. At the same time, Alan pursued acting, and eventually landed a role on the television series mash. While photography for magazines was booming at the time, little attention was paid to photos as works of art. Fellow photographers who'd left the art world such as Robert Frank and William Klein were pursuing street photography. A style which aimed to capture ordinary people and unexpected beauty. Some of dean's early explorations and art photography followed the style. It wasn't until she took classes with lisette model that deanne started to find her unique artistic voice. In an interview with D Anne's daughter dune, lisette modal recalled the DN came to her one day and said, I want to photograph what is evil. Dune interpreted her mother's words, saying that what dean was really looking to capture was what was forbidden or had been too dangerous to frightening or too ugly for anyone else to look on. For most of her art photography career, dean would seek out the places and characters on the fringes of society. In 1959, dean and Allen officially separated. Diane moved into a small carriage house in Connecticut with her two children and focused on finding work that would bring in money. That year, dean got her first solo magazine assignment for esquire. She produced a photo essay of New York City portraits. The photos were taken on a 35 millimeter camera with natural lighting, which was in line with the street photography style of the time. In 1962, she started taking photos with a two and a quarter format camera, which brought out bright details and sharper images. Dean had grown tired of the grainier photos that she was taking with the 35 millimeter. She said she wanted to see the difference between flesh and material. The densities of different kinds of things, air and water and shiny. During this time, deanne took to capturing places that most photographers did not step near. She explored dance halls, circuses, wax museums, and more. Through the end of her life, dean made her mark on the world of fashion editorial and art. She went on to publish over 250 photos and magazines. In 1967, she had 32 photos chosen for an exhibition at MoMA, entitled new documents. Among the photos was identical twins, which remains one of her most famous photographs. It's said to be mirrored in Stanley Kubrick's film The Shining. Dean's MoMA exhibition received mixed reviews. One reviewer called her work brutal, daring, and revealing. While another wrote that her work orders close to poor taste. Following the exhibition, dean struggled to book more fashion work. The challenge was likely in part due to the fact that celebrities did not want to be photographed by the woman who'd been dubbed the wizard of odds by one critic. Even as she struggled to bring in more money from her photography, her recognition in the art world grew. In 1971, dean was the first American photographer chosen to represent the United States at the Venice Biennale. Throughout her life, dean struggled with depression. On July 26th, 1971, she took her life at the age of 48. The year after her death, John's our Kowski, the director of photography at the MoMA at the time, curated an exhibit of dean's work. On the wall of the show, he wrote she stuck with her subjects, exploring their secrets and thus her own, more and more deeply. She was surely aware of the danger of this path. But she believed that her bravery would be equal to the demands she made of it. All month, we're talking about visionaries. To see some of dean arbus photographs, follow us on Facebook and Instagram at what manica podcast. Special thanks to Liz Kaplan, my favorite sister and co creator. And special thanks to Alessandra teja, who curated this month's theme. Talk to you tomorrow.

Dean Allen Diane Dan Arbus Jenny Kaplan Dean Arbus Dean Nemerov Russeks Alan Arbus Alan William Klein Lisette Modal Deanne New York City Pulitzer Prize YAN Renee Robert Frank
A highlight from World on Fire? (with Elizabeth Yeampierre and Allie Kelly)

The Suburban Women Problem

04:50 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from World on Fire? (with Elizabeth Yeampierre and Allie Kelly)

"We do not live in a tower that is surrounded by moats and a big wall where nothing can get in. You know, I understand people saying, oh, America. First, I actually don't really understand that much. But you know. We gotta address the suburban women problem, because it's real. Welcome to the suburban women problem. A podcast for red wine and blue. Hi, everyone. Thanks for listening. I'm Rachel vindman. I'm Jasmine Clark. I'm Amanda Weinstein, and you're listening to the suburban women problem. Thanks for joining us today. I hope everyone had a great Thanksgiving holiday. We are excited to be back together, having these conversations that might be hard but are so important. A little later, we're going to be talking climate change with ally Kelly, who runs a climate, nonprofit in Georgia, and then later on, I'll get the chance to talk to activists Elizabeth Jean Pierre about the intersections between climate justice and racial justice. But first, how was everyone's Thanksgiving? So nice. We actually ordered our Thanksgiving. Awesome. So many of our friends actually did this year, which we were surprised we didn't want to tell anyone. We're like, we're not cooking. We're just going to order it from a restaurant. But it was so relaxing. We didn't cook. We just heated it up, basically. And it was really relaxing and super nice at my mom's house. And we had in laws in town. So lots of grandparents, which is always super fun. Yeah, I spent the Thanksgiving Day with my dad and his wife and her family. And we did traditional Thanksgiving, so we did the turkey, the ham, the collard greens, Mac and cheese, dressing, and the thing is, like, these are all foods that I really love, but I honestly never, ever cook them until this time of year. So I was like really looking forward. That's probably best. Right, exactly. Exactly. Even Mac and cheese. Oh, I did actually make Mac and cheese. That's the one ad on I did make. I will make Mac and cheese occasionally throughout the year. But like dressing and potato salad and you know, just like all the cakes in the pies and sweet potatoes and things like that, those are things that I normally wait until this time. It's like a treat. So is this like early Christmas for me except for food? Food Christmas. I like that. Yes. We traveled to Oklahoma to see my grandma and it was a pretty chill time, but actually we had to really isolate because we had a COVID scare with our daughter. But it worked out well and it was nice. I have to say everyone was pretty like minded. So I know that was an issue for a lot of people over the holidays. I saw some frustration from people on Twitter and even talked to some Friends. What about you guys? Did you have any tough conversations? I'm glad I didn't because I don't think I had the capacity for it, but I think for my family, you know, right before Thanksgiving, the verdict for the ahmaud Arbery case came through that trial came through and of course all three of the defendants were found guilty of felony murder. And for a moment, it actually felt like things were right with the world, even if it was just for a moment. It never lasted. But of course, since I'm in politics and you know, I'm the state rap and my family is like see me on the news and stuff. They're like, wow, Jasmine, what do you think about everything that's going on? And so we had a good talk about just like justice. Justice was almost not served. I mean, it was almost not even started. And it really took public outcry, the family just not giving up at all in order for this to even get this far. And it says a whole lot that we have to go through those types of links because from the day he was killed to someone actually given enough of a darn to do anything about it, it was months. It was months in between that. I was kind of surprised. I mean, not surprised, but I was dismayed how surprised we like what a sigh of relief it was because that is how much little faith we had in the justice system to actually convict, which that's disconcerting. Exactly. But I was also not happy, but I was glad that people's voices mattered, right? That verdict would not have come to place just like you said, if people's voices weren't lifted and weren't heard, which means that our voices really matter when it comes to our justice system and what comes from our political system. Exactly, exactly. And so also, because I am the resident microbiologist, the Macron variant also came up at Thanksgiving. Not all the fun conversation. I know. I know.

Rachel Vindman Jasmine Clark Amanda Weinstein Ally Kelly Elizabeth Jean Pierre Ahmaud Arbery Georgia America Oklahoma Twitter
A highlight from Session 236: Healing Through Sound Meditation & Breathwork

Therapy for Black Girls

06:53 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Session 236: Healing Through Sound Meditation & Breathwork

"We had new routines, our gyms closed, our stress increased, and sadly, many people who are struggling with weight gain and weight regain are afraid to talk with their physicians in fear of being humiliated or talk down to. Despite what you might hear, weight itself is actually about so much more than diet and exercise. There's also science behind weight loss that may be making weight maintenance a challenge. So if you're struggling right now, we encourage you to work with the healthcare provider who can help develop a weight management plan that works for you. Watch HBO Max's new comedy series, the sex lives of college girls, now streaming. Get ready for another comedy series from Mindy Kaling, full of books, butts, boys, and four females who are a bundle of contradictions and hormones. These hilarious women stumble toward adulthood as they dive into new experiences, neck and parties, air rushed abs and caution tape dresses, refusing to be shamed for any of it. No rules, no regrets. Watch the sex lives of college girls now streaming only on HBO Max. It's important to note that healing looks different for all of us, and that each of us might find different things helpful. Joining us to chat about how he link can happen through sound meditation and breath work is linnaeus Smith Crawford. Linnea is a licensed marriage and family therapist. Holistic healer, wellness expert and entrepreneur. She earned her bachelor's degree in psychology from spelman college and her masters in marriage and family therapy with a certification in trauma therapy. In addition to her degrees, she's an advanced certified yoga breathwork and meditation guide, sound healer. International teacher and speaker. She specializes in holistic mental health and healing, which she defies as the return to wholeness through the blending of practices of the mind, body and spirit. Linnea and I chatted about the definition of holistic healing, how things like sound meditation and breath work and support healing, how to find someone appropriately trained to offer these services and she shares a special sound bath just for our community. If there is something that resonates with you while enjoying our conversation, please share it with us on social media using the hashtag TB G in session. Here's our conversation. What are we talking about when we talk about holistic healing, especially when it comes to mental health? Yes, so I have started to use holistic healing and holistic mental health interchangeably, but essentially what it means is that we are tuning into all aspects of ourselves. We are honoring that we are multifaceted and that in order for us to truly heal, we have to be able to integrate all layers of self. So our physical, our emotional, our energetic, our thoughts and our spiritual aspects to create this safe container for healing. Got it. And so some of the things that you use as a part of your practice are both breath work and sound healing. Can you tell us a little bit about how you have developed these wellness practices as a part of your life and how they've been beneficial to you? Yeah, absolutely. So I have always loved things like meditation and yoga and breath work. And I've always understood how necessary they were for healing and for our mental health. So much so that I completed my yoga and meditation teacher certification while I was finishing up my masters. While I was in grad school, I think, you know, you can also maybe relate to this, graduate school is probably one of the most stressful times in a professional's life. And so I really was able to lean into the power of breath work and yoga and meditation and ultimately sound feeling while I was going through that really stressful period. And I started to notice my colleagues and my peers were on the verge of straight burnout, right? And I had a sense of calmness about me. And it was at that point I really realized that things like breath work and yoga and sound feeling are really necessary for us, particularly in the most stressful times. And so with that realization from my personal practice, I wanted to integrate it with my work as a therapist. And so I definitely try to do it on my own or I tried to ask my supervisors for guidance as far as integration goes. And back then, it really wasn't like it was forever ago. It was almost 5 years ago, right? But we've seen how much this whole concept of holistic mental health and holistic healing has really taken off in the last I would say 5 years. My supervisors looked at me like huh, like girl just refer them out to a meditation teacher, just refer them out. We don't do that as therapists. And so that was ultimately the beginning of my journey of integrating these practices into the therapy room and in the mental health space. You know, I really appreciate you sharing that because I do feel like the people who are training now and in the future will have a very different experience of gray school than it sounds like we both had because it feels like we have learned so much more about how all of these things are integrated, but our training isn't typically integrated in that way, right? And so a lot of people have the same kind of story like you around like going back to get certified in yoga and meditation to supplement or compliment what they do in the therapy room. And so can you talk about how you have brought both of those things together and how things like breathwork and sound healing can actually complement traditional therapy. Yes, this is one of my favorite things to talk about. And to your point, we don't get this training in our master's program and still now it's not really a part of the curriculum. And so that's one of the reasons I created the holistic therapist academy, which is essentially to teach therapists and mental health professionals how to ethically integrate and confidently facilitate trauma and from yoga, breathwork and sound healing to help clients heal from anxiety depression and trauma. And so when you think about the major diagnoses, anxiety depression and trauma are really the top three that many of our clients face and a lot of society goes through. And so breathwork and sound healing is so beneficial for those diagnoses and just like stress overall. And so when we talk about this feeling of stress, when we talk about being in our fight, flight or freeze, right? Breathwork and sound meditation and sound healing ultimately help us to calm our nervous system. So in our nervous system, we have our parasympathetic and our sympathetic our sympathetic and I know you know this, but for the audience, the sympathetic nervous system is our seat of fight flight freeze and there's many other responses, but that's essentially our bodies knowing that we're in danger. That is when the bear comes out in the forest and we have to freeze or we're in danger. We're experiencing

Linnea Smith Crawford HBO Mindy Kaling Spelman College MAX Anxiety Depression Trauma
A highlight from Milli Hill on the Positive Birth Movement and how she was banished from her own community

Feminist Current

05:33 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Milli Hill on the Positive Birth Movement and how she was banished from her own community

"Current, I'm Megan Murphy. On today's episode, I'm speaking with Millie hill. A freelance journalist and author of the positive birth book give birth like a feminist and a new book for pre teens called my period. She founded the positive birth movement in 2012 and ran it up until this year when she was canceled for defending women centered language when talking about pregnancy and birth. I wonder if you can just start by telling me a little bit about your history and the birthing community and how you got involved there. Yeah, well, it's kind of a sort of convoluted story really how I got involved in the world of childbirth, but basically I've had three children, which I think is that always involves women in the world of childbirth, some degree or other really having babies themselves. But when before I had my kids, I worked as a therapist and so I was always sort of interested in the emotional and psychological angle of it all. And when I was first pregnant when my first baby I was kind of like, oh my God, you know, just really like I suddenly felt very different in the way people were speaking to me and I felt like I wasn't being respected in the sense of as an autonomous individual and an adult in the way that I was kind of used to in the rest of my life. So that was when I first started thinking about birth as a feminist issue and then that was when I was first started thinking about both as a feminist issue. And then, you know, I also really noticed whenever I spoke to other women about their birth experiences, when you become a mom, you kind of like go to a lot of groups for other women. You know, have other women in your life having babies at the same time. You know, so many people were talking to me about how awful their experiences were and how traumatized they were and how little autonomy they had, et cetera. And so I was just quite shocked by the whole thing. And so that kind of got me really involved in thinking about birth in terms of feeling there was an injustice happening to women and wondering what I could do about it. And then I started writing, which was kind of totally separate and enterprise. I like writing, but because I had time had small children and I started writing a blog and I started getting trying to do more and I started to get journalism work. And every time I wrote about birth, I got a big response, and so I kind of like, you know, started to realize that I wasn't the only person thinking all these thoughts about birth. So that kind of let me further into it. Then I set up something called a positive birth movement, which I kind of like didn't really realize was going to be as big as it was, but I just thought is there a way of using the Internet and social media which is blossoming at that time Facebook and everything is like right about 2012. And in the way that it's so great at connecting people. So is there a way we can have like real life meetup groups where women can really talk frankly about birth and their choices and their stories, but also is there a way we can use social media to connect all of these groups up around the world and kind of build a kind of power network of women. So that was the kind of vision I had for that. So all of these things kind of snowballed along and so that's kind of how I ended up getting involved in birth. The positive birth movement took off massively, very quickly. You know, we ended up with hundreds of groups around the world. And I kind of coordinate all that for about 9 years. And at the same time, I've done lots of writing about birth. I've written two books about birth since then and kind of been one of the kind of go to people in UK journalism to write about issues around birth. So that's kind of like it's a bit of a woven Tapestry. Yeah. And so like you so you founded the positive birth movement. Is that right? Yes, that's right, yeah. Yeah, and you're the author of the positive birth book. Of course. Can you talk a little bit more about that? What is the positive birth movement? I mean, do you said that a lot of women have negative and even traumatic birth experiences? How does the positive birth movement kind of try to address that or ameliorate ameliorate that situation? Well, I think the idea of it was the whole idea of positive birth was to try and cut down the middle of this polarity which was already there between go to the hospital and do everything the doctor says or stay at home and hug a tree and light all the candles kind of thing. You know, this idea that the positive birth could be something that any woman could have in any place in any situation and that it wasn't about the type of birth that she had or anything to do with judging the choices that she made. It was more about feeling in control being the key decision maker in the room, having choice, true choice, all of those things. So the positive birth movement, I think, aim to do that in two ways. One like I said by connecting women up and using social media to break down some of the kind of misinformation all kind of the imbalance power dynamic that goes on in birth. So for example, you know, if a woman in Kentucky is told, you have to do this by whoever. You know, this is the policy here. Well, if she then talks to a woman in London, who says, well, that's not that's not what our guidelines are.

Megan Murphy Millie Hill Facebook UK Kentucky London
A highlight from Would You Freeze and Share Your Eggs?

The Cut

04:01 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Would You Freeze and Share Your Eggs?

"The cut the cut, the cut. Cut. The cut. The cut. Months of lockdown made so much of our lives feel frozen in time. But not us. And not our bodies. We've kept aging, which meant a lot of people looked around during lockdown and decided to seize the moment. During the pandemic, you saw a lot of news reports that would talk about local fertility clinics seeing a big rise in demand marketing egg freezing to people. Analyses is a reporter on gender reproduction and economics. Some of the reasons they gave were people weren't dating as much. It was much harder to meet people. People felt like their lives were on pause and they weren't weren't moving forward. And so they wanted to be proactive about their future. And egg freezing is already a part of the cultural conversation with people like the Kardashians. So I've been thinking about freezing my eggs. Are you serious? You want another kid? What if I do, though? I don't know what I want. And that's great. When you've got Kardashian money, or when you live in California, where ten out of the 50 busiest fertility clinics in the U.S. are located, but access and affordability always come into question. To have kids right now to even think about freezing eggs is an expensive proposition. You've got to have means. Stand-alone egg freezing studios in the U.S., it's about 6500 to 9 or $10,000 for the procedure, but there are other ancillary costs like medications, which can be anywhere from three to $5000. And there's also a lot of testing and other kind of poking and prodding and that goes into it that you might be charged for. And there's also storage costs that come after the eggs are frozen, you'll pay an annual storage fee between 305 $100,600. So many people are simply priced out. Sure they could be an egg donor for people who could afford IVF and all the other stuff that goes along with conceiving that way. But freezing their own eggs? Nah, as for people who make a lot more money. But what if there was a way to do both at the same time? To use egg donation as a ticket to egg freezing. For the cut, Anna wrote about egg freeze and share programs. Someone would undergo egg freezing for free and give away half her eggs and freeze the other half. The recipient of half of the donor's eggs picks up the cost for everything. Procedures, testing, all of it. Doctor Amy, who I spoke to runs probably the most well-known freeze and share program. She speaks about it a lot her clinic offers 5 years for free and after that, something like $275 a year for storage. That's so much pressure. I would need 5 years to get my shit together. Oh, I've been paying since I was 34 and every year when the bill comes. I just think another year. Fertility specialist doctor Amy Ava's Ade started her freeze and share program out of frustration. Prison share actually came out of a situation where I had a 40 year old patient who was an egg donor when she was 20 and she needed an egg donor herself and then I just said enough enough. If only the donor had had a way to set aside some of their eggs when they were in their 20s. Well, doctor Amy, and other programs like hers, is that way? And with arguably problematic marketing that says things like preserve your options and freeze time, there's an increased demand. You're going to run out of X every single woman does and sometimes they run out before they're done having kids. Starting my practice, the average age of first time birth in the Bay Area, what's around you one or 32. Continuing to creep up where I'm seeing more and more patients who are 15 to 54 now more than ever before. At the patients are

U.S. Kardashian Amy Ava California AMY Anna ADE Bay Area
A highlight from Brooke Shields on Learning To Compartmentalize

Skimm'd from The Couch

07:54 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Brooke Shields on Learning To Compartmentalize

"I was going to have to. I'm Carly Zac and I'm Danielle weissberg. Welcome to 9 to 5 ish with the skin. We've run into so many questions over the years and had so many moments where we needed advice and we got it from women who'd been there. And that's what we're bringing you at this show. Each week we're helping you get what you want out of your career by talking to the smartest leaders we know. Because we know your work life is a lot more than 9 to 5. All right, let's get into it. Today, our guest is Brooke Shields. She has been a household name almost since birth from doing her first commercial at 11 months old to a Calvin Klein genes campaign at 14. She achieved notoriety through blockbuster movies in the 1980s, like the Blue Lagoon and endless love. Since then, Brooks becoming a Broadway actress starred in sitcoms and TV dramas, written two books and raised two daughters. And now, she is starring in and producing the upcoming Netflix Christmas movie a castle for Christmas. Brooke, we are so excited to have you. Welcome. Oh, thank you. Thank you for welcoming me. So before we get into the conversation, we like to warm up. We're going to do a lightning round. Quick questions, quick answers. Let's do it. What is a secret hobby or skill that you have? My secret hobby is needlepoint. Oh, that's a really good one. I am needle pointing a backgammon board. Like I have to be on the set doing something like some kind of craft or something. Okay. What is the last show that you binge watched? Oh, I haven't seen it, but I heard I would really like it. Oh, please, Rhonda walk. Okay, my next question, you have starred in many things that are beloved shows and movies of mine. But one of my most favorite roles you've done is when you were on Broadway and you played Rizzo in Greece. Oh my goodness. How old were you? You must have been a baby. I was a child, but I remember vividly. What is your favorite line or song from Greece? There are worse things I could do. Fair. When was the last time you negotiated for yourself? About 20 minutes ago. Where did you negotiate? I negotiated someone's fee for a perspective job. How does taking time to slow down fuel you to move forward? I never slowed down in my life till more recently in the past few years. And the fuel that I get from just doing something healing for myself sometimes that can just be hanging out with a friend or watching movies or doing something where there's where the regular noise is stopped. I find that I reemerge from that even stronger and more powerful. I just it's almost like that time the energy starts and it starts building up. Okay, we're going to move into the meat of our show. You started working when you were you couldn't even walk. You were less than a year old. And then you became famous as a teenager. You've talked a lot publicly about what your family dynamic was and what a unique childhood you had. But what was your support system? How did you basically stay normal? There's a few elements that I think my mother set in motion. She never moved us out of the east coast. We never went and moved to Hollywood and pursued all of that, which is rushing to high school and basically only being educated onset. And I think that even just that element for sure gave me a perspective and a more grounded way of being in the world. And when that's all you know, regular great schools, regular high schools. I think you really do have an understanding that the world you may inhabit at certain times is not real. It's just not your real world. It's kind of crazy. It is something that you can go in and out of to a certain extent. And the other piece is my mom always made sure I had someone my own age around me. So I always had a partner in crime. You know, I never felt like I was the only kid in a sea of adults. And my parents never spoke ill of the other. I mean, they got divorced when I was 5 months old. My father's family is so the opposite of any way that I grew up with my mother or my working life. And I was talking about this today, I've got this movie coming out and it's coming out the day after Thanksgiving. And everybody in my life outside of my family, they're all going to watch it. And I know for a fact that I'm going to get to my family in Florida. And it's not even going to be mentioned. And it's funny because my feelings aren't hurt or anything, but that's how I grew up. My youngest sister grew up with not an inkling of what I did. And it wasn't until she got much older and friends of hers would say things like that's your sister. And it's so interesting that sort of power of that kind of compartmentalizing. And sometimes it's not good, but it really served me. You know, I'm going to go down to be like, no one's going to watch my movie, but it's okay. Well now because they're going to listen to this podcast. No, but it's like, you know, and I never hurt my feelings that actually just helped me understand that, you know, it's not everything. It's not the only thing. And if I sat and said my sister down and said, look, this is really important to me. Please watch it. They would watch it. You know, it's interesting. On this show, Danielle and I were cofounders and we're friends and we talk about how unique it is that ten years in, we're sorely friends and cofounders of a business. We've had people on here that also are cofounders and friends or work with family or work with spouses and just kind of the unique dynamic of bringing work home, home to work into your personal life. You and your mom in particular were infamously just this tight type duo for so much of your career where she was your manager. She was with you for all of your early success. I would love to understand how you dealt with that, both the good part and maybe the parts that you're like, I wouldn't repeat. Your advice to those who think about working with family or working with those kind of closer to them. You know, I think it's always brought no matter how you look at it and boundaries are the most important thing. On the one hand, I think family you can trust more than anybody. Friends, family. On the other hand, if money is involved, that's when it gets tricky. I think full communication has to happen. I was very enmeshed with my mom. I knew nothing other than being in this industry that I was in kind of it happened to both of us and not knowing any other way in hindsight. I think it would have been healthier to have a bit more of a delineation between my professional life and my mom, however the way she protected me in an industry that basically devours its young. You know, I never had a me too moment when all the other young people were, you know, I was she was so avaricious sleep

Carly Zac Danielle Weissberg Greece Brooke Shields Calvin Klein Rizzo Netflix Rhonda Brooke Brooks East Coast Hollywood Florida Danielle
A highlight from Indigenous Women: Sarah Winnemucca

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:57 min | Last week

A highlight from Indigenous Women: Sarah Winnemucca

"Hello. From wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is romantica. Today we're talking about an educator, author and advocate, who worked as an interpreter and fought to protect indigenous rights. When she died, The New York Times called her the most remarkable woman among the piutes of Nevada. Let's meet Sarah winnemucca. Sarah was born to huck newtonia or shell flower around 1844. She was a numa, also known as northern piutes. The name Europeans gave them. Her tribe lived semi nomadic Lea and moved through Nevada and Oregon. Sarah first came into contact with white people when she was a child. Her grandfather, chief truckee was welcoming of white men who invaded their land. He called them his brothers and sisters. And he fought alongside them in wars, surfing as a guide to various emigrant parties as they crossed the great basin. But Sarah's father, chief winnemucca, was more suspicious. One spring day, when Sarah was a child and her grandfather was away from home. They heard that white people were coming. Fear passed over the tribe and they began to run away. But Sarah and her cousin were too small to keep up. So Sarah's mother and ant buried them and placed a sage bush on top of them. Sarah later wrote can anyone imagine my feelings buried alive, thinking every minute that I was to be unburied and eaten up by the people that my grandfather loved so much. Despite her grandfather's fascination and love for the settlers, the tribe remained fearful of them. But it eventually became clear that the settlers weren't going to leave. By the 1850s Sarah worked for white families, and it's likely there that she got that name. Sarah and her younger sister also lived with a white family for a time. By the age of 14, Sarah could speak 5 languages, including English and Spanish. When she was 16, she was sent to a conference school in San Jose, California. Her grandfather, chief Chuck E.'s dying wish. Some of Sarah's wealthy classmates families objected. So Sarah and her sister only stayed there a few weeks. As settlers built towns and mines and increasingly took over what was once native territory. Sarah and her people were forced onto reservations. Life was difficult there. There wasn't enough to eat, and the white people used the reservation land for grazing, while giving the piute nothing in return. The relationship between the piute and the white reservation agents was tense and violent. Sarah's language skills gained her jobs as an interpreter for the bureau of Indian affairs. The job was complicated. Sarah wanted to advocate for her people. But doing so would eventually lose her the job. Sarah witnessed a great deal of pain and suffering at the hands of the U.S. government. In 1879, the paiutes were forced to move to another reservation. 350 miles away in the dead of winter. Sarah was told that the president demanded the move. She later wrote every night I imagined I could see the thing called president. He had long years he had big eyes and long legs and a head like a bullfrog or something like that. I could not think of anything that could be so inhuman as to do such a thing. Send people across mountains with snow, so deep. In 1880, Sarah made it to The White House to meet the president. The meeting was brief and disappointing, and the government's promises of tents and food for her people were quickly broken. Sarah continued her fight. She drew up petitions and traveled around the country, lecturing on the ways in which her people were being mistreated. With the help of her friend and publisher Elizabeth Peabody, she also took to writing. Sarah often wrote critiques of the way white people treated indigenous people. She wrote letters and articles that were reprinted in newspapers and magazines. In 1883, she wrote, life among the piutes, their wrongs and claims. It was the first English book published by an indigenous woman in the U.S.. In 1885, Sarah opened a school for native children in Nevada. It was an innovative and safe space. At the time, the U.S. government was forcing native children to assimilate. Convert to Christianity and forget their customs languages and heritage. Sara would not allow her students to be taken into the boarding school system. She acknowledged the importance and power of education. But not at the expense of losing the piute culture. Sarah's life came to an early end. She died in 1891 at her younger sister's home.

Sarah Jenny Kaplan Sarah Winnemucca Huck Newtonia Chief Truckee Nevada Chuck E. Bureau Of Indian Affairs LEA The New York Times Oregon San Jose Bush U.S. Government Elizabeth Peabody California White House Government U.S.
A highlight from Squirting

Unladylike

08:17 min | Last week

A highlight from Squirting

"Enough. Hey y'all and welcome to and ladylike. I'm Caroline. I'm Kristin and let's splash right into squirting Caroline. We're talking about the gush or trickle or dribble of fluid that some people with vulvas experience when sexually stimulated, not to be confused with vaginal lubrication or orgasms. Squirting is totally normal and pretty common. Studies have estimated that anywhere from ten to 70% of people with vulvas have experienced it, which is a huge range because there's never been a large enough study to nail down definitive numbers. Nonetheless, we've known about it for not decades, not centuries, we're talking millennia, y'all. Squirting was described in a fourth century Chinese text titled secret instructions concerning the Jade chamber, as well as the kama sutra, which was written around the same time. And yet. Squirting still attracts so much scientific debate and cultural fetishization. Like, how can vaginas do that? Is it just pee? Is it just porn? When the question we should really be asking is, why can't we just normalize squirting already? For some answers and firsthand perspective, we're turning to sex educator Lux alptraum. Lux is the author of faking it. The lies women tell about sex and the truths they reveal. I think you know, you can look at porn and get the impression that it's always this huge, dramatic event with massive quantities of liquid that just kind of like put on a light show. It's like the fountain at the Bellagio or something. That's not always everybody's experience. For me, it just feels more like this kind of like unfocused explosion. It's just like, there it goes. Lux loves that she squirts, but that's not the case for everybody. All that over pathologizing about squirting can cause a lot of shame for folks, which brings us to our second guest who inspired this whole episode. She's an unlady we're calling Leah, who emailed us about the squirting shame, she experienced after listening to this podcast actually the first email I got back from you guys when I first got a response it went to my spam because it had the words reading in it. Oh, no, that's good to know. Yeah. It's a dirty word. Gmail is judgy. The spam filters are off people because today we're taking the squirting conversation out of the science lab off the porn set and into Lux's and Leah's lived experiences to find out what all the gushes about. Can you tell us about the first time you ever squirted? So the first time that I remember squirting, I guess I should say because this is important context for part of my late teens and then kind of off and on throughout my 20s, I was an orgasmic. So I really wasn't able to have an orgasm. I didn't know why at the time, I think being on antidepressants definitely was part of the problem. Anyway, after I went off of antidepressants, when I was 19, I think this was like a few months after that. I was just at home. I was masturbating and I just was masturbating. I was sitting on an office chair and I just remember, like, almost out of nowhere, my vulva just burst forth with fluid. And I was just like, oh, oh, well, that's squirting. I didn't know I could do that. And that was that was the first time that I squirted. And so it sounds like the answer is yes, but did you did you know in that moment, what was happening? Oh, yeah, yeah, I was very, very familiar with the concept of squirting. I was just surprised because I didn't know that I could. And I brought up the anarchism of stuff in part because orgasm was for a really long time. And still now, really. Or has also really confusing topic for me because everybody talks about orgasm as like, oh, you know it, if you've had it. And if you have to ask if it's happened like, then you just, it hasn't happened. And it's very this kind of smug but not very helpful thing. And I knew that touching myself felt good. I knew I was experiencing pleasure, but orgasm felt mysterious. And so when I squirted, it was just sort of like, oh, okay, well, yes. You did the thing. That feels like concrete proof like that is an orgasm. And yeah, so I knew what it was and it was just kind of like, ah, yes, my body can do this. I am not, quote unquote, broken. I can experience pleasure. And here's the thing that everybody says is so great. So could you describe a little bit more how the physical sensation of it feels for you? Yeah, I'm glad you said for me because I think it probably is different for everybody. But I would say the thing that definitely distinguishes squirting from peeing is that when you're squirting, you don't have control. Like we usually like when you are peeing, generally speaking, you can stop midstream. You have the ability to stop and start and you're the one guiding the experience. When you're squirting, it just sort of comes, and you don't have a choice in the matter and it's just sort of fluid that's kind of erupting out of you. Like sometimes it's a small amount, sometimes it's a big puddle. But it really is like being overtaken. And the way that people talk about orgasm kind of overtaking you, it is of an involuntary expulsion of fluid. To put it very, very non sexually. You know, you said a second ago that like, oh, okay. Like I'm not, I'm not broken. Could you tell us a little bit more about that feeling and how what roles squirting played in sort of your body, confidence in your body image, especially when it comes to sexuality? Yeah, absolutely. So I want to say just right off the bat because this is really important thing for me to communicate. I don't think that orgasm is the end all be all of sex. I don't think that people who have difficulty orgasming or can't orgasm are broken. Like I felt that way about myself and I don't want other people to feel that way. But that was what was in my mind when I was a teenager because I heard so much stuff about like, orgasm, orgasm, it's most important thing. That's the thing that you're quote unquote supposed to do. And I think that's because you know this is this is one of these things. When you have a penis, generally speaking, orgasm tends to be accompanied by ejaculation. They're not the same thing, but they usually go hand in hand. So you never have to be like, was that surge of pleasure and orgasm because you have this kind of physical proof? Whereas when you have a vulva, it's variantly experience is often very internal. And because we put so much emphasis on this as the end all be all, it's like, well, am I feeling good or did I have an orgasm? And if I didn't orgasm, but I'm just feeling good like, could I be feeling better? I think it's like, you know, it sets us up to lose. In a lot of ways, and just kind of often feel bad about ourselves. But in that mindset, and that mindset of feeling confused and feeling like, maybe I wasn't doing sex well enough or masturbating well enough to then squirt was like, oh, I. This is incontrovertible proof.

Caroline Lux Alptraum LUX Leah Kristin
A highlight from 282. LGBTQI People in Ukraine with Jessica Fostekew and guests Anna Sharyhina and Vira Chernygina

The Guilty Feminist

04:15 min | Last week

A highlight from 282. LGBTQI People in Ukraine with Jessica Fostekew and guests Anna Sharyhina and Vira Chernygina

"Helena warrior to explore stories and ask first those who usually ask last or not at all. This week's episode you will hear from refugees, specifically about channel crossings and it is such a tragic tragic week to release this. But it's never been more necessary. It's a wonderful engaging podcast that the world really, really needs. So please go rate review, subscribe to media storm, and support the new podcasts from the house of the guilty feminist. And now on with the podcast. I'm a feminist Deborah. I am. I'm a feminist but restaurant wise. When someone just decides to choose the food for the whole table, especially if the whole table is just me and them, I get a huge huge boner for that. Even though it's really domineering. Oh, you find it sexually attractive when someone says, we'll have higher order for us, shall I? And I'd be like, oh, you find out a sort of act of sexually dominant. I mean, it's one of those things there's a bit of conflict in my head. I'm like, oh, will we? Will you order for a space? Will you? But my pants go, yes, he will. Wow. And is that only when you say he? Is that only for mine? I just happened recently with a man, yeah. Oh, and you found it sexually exciting. Well, I don't know. Just a vaguely a bit of a single turn on the bossiness of it. Also just relaxing, isn't it? When you got a podcast by eating, people always gonna ask you, I'm eating now. There's a bit of satsuma in my mouth. So sorry. I'm rarely not eating. So people come to me for advice about eating, and it's so nice with someone so confident that they just take over. I sexy. I find it equally sexy. And I don't say I approve of it. I say I'm aroused by it. Yeah. That's different things. I'm a browse by hardly anything I approve of, and it's a real problem. I'm a feminist, but I'm aroused by things I don't approve of almost exclusively. I'm a feminist, but the other day in a restaurant, I came in a little bit late for a meeting and a man did that old fashioned chivalrous thing where he got up out of his seat a little bit. He just did this. He just stood up because I came in and then sat down again. Oh wow. Honored you with a little bit of standing up. Yeah, it's not that's a few steps away from a doff of a cap in terms of it's a chivalrous thing. Quite posh. Men used to do, probably a generation ago where they stand. And I really enjoyed being stood for. It made me feel very lady like. Yeah. I'm sorry, isn't it? I'm sorry. I had a boyfriend once was stature wise, absolutely minuscule. Tiny, gnome of a boyfriend. But he still did a thing where if we were walking along any pavement, he would insist on standing roadside. Yeah, one brother used to do that. So that if a car came on to the pavement he'd be the first to die, but. They wouldn't splash on your dress in the horse and Carol. I see. I felt like it was more of a I'm here to protect you. So it's so toxic masculine. It's so infantilizing of me. I'm in my, I was in my 20s. I wasn't just gonna run in the road. I'm not four. But equally, I just thought what a kind man. Yeah, so he didn't want mods smashing on a crinoline. On your bustle. It's protective whether it's a protective from being hit by a car or mud from a month. I'd rather, most of the time I'd rather get a bit of mud on me than hit by a car. Yeah, always. But I mean, if one has a gentleman caller, let's be incredibly honest about this. He can have the muddy trousers. Yeah. Slash, we run into our car. The patriarch has got to be good for something. Yeah. And if it keeps mud off my bustle. I want that to be an Edinburgh show. Keep mud of Debra's bustle. Is that mud on depressor? Debra's muddy bustle. That's a kids, but that's your first kids book. Deborah smiling. Yeah.

Helena Warrior Deborah Carol Edinburgh
A highlight from Vivianne Miedema: BBC Women's Footballer of the Year 2021; Adoption breakdown; Nicola Adams;

Woman's Hour

04:32 min | Last week

A highlight from Vivianne Miedema: BBC Women's Footballer of the Year 2021; Adoption breakdown; Nicola Adams;

"Good morning. Welcome to the program. Hope the weekend was a good one, if not pretty chilly for most people. I mean, I'm cold the whole year round, but I did see a man in a T-shirt this morning, so not everyone feeling the cold. But in terms of what's going on, you've just been hearing in the news with regards to the latest strain of COVID-19. The government seems to be placing its bets on boosting the boost of vaccine program to tackle the latest strain of COVID-19 with the UK's vaccine advisory body set to announce later if it will back an expansion of the COVID booster scheme. And minded to think back to our conversation we had together a few months ago about your methods of trying to convince those in your life to have the job. So many of you got in touch telling me various people, daughters, sons, brothers, other halves, just won't, and what you were trying to do to deal with that. How are those conversations going? I thought I'd check back in. Not least, because I was reading the story in the papers, I'm sure some of you will have seen this if Glenn Steele, a vegan man who refused the COVID job because it was tested on animals, who has died of the virus. He faced a two week battle in intensive care, begged nurses for the job as he fought for his life, but it was too late to save him. His last words to his wife Emma were, I have never felt so ill, I wish I'd had the vaccine. Emma, who is double jab, says she's now facing an empty future alone and has called on everyone to take the vaccine. While as the government, doctors and scientists alike grapple with omicron, the latest strain that we've become aware of, how are your conversations about the vaccine and COVID-19 going on in your family and friendship circles at the moment? Have you given up trying to convince people that you love and care about, or perhaps work with, you know, you don't have to love them, but you might have to have contact with them, or you doubling down. Are you canceling plans or are you carrying on as normal? Thought I'd check back in with you. Text me here at women's are an 8 four 8 four four. That's the number you need. You'll be charged at your standard message rates to do be aware of that. On social media, we're at BBC women's app or email me through our website. Also on today's program. Known to some as the baby faced assassin, I'll be joined by the UK's greatest female boxer, Nicola Adams is going to step into the women's hour ring. The BBC women's footballer of the year to keep with some sport is also announced we'll be talking to her and the woman who adopted two children, but has given one back to the care system. A story you don't often hear, but one that is important and she has a lot to say. Stay with us for that. But first, the British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell is due to go on trial in New York City today on sex trafficking and other charges in a highly anticipated trial. She's expected to challenge claims she groomed under age girls for convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein for sexual abuse. He died in prison in 2019. She's been in a U.S. jail since her arrest last year to talk more Laura paulman is the content editor of The Sunday Times and former New York correspondent and Steven Wright associate editor for the daily mail, who's actually outside the court in New York now and I'll go to you first. Good morning, Steven. Good morning. What's it like there? I know you arrived only recently. Just ten minutes ago because we were advised to get down to court before 6 a.m. just on 5 narrowly to make sure we can get in dozens of journalists reporters, TV crews, et cetera to be here. It is highly anticipated and it is in my experience. And unprecedented case because of who's effectively getting the dock and all the characters involved in this case on the outside of it. And of course, for women who alleged that delayed Maxwell committee crimes 90s and early noughties. So it's unprecedented. And for us time could I Maxwell will be in June court, central? Yes. And I mean, the thing is, I only recently was thinking about the way that we kind of lead up to these sorts of trials and what goes on and you've been covering crime for a very long time. And all sorts of levels of it and different stories. Why do you think this is so unprecedented for some? I think it's unprecedented because she's a woman. I mean in my 30 years covering crime fleet street to have a woman facing these charges is very unusual and because of her background her background started

Covid Glenn Steele Emma Nicola Adams Ghislaine Maxwell UK BBC Jeffrey Epstein Laura Paulman Steven Wright The Sunday Times New York The Daily Mail Maxwell Committee New York City Steven U.S. Maxwell
A highlight from Indigenous Women: Annie Dodge Wauneka

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:21 min | Last week

A highlight from Indigenous Women: Annie Dodge Wauneka

"John Andre asked Annie Wonka. Why the navajos seem to welcome new ideas so much more readily than other Indians. Well, the changes are so fast, and I'm quite sure and now who's her real love that we can not stand still. We've got to live this black, it can go along with other people. Hello. From wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is a manica. This month we're covering indigenous women from around the globe. Today, we're talking about a woman who was a prominent leader in the Navajo community and a voice for Navajo people in the U.S. government. She worked to improve her people's health while respecting and preserving Navajo culture. Let's talk about Annie Dodge juanita. Annie was born in 1910 on a Navajo reservation. Her father, Henry Q Dodge was a prominent leader in their tribe. Annie grew up herding sheep on his ranch. When Annie was 8 years old, an influenza epidemic swept across her community, killing thousands of Navajo people. Annie witnessed many of her peers fall sick and die. Later, Annie enrolled the university of Arizona and graduated with a degree in public health. Then in 1951, Annie ran for a seat in the Navajo tribal council and won. Becoming the second woman ever to be elected. Two years later, a tuberculosis epidemic struck the Navajo reservation. Annie was appointed as the chair of the health and welfare committee. She began learning everything she could about tuberculosis. She would drive alone across the reservation, which stretched through Arizona, Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico, visiting hospitals and tuberculosis patients and studying the disease and treatment options. During her research, Annie began to observe that many Navajo tuberculosis patients distrusted government run hospitals, and wouldn't complete treatments in those spaces. So Annie launched health education campaigns to specifically target Navajo populations. She created a Navajo English dictionary of medical terms. She helped produce short films narrated in Navajo about health education, and she launched a weekly radio program. She even organized a baby contest, where physicians would screen babies health and offer medical advice. On top of all that, Annie traveled around the reservation, explaining to people how tuberculosis worked, and how western medicine, like x-ray machines could help. While Annie was doing this work, she also observed the living conditions of many of the people she was visiting. What she witnessed led to the development of other programs in the Navajo reservation to provide adequate sanitation vaccinations and infant care. Annie was always conscious of Navajo culture and traditions, and her programming always considered the existing practices of the Navajo people. She focused on integrating modern medicine into existing Navajo traditions. During her time on the tribal council, she connected government physicians and volunteer doctors with traditional Navajo medicine men, so they could all work together to improve the health conditions of the Navajo people. But Annie's influence expanded beyond the reservation. During her career, she also was a member of advisory boards of the U.S. Surgeon General and the U.S. public health service. At a time when Congress was overwhelmingly male. Annie regularly walked the halls to confer with presidents, heads of government agencies and U.S. representatives to be a voice for the Navajo people. Annie served 7 terms on the Navajo tribal council, from 1951 to 1979. At one point, she ran against her husband and won. In 1963, Annie was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom for her groundbreaking work in public health. In 1984, she was designated by the Navajo people are legendary mother of the Navajo Nation. Annie passed away in 1997 at the age of 87. All month were highlighting the legacies of indigenous women.

Annie Navajo Tuberculosis John Andre Annie Wonka Jenny Kaplan Annie Dodge Juanita Navajo Tribal Council Henry Q Dodge Health And Welfare Committee U.S. Government University Of Arizona Influenza New Mexico Utah Arizona Colorado U.S. Public Health Service Tribal Council U.S.
A highlight from How Queens' Star Nadine Velazquez is Making the Most of a Second Chance

Latina to Latina

07:01 min | Last week

A highlight from How Queens' Star Nadine Velazquez is Making the Most of a Second Chance

"What happens when you get a second chance? That question is at the heart of the new TV show, queens, about a 90s hip hop girls group that reunites for a second chance at fame. And for Nadine Velazquez, who plays valeria, the only member of the group who is still in the limelight, that question is deeply personal. You know Nadine from her roles on this is Earl and the league, those gave Nadine a taste of success and left her feeling lost anyway. Took being fired from a job and being given a shot at a do over to grant needing the clarity she needed to go after the things she wants most. Nadine, thank you so much for doing this. Thank you for having me. What is sort of the dates that queens hooks into is 1999? And watching it, I was wondering, what were you actually doing in 1999? Who were you in 1999? In 1999 I was cool. I think I was a junior it Columbia college. I was living with a man who was older than me. I was working for talent agency as an assistant, and then I think I was also waitressing or hosting or something at night. That squares because it seems like you're the type of person who's always living 5 different lives at the same time. Oh yeah, there was definitely a time I had 5 jobs at once. Especially when I was I moved out when I was 16, I became very ambitious at 16. I knew I had to survive. So I was determined to finish school was determined to get a degree. I was determined to have money because I knew I could be a statistic and just be a deadbeat. All the odds were against me. You know what I'm saying? And there have been a lot of detours along the way. My understanding that you really in your heart wanted to be a writer, but got redirected. What was that redirection? Acting? It's a very long story, but when I was working for the talent agency, I thought I was going to become an agent while I finished school and after I graduated at Columbia. I wanted to get a master's in writing. And so part of that was television writing, fiction all kinds of writing. And that's the year that I met my husband. My second husband, because I was married twice. And he was an agent in Los Angeles. For a literary agent writers. So it was perfect, but then the agency that I worked for as an assistant, the agent there told me that I had to be an actress. That was my calling. Why? What was it about you that made that person say that? Thought I was. She was like, she's the one who actually pushed me to get my head shots and 'cause she kept saying to me to this day. Her name is mirna Salazar. She lives in Chicago. She had a Latino agency. The only Latino boutique agency in Chicago for a long time. And she was also like a mother figure to me because I left early at gravitated to just her sense of business and the fact that she was a strong woman. And so I really enjoyed working for her. And one day she was just like, when are you going to ask me for your headshots? And I'm like, I'm not planning to be an actor. I feel like that vote's gone. She's like, are you kidding me? You belong in Hollywood. This is the perfect time for you. And so my thought was, if I'm going to be an actress then I don't want to be in an actress in Chicago like then take it all the way. And she was like, no, you have to go to Los Angeles, and I thought I don't know how to get to Los Angeles. I only know Chicago. I have this job here. I'm going to school. That didn't make sense to me. And then I met my husband who was a literary who was in Chicago happened to be working with one of his clients I was working there for a weekend, and then we just connected. There's a whole long story of how we actually came together 9 months later after September 11th, we were brought together again, but this time I fell in love with him. Before I didn't. And then that's how I ended up in LA. I did end up and I didn't know how I was gonna end up in LA, but I ended up in LA and then when I ended up in LA, I thought about what she told me. And I was like, this is the time I'm here. She said that I should be here. The universe got me here, so I had an agent and a manager like this overnight. And I'm like, so it's right here in my hand. What do I do? And then so I started pursuing that more than the writing. I was taking writing classes in LA for a little bit. You're letting me talk way too long. I got all the time in the world. You're the one who's got a heart out. Yeah, okay, so anyway, more of the story is, I follow signs. I've lived my life that way. I do want to get to the moral of the story because I think there are a lot of us who are not going to be Hollywood writers or Hollywood actresses, but your story as I understand it is very much one of being ushered in a direction and then after you had achieved some success, ushered down that path. Sort of do hit a dead end where you start to wonder for yourself, is this really what it is that I want? And that is a very familiar feeling for a lot of us, right? Whether we feel like we have been ushered into partnerships into motherhood into careers that somebody else picked for us. And for you, that realization comes pretty dramatically and at what could have been a incredibly high cost. You're on this film, you're acting alongside Will Smith and as I say just burn out. Another breakup coming off of a TV show, I hated being away. I hated being in North Carolina. I hated being in Vancouver. I was questioning everything. Why did I take the job? Why do I think that I have to just take any job? What am I going to do if I don't take the job? I'm with the guy only because I'm 37 and I think my time is running out and I should just stay with him because he's going to want to hear her. A lot of ideas that were false that I bought into because I had a plan. Sometimes I told this story, I saw my life up until I was 30. When I was a teenager, for whatever reason I just saw two 30. And I didn't see past that. Maybe I thought at 30 I would be going so well that I would then think of the next ten years. But I never saw my life passed 30. I just knew I wanted to be professional and I wanted to be a millionaire by 30. That's what I said. I would always say that. My 30, I'm gonna be a millionaire. And by 30 I was. I was on my name is Earl. It was several seasons. I was making really good money. I had a husband, he also had incredible income. We had home in Los Angeles. We had car. We had everything. I had it all. The way that I envisioned it. But

Nadine Nadine Velazquez Chicago LA Mirna Salazar Los Angeles Valeria Columbia College Earl Hollywood Columbia Will Smith North Carolina Vancouver
A highlight from Weekend Woman's Hour: Beverley Knight, Melanie Sykes, Cinderella

Woman's Hour

05:40 min | Last week

A highlight from Weekend Woman's Hour: Beverley Knight, Melanie Sykes, Cinderella

"And is it possible for a story like Cinderella to be feminist? I'll be talking to cinders to find out. But first, the drifters girl is currently on stage at the garrick theater in London, like so many productions it was delayed from last year due to the pandemic. And it tells the story of Faye treadwell, one of the first black women to manage a vocal group in the United States. With the death of her husband in 1967, Faye decided to continue managing the drifters on her own, the musical tells the story of her struggle to make the group successful in the face of ongoing racism, sexism and legal battles. Faye treadwell is played by the singer and actor Beverly knight, and Emma spoke to Beverly earlier this week and started by asking what drew her to this role. Initially, you know, the music is obviously very compelling. But I have to say the idea for the musical started with Faye treadwell herself. So for me, the big interest was actually getting to play this utterly formidable woman who just did incredible things at a time where women were expected to stay home and, you know, wash the dishes and, you know, mind the children and all of that. So and we're talking so proud. Tell us a bit more about her because we're talking about a time when she has to take over. It's in the 60s. Is that right? That's right. George treadwell died in 1967 at lung cancer. And at that time, you know, as I say, women were expected to quote unquote. Know their place. And she decided to take on the management of the drifters and it was her who took them to global superstardom because she was a brilliant strategist, you know, she thought on her feet. And she was formidable. She took no mess from anyone. And this was unheard of at that time. Absolutely unheard of. Added to that, she was a woman of color, a black woman who grew up at a time where black people under segregation. You know, Jim Crow was was alive and well when she was born, she was born into Arkansas, the state Arkansas, you know? That was the state that famously had the Brown versus board of education, battle to integrate schools. She saw it all around her. But as a woman and as a woman of color, she just fought through. Nevertheless she persisted. And she really won. Yes. And she had to make a lot of sacrifices, didn't she in terms of her own family to do this? That's right. Tina treadwell, her daughter was left behind at home while she went to London to manage, you know, as closely as she could, the careers of the drifters at a time where their star was beginning to fade in the U.S. so she took them to the UK and ignited the second wave of their success. And as a mother, that must have been a hard, hard wrench for her, but she did that. And she did that because she wanted to leave a legacy for her young daughter, not only to provide her with financial stability, but to say to Tina and subsequently to many other women, women she wouldn't have even have known to say you can do this. You can forge your own path. If you stick to it, you know, there is nothing you can't achieve, but you just need the opportunity to do it. And seeing have took that and ran with it. Well, I mean, this is a lot about and for what you're saying here about what she had to do I suppose to try and make a success here to keep a success going to revive their act and make sure that they were popular again and then experienced success. But how did they take it? How did the guys that she was managing? Deal with suddenly having a woman manage them having had her husband. Well, it's an interesting thing. We see in the show, we see the battles that she has with various members of the drifters who came and went and came and went. They drifted kinds of different reasons. Interested in, they drifted out. And yeah, some certainly didn't take very kindly to being told what to do by a woman. Not only the very band members, but, you know, record label bosses and every turn. The music industry as we all know is an industry that is dominated at the decision making level by men. And yeah, when you have a woman, a forthright woman who is not afraid to speak her mind. And he's in a position of power whereby she can speak her mind. It doesn't always go down very well. You know, but you know all about this, don't you? Because you've had your own experiences. I was having the joy of listening about some of your music this morning. And so many of your songs I know and so many of us know. And I was particularly listening back to gold. And I know that you were very clear what you wanted with that particular song.

Faye Treadwell Garrick Theater Beverly Knight George Treadwell Brown Versus Board Of Educatio Tina Treadwell Faye Arkansas London U.S. Beverly Emma Jim Crow Lung Cancer Tina UK
A highlight from Arwa Mahdawi, Cinderella & Sexual Harassment in Schools

Woman's Hour

05:48 min | Last week

A highlight from Arwa Mahdawi, Cinderella & Sexual Harassment in Schools

"Men have run things for a very long time, businesses, countries, barbecues, and they've done it in their way and built a certain culture, a culture that often women have to fit into to get ahead. But can things be done differently? What do you think? Have you had a female boss, manager, team leader? Did it make a difference to the environment? We've had a tweet in already that says the best bosses I've had have been women, largely because they knew how to deal with people. Do you agree? You can text us on 8 four 8 four four. You can contact us via social media as well as at BBC women's hour or of course you can email us through our website with your thoughts. Well, journalists are well madawi has written a book looking into just this, and we'll be talking to us about the lessons we can learn from women in power. Also, on woman's hour today, two updates, one on virginity testing that MPs have called indefensible and the other on the windrush scandal and why only a fraction of victims have received compensation. We'll also be discussing a powerful new BBC three documentary looking into sexual harassment in schools and amongst teenagers. And Cinderella, why has the story of the girl who gets to go to the ball captured our imaginations for generations? I'll be talking to cinders to get her take. But before any of that, I'd like you all to spare a thought for the conservative MP Nick Fletcher. And Internet in an international men's day debate in parliament yesterday afternoon. He tried to make a serious point about men and crime. But what he said about Doctor Who played most recently by Jodie Whittaker has grabbed the headlines instead. Take a listen. Everywhere, not at least within the cultural sphere. There seems to be a goal from a time it very vocal minority that every male character or good role model must have a female replacement. One on an Easter look at the discussion surrounding who will play the next James Bond. And it's not just James Bond. In recent years, we have seen Doctor Who was supposed to look Skywalker, the equalizer, all replaced by women, and men are left with the craze and Tommy Shelby. Is there any wonder we are seeing so many young men committing crime? Nodding away, or we just spat your tea out. I'd love to hear your thoughts about that. Afterwards he did clarify on Twitter that he wasn't linking a female Doctor Who with crime being committed by men. He was just trying to say that boys and young men need positive role models in the media too, just like women and girls, what do you think 8 four 8 four four is the number to text. But first, do women make better leaders? If so, what can they teach us? Strong female lead lessons from women in power. It's a new book by journalist awa medawi. And she argues that a rigid and masculine model of leadership is not up to tackling the complex problems we're facing in the world today. Arwa says, if we want to save the world, it's time we stop telling women to act like men and started telling everyone to lead like women. She draws on the pandemic and beyond to showcase the leadership skills women are displaying that she believes everyone can learn from. And I'm delighted to say awa joins me now. In the studio in the flesh. I mean, this couldn't be better timing this comment from Nick Fletcher for you 'cause literally on page two of your book, you say, when Jody Whittaker was cast as a female at first female Doctor Who, for example, there were men who lamented the loss of a role model for boys. What do you think? I know Netflix has not even been original, Jodie Whittaker seems to have triggered a lot of men. And I find it so fascinating that men seem to think there are no male role models anymore. I mean, there was a recent study that found that there are more statues of animals in London than statues of named women. In America, there are more monuments to mermaids than there are to congresswoman. How on earth can anyone say there are no male role models? And what I open my book with is actually saying that men often don't have female role models when Ruth Bader Ginsburg died notorious RBG, some of the politicians tweeted about what a great role model she was for women. It's like, why can't she be a role model for men, too? Men often aren't taught to think of women as role models because as I said that a whole model of leadership is gendered very masculine. It's not, you know, we associate leadership with masculine traits and women as you mentioned have been told throughout. They're working lives that if they want to get to the top they've got to act more like men, you know, stop saying sorry, be more assertive, take up more space. That doesn't actually make for better leaders. We've really sort of just confused confidence with competence. And I don't think that's the way forward. So why did you want to write the book? Well, I mean, this issue is something that's really irritated me throughout my career this being told, don't say sorry, be more assertive, like basically, you know, women, I don't think that women and men are hardwired for differently, but we all socialize very differently. And we are rewarded for different traits, and as a woman you're rewarded by society for being nurturing and compassionate. But when you get into the working world, you're told that all of these things these quote unquote feminine qualities are actually weaknesses, and they're sort of pathologized. And as you know, their strengths, and, you know, I feel that very strongly. During the pandemic, there was a sort of very beginning of the pandemic. There was a sort of focus on how a lot of countries led by women seem to be doing better and there was a focus on how actually maybe we need a different style of leadership that you know the very beginning of the pandemic that strong men like Bolsonaro Trump and Boris Johnson they were all acting as if they could arm wrestle the coronavirus to the ground. Sort of the cavalier attitude that I think and the comparisons to war. Yeah, lots and lots of comparisons to war.

Nick Fletcher Jodie Whittaker Madawi James Bond Tommy Shelby BBC Awa Medawi Arwa Jody Whittaker Skywalker Parliament Ruth Bader Ginsburg Netflix Twitter London America Bolsonaro Trump Boris Johnson
A highlight from Indigenous Women: Maria Tallchief

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:50 min | Last week

A highlight from Indigenous Women: Maria Tallchief

"Hello, I'm Jordan Marie brings three white horses Daniel. I'm Chloe Tasha Lakota and I'm the founder and organizer of rising hearts, a professional runner and also a filmmaker. And today I'm excited to introduce Maria tall chief. Maria stands out to me because she was the first native to hold rank as one of the first major prima ballerinas and really revolutionized ballet. And I'm really happy to see that she's on this list because she just really helped pave the way for representation for native peoples, but also as a native woman doing what she loved what she was passionate about. I'm really excited for you all to learn more about her and now here's host Jenny caplan to tell you all about Maria tell chief. Hello. From under media network, I'm Jenny caplan, and this is a manica. Today we're talking about the first indigenous ballerina in history to receive international recognition. She was the highest paid ballet dancer in her time and gave new life to the American ballet scene. Let's talk about Maria tall chief. Maria was born Elizabeth Marie tall chief on January 24th, 1925 in fairfax, Oklahoma. Her father, Alexander, was a member of the osage tribe, and her mother Ruth was of Scott's Irish descent. Maria had an older brother George and a younger sister, Marjorie. Growing up, Maria lived in affluent life. When her father was a boy, oil was discovered on osage land, and the tribe became quite wealthy. Maria recalled in her memoir that she felt her father owned the town. From the local movie theater to the pool hall, he had a lot of property. Her family also owned a summer house in Colorado Springs, where Maria had her first ballet lesson at the age of three. The arts were important to Maria's family. She and her sister learned concert piano alongside dance from a young age. But dance quickly became their focus. When Maria was 8 years old, her family moved to Los Angeles. The day they arrived, Maria went to a drugstore with her mom and sister to get some snacks. While waiting for their order Maria's mom asked the clerk if he knew of any dance teachers in the neighborhood, he recommended Ernest belcher, the father of famous TV star Marge champion. Maria's mom took his recommendation, and from there, Maria's future began to unfold. Maria later recounted in her memoir an anonymous man in an unfamiliar town decided our fate with those few words. At 12 years old, Maria began rigorous training under the tutelage of the renowned Polish dancer, bronislaw and nijinska. Maria received special encouragement from her teacher. During the height of World War II, Maria signed on to join the ballet Rus de Monte Carlo in New York. Her colleagues often tried to convince Maria to change her name to sound more Eastern European. But Maria refused to change tall chief to Tulsi Eva. She was proud of her osage surname. Instead, she changed Marie to Maria, and called it a day. Maria danced in several ensembles and musicals. She made a name for herself as she pioneered poetic Americana. She began to catch the eye of George Balanchine, a famous Georgian choreographer. Their fondness of each other's genius led the two to marry in 1946. Their relationship wasn't necessarily steamy or passionate. Maria said passion and romance didn't play a big part in our married life. We saved our emotions for the classroom. Together they were an unstoppable force. Balanchine created several noteworthy roles for Maria. Her most celebrated performance was perhaps as the title role in firebird, an elaborate dance based on Russian folklore. Still, the relationship didn't last. Within four years of marriage, the couple divorced. They maintained a working relationship. From 1954 to 1955, Maria returned to the ballet Russ de Monte Carlo. There she received a $2000 per week salary from the company, the most any ballet dancer had ever been paid. Though she was earning a lot of money. Maria grew disappointed with the company, and left after one season. She moved instead to the New York City ballet, where she remained for another decade. In 1956, she married Henry passion, a wealthy construction executive. The couple had one daughter together named elisa. In 1965, Maria thought she'd retire completely from ballet. But 9 years later, the lyric opera of

Maria Maria Tall Jenny Caplan Jordan Marie Chloe Tasha Lakota Elizabeth Marie Tall Ernest Belcher Marge Champion Bronislaw Nijinska Rus De Monte Carlo Marjorie Daniel Fairfax Tulsi Eva Ruth Colorado Springs Alexander Oklahoma Scott
A highlight from Money, Grief, Kids

Call Your Girlfriend

05:06 min | Last week

A highlight from Money, Grief, Kids

"Same. And I really feel like just leaving it at gratitude is the right is the right move when we are dealing with this particular American holiday. I really like I really just want to focus on that. And I am grateful to hear your voice today. A pleasure today and always. Same same same. Another friend that I am very grateful and thankful for is who I talk to today. Oh my God, you mean like for this episode. Yeah, I mean, for this episode, can you tell that I'm like rusty at doing intros because they don't do them anymore? I love that. I'm so excited to listen. And I also, you know, any time it's like a friend of a friend, I have a special interest where I'm like, it's like me, eavesdropping on what goes on with my friends in law and you and conversation. It's like the biggest treat. While let me tell you about today's amazing guest who is also one of my favorite writers. This is like this is kind of like you, it's one of my favorite stories when you read someone before you meet them, and you're like, oh, I was a fan of your ideas and now I know you as a human. It makes me happy. But today's guest is Ariel levy who is a staff writer at The New Yorker. She is also written many books, namely, female chauvinist pegs, and her incredible memoir, the rules you're not apply. She is also the co author of Demi Moore's memoir inside out. If you haven't listened to that on audiobook, you're really missing out. And Ariel's like us. She's an media entrepreneur, so her latest foray is in podcasting. And she is the host of this kind of like memoir like podcast on Liz Lang. Do you know who's Lilith sling is? Yes, I think, but I will confess that I know only because I read like a related article that Arielle wrote tied to the podcast. I don't know if I would have known. Please explain. Amazing. Well, I am obsessed with Liz Lang because I like fashion, but Liz Lang revolutionized maternity wear in the 90s. And the podcast is called the just enough family, and it offers insights on Liz's family, the steinbergs. They're basically like a tabloid fixture family in 20th century, New York. Our very own Kardashians before reality TV. And two words. I can't wait. No, truly. And the podcast is truly amazing and I really mean that it is like memoir like. And like all things Ariel, it's just like very riveting and very personal. And so I was excited to talk to her about what she's been up to about what it was like. Doing this podcast and also what's that going on in her world right now? Kyle guy. It's time you had the time. Say. You desperate somebody. To get up. I'm so excited to listen. I also have been reading her writing forever and so this is just a double bonus for me like friend of friend plus writer I've been reading for ages. I can't wait to listen. I just love deeply curious person who is not judgmental and just lets their curiosity unfold for everyone. That has been a true highlight of reading Ari and also like now hearing her be a podcast host. It's the best. I'm Arielle levy and I'm the host of the just enough family podcast and I'm a writer at The New Yorker magazine. Oh my gosh. Wow, when we have royalty come visit the park. Well, you know, it's good to be here today and meet our thanks for rolling out the red carpet. You know, this is this is it. This is it, man. It's sorry we didn't send you snacks or some water or some, you know. I'm in my bathtub, I've got my snacks. I've got it all. I love it. We're both recording from the bathroom today. That makes me very happy. The only place to be. You know, sometimes it is the quietest room in the house. It's definitely the nicest room in my house. Well, you're a podcast right now. I've been a longtime podcaster. Tell me about your transition into podcasting because wow. Well, I thought it was fun that you went with a whole microphone to interview people. It's just a very different, you know, I'm used to sitting trying to get people to tell me things with like a pad and a pen. So sitting there, you don't record people when you're like going to Diana Naya's house. You don't have a recorder with you. You're writing this down? Well, no. I have my stupid iPhone reporting. Or I used to have, you know, like, a little tape recorder.

Liz Lang Ariel Levy The New Yorker Magazine Ariel Rusty Demi Moore Arielle Arielle Levy LIZ Kyle ARI New York Diana Naya
A highlight from Cli-fi and catastrophe

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

03:38 min | Last week

A highlight from Cli-fi and catastrophe

"At breaking the glass slipper, we believe it is important to have conversations about women and issues of intersectional feminism within science fiction fantasy and horror. To continue to do so, we need your help. Please consider supporting us on Patreon. Join the conversation by following us on Twitter Facebook and Instagram. Welcome to breaking the glass slipper. I mainly. I'm Lucy Hansen and I'm Charlotte Bond. We are destroying our planet. The scientists agree. There is no denying that catastrophic climate change is imminent. And yet, our leaders continue to play lip service to the issue without taking real impactful action. If things don't change, drastically, and soon, we won't have a planet to go home. Speculative fiction writers have long played with the idea of human made dystopias. But in recent years, these stories have gathered speed. After all, what speculative fiction is best at is encouraging audiences to view contemporary issues from new perspectives. Claf or climate fiction, aims to make readers and viewers more aware of the possible future that awaits us before it's too late. In this episode, we are joined by the writing duo of Natasha Calder, and Emma, known as colder, chef Jack to discuss all things clarify. So Natasha, Emma, would you like to introduce yourselves to our listeners? Thank you very much for having us. I'm Emma chef Jack and I am one half of call the chef Jack. I met my writing partner Natasha, a university, and we decided to write a novel about having children after I gave birth to my first child. And I'm Natasha called her. I'm the other half of call the chef Jack. And that's it. That's all I've got apparently. Natasha and I were both writing on our own and then at some point, we made the embarrassing decision to tell each other about our writing ambitions. And in conversations, we started writing stuff, coming up with projects together and it was really when we landed on the idea of writing something of writing a piece of clif eye, dystopian fiction, around having children that we really got to the we got to what we wanted to do. And so that's why we wrote this book. What do you think makes a good cly fi novel? I mean, what are the trope boxes it needs to tick in order to be considered clif eye? I think it's quite hard to say what makes novel event any genre good. That's super subjective and kind of down to the individual reader to decide, but in terms of what box is a book does need to take in order to be considered clarify, there's sort of a very basic level where I would say it just needed to show case the impact of an unnaturally changing environment on its characters. And those characters don't necessarily have to be human and the climate change doesn't necessarily have to take place on earth. If you think of something like the man who fell to earth by Walter tevis, in that book, the protagonist, Thomas Jerome Newton, famously portrayed by David Bowie in the Nicholas rogue film. That character is an alien, and he comes to earth in search of resources because his home planet is suffering a massive drought in the wake of nuclear war. And I think there's a very strong argument to say that that work can be categorized as climate fiction, because it shares the same concerns about the impact of a technologically advanced society upon the environment.

Natasha Lucy Hansen Charlotte Bond Natasha Calder Chef Jack Emma Chef Jack Emma Instagram Jack Twitter Facebook Walter Tevis Thomas Jerome Newton David Bowie
Sweden's 1st female prime minister steps down after just hours

Woman's Hour

00:41 sec | Last week

Sweden's 1st female prime minister steps down after just hours

"Moment for Sweden, and women, because the country voted in its first female prime minister, a hundred years after women there got the vote. Magdalena Anderson had been the finance minister for 7 years and became prime minister. Briefly, the number 7 was to feature again in her life because she only lasted 7 hours as the Swedish prime minister will be digging into what on earth happened to this history maker and could it have been different or how it will be now, but I wanted to ask you today if I may, and if you'd be so kind and you often are, to indulge me with your stories of jobs, you've held for a short period of time. What are those roles that you've only held on to by choice or otherwise

Magdalena Anderson Sweden
A highlight from Indigenous Women: Bartolina Sisa

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:42 min | Last week

A highlight from Indigenous Women: Bartolina Sisa

"Hello. From wonder media network, I'm Jenny caplan, and this is a manica. This month we're highlighting indigenous women from around the globe. This episode is depictions of violence. If you're listening with young children, you may want to sit this one out. Today we're featuring a woman who became a symbol for the Latin American anti colonial movement of the 18th century. She led several uprisings against Spanish rule. Please welcome bartolina sisa. Bartolina sisa was likely born on August 24th, 1753. She came from a well off, aymara family that traded coca leaves. The aymara are an indigenous people from the central Andes in Peru and Bolivia. Their language is also called Amara. Bertolina was from the imperial province of La Paz. Back then, La Paz was considered upper Peru. Today, it's part of Bolivia. La Paz was founded by a Spanish colonizer or conquistador in 1548 on the site of an Incan village. Soon after the Spanish conquest, much of the indigenous population of what's now Bolivia was forced to labor in mines by the Spaniards. Some cities, including La Paz supplied the food and other necessities for this labor. The Spanish invasion introduced violence and exploitation to the continent. It was under the suppression that bartolina grew up. She set out to fight back and organize grassroots battalions against the Spanish Empire with the help of other women and her partner, Tupac Qatari. Tupac was an insurgent leader and the Inca king of the aymaras and vice king of the Incan empire. Bartolina was responsible for recruiting fighters, organizing supply logistics and controlling movement around the rebel territory. In 1781, she took part in the first siege of La Paz. She organized camps and other towns and parts of the capitol. On March 13th, the group set up in the eastern part of L aalto, a city adjacent to La Paz and closed off all access to the capitol. They maintained their occupation until June when the army intervened. Some sources say that bartolina was tortured and brutally interrogated. But that she didn't divulge any information to her Spanish captors. There are also reports that say that her fellow organizers hosted a party of sorts, for her birthday. They made noise outside the prison where she was being held to demonstrate solidarity and offer strength. Bartoli's husband tried to rescue her, and may have offered himself an exchange for her freedom. He was unsuccessful and was captured and sentenced by Spanish forces. On November 14th, while bartolina was still in prison, she was forced to watch the public dismemberment of her partner Tupac Qatari. The aymara tradition credits him with speaking these words before his death. They will only kill me, but tomorrow, I shall return, and I will be millions. While the uprisings of 1781 were difficult to maintain, and were challenged with suppression and violence. It's clearly played a key role in the fight for independence. According to an investigation by historian Pilar mendieta, who looked into the journals of a judge and member of the local elite. He was surprised by how indigenous women played a primary role in political actions usually regarded as valid only in the male realm. As they fought side by side with their husbands, throwing stones and even leading armies. Indigenous women were taking action outside the walls of the city under siege. Bartolina sisa was brutally murdered on September 5th, 1782. While her death was used to instill fear. Her legacy lives on and continues to inspire. September 5th marks international indigenous women's day. In 2005, bartolina was declared a national imara heroin by the Bolivian Congress. Many anti imperialist and anti colonial indigenous groups bear her name to this day. All month, we're honoring the legacies of indigenous women.

La Paz Bartolina Bolivia Bartolina Sisa Jenny Caplan Tupac Qatari Central Andes Bertolina Peru Aymara Amara Coca Tupac Bartoli Pilar Mendieta Army Congress
A highlight from The Enjoy Today Show (with Katie Couric)

Hysteria

04:37 min | Last week

A highlight from The Enjoy Today Show (with Katie Couric)

"Hello and welcome to hysteria. I'm Alyssa master Monaco, and I'm talisa arsen. Jaleesa, it's Thanksgiving. Happy Thanksgiving. My question to you this week is a very specific, not at all broad. What does today mean to you? Thanksgiving. I mean, I know we want to keep it light, but, you know, the whole genocide thing is comes to mind. I have a weird relationship with Thanksgiving because as I've learned more and more about what it really means how it really started, you know, the pilgrims coming and the programs weren't even like the first Europeans to come to America. It was like the Spanish, like a lot earlier than that. So it's interesting, but I like to give thanks on Thanksgiving to the farm workers that make sure that we have food on the table to eat and, you know, I give thanks to them and Thanksgiving has just become more about eating good food and really being grateful for all the things that the universe God, whatever you call it, has bestowed upon me and my family. And I'm just really grateful. I'm really grateful today. That's how I feel. I feel like Thanksgiving is really just about being grateful now for the things, especially after almost two years of being acutely aware of why we have things to be grateful for. So we're gonna get right into it this week. I'm joined by Katie Couric, julissa arce Dana Schwartz, akela Hughes and Caroline Reston to tackle the following questions. Why is the media twisting the narrative around Katie Couric's book? What is the actual appropriate time to eat Thanksgiving dinner? And is it okay to mix stuffing and champagne? In your mouth, all this and more coming up. I'm gonna bring in the other ladies who are joining us and I am grateful for them. First up, she's a TikTok dress, a writer, and her new book anatomy a love story is available for pre order. Now it's Danish Schwartz. Oh, thank you so much for having me. Thank you. And if you will, please send us all your galleys so that we can properly promote your book too. Yes, absolutely. Okay. Next up, she literally does everything. She's Fauci pup's mother and the former host of what a day, it's akeelah Hughes. Hi, thank you for having me. Oh, you know you're the dowager of decor. So we're gonna not do a holiday episode without you. Finally, she is a bravo historian and crooked media producer generally, but our producers specifically Caroline rest in. Hi, thanks so much for having me on. And Dana also, I'm obsessed with your tiktoks, which is why I called you a TikTok to us. That is maybe the most embarrassing thing in the world. The story behind the tiktoks is I have a young adult novel coming out. And my little sister informed me that no teenagers are on Twitter where it's just like the social media platform that I'm on most of the time. And so I was like, oh, oh shit. I have to do something. And so I started TikTok and then quickly got addicted. They're so good. I'm learning a lot from them, so thank you. I only see the tiktoks that people post on Instagram, but I am going to go look up your tiktoks on TikTok because I do have the app. So now I'm going to have to go look them up. It's addicting. I guess I'm going to have to officially get the fucking app. I really was only on it for shanty TikTok last year, but I guess time's coming. All right, so we're going to be talking about all things Thanksgiving and play some of our listeners submitted voice memos today, so it's going to be a riot. Akela, what did you do last year? Well, you know, I'm not a role model. You know, I technically, I sheltered in place. My mother could not stay on. She insisted on coming over. We had a nice little outdoor thing with my mom, me, and then two friends that I knew from New York, but who had also moved to LA and they brought their dog and it was very sweet. I cooked my first Turkey on my own. How'd that go? It was really good. Oh it was great. It was actually I got the recipe from a TikTok. It was Kamala Harris recipe. And she knows how to make Turkey. It's really, really good. I brined it for two days beforehand, so it was just juicy and perfect. But yeah, mostly I cooked, I put on makeup for the first time in 2020, I think. I took hella selfies, I ate too much, and then we played jackbox games on the switch.

Talisa Arsen Katie Couric Julissa Arce Dana Schwartz Akela Hughes Caroline Reston Danish Schwartz Akeelah Hughes Alyssa Monaco Fauci America Caroline Dana Twitter Kamala Harris LA New York Turkey Hella Selfies
A highlight from Sheila Rowbotham; Sikh Women's Aid; Stella Creasy; HOGO; Motherhood & elite sport

Woman's Hour

04:07 min | Last week

A highlight from Sheila Rowbotham; Sikh Women's Aid; Stella Creasy; HOGO; Motherhood & elite sport

"Nowhere is this clearer than when it comes to maternity policies or lack thereof. And even when things have improved, there are still gaps. Today you will hear how finally the world of elite sport may be catching up on that front, but you're also going to hear from a labor MP. You just heard a mention in the news, stellar creases, whose angry about not being able to take her three month old into her place of work. And of course, there are many other examples of a male designed world, but perhaps this area is the starkest. Somebody to whom these challenges will sound all too familiar is the feminist campaigner Sheila robotham, who was at the Vanguard of the women's liberation movement in this country in the 1970s. She's also on the program today. But what or who turned you on to women's rights? That's if you care about them at all, of course, but I'm willing to guess a fair few of you do, especially if you're joining us here on women's hour who turned you on to feminism or perhaps that's not the word you prefer, but who got you into thinking about how women's rights work or don't? Who turned you on to it or who turned you off? That's a whole other story, perhaps. I'm in the market for both today. You can text me here at women's hour and 8 four 8 four four do check for those costs on social media. It's at BBC women's app or email me through our website. Also on today's program, do you have Ho go? No, not a new kind of disease or virus, but a social status I assure you. It stands for the hassle of going out. Post lockdown, the love of making plans if you indeed felt that or were able to and very mindful of people who are still not able to resume regular life as it were because of the pandemic, which is far from over in many ways. But if you did feel once lockdown certainly was lifted in the main, now maybe that love of going out seems to have faded for some and hogo is what we have in its place. How about you? Let me know if you're suffering a serious case of it to remind you hogo HG O G I'm just kind of not spelled that right on my age Ohio excuse me. Hassel of going out. Sarah has already got in on this with us on email. Thank you for that good morning. My 27 year old daughter says she has jomo. It's the joy of missing out. There are many more of these things and we'll try and get across them. So do get in touch. Let me know your take on this and also whilst or who, perhaps turn you on to women's rights, very much want to hear those stories and those people who have influenced you. But first, a first. Yesterday, seek women's aid, the UK's only frontline service for Sikh women, released a new report about domestic abuse and child sexual abuse within the Sikh community. It is the first comprehensive review of this issue in the community, which is over 430,000 strong in Britain. It was conducted anonymously via anonymous survey sent out over the summer and the survey of nearly 700 respondents showed that 70% had experienced domestic violence. And other details that we'll get into shortly. But to tell us more, I'm going to be speaking to in a moment the cofounder of Sikh women's aid and co author of the report, sudesh pal. But first, we're going to hear from a woman who were calling Rani, who has experienced domestic abuse. Here is her story, voiced up by one of our producers. It started after I had my first child. It was a physical attack. I went to the police. It went to court, and he was cautioned. And then he changed tactics. It became mental, verbal, derogatory. I was blind to it because you didn't realize this is also abuse. He tried to stop me from going to work. He didn't like me going to visit my family or friends. Anything I wanted to do, there were always barriers. Then it got worse and worse as his family intervened. I was constantly put down in front of my kids, mind games, lies. You're fighting to live, you're fighting to be yourself. I didn't realize I was in a constant state of fight or flight. Constantly on edge wondering, what will he say to this? What will he do if I do this?

Sheila Robotham Vanguard Of The Women's Libera Hassel BBC Sudesh Pal Sarah Ohio Rani Britain UK
A highlight from Indigenous Women: Angela Sidney

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:04 min | Last week

A highlight from Indigenous Women: Angela Sidney

"Hello, from wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is romantica. This month we're highlighting indigenous women from around the globe. Today's a mannequin was a remarkable storyteller in the Yukon territory of Canada. As one of the last members of the tag ish. She recognized the power and importance of preserving native culture and traditions. Please welcome Angela Sydney. Angela Sydney was born in care cross in Yukon, Canada on January 4th, 1902. Originally known as Caribou crossing, care cross was home to the care cross, tagged, first nation. Angela's parents, John and Maria were of tagish and clink at ancestry. They were both members of the day shitan clan. When Angela was a baby, she was given a tagged and clink at name in addition to her English name. It's been said she was given the name Angela because her godfather said she looks like a little angel. Before Angela and her brother and sister were born, their parents had four other children. Tragically, these children died at the hands of various illnesses, including German measles, dysentery, smallpox, and jaundice. Angela's mother was not immune to these diseases and suffered from long-term side effects for the rest of her life. As the eldest surviving daughter, Angela was responsible for taking care of her mother. Angela took advantage of their mother daughter time. She asked question after question about the traditions and culture of their people. She heard many colorful stories about the way things used to be. One of Angela's favorite activities was listening to her elders share ancient stories that had been passed down through many generations. Growing up, Angela learned three languages. Click it, tagged and English. She learned clink it and tagged from family members while earning English at an Anglican mission school and care cross. When Angela was just 5 years old, she stopped regularly speaking tagged. As she grew older, she noticed that the tagged language and culture was starting to fade. Throughout Angela's childhood, her tagged community was going through a significant transition. For hundreds of years, the tag ish and clink at people lived harmoniously side by side, trading goods and intermarrying. By the mid 19th century, the tagas people had started adopt and clean kit language and customs. Tag culture slowly began to disappear. It became almost obsolete in the 1900s, a decline perhaps hastened by white prospectors who came to Yukon in search of gold and disrupted the tagged way of life. When Angela was 14 years old, with her parents support, she married a section worker named George Sidney, who was twice her age. They married in a traditional clink at ceremony. When one of Angela's white school teachers learned of the marriage, the teacher told George that they needed to marry the white man way. George and Angela obliged and had a second wedding in the Anglican church. Shortly after their marriage, Angela gave birth to their first child in 1917. In the years to come, she would have 6 more children. Four of whom died young. When it came to passing her knowledge down to her children. Angela embraced the old and new ways of her world. She wanted her children to be progressive without forgetting the ways of their ancestors. Angela herself had feet in both worlds. She learned the traditional healing methods of her clan, while caring for her mother, and also studied modern medical textbooks as an adult. Because of this dual wealth of knowledge, Angela served as the unofficial nurse of care cross. Angela's husband George became the chief of care cross after chief Patsy Henderson died. In this new position of power, he and Angela made it a mission to maintain mixed race schools of white and first nation kids. After her husband passed away in 1971, Angela dedicated her life to preserving the language and stories of the tag ish, as well as the history of the Yukon. She was one of the last fluent speakers of the tagish language, and one of the few people still telling in passing down old stories. Angela was intent on not letting Yukon tradition and customs disappear. She was all too familiar with the disappointment of feeling like the stories she was told growing up. Didn't match her lived experiences. For example, when it was time for her to receive a potlatch name, there was no clan elder to give it to her because those with the knowledge had passed without sharing it with their descendants. In the last 17 years of her life, Angela worked with anthropologists and other elders to keep the tagged language and traditions alive. In collaboration with anthropologist Julie cruikshank. Angela published two books. My stories are my wealth in 1977 and tagged sluggy, tagged stories in 1982. She also published a book that archived place names for tagged and clink at locations around the region's southern lakes. In 1983, Angela and Julie produced a record of Angela's family tree that encompassed 6 generations starting in the mid 1800s. Angela made history in 1986 when she became the first native woman from the Yukon to become a member of the order of Canada. She was recognized for her contributions to northern linguistics and ethnographic studies. In 1988, Angela's niece and a fellow storyteller created the Yukon international storytelling festival in honor of Angela and her stories. Angela Sidney died on July 17th, 1991. Her contributions to preserving her language and culture are commemorated with the bust in white horse Canada. Underneath the statue lies a plaque inscribed with her words. I have no money to leave for my grandchildren. My stories are my wealth. All month, we're talking

Angela Angela Sydney Jenny Kaplan Yukon Anglican Mission School Canada George Sidney Dysentery George Jaundice Smallpox Patsy Henderson Maria Anglican Church John Julie Cruikshank Julie Angela Sidney
A highlight from Pro-Mother, Pro-Abortion

The Double Shift

02:50 min | Last week

A highlight from Pro-Mother, Pro-Abortion

"Today I came out because I can't believe we're still talking about this issue. My sign says I'm so damn tired of this fight. So tired that we can't focus on other things because we have to focus on this constantly. We've already done this 30 years ago and 30 years before that. And it's time to stop this fight and let women choose. What is right for their bodies? This is the double shift, and I'm your host, Catherine Goldstein. And I'm your co host Angela garbus. And today, we are going to talk about something that's been on our minds a lot. Reproductive freedom. And as you can hear from the voices of those moms at marches to defend reproductive rights earlier this fall, it's really always on our minds. Yes. Maddeningly so. The same fights that have been going on for decades are still going on. Still going on. But really amped up and scary because of who's on the Supreme Court right now. And the fact that new laws like in Texas, which we're going to talk more about later in this episode are allowed to actually go into effect, mean this has really basically game on time in protecting abortion rights. Yes. And while it's definitely important to stay up on what's happening in Texas and other states, obviously, and the Supreme Court. Today, we want to have a much more expansive conversation. About what reproductive freedom really is. Yeah, and what reproductive freedom really means to us as individuals, you and I, Angela, but also, you know, I also just want to say, here at the double shift, we think all stories and lived experiences from people who have had abortions matter, full stop. Like we are all about those stories. And in this episode, though, we want to create space to elevate one segment of the population. You may be able to guess who that is. That we feel like it's really important to hear from right now. These are people who have already given birth and know truly what it means to bring a child into the world and care for them. And how that factors into their views on reproductive freedom. So we're going to hear from two different moms on this today. They are sharing experiences that I feel like I haven't heard as much, but these two guests they very much speak for themselves. We heard from listeners about their experiences with abortion and some of the emotions they brought up were feelings of relief or frustration with the insensitivity of their medical care. We heard about anger at the politicalization of their abortion care, and we also heard about devastating grief and heartbreaking decisions that no

Catherine Goldstein Angela Garbus Supreme Court Texas Angela
A highlight from Revisiting Why Right Matters (with Alexander Vindman)

The Suburban Women Problem

04:53 min | Last week

A highlight from Revisiting Why Right Matters (with Alexander Vindman)

"We gotta address the suburban women problem, because it's real. Suburban women helped determine the 2020 election, but there's more to us in the headlines would have you believe. The suburbs aren't homogeneous of white people in perfect houses. Real change is happening in the suburbs, and we have things to say. When women share their personal stories, walls come down and barriers are broken. Welcome to the suburban women problem. A podcast from red wine and blue. Hi, everyone, thanks for listening. I'm Rachel vindman. I'm Jasmine Clark. I'm Amanda Weinstein. And this is the suburban women problem. Thank you for joining us. Today, we are going to chat with retired United States Army lieutenant colonel Alexander vindman, whose book here write matters about his decision to testify against Donald Trump in the first impeachment hearing. And also spoiler alert, he is my husband. Alex will join our panel here in a little bit to talk about his experience, and then after that, we're going to sit down one on one to discuss everything from how the events of the past few years impacted our relationship to who we think should play each other in a movie version of our life. It was a new experience for both of us. So make sure you stick around. But before we get to Alex, we could not have a discussion about why right matters without talking about last week's January 6th commission hearings. And the incredibly brave officers who have spoken up. For those of you who did not get a chance to watch four brave officers gave gripping testimony about their experiences on January 6th, 2021. They talked about being overrun, assaulted, and screamed at by rioters. Branded as traders. The officers were extremely vulnerable and emotional as they shared their stories. And I just want to say if you haven't seen their opening testimonies, you can watch the full video on C-SPAN. And it is certainly worth your time. It's hard to watch, but you should watch. Jasmine, did you get a chance to watch? So I didn't get a chance to actually watch it in real time. I have those scenes some of the clips of some of the testimony. And it's heartbreaking to me to see our democracy really under attack this way. And I think even more so, it's heartbreaking to me that and I could be wrong. It just feels like the perpetrators of these crimes are in the least probably going to get a slap on the wrist. At most some of them might actually get away with this. And nothing happened to them. And that's scary to me. It really does scare me. I can't help but think about Benghazi, right? And how different the GOP is reacting to the January 6th commission compared to the Benghazi committee. And the GOP wanted a public hearing on Benghazi, supposedly to get to the bottom of it and to ensure whatever happened, whatever mistakes, you know, were made, didn't happen again. And now suddenly they don't want to get to the bottom of it. And they are interested in making sure it doesn't happen again. And that is really scary because we're not holding people accountable or maybe not as accountable as they should be held. And this was on U.S. soil. This was our country. This was our people. These were our capital police officers. I just can't believe having Benghazi and it just keeps popping in my mind is like, look at how different this is. Even scarier, as scary as it was to watch it when it was happening, like reading about what actually happened from the people that were there and hearing about it from the capitol police officers. He was even scarier than I thought, and reading about Connie's shoulders article about not knowing if her husband was alive or dead or what was going on at that time. I can not even imagine what that was like if you had a loved one inside that building and just not knowing. But the truth is the GOP isn't interested in getting to the bottom of it, right? They really are. This is all about political attacks. And that's what Benghazi was, right? It was a way for them to throw mud on Hillary Clinton, and that's how they view this too, right? This is just, they are not into it because it's going to make them look bad, which is the most telling thing of all. They're not into the January 6 commission because it's going to make the GOP look bad. I have no words. I mean, not only is this someone's account of it, but we actually have video evidence. It's the same as watching George Floyd and the knee on his neck, and then saying that didn't happen that that didn't kill him.

Rachel Vindman Jasmine Clark Amanda Weinstein Lieutenant Colonel Alexander V Benghazi Alex United States Army Donald Trump GOP Benghazi Committee Jasmine Capitol Police Connie U.S. Hillary Clinton George Floyd
A highlight from The Crock-Pot, from Nice Try!

The Cut

02:56 min | Last week

A highlight from The Crock-Pot, from Nice Try!

"This episode is brought to you by Disney's and kanto from the studio that brought you Moana and frozen. This Wednesday, Disney invites you to celebrate the magic of in kanto, filled with mystery, adventurer, family, and music that is sure to get you on your feet. Don't miss the Thanksgiving movie event that can only be seen on the big screen in theaters. See, Disney's encanto, only in theaters Wednesday, get tickets now. When was the last time you pampered yourself? Like seriously, think about that for a second. Because we all need something special every so often. Something unforgettable. Something like a stay at Waldorf Astoria. Waldorf Astoria hotels offer a blend of comfort and next level care and attention to detail. From the refined dining options to the beautifully appointed residences to the memorable experiences, there's nothing like a stay curated by the masters of hospitality. Set your sights on making some unforgettable memories and start planning your next trip at Waldorf Astoria dot com. My last real Thanksgiving, so Turkey day 2019, my family and I just couldn't be bothered. It's always such a hassle to figure out plans, decide who makes what, navigate all of the family trauma landmines during conversation. So that year, I suggested we go to the only place I could think of that would offer copious amounts of alcohol and food and minimal judgment if things went sideways. And that place was an all you can eat buffet in Las Vegas. Not only was it a genius idea, it saved my family all the stress of the holiday. And it was one of the best thanksgivings in recent memory. And maybe that's what we should be thankful for this year. Ease. Stress relievers. The things in life that make everything else easier. So this week we're featuring an episode from nice try and our daily beloved friend, Avery truffle man, about arguably the household appliance that makes cooking a little easier. The crock pot. So this holiday folks set it and forget it. Take it away, Avery. On a lot of appliances, many normal, unassuming, refrigerators, and dishwashers. There is a secret code. Sometimes it's not even in the instruction manual. But if you can figure out the right series of unintuitive, unrelated buttons to press in a very particular order, the appliance will enter Sabbath mode. So you have to simultaneously press the up button for the refrigerator temperature and the down button for the freezer temperature. Which are some distance apart. Right. That's my friend Monaco, and his mom. And her refrigerator. Only across from each other. Definitely done by two hands or two people. Press both of them simultaneously. And when they press those buttons. Nothing appears to happen. Because Sabbath

Disney Waldorf Astoria Waldorf Astoria Hotels Avery Turkey Las Vegas Monaco
A highlight from TANGOTI CLASSIC: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is facing a coordinated disinfo attack

There Are No Girls on the Internet

02:30 min | Last week

A highlight from TANGOTI CLASSIC: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is facing a coordinated disinfo attack

"Of the coalition, dove is committed to the passage of The Crown act. This legislation protects against race based hair discrimination in schools and the workplace. Helped dove in The Crown coalition make race based hair discrimination illegal in all 50 states. Sign The Crown act petition today at dove dot com backslash crown. There are no girls on the Internet as a production of iHeartRadio and unboss creative. I'm Bridget Todd and this is there are no girls on the Internet. Last week, representative Paul gothar tweeted an anime video depiction of him killing his colleague, representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Now, this is pretty clearly unacceptable. It's against Twitter's terms of service, and if I tweeted a video of myself murdering a coworker, not only would I be fired, I'd probably be getting a visit from law enforcement. Twitter removed the tweet but did not go far off the platform. And after he was censured and stripped of his two committee assignments by a vote of 223 to two O 7 for tweeting the video, he retweeted it because he doesn't care. Women of color like AOC, they disproportionate levels of harassment, disinformation and threats online. And this kind of abuse impacts us all because we're not able to have a healthy functioning democracy unless everyone is able to fully participate. Let's revisit this episode that originally aired in February after AOC faced attacks online because she shared her experience of the insurrection. She really hear the toll that harassment takes on women of color in the public eye. If you were online at all last week, you probably saw representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez used Instagram Live to get a harrowing account of what she experienced from inside the capitol complex during the insurrection on the capitol. In this account, she also shared that like so many of us, she is a survivor of sexual violence. Now this triggered a real time tsunami of disinformation. Right wing figures like representative Nancy mace and Jack wasabi. And others falsely accused AOC of not really being at the capitol at all or exaggerating her claims. So it's true while she was not in the main domed capitol building, that building that you think of when you picture the capital in your head. When rioters breached it, she also never claimed to be. She accurately said that she was in the canon House office building, which is part of the capital complex and is connected to the main building by tunnels. Here's what she said on Instagram. I hide back in.

Alexandria Ocasio Crown Coalition Bridget Todd Paul Gothar Cortez Twitter AOC Nancy Mace Jack Wasabi Canon House Office Building Instagram
A highlight from Episode 68: Beyond the Count: Talking to Jews of Color

Can We Talk?

06:08 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Episode 68: Beyond the Count: Talking to Jews of Color

"Being a black American Jew means that no matter what I'm doing, the first thing people see is that I'm black. I am from an interfaith Muslim Jewish family, growing up in a post 9 11 post second intifada, America, I grew up a racialized Jew. For me, being a first generation immigrant to by choice means that I most often find myself on the outside looking in of multiple spaces and places. Koreans see me as being more American than Korean Jews see me more as being non Jewish as a convert than really and truly Jewish. For me being mixed ethnic, queer, Jewish person is both about being part of something vast and communal and also something that's isolating because it's the pie is getting cut into very small slices and it's hard to find others like yourself. That was Cassandra housley, maruchi zalal, tsuji men Miranda, and gage gorsky, who all identify as Jews of color. The Jews of color initiative, a nonprofit based in San Francisco, estimates that between 12 to 15% of American Jews are Jews of color. The Pew Research institute has a similar if slightly lower estimate. The Jews of color initiative recently released a survey of over a thousand self identified Jews of color from all over the United States. The survey respondents were a diverse group of Jews who also identify as African American, Hispanic or LatinX, Native American or indigenous, Asian American, Pacific Islander, Middle Eastern, mizrahi, and beta Israel or Ethiopian Jewish, and multiracial. Ilana Kaufman is the executive director of the Jews of color initiative. I spoke with her about the survey's findings, and the Jewish communities growing awareness of its own diversity. As this conversation has continued to gain momentum. There's been some very sincere wondering about our experiences as Jewish people of color. Our perspectives, what happens to us when we're communal spaces? Do we really have experiences or racism or not? How and in what ways do we engage Jewish life and why? The survey respondents report engaging in Jewish life in many of the traditional ways. Going to synagogue, celebrating Shabbat and holidays, passing on Jewish identity to the next generation. Three quarters of them said that engaging in tikun olam or social justice was an important expression of their Jewish identity. And an overwhelming majority report facing racism and discrimination in majority white Jewish communal settings. In this episode, ilana and I talk about the survey and its implications. You'll also hear from Cassandra morocha gage and suji about their personal experiences. So elana, this is an engaged group of Jews. That's right. And yet the survey shows that the vast majority, 80% report they faced discrimination, especially in Jewish congregational settings. I mean, I don't imagine that came as a surprise to you or did it. I mean, what was your reaction to that finding? This number is jaw dropping. And while it's not surprising, because each one of us who's a Jewish person of color who engages in community life, experiences racism on a daily basis. What does it mean that a group of a collective group of people who again have different experiences based on our own racial ethnic backgrounds, but a collective experience of racism in this context, what does it mean when a group is so highly engaged and enduring so much so much injustice and pain and what would it be like if we could just dive in and just engage in Jewish life without having to into a racism? My name is Cassandra housley. I'm originally from Terre Haute Indiana, but I've been in Bloomington now for quite a long time. I'm hyper aware that I'm the only black woman in this space. There's no way around that. And all of that subconscious like performance like I have to be awesome because if I do anything wrong, it's not just because I'm, you know, I had a bad day or because, you know, I tripped on my way here and it threw up my mojo, 'cause, well, she's black and she's this, and she's that. And she's the affirmative action hire that we didn't. Or whatever, you know? And I just not wanting to go down that road because once you go down that road, you don't have brain space left to think about what it is you're there to do. I'm suji men Miranda. I live in Ann Arbor, Michigan. I am an immigrant first generation was born in Seoul Korea, converted to Judaism as an adult on my own, and I am currently the executive director of the aleph alliance for Jewish renewal. I was in a waiting room and happened to come across a woman from a synagogue that I was the executive director of for 6 years. I was very, very involved in this synagogue for 6 years. And she mistook me for another Korean woman who belongs to the synagogue. So they're really is, you know, this feeling that Asians, we all look alike. I mean, that's what resonated or made me real. My name is Miro Shah. I also go by Mira. I'm 22. And I grew up on the northeast coast

Jews Of Color Initiative Cassandra Housley Maruchi Zalal Tsuji Gage Gorsky Pew Research Institute Ilana Kaufman Suji Cassandra Morocha Gage America Miranda Ilana San Francisco Elana Israel Terre Haute Bloomington
A highlight from Beverley Knight, Chinese tennis player Peng Shuai, Vulvodynia

Woman's Hour

05:17 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Beverley Knight, Chinese tennis player Peng Shuai, Vulvodynia

"Putting your head above the parapet, ever done it, said or done something you knew would have repercussions, however big or small, well today we're talking to and about several women who have done just that, starting with Caroline notes the conservative MP, who is accused the prime minister's father of groping her, Stanley Johnson is so far declined to comment on the allegation saying he has no recollection of it. I'm going to speak to Caroline shortly about what's happened since she made that allegation, and whether it's been worth it also would have been the repercussions for her. But what about you? Have you ever spoken out when perhaps you were scared to or you'd wanted to for some time or maybe you've intervened if you've seen perhaps I don't know inappropriate behavior out on the streets or on the train on a bus or closer to home or perhaps it was in the workplace. Maybe you've called out a bullying or difficult boss in some way. What did you do and how did it go down? And was it the right thing to do, and are you happy you did it? Or do you know it was the right thing to do, but perhaps you regret it? Maybe the cost to you was today. We talk about the need for, especially women to be able to speak out to be heard, but what about what happens next? Text me here at woman's own 8 four 8 four four text will be charged at your standard message rate, or get in touch with me on social media at BBC women's or email us through our website. Also on today's program, I'll be joined by the singer and actor Beverly knight. We're going to be talking about women, power, and music. And in terms of health issues, something that you have some of you I should say have been getting in touch with us about vulvodynia. Do you have persistent unexplained pain in your vulva? Women are living with this and talking about it more and more, and we want to understand it. So we'll be hearing from someone who has suffered with it and someone who's studying it. And how one woman became the strongest in the world. Well, that was certainly her title. How could Joan Rhodes bend steel bars and rip up phonebooks with her bare hands? But first, last week, Caroline notes former minister conservative MP and now chair of the women and equalities committee has accused the prime minister's father of groping her 18 years ago at a Conservative Party conference. She told Sky News that Stanley Johnson, who was a parliamentary candidate at the time, smacked her quote on the backside about as hard as he could. Allegedly saying you've got a lovely seat. Stanley Johnson has so far declined to comment on the allegation, as I said before saying he has no recollection of it. Caroline notes joins me now. Good morning. Morning Emma. What's it been like since you said that? I think it would be fair to say it's been good and bad. I've had some amazing support from both my constituents and from women in and around Westminster. And I've been sent to Coventry by some and openly criticized in sections of the press file that so very, very mixed week for me personally. But actually, for women everywhere, it's been a week where they've seen that, however, notionally powerful you are. You can still have these hideous experiences. And it's important that we all prepare to speak up, but we are prepared to call out behavior that it's just inappropriate. You've called it out some years or nearly 20 years on. Does that mean you've been thinking about this ever since? So I think it wouldn't be right to say I've been thinking about it ever since. I have not dwelt on it. But the reality is that all of the various incidents that have happened to me and I have seen happen to other people, do prey on your mind. And this year, more than any other year, we have been looking at the hideous incidents of violence against women and girls, the unwanted sexual harassment and touching that goes on. And, you know, I've just got to the point in my life where I thought it was imperative to call it out. So when people have said, why call it out now? It's that climate that we're in, not nothing else specific that's happened to you or perhaps you've seen, I don't know Stanley Johnson again. I mean, what was the actual moment you thought I'm going to do this? So and I shouldn't plug somebody else's show on yours. But it was when Beth Rigby spoke to a number of female MPs and spoke to me about the program she was planning on doing, which was absolutely about empowering other women to speak up. And I think initially, the conversation was around, did I know any colleagues who might be prepared to take part? And when Katie, who produced it said, would I be prepared to take part? I thought about that thought, well, you know what? Over the last 20 plus years since I was first elected as a conservative candidate way back in the year 2000. I've seen too much I've experienced too much. And what I wouldn't have known I wouldn't necessarily have known how or to whom to call it out 20 years ago, I do now. I have a platform and a voice now and I don't want other younger women, maybe entering politics, journalism, or any other career. That's the start reality. This can happen in any walk of life. Don't want them to go through what I've been through and what some of my contemporaries have been through. What did you do when he, as you say, as you allege, smack you on the backside about as hard as he could? What

Stanley Johnson Caroline Beverly Knight Joan Rhodes Women And Equalities Committee Sky News Conservative Party BBC Coventry Emma Beth Rigby Westminster Katie
A highlight from Indigenous Women: Evelyn Scott

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:21 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Indigenous Women: Evelyn Scott

"Hello. From wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is romantica. Today we're talking about one of the most celebrated voices in the battle for indigenous rights in Australia. She was a lifelong political activist, and the leading force in the historic 1967 referendum for Aboriginal rights. Please welcome Evelyn Scott. Evelyn was born Evelyn Ruth back in 1935 in income Queensland. Her father was the son of an enslaved person from Vanuatu. Evelyn's desire to fight injustice may have stemmed from him. While we don't know much about Evelyn's childhood, many authors and journalists have suggested she took inspiration from her father's motto. If you don't think something's right, then challenge it. When Evelyn was in her mid 20s, she moved to townsville, a city in northeastern Queensland. It was there in the 1960s that she was called to action. She joined the townsville Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander advancement league, where she organized to fight widespread injustice against Aboriginal people. At the time, the Queensland government was enforcing many discriminatory practices in housing, employment and education under the aborigines protection act. Under this law, Aboriginal rights were almost entirely controlled by Aboriginal protectors. Protectors were classified as European civil servants, police and missionaries. These so called protectors had full legal right to remove Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander people from their homes, and relocate them to reserves. Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander people's civil workplace and political rights were diminished, if not totally nonexistent. In 1967, Evelyn was a major leader in a campaign to turn back those protection laws. She campaigned for a yes vote on the 1967 referendum, which called for changing two sections of Australia's constitution. As it then stood, the Australian constitution stated that the federal parliament could not make laws for Aboriginal people. Instead, that responsibility fell to individual states, which enabled the creation of sporadic, unjust laws like the protection act in Queensland. The constitution also omitted Aboriginal people from the federal census. The 1967 referendum asked Australians if they supported including Aboriginal people from every state in these constitutional provisions. The result was historic, more than 90% of voters voted yes, making it the most successful referendum in Australian history. Afterwards, Evelyn joined the federal council for the advancement of aboriginals and Torres Strait islanders as its vice president. A few years later, in 1973, she helped the council become indigenous led and became its general secretary. She would say in an interview years later, we have to determine our own agenda if we're going to address the issue right. Evelyn was dedicated to the importance of women's voices in the fight for indigenous rights. Throughout the 1970s, she was active in the cairns and district Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander corporation for women, as well as the national Aboriginal and islander women's council. She also campaigned for the protection of the Great Barrier Reef and believed in involving more indigenous voices and land and sea conservation. Evelyn was awarded the queen's silver jubilee metal for her activism in 1977. She also received two honorary doctorates and was appointed as an officer of the order of Australia in 2003. She continued her advocacy work into her 60s. From 1997 to 2000, Evelyn acted as the chair of the National Council for Aboriginal reconciliation. She worked in opposition to prime minister John Howard, who was resolute on cutting reconciliation funding. Evelyn's efforts culminated in the corroborate 2000 bridge walk where more than a quarter of a million people marched across the Sydney harbor bridge in support of an official government apology. In 2015, Evelyn moved to a care facility. And on September 21st, 2017, she died at the age of 81. Her contributions to indigenous rights in Australia were widely lauded at the time of her death. She became the first Aboriginal woman to be honored by the Queensland government with a state funeral.

Evelyn Jenny Kaplan Evelyn Scott Evelyn Ruth Queensland Townsville Aboriginal And Torr Federal Parliament Australia Vanuatu Queensland Government Townsville Federal Council For The Advanc Cairns And District Aboriginal National Aboriginal And Island National Council For Aborigina Prime Minister John Howard Great Barrier Reef Sydney Harbor Bridge
Against White Feminism With Rafia Zakaria

Woman's Hour

02:14 min | 3 months ago

Against White Feminism With Rafia Zakaria

"Yesterday we spoke to the writer and campaigner. Julie bendel who in her new book is against type of feminism that she sees as most benefiting men today. I joined by raphael sakaria. Any american feminist. Who in her new book is arguing against type of feminism most benefits white women on behalf of domestic violence victims as a lawyer and a human rights activists years. She sees the issue of race as the biggest obstacle to true solidarity among women and she is calling for a moment of reckoning. Halbrook is called against white feminism rafi. Good morning welcome to the program. Good morning how are you. Thank you for being with us. I'm against white feminism. It is a very striking title at anew. Say you've taken a risk in writing this book. Why did you do it well off to be really blunt. I did it. Because i was quite tired. Like women Saying all the right things pretending to be low end even committed to Quote unquote intersectional. Feminism Where they recognize the importance of considering race and gender But when it comes to their actual lines were actually seating any space four women of color. It's an absolute no can do you. Now so you know for instance if you know if if if if a group of say why an women of color line for to be the top parson organization had in the book i say National organization of women They face tremendous marginalization personal attacks and all sorts of harassment. Honestly so i was just honestly tried to. I was i was done with it. You know i was done with. This pretends that women of color have to engage in to be sort of accepted into a system that's been created by white women and four white women

Julie Bendel Raphael Sakaria Halbrook Rafi Parson Organization National Organization Of Women
What Is the Difference Between a Mentor and a Sponsor? With Alison Martin

Brave Women at Work

01:50 min | 3 months ago

What Is the Difference Between a Mentor and a Sponsor? With Alison Martin

"Let's start with what you alison is a mentor. In how is that. Different from a publisher. Sure so what. We teach at engage. Venturing in terms of definition of mentoring is something that we there's a lot of different academic definitions. We boiled it down into a concept. Everyone can understand which is knowledge transfer so in other words. The mentor is shared there to show their experiences share. Their knowledge share their talent show. There was on whatever topic it is. Were speaking on so true. Mentoring is i've been there. I've done that. I've done that successfully. Ideally and i'm here to share my perspective with you so that you can really short cut your learning on whatever topic. It is that we are talking about it. We also teach this concept of having a personal board of directors or multiple. Mentors that you can count on but i believe it's important that you have as strong pure mentor. Someone who does a similar job to you but inspires you and is someone you can let your hair down with a little bit and really learn from and be inspired by someone who can give you some sound career advice and help you career perspective as you're thinking about what that looks like the more traditional mentor is when you aspire to be more like whether they demonstrate qualities and characteristics you would like to have or they occupy a position. You'd like to hold in the future. That's the most traditional form of mentoring but then finally we also teach this concept of competency. Mentoring so i wanna work on a specific skill or a specific topic. So i'm gonna work. Got a mentor to help me with it with that area because it's such a powerful and efficient way of learning whatever it is you're trying to learn that's how we defined mentoring knowledge transfer on whatever topic. It is that you are going to a mentor about. A sponsor is an advocate so as someone who is there. Ideally they're in a position that where they can open up doors for you or they can serve as an advocate for

Alison