Entrepreneurs

Leaders, dreamers and persistence - listen here for stories on business ventures, the visionaries behind them, tales of failure, and the never-give-up attitude that ultimately leads to success, from audio broadcasts aired on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

A highlight from Future of NFTs with Avery Akkineni

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:38 min | 10 hrs ago

A highlight from Future of NFTs with Avery Akkineni

"This day and age, if you're strategizing for three or four months, let alone three or four years, like you've already missed your opportunity, like it's gone by because things are moving so fast. And I can't tell you the amount of people that have come up to me and say, John, I literally thought of Uber before Uber launched, or I thought of Airbnb before Airbnb. I'm like, so where's your execution? Where's the execution? Exactly. Just wasn't there. Yeah, you should have launched it. Should have launched it. So at wiener NFT, you help other people unlock the potential of one of the greatest technology shifts that we are experiencing. This is literally the greatest technology shift of our time. Can you share some of the details about this shift? We believe that web three is going to be a transformative technological change for everyone. The same way the Internet was a major change. Fundamentally shifting the way that people interacted with content, communication, payments, travel, et cetera, et cetera. We think the same is going to be true of web three and NFTs are the gateway into web three NFTs fundamentally are the first way that you can actually own a digital asset and that's a big mind shift for a lot of people. And it's our great pleasure and opportunity and challenge and joy to be helping some of the world's biggest intellectual property owners figure out this wonderful new world of NFTs and web three and create programs that engage their communities inspire their communities and let them interact in a new way as we kind of start this ascent into this wonderful new technology transformation. Can you give a couple examples of people that you're helping right now at Vayner NFT? And we can get as vague or specific as you're able or willing to do. We can, again, just kind of be very broad stroke here and not name names. But we'd love to hear maybe a couple examples of real world. We work with a couple of different groups. First, celebrities and sort of people of interest, whether they're influencers or more traditional and mainstream celebrities who have engaged audiences, maybe they've become successful via social media or via other more traditional channels. We help them engage with NFT programs that engage their communities in a new way. So that's one group. And I'll give you an example. One of our first projects was the world's largest YouTuber with over 200 million subscribers. She's 7 years old and we helped her launch her first NFT project a couple of months back and we're now working on a whole new program that's going to be a new way for her to engage with her community and fan base. So that's one example. We also have examples of brand partners or working with Budweiser and Stella artois and Corona and everyone in the Anheuser Busch family to launch brand programs, which allow their communities in new way to collect and to engage with the brands. And just last Friday, a couple of days ago, we did a really fun collaboration with Tom Sachs rocket factory. I thought it was actually purchased a rocket from Tom Sachs, who's a contemporary artist who's launched a very successful NFT program. We then invited Tom and his team to launch the rockets from Budweiser headquarters and hosted some of Tom's fans and collectors and Budweiser fans and collectors there in an exclusive NFT event, which included special tour of the brewery and some exclusive merch and fun stuff of that nature. And then we also work with platforms like we work with coinbase and launching their new NFT offerings, so we're in the midst of that right now, which is very exciting. We believe this isn't a whole new platform that's going to bring way more people into the wonderful world of NFTs. And we also work with association. So folks like the U.S. tennis association on celebrating remarkable achievements of their players at their iconic event, which is the U.S. open. We didn't really awesome program there, which included elements of both free NFTs, low cost NFTs that are collectibles and in that golden ace at sort of trading card NFTs, which unlocked these incredible experiences that only U.S. open in their tennis legends could provide. We also work with folks like artists, we're working with a renowned photographer and artist called David Drummond on launching something really fun in art Basel. And yeah, that's all in a day's work. Well, I want to keep talking about the future of NFTs because this is all very fascinating to me. I want to really get into how they're becoming a game changer. And we're talking right now specifically for brands, specifically for IP owners. What are you seeing that's going to be happening in the future going forward? Anesthesia are fundamentally so different from a marketing campaign that it's a very new thing for brands because I've spent a lot of my career in marketing where we thought, you know, we're launching a new product or a new line or something like that and campaigns were one, very localized to specific markets because the products might only be available in certain countries. And then two, they were very temporary. It was only meant to be the message for a few months, a specific campaign thing. NFTs are different. And I have to use our inherently global and they're inherently forever. And that's a huge mindset shift for brands. And we're coaching a lot of our brand partners to think about NFTs way beyond a campaign, way beyond in our media moment really is something that is a new kind of a business for them that requires always on support and always on surprising delight of their fan bases and communities and really an investment in both time and resources to make them really successful.

Tom Sachs Airbnb Anheuser Busch Budweiser U.S. Tennis Association Stella Artois TOM John Corona David Drummond U.S. Basel Tennis
A highlight from MBA1931 Why We Launched a Free Plan

The $100 MBA Show

02:04 min | 14 hrs ago

A highlight from MBA1931 Why We Launched a Free Plan

"No money is coming in, but money is going out. So initially, we started with a free 14 day trial. One of the things that we really believe in in our company is that you need to be close to the customer. So we do as many customer interviews as possible. We've talked to our customers who do surveys. We run webinars, and in that process, what we've learned over the years is that people need more time. 14 days is just not enough for them to evaluate their webinar software to figure out if it's a good fit for them to actually get a webinar up and running with their content and their slides and everything. And no, hey, this is a solution for me. And we would get that feedback in our cancellation feedback. When people cancel their account, we have a process where we collect feedback. It's like a survey when they cancel their account. In those surveys, many people would say, you know, I didn't use it or to have a chance to do it, or I needed more time. So I'll be back. So we were faced with the dilemma, okay, we have this free trial where it gives them all the power, all the solutions they need, all the features, but they have 14 days to decide. After the 14 days, they will be charged for their plan. So hence they might cancel before the 14 days so they don't get charged for something they're not sure about yet. Sounds reasonable. So what are the options for us? And let me just tell you that successful businesses don't work alone. We learned that we don't have all the answers. So we reached out to people that do have the answers. We reach out to pricing experts and freemium experts like Patrick Campbell from prophet who was generous enough to coach us on this. We reached out to Marcus Rivera, who is the founder of pricing IO. Also gave us some really solid advice when it comes to freemium. And what they all said, these experts is that if you're going to go freelance, understand this is a customer acquisition model and not a pricing model. Meaning, you've got to see this as sort of like a glorified opt in, a way to get really good leads. You're paying for these leads by offering your software. And that's really

Marcus Rivera Patrick Campbell
A highlight from S5 Bonus: Cherish Santoshi, SAWO Labs

Code Story

14:36 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from S5 Bonus: Cherish Santoshi, SAWO Labs

"He likes to interact with founders and startup folks, which make his current role as head of community a perfect fit. Being startup minded, he set out with his founding members to continue the growth of sas in India. And build a product specifically for the developer community. And building an off product that furthers the passwordless revolution. This is the creation story of Saul. Saddle is an auth SDK that helps developers and businesses to enable password list logins on their web and mobile apps. It helps to create OTP less password less log inflows so your user could just click on login without password and just directly into your app. It helps the businesses to reduce their bounce rate their children rate and improve the overall user on body onboarding journey as a whole. So that's what we do. So it's a developer facing product. It's a SaaS dev tool in India, and that's just picking up India, especially dev tools. I take care of the community here at SAO. I take a three verticals. The first is developer marketing, which means how the developers find the product, how they get away about the product itself. The second is developer experience, which means how they consume the product from end to end. Everything that helps them create and build using saddle. And the third is community management, which means, if anybody has ever interacted with travel, and they're willing to be a part of a password address revolution, we want them. And we want them to interact with each other. So everybody learns from them. They learn from everybody. And it's an ecosystem that just promotes product culture here at a travel and everywhere we go. So being one of the founding members, you were right around the out of the gates MVP. So tell me a little bit about that first product that you built as a team. You know, the product that community, how long it took you to build, and what sort of tools you use to bring it to life. So the company was founded in August 28, 2020. And we started with two member team and IUCN actually the first two members. And from there on we went on to build the community. We went on to build the entire product on Java, as core framework. Now the reason for that was that Java is something which is usually like the pump table stack to kind of work with what I native local cofounder, and it's easier to get source the talent, right? Of course, that is something that seemed like a short term benefit that we had to do, and that is something that we started building on. Within a few months, we had within I want to say three to four months we had enough traction to kind of go out in the market and showcase our product. But before that, I think idea in the stack and the MVP was good enough that we got VCS before pre incorporation. So just as we were incorporated, we picked up a seed funding of 8 40 K from investors and then we went on to actually pick up seed round much later here in December. And that's what we did. So within a span of four months, we picked up two span of two months I want to say, we closed two out so funding. And then we had the capacity and the bandwidth to change the stack and hired something which is far more scalable and even more niche. Even if that comes a costly italic trade. In that three to four month time frame, you mentioned you mentioned the two seas, but even prior to that, you have to make certain decisions and tradeoffs when you're building an MVP, right about what features you're going to start with, which means which features you're going to cut, or which, you know, what technical debt you're going to accept. So tell me about some of those decisions and tradeoffs you had to make as a team and how you cope with them. So multiple, right? So because we picked up Java at the beginning and then we moved on to jungle. There was a lot of researching that had to do in terms of the product road map in the terms of features. But I think that came at the right point in time and that was a tradeoff that we were willing to do because when we had picked up a funding far more scalable to the use cases that we serve. And we could hire the talent once we had the funding out of the way. Because of that, we kind of floated initially, but that came with certain technical diet that we kind of solved for the next few months. That's something that we had to do initially. And the second thing that we realized much long ago, especially in Q one of 2021, was that although when it comes to the API usage, like, of course, you will use more odd APIs or like more calls per say more authentications in general if you're a bigger company. But though average life cycle of closing and enterprise companies far more than closing smaller, scale startups, developers and product product managers, community, and you are very products like big small companies. So we moved on to pivot our strategy from skipping the enterprises and taking community first, small companies, enterprises and small medium businesses. Kind of go out and actually sell them. Now, the reason and realize this very early and this is where I came into picture when when I spoke to papa, who was the founder and the CEO at Saba labs. About and I were discussing that when you when you're making a dev tools, right? The person who has the influence of using the tool will always be a developer. I mean, I'm sure the person who will try to check will probably be a CPO founder or a director, right? And they'll have that technical mentality probably. But they will always make sure that they get the bind from their actual developers before they actually write your check in by that product. So it made sense for us to make that developer community reach out to these people, understand what we are building for them is actually solving for him for solving for them solving the use cases that they want, build with them, make sure that our documentation is easily understandable easily consumable. And they are able to play around with it and make sure that it fits almost everywhere. We want to go. So we made sure that our product was built with the community. Now, even now, right? The community is somebody who communities are great entity for us, because I always say that their feedback is gold for us because we take their feedback we wet it and then we put it on our road map and once we have implemented that, we go back to the community and tell them hey, thanks so much for doing this for us. You know, we want to make sure that we incentivize you and we cherish you and we also make sure that we appreciate you and whatever possible way. And that's why we spend a lot and that's why we encourage a huge community or product culture here at savo. So from that point, post three to four months, you've got the seeds. You know, you're encouraging community, which is fantastic. How did you progress the product from there and mature it? And even as a company, how did you build your road map and figure out, okay, this is the next most important thing to build or this is the next most important key element to drive the community in interaction. We've always prioritized functionality before features. And when you have a dev tool, you want to make sure that before you add on features like different dashboard customizations, you want to make sure that your compatible to all the tech stocks that you want to serve. And not just that you want to make sure that you have your presence towards a lot of people do a lot of no code platforms or web platforms like bubble Shopify. So we started building for them in Q two 2021. In fact, Q one to Q two 2021. And we built a lot of hybrid platforms for flutter. We built a lot for commerce websites. We decided building for Shopify bubble and these no code platforms as well. We made sure that we have an SDK available for iOS Android or hybrid flutter, main, many developer and we kind of built it for them. And of course, I will because it's an OTP list and a password list SDK. It also helps you it also gives you the iframe that you can embed in your logins activity or login screen that helps you the healthy user kind of go through the entire process and ask seamless way as possible. And as we progress further, the I frame has got a little more customization. We could add multiple custom fields. We gave a bunch of colors. We introduce dark themes. And that's something that a lot of users, especially developers really, right? They take a lot of pride in what they've created. And once they started doing that, they realized that any iframe that wasn't necessarily working out in the entire theme of their product, they like, huh, this is something that I would like to change. And that's why we moved on to giving them the customization and UI UX changes. And we also have a capture on our road map. That's something that we're going to put forward and make sure that our communities helping us building a capture. That's also going to be a part of our road map. The last thing I want to say, which is on our road map is going to be like a self checkout self checkout mechanism for a lot of ecommerce and B2C websites because it's very important whenever you're making a transaction that you'll have to authenticate yourself a bunch of things. So we want to make sure that journey is as easy as authenticate shop, authenticate and AutoPlay. Just two step or four step kind of journey. So this next question will be interesting given, given so much community involvement in the product. How did you go about building your team and your team? You know, seems like it could extend out into that community too. So how are you, how are you approaching building your team and what do you look for in those people to indicate that they are the winning horses to join you? Has a great leadership. Most of them are really young, driven people. All of us are in our 20s, really inspired really excited people who have come from all works of life. I happen to come from companies like Google, Amazon, how could bigger names in the industry, but I've always jumped from a bigger company to a smaller one, only to understand that. Shortness is where learning slice startup is where I want to break things. You can make things and you can pay multiple hats. So you see the bigger picture far more clearly. And others as well. A lot of our founding member, they come from the very first perspective of building product. They're not somebody who have bogged down by the capacity of what is something that you can do. What is their spend capacity? They have that entire growth mindset in product mindset. That's something that we look forward to when we hire. Our hiring has always been a little challenging because the bar has been usually a very high. But the good thing about the team is that we've only I think in the last one years since the company was incorporated, maybe just 6 to ten people left the company and the rest kind of state. We've grown from two people from last year to 15 now and that's where we're headed. We're growing at a very rapid pace. So whenever you're working in a startup, I don't want to. This is a common culture in India that a lot of managers micromanage. And especially with remote work, they want to make sure that every work or every hour or every minute is accounted for. Startup leaders do not have the bandwidth to do because they have their own work handle and they can't actually go out and do that. And so the things that I look forward to whenever I hire are ownership, which means that you will look at the job from end to end and you will not single IO of the entire program or the product should be like this is beyond my scope and hence I can not contribute. That's something that that's non negotiable. The second is integrity, startups have moved things really quick. So there's not a lot of hierarchy, red tapes and a lot of things in the process that is going to drill down on your ethics or your work ethics. So then there's a lot of freedom that is given to the employees, and technically comes into play. And the third is intelligence. You might do all the right things and all the right time, but making sure that you're doing you have the capacity to think. And you have the capacity to assimilate and analyze situations and products and features and communities and decisions in a way that makes sense is something which is extremely important for us. That's something that I look at. And the team that I know we have fantastic sales team leads that we have a great product team. I usually lead that marketing and I lead community and we also have sawmills also leads the tech partner in Mantua horizon. Our prepared is cofounder and CEO at savo, he's the brain behind hiring all these masters. This episode is brought to you by courier. Your application speaks to your users with notifications. But what do you do when your users each respond better to a different channel? Building the event triggers is annoying enough. But when you have to build templates for multiple channels track deliverability and performance and manage granular user preferences, you end up with overwhelming complexity that distracts your team from your core product. That's why courier builds its API and notification system as a surface. Courier is the fastest way to design, manage and orchestrate all of your applications, notifications using a simple API. The UI is a powerful drag and drop editor to help you build and send templates over any channel while giving your users full control over their own preferences. Plugin providers like Twilio, SendGrid, mailgun, and Firebase, to send email, SMS push in app, or even direct messages like slack. WhatsApp, or MS teams. Get started today with 10,000 notifications free every month. No credit card needed. Just go to courier dot com slash code story. That's, IER dot com slash code story. This episode is sponsored by image. If you're ready to add photo or video editing to your application, is a great place to start. Image provides a software development kit that handles all the technology for adding photo and video editing right inside your application. Their SDKs are fully customizable and can match your apps look and feel and support all major platforms. Let users share beautiful photos or videos create imagery for marketing campaigns, build photo books or even automate design with templates. Their video and photo editor SDK is used by a Shopify hoot suite Shutterfly and hundreds of other companies, helping them ships offer faster. The image they software development kit is the fastest way to add photo or video functionality to any application. Visit IMG LY slash code story today to try the web demo. That's IMG dot LY slash code story.

India Saba Labs Iucn SAO SAS Saul Papa Amazon Google Mantua Firebase
A highlight from Crowdfunding From 500 Physicians Instead of 1 VC with Laurence Girard

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:23 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Crowdfunding From 500 Physicians Instead of 1 VC with Laurence Girard

"Delivering this program and having a real social impact. Fire nation, focus is one of my favorite words for a reason. Follow one course until success. So I personally love how Lawrence was just able to identify one specific issue amongst the tens of thousands that are out there, that he was like, I'm going to go all in on this. And I'm going to make a difference. As a result, and hopefully by the way, inspire a bunch of other people to go all in on their specific niche on their specific passion industry. But I do have to ask you, why did you go the crowdfunding route instead of VCs? I mean, in this day and age, it seems like everybody's going to these big venture capital firms who have more money than they even know what to do with, and they're spacs, and there's angel investors. But instead, you went to 500 physicians to crowdfund to talk about that. I think that in healthcare, you have to have a dual focus of wanting to have a social impact and also having a sustainable business model at the same time. And this is not true of all venture capital and private equity firms, but I think the majority of them are mandated to exclusively focus on the financial returns and having an exit as fast as possible. And I was more interested in building something for the long term that had a social impact, but also had a sustainable business model. And so when you think of the mindset of a physician, it's very similar. Doctors go to medical school because they want to help improve healthcare and help patients. But I think they all realize that it's a fairly good job in terms of having a good income as well. And so we had made this decision that instead of working with the venture capital firm for capital and advice, we were going to make fruit street more of this grassroots effort at physicians who wanted to have a social impact in healthcare. And so we do have more than 500 physicians who have invested in our company, but they're not just investors. We've also included them in an advisory board through an online discussion forum software called base camp, where they also provide us with very valuable advice into things like the software design, the business model, clinical guidelines, introducing us to colleagues that may want to refer patients to our program. And so we're kind of like crowdfunding and the capital for the company, but also crowdsourcing knowledge for the company and then building a network of evangelists who could lead to potential customers. My last point is just that I saw a quote from the CEO of AngelList recently. It went something like this. Venture capital firms and angel investors provide capital and advice, but crowdfunding creates customers and fans. And so it's a bit of a different approach and actually one last point is there's a quote that we kind of live by, which is that the only thing that ever changed the world was a small group of committed citizens. And so that's another reason why we've gone down this crowdfunding route. I love that quote. That last one specifically really resonates because it is all about those evangelists. It's about those raving fans and I love that phrase you use too about crowdsourcing knowledge. I mean, think about that. You bring in one VC or even a VC team, what's their expertise, their expertise is finance. Their money people are they really going to be able to advise you very well on health and specifically diabetes. Probably not, you know, a very unlikely chance that could happen, but it's unlikely. But if you have 500 physicians who have a vested interest who have invested into a company, they want to see a succeed and they have the knowledge, the excitement, the passion, the enthusiasm to make it happen. Now you have 500 people who are out there sharing this message with the world, sharing the fact that, hey, fruit street health is an online diabetes prevention program. And you need to check it out because this is something that I'm vested in. I'm passionate about. I'm contributing to and again, I'm talking right now as if I'm one of these 500 physicians, which of course I'm not. But that's what they're thinking. That's what they're saying. So this is why you can see fire nation. This can be such a powerful idea in path to take. So before we move on, is there anything that you want to add to this specific topic? I think the physicians are also realizing that it's an idea that can benefit their patients, right? They're realizing that prediabetes, diabetes and obesity or big problems in their patient population and they're investing in an idea that can ultimately help their patients. Now, of course, those physicians need to disclose to their patients that they are very small, shareholder in the company, but its physicians that are also realizing that, hey, I don't have to sit here and wait for a big insurance company or a big venture capital firm to invest in a good idea. I can participate in the entrepreneurial process and support an idea through capital and advice that can benefit patients in my own local community. And so I don't think that we need to wait for these big institutions to do something to improve our local community. We can just take it upon ourselves to do that, which is what many of these physicians have realized. That's a fantastic point. I'm really glad that you brought that up. You can see how this just continues to grow fire nation. I mean, it's truly exponential at this point.

Angellist Lawrence Diabetes Obesity
A highlight from MBA1930 Q&A Wednesday: How do I tell my spouse I want to start a business?

The $100 MBA Show

04:07 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from MBA1930 Q&A Wednesday: How do I tell my spouse I want to start a business?

"Having that talk with your significant other about starting a business is an important one. And at first you might think this is going to be an emotional discussion. It's going to be emotional talk. My significant other knows me more than anybody else, I'm afraid that there will judge me or maybe shoot down my idea and it's going to hurt even more coming from somebody I love so much. So it's safer just to keep it inside and not tell other people. But the reality is that this business won't be a reality. If you don't start working start doing start implementing, and you're going to need the person that's closest to you to be in the know to be supportive because eventually when this business grows and becomes your full-time thing, their life is going to be effective. It's who you are. You are changing. My advice is to try to remove the emotion as much as possible. And almost see yourself like you're pitching your business to an investor. Kind of like what you see on Shark Tank. Now, the sharks bite, you know, they invest when they see facts. They see information to see numbers. They see action. They see proof that this business is viable and they're convinced this is a good idea. I think we should do this. I think we should go to business together. And in some way, the person you live with the person you're involved with emotionally and practically every day in your life, they're investing in you in terms of being a partner in your life. They need to be sold. They need to be understood that, okay, this is actually not a bad idea. This is actually a good idea and you have a plan to move forward. This is probably your most important pitch because you can pitch to several investors, but you can't pitch to civil partners. You've got your partner. You want to stick with them. What you don't want to do is you don't want to just approach them and say, hey, I'm thinking about starting a business. This is my idea. Ideas are dime a dozen, and it's easy for somebody to be like, okay, this is a great idea, but I deal with reality, right? They might say, hey, what about your day job? That's what's stable. That's what pays the bill. This will help our house or family. Why would you leave something that's secure for something that's totally risky? And in their defense, that's a logical argument. I wouldn't be advising coming into this conversation with more than just saying I have an idea. If you weren't hesitant. The reason why you haven't shared this idea for over a year, Fred is because you're afraid of the reaction. You're afraid of maybe you're going to get shot down or maybe you're going to be talked out of it. Some people are worried about that. So you're going to come into this with some information with some facts and with a game plan. That also addresses your partner's concerns. Just like if you sell a product to somebody, they have concerns. They have rebuttals. You need to address these or they're not going to buy. So this is a good starting point. What are some of the concerns your spouse might have with you sharing this news? And list them out because they might be different for you versus other people. I can suggest some right now and say, hey, they might be concerned with the stability of the household. The amount of time that's going to take, if you can pull it off, if you have the experience, did you have any data to prove that this idea can be fruitful? It could be a whole list of things that you know your partner better than I do. So go ahead and list them. And then you gotta have some information some research something prepared for that. And by the way, they're not wrong. This is actually great preparation for you. You need to prove to yourself and to them that this is a good idea. This is something you should pursue. And this S.W.A.T. analysis really will allow you to do that. Next, most people do not like spontaneity. They don't like extremes. They're like consistency. So if you have a plan forward to get to the end goal, let's say, for example, you want to start an online business like you mentioned, you want it to be your full-time thing, you want to be able to make more money and have more freedom. That's the end goal. Maybe that's where you're at in 5 years from now. But what are the steps to get you there? And what does that look like for you?

Sharks Fred
A highlight from Brooke Shields on Learning To Compartmentalize

Skimm'd from The Couch

07:54 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Brooke Shields on Learning To Compartmentalize

"I was going to have to. I'm Carly Zac and I'm Danielle weissberg. Welcome to 9 to 5 ish with the skin. We've run into so many questions over the years and had so many moments where we needed advice and we got it from women who'd been there. And that's what we're bringing you at this show. Each week we're helping you get what you want out of your career by talking to the smartest leaders we know. Because we know your work life is a lot more than 9 to 5. All right, let's get into it. Today, our guest is Brooke Shields. She has been a household name almost since birth from doing her first commercial at 11 months old to a Calvin Klein genes campaign at 14. She achieved notoriety through blockbuster movies in the 1980s, like the Blue Lagoon and endless love. Since then, Brooks becoming a Broadway actress starred in sitcoms and TV dramas, written two books and raised two daughters. And now, she is starring in and producing the upcoming Netflix Christmas movie a castle for Christmas. Brooke, we are so excited to have you. Welcome. Oh, thank you. Thank you for welcoming me. So before we get into the conversation, we like to warm up. We're going to do a lightning round. Quick questions, quick answers. Let's do it. What is a secret hobby or skill that you have? My secret hobby is needlepoint. Oh, that's a really good one. I am needle pointing a backgammon board. Like I have to be on the set doing something like some kind of craft or something. Okay. What is the last show that you binge watched? Oh, I haven't seen it, but I heard I would really like it. Oh, please, Rhonda walk. Okay, my next question, you have starred in many things that are beloved shows and movies of mine. But one of my most favorite roles you've done is when you were on Broadway and you played Rizzo in Greece. Oh my goodness. How old were you? You must have been a baby. I was a child, but I remember vividly. What is your favorite line or song from Greece? There are worse things I could do. Fair. When was the last time you negotiated for yourself? About 20 minutes ago. Where did you negotiate? I negotiated someone's fee for a perspective job. How does taking time to slow down fuel you to move forward? I never slowed down in my life till more recently in the past few years. And the fuel that I get from just doing something healing for myself sometimes that can just be hanging out with a friend or watching movies or doing something where there's where the regular noise is stopped. I find that I reemerge from that even stronger and more powerful. I just it's almost like that time the energy starts and it starts building up. Okay, we're going to move into the meat of our show. You started working when you were you couldn't even walk. You were less than a year old. And then you became famous as a teenager. You've talked a lot publicly about what your family dynamic was and what a unique childhood you had. But what was your support system? How did you basically stay normal? There's a few elements that I think my mother set in motion. She never moved us out of the east coast. We never went and moved to Hollywood and pursued all of that, which is rushing to high school and basically only being educated onset. And I think that even just that element for sure gave me a perspective and a more grounded way of being in the world. And when that's all you know, regular great schools, regular high schools. I think you really do have an understanding that the world you may inhabit at certain times is not real. It's just not your real world. It's kind of crazy. It is something that you can go in and out of to a certain extent. And the other piece is my mom always made sure I had someone my own age around me. So I always had a partner in crime. You know, I never felt like I was the only kid in a sea of adults. And my parents never spoke ill of the other. I mean, they got divorced when I was 5 months old. My father's family is so the opposite of any way that I grew up with my mother or my working life. And I was talking about this today, I've got this movie coming out and it's coming out the day after Thanksgiving. And everybody in my life outside of my family, they're all going to watch it. And I know for a fact that I'm going to get to my family in Florida. And it's not even going to be mentioned. And it's funny because my feelings aren't hurt or anything, but that's how I grew up. My youngest sister grew up with not an inkling of what I did. And it wasn't until she got much older and friends of hers would say things like that's your sister. And it's so interesting that sort of power of that kind of compartmentalizing. And sometimes it's not good, but it really served me. You know, I'm going to go down to be like, no one's going to watch my movie, but it's okay. Well now because they're going to listen to this podcast. No, but it's like, you know, and I never hurt my feelings that actually just helped me understand that, you know, it's not everything. It's not the only thing. And if I sat and said my sister down and said, look, this is really important to me. Please watch it. They would watch it. You know, it's interesting. On this show, Danielle and I were cofounders and we're friends and we talk about how unique it is that ten years in, we're sorely friends and cofounders of a business. We've had people on here that also are cofounders and friends or work with family or work with spouses and just kind of the unique dynamic of bringing work home, home to work into your personal life. You and your mom in particular were infamously just this tight type duo for so much of your career where she was your manager. She was with you for all of your early success. I would love to understand how you dealt with that, both the good part and maybe the parts that you're like, I wouldn't repeat. Your advice to those who think about working with family or working with those kind of closer to them. You know, I think it's always brought no matter how you look at it and boundaries are the most important thing. On the one hand, I think family you can trust more than anybody. Friends, family. On the other hand, if money is involved, that's when it gets tricky. I think full communication has to happen. I was very enmeshed with my mom. I knew nothing other than being in this industry that I was in kind of it happened to both of us and not knowing any other way in hindsight. I think it would have been healthier to have a bit more of a delineation between my professional life and my mom, however the way she protected me in an industry that basically devours its young. You know, I never had a me too moment when all the other young people were, you know, I was she was so avaricious sleep

Carly Zac Danielle Weissberg Greece Brooke Shields Calvin Klein Rizzo Netflix Rhonda Brooke Brooks East Coast Hollywood Florida Danielle
A highlight from Mission Statement Impossible

Rework

01:00 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Mission Statement Impossible

"And my background is awesome right now. It really looks like I'm floating head in space. You know that lex Friedman Friedman guy? He always does black backgrounds like that. It's very armies. Yeah, it's weird. I haven't actually listened to his stuff very much. Other people's podcasts. That's right. Welcome to rework a podcast by base camp about the better way to work and run your business. I'm your host, Sean Hilton. This week we're talking about mission statements, and well, quite frankly, we're talking about why they're horrible. On the last episode, we talked about the importance of standing for something and you'd think a great way to let people know what your values are would be to write them down in a mission statement. However, these exercises usually just produce a few meaningless paragraphs of platitudes and actually work against what you're trying to accomplish by writing them in the first place. As always, I'm joined by base camps cofounders and the authors of rework, David heinemeier Hansen. How are you? I am good Sean how are you? Wonderful. And Jason freed, how are you? I'm

Lex Friedman Friedman Sean Hilton David Heinemeier Hansen Sean Jason
A highlight from Andrew Chen  Growth Secrets from Tinder, Uber, and Twitch; Exploring the Metaverse; the Future of Startup Investing; Games as the Next Social Networks; and How to Pick the Right Metrics (#550)

The Tim Ferriss Show

00:59 sec | 2 d ago

A highlight from Andrew Chen Growth Secrets from Tinder, Uber, and Twitch; Exploring the Metaverse; the Future of Startup Investing; Games as the Next Social Networks; and How to Pick the Right Metrics (#550)

"This episode is brought to you by 80,000 hours. You have roughly 80,000 hours in your career. That's 40 hours a week, 50 weeks a year for 40 years. They add up and are one of your biggest opportunities if not the biggest opportunity to make a positive impact on the world. In other words, if you want to make the best use of your 80,000 hours until we wrap up this show called life, where should you start? Where should you focus? It can be really hard and quite frankly, pretty stressful to try and figure out. Some of the best strategies best research and best tactical advice I've seen and heard come from 80,000 hours, a nonprofit cofounded by will mccaskill and Oxford philosopher and a popular past guest on this podcast. Will is perhaps best known as being the cofounder of the effective altruism movement, which has gained a lot of steam. And a lot of popular coverage in the last handful of years.

Mccaskill Oxford
A highlight from Tom Bilyeus EYE OPENING Keynote on Success & Life Will Leave You SPEECHLESS

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

01:23 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Tom Bilyeus EYE OPENING Keynote on Success & Life Will Leave You SPEECHLESS

"The reality is when I started my life, nobody thought I was going to be successful. My own mother, quietly assumed I was going to fail. My best friend said, oh, I just assumed you were going to marshmallow your way through life. My father in law, when I asked for his blessing to marry his daughter, he said, no. They were right. I was wrong. I go on to build a $1 billion business, but I start laying in bed. 5 hours a day, not knowing how the fuck I'm going to make my dreams come true. So the question is then how did I become successful? And the only honest answer is, the very reason you're here, which is the only thing that matters is skill set. Soon is about to get really real. So here is what we're going to do. I'm going to put myself on a high wire act, which is that very shortly you guys are going to get access to a microphone. And

A highlight from S5 E25: Bobby Ross, Fire Hydrant

Code Story

08:03 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from S5 E25: Bobby Ross, Fire Hydrant

"Ross also known as Bobby tables has been into building stuff since he was 12 years old. Around that time he Googled how to make a website. Learn from an online tutorial and has been hooked on development ever since. He started making websites for people he knew in San Diego, which allowed him to facilitate his Xbox and Xbox Live needs. Post high school, we started working for a web consultancy. Then went on to the next thing in the next and he feels very lucky to have made the stops he made in his career. He's grateful for his early work at an agency because required him to move quickly. Eventually he was an on-call engineer, either by accident or intentional. Because he always wanted to help solve the problem. At one point, he set out to bridge boot camp grads into the real world software through a video series. As it turns out, the product he was building during the series was much more interesting than the videos himself. This is the creation story of fire hydrant. Fire hydrant, it started off as a tool to help with incident management. So as an on call engineer, I would get paged and have to declare an incident run a whole process, create a Jared ticket create a status page update and it felt really tedious and kind of taking away from the thing that I wanted to do, which was mitigate the problem. I have a bunch of customers going to the customer support team, which is then being relayed to me. Why is my inbox flowing up? And I'm just the on call engineer trying to solve a problem. So wanted to solve that problem of I want to declare an incident as fast as I can. And that basically gets all of the necessary process but not process that's helping me solve the incident out of the way. Now we're much more focused on reliability. We don't think that reliability is an engineering metric. We truly believe that it's a business metric, because people view reliability of a business as from the business holistically. So for example, if Netflix goes down. Nobody gets to see how to say Netflix's engineering team is having an outage. That's not how we talk about things. We say Netflix is down. So fire hydrant is a tool for companies that want to bring a level of service ownership into their organization, bring really nice incident management processes that are followed consistently. And once the instance done will show you your entire timeline of everything that's went down during the outage or whatever degradation you're fixing. And that allows you to spend much more time thinking about how do we get to this point, what were the multiple? What were those contributing factors that brought us to this outage and how can we help prevent those again? So the cycle repeats. The way that fire had started was I wanted to close the gap or not close up but create a bridge from where a lot of boot camps were having their graduates and so there's a lot of boot camps teaching folks have a coat now. And there's this kind of promise that when you're done with this boot camp, you'll be able to go work at a company and write software for a living. Fire hydrant was this video series where I bought a bunch of reporting equipment and software and started recording the creation of fire hydride showed how I wrote tickets. I showed how I did entity relation diagrams. I then would show every commit was a video its own individual video, so 15 to maybe 45 minutes per video. And I would do a git commit at the end of the video. That was the feature. The next video would start building the next feature. And the thing that I was building was fire hydrant. I didn't want to build a contrived example to do app or something like that. I think that's kind of overdone. It doesn't really give you the depth of a production piece of software. So fire hydrant the very first 40 hours of building fire hydrant is all recorded with commentary with screencasts of me writing code. And eventually I had a friend, say, hey, what you're building. Fire hydrant is way more valuable than the web series that you're actually building and releasing. And they were right. So I actually one day just as I got up early on a Saturday morning and went to a coffee shop and as it turns out, no surprise, you go way faster when you're not trying to explain live and record live what you're doing so far had started taking its shape very quickly after that. Let's dive into the MVP so that first product you build after perhaps during the video series to yes, but then even after, how long it takes to build and what sort of tools you use to bring it to life. It is a ruby Ruby on Rails application. I've been writing ruby for a long time and I thought, you know, why use a new shiny technology? And also because because of the origin of fire hydrant of helping boot camp graduates leave the boot camp and go to production ready software. There are a lot of boot camps are still doing ruby and ruby and rails. And they still are. So that was also a big contributor to the wire stack is rooting for the unreal. And we wanted to kind of build it as an API first way of thinking as well. We wanted everything to have an API. So we used open API spec, and it would be great for API. It initially started on Heroku, but it moved pretty quickly to Kubernetes. And our MVP, the initial MVP was let's help people create an incident in slack channel and retrospective as fast as humanly possible. We wanted to make a very slick command in slack for any oncogene. Early any engineer to declare an incident. So after the seed round hit in December of 2018, me and my two coup found cofounders, Dan Kahne and Dylan Nielsen, we did not stop writing code for four and a half months. We just wrote code. And in April 2nd of 2019, is when we did our initial launch. And it included declaring an incident doing retrospectives, creating action items. Paging folks out on PagerDuty. And it was a really kind of cool system that we had built as our launch MVP. And it garnered a lot of interest on day one. And actually, a couple of companies that signed up on that there are still customers. Sticking on the MVP a little bit longer. With any MVP, you got to make certain decisions and tradeoffs about what you're going to do and not do, you know, and what sort of debt you're going to accept from a technical standpoint. So tell me about some of those decisions and tradeoffs that you had to make and how you cope with them. Pick the biggest trade off we made was not having tradeoffs. So there was something that we kind of agreed on early is that we know we wanted to make a bet on ourselves. I think that technical debt is necessary. You have to cut corners at certain points to hit due dates and customer demand. That's a necessary thing. You have to do when building software in a startup. One of the things and one of the things that we kind of did is we didn't want to go for the multi tenant model. Off the bat. So fire hydrant, you know, a lot of companies are like this today and doing just fine as we are single database. That was one thing that we kind of made a trade off in the early days. But then we started layering other things that kind of gave us the ability. To switch off of that model in the future. So we actually baked in we engineered in a way that we know that we can start splitting the database later on by using account ID records, identifiers on every single record of the database. So every single record in fire hydrant has

Bobby Tables Netflix Bridge Boot Camp Post High School Ross San Diego Dan Kahne Dylan Nielsen
A highlight from Protect Your Brand from a PR Crisis with Dr. Jay Feldman

Entrepreneur on FIRE

01:08 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Protect Your Brand from a PR Crisis with Dr. Jay Feldman

"Who's ready to rock today fire nation, jail, here, and welcome to entrepreneurs on fire, brought to you by the HubSpot podcast network with great shows like my first million. Today we'll be breaking down how to protect your brand from a PR crisis to drop these value bombs. I have brought doctor J Feldman into eo fire studios. Jay is an osteopathic medical doctor and founder of auto public relations, a PR agency with more than 30 employees internationally. Jay has more than 300,000 followers on social media, and it's a host of the top business podcast, mentors collective. He is a contributor at entrepreneur and has been featured in Forbes, Business Insider and other top networks. And today foundation, we'll talk about why you might be at risk of a media crisis right now. What we can do to prepare for this, how should we respond? And then the aftermath and so much more when we get back from thinking our sponsors. Crowd health is a community of health conscious members and for a limited time, get your first month free and after you've been a member, crowd health will include a fitness wearable visit, join crowd health dot

J Feldman JAY Forbes, Business Insider
A highlight from 'Becoming a direct-to-consumer company': How Cond Nast's Pamela Drucker Mann is focusing on innovation in 2022 after the best revenue year in a decade

Digiday Podcast

03:53 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from 'Becoming a direct-to-consumer company': How Cond Nast's Pamela Drucker Mann is focusing on innovation in 2022 after the best revenue year in a decade

"I am senior media at our digital. And I'm Keeley barber, media editor at today. All right, Kayla, you had the interview this week, you spoke with Pam drucker man who is the global chief revenue officer of Conde nast. So I feel like anyone who's chief revenue officer of a major publisher Conde nast is probably had a pretty busy 2021 coming off of 2020. What did Pam say about like how 2021 was and wasn't different than 2020? Yeah, that was one of the first questions I asked her because it feels like in a lot of the coverage that we've done. There's been a lot of indication that 2021 was like a year of innovation, experimentation, getting experimental with revenue streams. And Pam kind of agreed to that in that, especially when it comes to the consumer business that they're running. They've been trying to meet their consumers in different locations on different platforms. And really focus on growing things like ecommerce and even ticket revenue. Now that events have come back to a degree in 2020, she mentioned that like any other kind of media company, like advertisers were pulling back and they saw a steep drop off in revenue for several months. So 2020 ended, I don't think as drastically as a lot of publishers were expecting it to, but it did have an impact and it was a lot of survival mode. So we talked about how a lot of these businesses from 2019 were coming back into the fold, but then we also talked about some of the newer businesses that were being created in the same vein. And how that ultimately led to an increase in revenue, which Pam says was the best year, 2021 was the best year in the past ten years for the company. In terms of revenue in terms of revenue, and she does get into some of the percentage growth numbers, which I don't remember off the top of my head, so listen for them. But yeah, she did say it was the best year in the past decade in terms of revenue for the company. Got it. Although I guess not that I think of it kind of makes sense 'cause of the past decade, it's not like the print side of the company would have been gone bananas. I wouldn't think, but it's something to be said for that. Yeah, compared to legacy magazine publishers of old, it's not at that same level, but I imagine I'm not seeing their books, but I imagine it's not, you know, back when they were devil wears Prada selling or sending cars to pick up editors at the building. But anyway, she did get into a lot of the innovation and experimentation that she's excited for in the coming year as well. Yeah, what she expected for 2022. Yeah, so she mentioned a few of the areas that she wasn't fully ready to delve into in too much detail because again, these are upcoming initiatives. But things like live shopping, which is an extension of their ecommerce strategy. She talked about potential blockchain and NFT experimentation, especially because how the NFT space is very focused on collectors and luxury and sports and things like that. But there's a lot of room for legacy brands to get involved there as well. And she talked about seeing the potential there. And then also just, I guess getting deeper into events coming back and new digital products that they could sell to advertisers that are tied to storytelling and tied to the brands. So those are some of the things that she talked about

Conde Nast Keeley Barber PAM Pam Drucker Kayla Prada
A highlight from MBA1929 What Does Facebooks Metaverse Mean For Your Business?

The $100 MBA Show

01:29 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from MBA1929 What Does Facebooks Metaverse Mean For Your Business?

"And in today's lesson you will learn, what does Facebook's metaverse mean for your business? A few weeks ago, Facebook announced that they're changing their name to meta, which is short for metaverse. A virtual world that will be the next iteration of Facebook. Some are saying it's the next iteration of the Internet. We're talking about a totally immersive virtual world, something out of a sci-fi movie. Some people are equating it to the real world version of the fiction novel ready player one. This is not fiction. This is actually real and in fact, Facebook has been working on the metaverse for years now. In fact, in 2014, well over 7 years ago, Facebook bought the virtual reality, hardware company, Oculus, knowing that this is the future they will pursue. But what does this all mean for your business? Are there going to be opportunities? Are there going to be threats? How soon will this affect your business? When is a meadow versus going to be real? And mainstream. That's what we get into in today's lesson. One of the things that I think makes a strong business in a strong entrepreneur is preparation. Being prepared for the future, like Wayne grizzly says, look where the puck is going, not where it is right now. So we're going to get into what the metaverse is, what it means for your business how to prepare, and what are some things you just don't need to worry about. So let's get into it. Let's get down to business. Support for today's

Facebook Oculus Wayne Grizzly
A highlight from How to Use Your Life to Impact a Generation with Trent Shelton

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:32 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from How to Use Your Life to Impact a Generation with Trent Shelton

"Trent say what's up to fire nation and share something that you believe about becoming successful that most people disagree with? Oh, man, what's up, fire nation? I appreciate you having me on your podcast, bro Shane. Share your platform. Hopefully that I can inspire impacts and lives out there. That's a great question, man. Often think about that often. Ironically. And the thing I would say is stop trying too hard. And I know that's probably going directly against the method of the methodology of what this world is teaching, you know, go hard, go hard, go hard, don't take it out of context, but I think sometimes we're trying too hard to become something that might not be what's meant for our life. And when I look back over my journey of becoming successful, it's not about me being lazy, but it's me allowing and attracting the right things and becoming the magnet instead of chasing everything because chasing is exhausting. So it's not excuse to be lazy, but maybe you need to be still for a moment, work on yourself and to let those things find you and you attract those things. I love that. I mean, be still working on yourself. that Abraham, Lincoln, quote, which is, you know, if he had to cut down a tree, he'd spend 55 minutes sharpening the axe and then the last 5 minutes would be a breeze. And I look at my life, man. The times I work the hardest or the times and a lot of cases I had the least success because I was grinding, but I was grinding in a stupid way. I wasn't working smart. But the times that I just sat there and said, you know what? This is what I want to do. This is what I'm excited about I'm passionate about, and I'm going to sit down and be smart about it. Everything changed. So I love that message. Thanks for sharing it. Just before we do dive and I want to give a quick side note fire nation. If you ever get to see Trent Shelton, speak live on a stage, you've got to take advantage of that opportunity. I just got back from funnel hacking live and it was 3000 people live in a room. We were talking pre interview about how cool the entrance was for the speakers. I mean, Russell went all out on this. And Trent just controlled every single human. In that room for his entire talk. So hard to not let people look at their phones or not have people look at their phones, like every 5 seconds at something stupid. People didn't even think they had a phone on them during that whole time. So I just want to say brother, you inspired the masses at that conference, and I'm so glad you're going to be here to speak to fire nation today. So thank you. Oh man, thank you and that comfort was incredible. And I'm glad I got to run into you backstage, brother. And I think the biggest distraction may be there, which wasn't a distraction, but my daughter yelling daddy loud to everybody to hear for the whole time. I couldn't get her, but she was super proud. Oh, that's so beautiful. That was a beautiful moment. People really resonated with that. And fire nations I mentioned we're talking about how you can use your life to impact a generation. And I want to just talk right now because it's so hard trend for somebody who is just starting out to stand out in the busy loud world that we live in. How did you create content that stands out from the crowd to have the kind of success that you've been able to generate over time? Yeah, for sure, man. You know, one of the main things for myself is, first of all, understanding the power of connection. And connection is a deeper formal communication. Connection always say goes from heart to heart. And I understood these three things, you know, once I started. And the first thing is entertain. And when I say these three things, it's how people are moved. If you look at anything that's viral, anything that people share, anything that people watch usually contains these three things. And the first thing is entertain. And I wasn't a big person in this space. You can do one of these very well. You can do all three. I think if you do all three, you're gonna hit home runs consistently, but you can do one really, really well. You can still hit a home run. But entertain, right? People want to be entertained in this world, especially now with social media, especially where we're at. Entertainment grabs people's attention. So I understood that the second thing I understood, the second E, which was educated. I know if you educate somebody, you give somebody some knowledge some tools, which you do all of these very well brother. You give these people the things that they need to be able to change their life to be able to change their business. So they don't have to go through the experience themselves they can learn from you and shortcut it in a positive way.

Bro Shane Trent Trent Shelton Abraham Lincoln The Times Russell
A highlight from The Top Business Strategies for Social Media with Jasmine Star

The EntreLeadership Podcast

05:48 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from The Top Business Strategies for Social Media with Jasmine Star

"I sat down with her to talk about social media marketing and what you can do to implement it in your business today. In our second conversation, I talk with Ramsey leader Jenny greeson, and we talk about the practical steps you can take to get social media to work for you. Up first, we've got my conversation with Jasmine star. Jasmine, it's so good to have you on the entre leadership podcast. Thank you. I'm happy to be here. You are doing some amazing things. And as we start here, I just want you to let the business leaders listening know what you do and what you're all about. I like to believe that I make people believe that the impossible is possible. And most of the time people can achieve this by doing some of the above serving people well and monetizing along the way. Wow, nailed it. That was a great elevator pitch. Thanks. So you're one of your expertise out of many is social media. Something that you've become known for, you love helping entrepreneurs use social media as a platform to grow their business. And a lot of business owners out there, they might be asking this question is social media a waste of time for my business. And before we go there, if you'll allow me to kind of detour a second, is at this point in time, at the time of this recording, people would introduce me as being Jasmine star is known for X but I have to tell you that it's been multiple iterations. And I think that the core of it is Jasmine star is known for taking whatever is affordable, accessible, quick, and highly effective. So next year, when I'm hopefully invited back to the show, I might be talking about something else where you might introduce me as Jasmine star is great at, and then whatever is, effective, cost, you know, it's not going to break the bank and gets results. That's what I'll be talking about. So today we can talk about social media, 'cause I'm all about it. But that's my pitch. And so people are here being like, okay, I do want to do something that's light lifting that's effective that's affordable for my small business, then we can have a conversation. So let's go back to the question. I love it. Is it a waste of time? Well, I think in history, people could have said that when you decided to run a radio commercial, it was a waste of time because who was listening to the radio. Likewise with television, likewise with blogging, likewise with early days of social media. So I don't think it's waste of time. I think it's art form, and I do think that it's well worth your time if you have a plan and a strategy. Throwing darts in the win never a good idea. And that's what I see a lot happening on social media. So people are just going, well, I know I need to be on here, so I'm just going to make an account and kind of hope for the best and make it up as I go. Yes, and it's kind of like the same. I really want to lose ten pounds. So I'm going to go to the gym. I'm just going to stare at the treadmill. This felt like a personal attack. And you know me. You know me. That is me. I walk in and I go, there's a lot of machines, I'm just gonna walk around and look like I know what I'm doing. Or like, I'm gonna find myself in the sauna and that's my workout. Yeah, that's a lot what a lot of people do on social as well. And it works when you work. And oftentimes, people, and I get it, that struggle is real. Small business owners have 10,000 things that they need to do. And so social media feels like another thing to do. And I truly get it, but when it comes to marketing your business, if you're not talking about your business, very few other people will. So I think that this is our opportunity to take control of the narrative, give people things to talk about, make them think favorably of your brand and then have that result in sales. So it's not just a box you check off on the business checklist. It is a foundation for your business. So what are the top reasons businesses should be on social media if they're not already? I think I said it's free. So that in and of itself. And it very, very easy to learn. If people like to complicate things and if the idea is just to get content out and to speak to a singular customer who will then have long-term ramifications and ripples in your business, then the idea is like, what could you say in a singular post that's going to make somebody think favorably about your business? And that could be wildly effective, cost virtually nothing at all and have long-term effects. And this is what we see on very inspirational, helpful, educational posts on social media. So it's not about, you know, if I'm a business owner, I'm thinking, well, I can get a sales guy or saleswoman to make a call today and get money in the door. But what am I gonna do with this Twitter feed or this Facebook account that's gonna actually impact my business revenue wise? What do you say to that person? So I think that salespeople are great for sales. I think that social media is great for brand. And over time, we are going to be competing more on brand than we are on the efficacy of a salesperson. And it is not currently the over indexed in the present. It is the future, though. Had wonderful conversations with a couple by the name of Rory and AJ Eden. And they focus on brands and they were talking about how the next big buyer sector is going to be millennials. And is 70, 80% of millennials want to choose a doctor or a lawyer based on their personal brand. Never mind the fact that they want to Harvard or Yale. It's the fact of what are you putting out on Twitter? What are you putting out on Instagram that's making me feel an affinity for you so that I can then trust you? So if that's going to be the demand on the highest educated in the land, imagine what the demand will be for somebody who wants to bring in a plumber, a locksmith, a photographer into their life, the brand is going to be the thing, especially as we move to voice. People are going to say, I don't give me a plumber Alexa. They're going to say, please send me John in Nashville on 8th street plumber. It's gonna get very specific. Yeah, so as we get more competitive and we're in the information age, people have access to every single contact for every plumber in your area. And so it's going to get a little become harder to compete. And so you've got to have a strong brand out front and social media is one of the best ways to do that. When you think about it, if you were to look at your own buying behavior. And you are looking for you move to a new town or perhaps your vacationing, and you need something last

Jenny Greeson Ramsey Aj Eden Twitter Rory Facebook Yale Harvard Nashville John
A highlight from Live Episode! Tofurky: Seth Tibbott (2019)

How I Built This

01:34 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Live Episode! Tofurky: Seth Tibbott (2019)

"Hey, really quick before we start the show, a lot of you have lots of questions about how I built this, like, how do you pick guests or where do you record the show? Or how can I get in touch with Howard Schultz? Spoiler alert on that one. We can't help you. But we can try and answer any questions you might have about the show our work or even me. If you'd like to submit a question, please visit guy raz dot com and fill out the form and we'll answer some of your questions right here on the show in the coming weeks. Again, that's GUI raz dot com. You know, one thing we're really hoping to start up again next year is our how I built this live shows in real theaters with real human audiences because there is so much great energy in those shows so much joy and I have to tell you, I really miss them. So this holiday season, I want to take you back to a very joyful conversation. I had a few years ago live on stage with Seth Tibet, the founder of tofurkey. We did it in Portland Oregon and it's hard to figure out who's having a better time here. Him or me or the audience. So happy holidays and enjoy. 20 years 20 years of losing money. I mean, how are you paying your employees? How are you, you know? Well, that was the question that my tax guy always asked me every year. He would say I got two questions for you. How much

Howard Schultz Seth Tibet Portland Oregon
A highlight from MBA1928 Guest Teacher  Tanessa Shears  How to Eliminate Brain Fog for More Productivity, Energy, and Growth in Your Business

The $100 MBA Show

01:12 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from MBA1928 Guest Teacher Tanessa Shears How to Eliminate Brain Fog for More Productivity, Energy, and Growth in Your Business

"Hello welcome to the $100 RBA show helping you to get better every single day with our daily ten minute business lessons for the real world. I'm your host your coach your teacher, Omar is at home. I'm also the cofounder of webinar ninja and independent software company are my cofounder back in 2014. And today's episode is a guest teacher episode. On our guest teacher episodes, we bring out an expert to teach their area of expertise. Today we have tennessees. For more productivity, more energy, and growth in your business. Are you burning the midnight oil? Are you taking on the advice of hustle harder and harder? Do you find yourself having to have a few cups of coffee a day? Just to stay focused while you're in for a treat today because we got Tennessee's who is a professional. She's a health consultant as well as the host of the becoming limitless podcast. Where she helps entrepreneurs scale their business by optimizing their health. Hey, if you've been a listener of the show for some time, you

Webinar Ninja Omar Tennessee
A highlight from Liberty Accelerator Program with Jarrod H. Smith

Veteran on the Move

05:40 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Liberty Accelerator Program with Jarrod H. Smith

"Military families to the military transition, tabs Lee, Jared, we've had you on the show once before talking about commission officers guide and transition in general. You've been adding and still going with what most of us like to refer as the military transition, but you're going to have a little bit different twist to that. But before we get to talking about it, remind us what you did in the navy. How's your thing, Joe? We'll do. So maybe kept me busy for the last 19 years as a U.S. Navy supply core officer. And I've got the good fortune of serving in the submarine force that is still with naval aviation on aircraft carrier at a Norfolk. And then a quick extent with the naval expeditionary forces as well as with the army in against and so they kept me away from a wife and four kids for a lot of that time. And we were whining it down now. I've got 11 months left. On active duty. And I recognize as I was entering what I'm working now is my military transition battle window that we had planning for that eventuality that being all of us get out of service one day. We had the planning all backwards. So I'll try to solve that problem. So talk a little bit about I mean, you're still in the process of your transition if you allow you to use that word. It is. So you're 11 months out before you're done at 20. What's some of the initial what are some of the things you've run across some of the obstacles you've encountered in the process of looking at your transition out of the military? Yeah, thanks, Joe. That is the, that is the question to answer, right? I believe the most important obstacle that a lot of us aren't aware of is the time factor. We've got this mindset in the military service that transition against a couple of years out or when told that you're no longer eligible to serve or you have a promoted kicked out. Simply not in a time. It's simply is not enough time. My own personal experience and unfortunate I'm one of the fortunate few. But I recognized about a decade ago that I would leave one day, but there was no structure for me to really lay in on to really intentionally and informatively plan for that eventuality, right? So whenever I finally attended the DoD tap about a year ago, actually, I was like, wow, you know, a lot of this stuff I should have known about ten years ago And nothing kept me from requesting to go attend to the odac course. I could have I could have taken leave and taking it, you know, under the curtain or I could have requested to go TDY for three days to go take it. But I didn't. And a lot of the information that they give in there, we need yesterday no matter our time in service, but we don't think that way. We're all thinking about being fully mission capable for deploying that range. Our families are ready for us to deploy down range through God's work. And I think that's the I think that's a subpar approach. Yeah, you know, take it back about be personally I actually, from being even when I was still going through initial schools and stuff, I was always kind of thinking outside the Marine Corps when I was in. If nothing else just out of my own curiosity, but there was no structured plan in place really. It was just kind of on my own toying with different things, mostly in the entrepreneurship realm. I'm not necessarily what's my job. What kind of job am I going to get when I get out? But you kind of have to wait. Sometimes in the military almost made you feel guilty about preparing yourself for what you're going to do when you get out. And really, in the military, military is one of those few things where you go into it, you know you're leaving at some point. Whether it's after four year enlistment or 30 year retirement, you know you're leaving, so transitions always discussed, especially if you're leadership where you get to be really careful tactful about how you go about talking about getting out or even prepared about getting out. Usually some of the big things like I'm going to get that degree I never had, or I'm going to get that higher level degree than I've always wanted to get. Those kind of things are usually fairly well accepted. But running a business or doing other things or going to other customized specialized type transition classes usually is very well accepted. So ironic, too. Yeah. The military puts a lot of money into these tamp tap transition assistance classes that are out there and have been there for many for decades now. They're getting better, but they're still kind of a one size fits all. And they do have some customized approaches and things like that here and there and some optional tracks you can do. But. What is the main reason for the military putting so much money into the transition process?

U.S. Navy Supply Core JOE Jared Norfolk Navy LEE Army DOD Marine Corps
A highlight from IG Mastery  Why Attention Is The New Currency with Jason Stone

Entrepreneur on FIRE

01:04 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from IG Mastery Why Attention Is The New Currency with Jason Stone

"Late that spark fire nation jlt here and welcome to entrepreneurs on fire, brought to you by the HubSpot podcast network with great shows like goal, digger. Today we'll be breaking down IG mastery. Why attention is the new currency to drop these value bombs? I have brought Jason stone into eo fire studios. Jason is a serial entrepreneur who are widely known as at millionaire mentor on his Instagram with 8 million verified followers in $15 million plus in revenue. And today foundation, we're talking about how you turn followers into revenue, some tips to get started. And so much more. When we get back from thinking our sponsors. Easy to start and built to customize thinkific enables thousands of entrepreneurs to run their training remotely to learn more about their biggest deal of the year, go to thinkific dot com slash fire Friday. That's TH. I see dot com slash fire Friday.

Jason Stone Jason
A highlight from Hack Your Health: Physical, Emotional, Spiritual & Financial Game-Changing Practices with Allison Melody

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:36 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Hack Your Health: Physical, Emotional, Spiritual & Financial Game-Changing Practices with Allison Melody

"Allison, say what's up to fire nation and share something unique and interesting about yourself? Hey, fire nation. I'm so excited to be here today. So something that most people don't know about me is that before I started on this crazy entrepreneurial journey that we're all on is that I was in film school and I was in college and my first job in college was actually, I was a stand in on a little show called Dawson's creek. And so yeah, when they do the lighting for the before the actors come out, I would stand in for Michelle Williams who is now Oscar nominated actress. And so I'm just so excited and proud to see how far she's come and I just remember, I started on a little show. My whole career. Well, I love that. And I can't believe I didn't know that about you because you and I actually go back a little ways you are actually part of the first round of Puerto palooza you came down last year to Puerto Rico with four other incredible people for a nice three day weekend where we got to hang out with myself, Kate and just really get to enjoy the Puerto Rico vibe. And we did a couple of days of real business stuff, but then we got out on a yacht and we got to see the Caribbean a little bit too. Yes, if you need a testimonial, I will be your testimonial. Everyone now that knows that I've done this is like, when can I go? When can I sign up? I love it. And what I loved about learning about you Alison is just how focus you are on the health. And the spiritual and the emotional and the financial. Really the full spectrum. I'm telling you right now fire nation from firsthand experience. You are not going to win at a high level unless you've really got a well rounded balance mentality about health about wellness, about finances. It's just about business. You need to have the full package because if you're just two one leveled in any direction, something is going to be off. If you're too focused on health and not enough on the business and your business is going to dry up and if it's the opposite, it's the opposite. You've got to really be having all these wheels moving. And that's what today's masterclass is going to be about hack your health, physical, emotional, spiritual and financial game changing, practices. So this is going to be so valuable it's going to be one that you go back to time and time again to just remind yourself, am I doing these things? Am I balance? Am I centered? Because these are things that are going to make your entrepreneurial journey worth journeying. Because I can tell you, I've had these, again, off balance in my life. And then I've had to pull them back in. And when I do, things align correctly. So Alison, let's start off with number one, which is something that I really like talking about because I'd say it's probably my biggest struggle right now. And that's mindful eating. Let's go into that because I think it's something that a lot of us lack for many reasons. But kind of break this part down for us. Absolutely. And I couldn't agree more with everything you said. You know, mindful eating is really about as entrepreneurs were on the go. We're always running around from appointment to appointment, meaning to meeting or we're recording. I don't know how many podcasts you do a day anymore, but ten, 20 podcasts a day. Just 8. I'm down to 8 now. It's very easy. Quite high. Like you're actually my last year at my 8th interview today. And I'm like, is it really over? I want to talk to some more people. I hope you can hang out after this call. That's great. I'm glad to hear that you're not super exhausted. Yeah, we still have a great interview. I love it. So yeah, mindful eating is really just being mindful about not only what you put in your body, which we're going to talk about, but how you're eating. And so if we're mindlessly watching TV and stuffing our face with food at the end of a long day, that's really that food is not going to serve our bodies. We're going to have poor digestion. We're not going to be easily absorbing the nutrients from that food. So mindful eating is really about appreciating the food that you are eating and allowing it to nourish your body. So I almost see it as a break in the meditation in my day. So if I was doing 8 podcasts, let's say after four, I was going to take a lunch break or perhaps a dinner break depending on when I was recording. I would sit and I would take that 30 minutes and I would eat in silence. Sometimes I'll put music on. Music or silence, but I'm not going to put TV on because that's really a distraction. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to eat I'm going to enjoy the flavor. So I'm going to be grateful for the food that I'm eating. And then I can think about some creative ways to improve my day. Instead of eating mindfully or eating on the go or eating in the car or just not nourishing your body with good food. So that's what mindful eating is. And it really does make a difference. This is huge for me. I really feel like I am one of those people that are just like, okay, it's break time. I want to eat some food and I want to pop on my favorite show billions or Westworld and just kick back and just eat and it's become like a habit form. It's become like an escape for me. You know, because I love to work hard and I love to be able to focus, but I love to be able to take a break from that working hard and focusing and to just completely relax. And at the end of the day, he cooks a great meal and it's like 6 37 p.m.. She makes a big bowl. It's a healthy bowl of food, you know, it's a bowl of vegetables and quinoa, different things. But then what am I doing? I'm sitting in front of the TV and she sit in front of the TV and we're just kind of spooning food into our mouths. Mindlessly, I'm going to write, I'm not thinking about how good this food tastes. And I'm not like chewing it properly. Guess what? I'm probably getting full, but I'm still eating because I'm just not thinking about it. I'm enjoying the show. So that's where that word mindful. I think really comes in. And I'm going to tell you right now I'm making a commitment to you Allison and after this, I'm going to talk to Kate as well. I want to start eating out in that kitchen tariffs. We have that beautiful kitchen tariffs overlooking the Caribbean.

Puerto Rico Alison Michelle Williams Allison Dawson Oscar Kate Caribbean
A highlight from MBA1927 5 Low-Cost Ways To Increase Revenue + Free Ride Friday

The $100 MBA Show

05:05 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from MBA1927 5 Low-Cost Ways To Increase Revenue + Free Ride Friday

"Find a group an organization. A business that will have people that are interested in what you offer. For example, I sell webinar software, a good demographic or audience for me would be a coworking space. Like a WeWork or a startup space. These guys, these spaces are fantastic because they give you the space to do an event. And many people are doing events anyway, like they have pitch nights. They have holiday parties. They have guest speakers, all that kind of stuff. You don't even need to organize the event, but you can be the headline sponsor. And often, these organizations, these groups are not really looking for a lot. Often you can be the headline sponsor by just buying some pizzas for the event. Being the food sponsor. And what I love about this is that it's a very non traditional so there's a lot of room for negotiation. You can ask for a lot. A lot of these events I say, hey, I want a table. I want to put up my banner. I would love to address the audience for maybe a few minutes, maybe give a mini workshop, maybe even run a contest. So I can give away some of my product and give people some awareness. You can even be the sponsor of some sort of award like, you know? Startup of the year presented by webinar ninja. So you get the point here. You can supply the awards and the plaques. Part of the award could be a sample of your business or your services or discount or a voucher or something like that. The point here is that you're getting in front of an audience in person. So the ability to build trust quickly is incredible. You're getting exposure. You're finding your people. You're becoming a household name to many people that would like to use your services. I like to take a step further because I like our return on my investment and I like to have a table at these local events. I'll give you about swag. I'll talk to people. I will encourage people to sign up for a free account or free trial or whatever. I highly recommend this and you can make it contest. So if you sign up you enter the contest and the winner gets XYZ. You know, a massage package or something. What I found is that a lot of times I spend 304 105 $100 sponsoring an event and I get that tenfold in business. There are a ton of organization, sports teams, reading clubs, you name it fine organization that has the audience that you're looking for and sponsor an event. They're already doing. All right, that's strategy number one in the books. Strategy number two swag bonuses. People love bonuses. They love getting more than what they bargained for. And one of the ways that get more sales is a tap into your existing customer base. It's to offer your current customers some swag, a T-shirt a hoodie, a cap, something with your brand on it to make them proud. Something that looks great, by the way. We love to use print full, which is a great, great place to create your own swag and sell it. In fact, we are launching our own swag store called sewn ninja to facilitate this. So basically what you can do is you give away swag that you order to anybody that upgrades their account that buys another product that takes you up on an offer. You want to get fancy, make it limited edition have only a hundred pieces of each item. People love something that's special. And make it special. Don't just put your logo on the T-shirt. Go to fiber, go to freelance or get a graphic designer to create the design of the T-shirt and make it look really, really cool. Something that you would wear to dinner. Something that you would wear that on a night out how that looks cool, what is that? Have fun with your brand, put it on a piece of clothing on a piece of swag. And show it to your audience. Hey, you can get this if you upgrade if you take on the offer. By the way, it costs you nearly nothing to do this. You can get somebody on fiber for $20 or something to design a beautiful, beautiful T-shirt. And you can mock it up on an actual T-shirt digitally on printf, for example or custom ink and you can go ahead and show your audience, hey, here's an image of what the T-shirt looks like of this hoodie of this cap. And you only fulfill that order when they buy. If you're wondering the logistics, don't over complicate it. You don't have to have a digital sore Shopify store to try this out. You could literally just manually do when they take on the offer. You take their name and email address. You get their mailing address. You can just sip the email them. Hey, can you give me your mailing address so that I can send you your bonus? Order the bonus, send it out. You can even hire a VA or something to handle this process for you, or you could just do yourself. I did it myself in the beginning. Swag bonuses, huge, huge winner. All right, number three, we talked about sponsoring an event, but you can host your own live event. And here's the kicker. Don't just make a conference. Don't just make some sort of lunch and learn. You can, and you probably would do pretty well, but instead make it an experience.

A highlight from This Is How You Achieve LASTING Change By Rewiring Your BELIEFS | Jonas Kaplan on Conversations with Tom

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

05:39 min | Last week

A highlight from This Is How You Achieve LASTING Change By Rewiring Your BELIEFS | Jonas Kaplan on Conversations with Tom

"Jonas Kaplan welcome to the show. Thank you. Happy to be here. I am very happy to have you as I was saying before we started rolling. Anything about the brain, beliefs, like all that stuff is my absolute sweet spot, my total obsession. And as somebody who studies this for a living, I want to start with the idea of beliefs. I think beliefs govern your behaviors, behaviors govern your life, therefore, the quality of your life is basically the quality of your beliefs. But most people I have found, mistake their chosen beliefs for objective truth, and they don't realize that they have chosen throughout life to believe things, whether their parents told them to, or whatever, but they have decided that certain things are true. Talk to me. How do beliefs get formed? Yeah, that's right. So they can form very early in life almost through osmosis, the brain starts to build models of the world. I mean, if you think about what the brain is there for, that's the way I like to start the brain. What is the brain there for? Really, the brain is there to keep our bodies alive. The brain is a complicated solution to the problem of homeostasis, the problem of maintaining a complicated organism like the human body. Do you have a thesis on why we developed really big brains? Well, our brains could have been bigger. I mean, it's interesting about the size of the brain isn't necessarily the important thing. High powered intellect. We want smart brains, right? Not necessarily big brains. And actually what happened is the brain got wrinklier and wrinkly or to fit more and more surface area in the same head. Because if we just kept getting bigger and bigger heads that becomes an issue, that's the issue I'm walking and all kinds of stuff. But do you have a thesis on that? Was it for locomotion? Was it for something else? Is it for social cooperation? I think all of those things. I mean, basically, problem solving as life gets more and more complicated. There are more and more problems to solve. Some of those problems are motor problems. You know, how do I get inside this bottle to get a grape that's stuck at the bottom? Some of them are social. How do I deal with living within a community of individuals where everybody's got different attentions and different beliefs and I have to navigate that whole situation. So it's not one thing. The brain is an in many ways a general purpose problem solver. But all of those problems do have to do with maintaining life and keeping us alive. And as part of doing that, the brain builds a model of the world that it has to navigate. It builds a simulated picture of what the world is like. That's where police come from. That's the basis of belief. Some of them are built into us from the course of evolution itself. We have beliefs about gravity and about shadows that are built into the very perceptual system that we have. Meaning, no matter what you're going to have those. You're born with them. And they are going to influence how you understand the world, how you see and how you hear. And I would touch things. Now respond to them. And then optical illusions or illusions of some kind that reveal those things. There's so many optical illusions, for example, when you have you can show that two different patches of light on a page that look very different to us, one looks dark gray. One looks light gray. Actually result from the same amount of light hitting our retina. And just because one of them falls within the cast shadow of an object, the brain reasons that it must be actually lighter and it's darker because of this. You see that test for the first time. It seems impossible. I remember thinking, nope, this, they're playing a trick and they're leading me to try to make my cognitive dissonance. Go away or something because there's no way these are actually the same color. And then you fold the paper and you're like, what the fuck? Is the most bizarre experience? We believe our perceptions. We believe our eyes. And it's very convincing to see something. It seems like when you see it, it's out there in the world as it is. But perception is a constructive process. The brain is making hypotheses about what's out there. And it's confirming and disconfirming those hypotheses. You remember the whole blue dress, yellow dress they bring this up. I still can't fathom that other people see it differently. Right. Which way? I don't remember now, but I remember when I saw it, I was like, what do you mean? Either I saw it as blue or gold. I don't remember which. But I was looking at it going, well, this is obviously blue. Let's say. And I was like, I don't understand how it is even remotely conceivable that people see it as gold. I still to this day. It's really hard to believe. It just seems like they must be completely wrong. But they're messing with me again. I was like, it's not possible. Because there are some optical illusions. And the reason that I want to go in on this for anybody listening is there are some things that are hardwired to your point about evolution has given you these things. So the idea of gravity hardwire, the idea of shadows means something hardwired. Things going more blue at distance, hardwired, like there are just all these things that our brain uses as born in context to make sense of the world. The point is to get people to understand that these things that you perceive are constructed realities, they are not objective truth, and that will have deep implications. I'm sure as we continue this conversation, it certainly has deep implications in people's lives. But how convincing these perceptions can be is really jarring. So going to the blue gold thing, what's going on there? So the shadow I get, so your brain goes, oh, something in shadow means that some of the luminosity is being blocked. It's not actually changing the color. Yeah. But the blue gold one. Brain is making two different assumptions in two different people about the context of the color.

Jonas Kaplan
A highlight from The "Go-To" Matchmakers for Entrepreneurs with Amber Lee & Sandra Myers

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:52 min | Last week

A highlight from The "Go-To" Matchmakers for Entrepreneurs with Amber Lee & Sandra Myers

"Sandra say what's up to fire nation and share something that you believe about becoming successful that most people disagree with? What's up fire nation? So excited to be here, John. So this is an interesting one. I think that most people believe that partnerships are like a downfall or a high risk situation. And, you know, for us, it's actually our ace in the hole. So amber and I have known each other since 2009, one of the reasons why we chose to become business partners is her skill set is phenomenal in her areas and mine is really good in my areas. What we get to do as a partnership is really focus on the things we do well, all the time, which makes for happy partners. We appreciate each other. We complement each other. And, you know, for us, two are always better than one, but it has to be the right match. It's got to be the right match. I mean, I can tell you over the past decade I've interviewed people who have just not been the right match. And sure enough, shortly afterwards, you hear about it. In fire nation, as I mentioned in the introduction, we're going to be talking about the go to matchmakers for entrepreneurs, who they are, what they're doing and why they are having such success. And as I did also talk about in the introduction, we have amber Lee on the microphone as well who is joining us. So I want to switch over to amber, so she can tell us the origin story of the select date society. So amber, hello, how are you and take it away? Hey, John, I am so happy to be here. Select date society has a lot of history as Sandra mentioned her and I met in 2009. We've actually both been matchmakers in the industry since the late 90s. So we both have decades of experience. And we met working together at a big franchised dating service. And we always knew that we could do it better. So we always kind of played with the idea what if we did our own matchmaking confirm? What would that look like? And we were really talking about it, but it was really just this kind of dream, this kind of idea. And then in the middle of the pandemic and May of 2020, I had just turned 40. I was driving with my family in the car. And I suffered a sudden cardiac arrest out of nowhere, my heart just stopped beating. I had my foot on the gas, drove through four lanes of traffic into a brick home. I don't remember any of this. So it's not as scary for me as it sounds, but I woke up a few days later in a hospital room and you know what? I just realized in that moment that life is short. And I think that was the biggest business lesson that we got right out of the gate. An idea doesn't matter unless you take action. And so I called Sandra and said, let's get to work. And I was recovering and she was behind the scenes talking to web developers and getting the ball rolling. So that's how it all started. I mean, fire nation. I love when there's origin stories that you kind of just like, you know what? Life is short. We don't know what's happening tomorrow. What am I doing, not pursuing my dreams, my hopes, my passions, lesser having some fun, so I can look back years decades, hopefully decades and decades and decades from now and say, you know what? That was such a great moment in time where I made the decision to follow and to do what my heart was telling me to do. And I want to move over to you and kind of get a little bit about what your why is. Why did you feel like select date society was a project that you actually wanted to tackle in this world? Well, for me, I think it was always being excited about the industry I was in, but never genuinely feeling comfortable that I was doing everything to the extent that I would like to have done it for clients. There was that push pole. Like I love the industry, but I feel like I think it could be done better. So that was the way for me because genuinely, I think amber and I both had an aha moment of we want to be the Ritz Carlton of matchmaking. We want clients to have that experience. That when they call regardless of who picks up the phone, everybody knows who they are, they know where they're at in their membership. They know exactly why they're calling. They feel like family and just to bring matchmaking to a level to where it's exciting and it's fun. And people actually look forward to their dating experience again. I love that why. And I really feel like that's one thing a lot of people are missing in their business. Is their why in fire nation? As you're listening as you're driving in your car right now or is your walking your dog or listening to this podcast while you're folding laundry doing dishes, whatever it is that you might be doing right now. It's actually solved a tough question. Is what I'm doing day to day. My why. Do I have a meaningful why behind what I get up and do every single day in this one single life that we have. And frankly, amber, getting to 7 figures is tough. I was actually just at an event fantastic funnel hacking live, Tony Robbins spoke there, and he went through the numbers. Of what it actually takes to get to 7 figures as a business. And it is a percent of a percent that businesses that launch that actually make it to those numbers.

Sandra Amber Lee John Amber Ritz Carlton Tony Robbins
A highlight from S5 Bonus: Luke Hoban, Pulumi

Code Story

02:35 min | Last week

A highlight from S5 Bonus: Luke Hoban, Pulumi

"This episode is sponsored by imagery. If you're ready to add photo or video editing to your application. Is a great place to start. Image Lee provides a software development kit that handles all the technology for adding photo and video editing right inside your application. Their SDKs are fully customizable and can match your apps look and feel and support all major platforms. Let users share beautiful photos or videos create imagery for marketing campaigns, build photo books or even automate design with templates. Their video and photo editor SDK is used by Shopify, hootsuite, Shutterfly, and hundreds of other companies, helping them ships offer faster. The image they software development kit is the fastest way to add photo or video functionality to any application. Visit IMG LY slash code story today to try the web demo. That's IMG LY slash code story. This episode is sponsored by ratable. Are you interested in joining a team that encourages intellectual curiosity problem solving and openness? Not only that, but one that provides the support and mentorship needed to succeed learn and grow? Meat routable. The team at routable has built a world class platform for modern bill payments, payouts, and invoicing. Ratable helps companies speed up their business payments using a secure invoice and bill payment system. And not just for accounting groups, the company is solving problems for the CFO controller, the accountant and the developer. Ratable is engineering lead and fully remote. They're looking for the best engineers and operators to join their team and drive forward their mission of removing the burden of business payments. To apply today, go to routable dot com slash about and click view open roles. That's rou, TA BLE dot com slash about. Check out routable today and join a team who's changing the face of business payments. For me, a big part of fellini was being that this intersection of kind of developer tools on the one side and cloud on the other side. And I think a lot of the folks especially the early folks who came to halloumi were really excited about working at that intersection and about kind of pushing forward where the industry was in terms of that that intersection. And that, you know, let us, there's a lot of really great folks out there who are excited about that intersection of excited about both of those in cloud. And so we were able to talk to them about our vision and get them excited about that. And once folks were excited about that, many or

Routable Ratable Shopify Shutterfly LEE Fellini
A highlight from 5 Things You Can Do Right Now to Create Residual Results in Your Business with Greg McKeown

Entrepreneur on FIRE

01:58 min | Last week

A highlight from 5 Things You Can Do Right Now to Create Residual Results in Your Business with Greg McKeown

"Greg, say what's up to fire nation and share something that you believe about becoming successful that most people disagree with? Well, I think the most important thing you need to know about success is that success can become a catalyst for failure. And so what gets us here is not what will get us there. And so we have to in a sense distrust success or at least learn how to become successful at success, or it will tend to produce behaviors that undermine the very things that led to success in the future. Become successful at having success. That's something that so few people give any thought to. They just spend so much time in the grind in the dirt. No to the grindstone, then they look up and maybe months years, decades later they've achieved whatever level of success they're looking for. And then they're kind of like, well, now what? How do I actually become successful at this success that I have? And there's one phrase that I actually love, which is how do you go from success to significance? Once you've achieved success, how do you go to significance in your life? And I want to dive into two types of results. Linear and residual. Can you give an example of each of these specific results? And then share the difference between the tail? Linea results and residual results are so different in kind it's like night and day, a linear results, a linear result is one that has a one to one ratio. The amount of effort you put in equals the results you receive. An employee who works an hour gets paid for that hour.

Greg
A highlight from The Random Show  Biohacking, Tims COVID Experience, Holiday Gift Ideas, Favorite New Apps, Bad Science, Quarantine Delights, and a Small Dose of NFTs and DAOs (#549)

The Tim Ferriss Show

06:18 min | Last week

A highlight from The Random Show Biohacking, Tims COVID Experience, Holiday Gift Ideas, Favorite New Apps, Bad Science, Quarantine Delights, and a Small Dose of NFTs and DAOs (#549)

"Hello boys and girls, ladies and germs, Kevin's and toasters. This is Tim Ferriss and welcome to another episode of the random show. Episode number 1374. My guess today, as always, is Kevin rose. Mister kros, how are you, sir? Dude, it is. I'm so glad we finally got a chance to hang, you know? We went for that trip together. It had been so long, and we finally, you know, now that we're all vexed and whatnot, had a chance to hang out in Marfa Texas. We could talk about all that stuff. Well, you should. You said you're teasing it. So you might as well just describe for folks, what we ended up doing. It was a lot of fun. It was a great time. It was also just fun to crash together me on the couch. Yeah, you tried to get in the bed. I did. I tried to snuggle into bed. It was freezing. And then what we should provide some more context, but I will just say that Kevin's like, you got the couch. I'm like, that's fine. I can crash on the couch and I was like, where are the blankets? We found basically some towels, and it got down to like mid 40s at night. I was dying. And then the very last day, I was like, are you sure you checked everywhere? Yeah, I checked everywhere. And I'm like, what about these drawers? I pulled it out into the bed. I'm like, you fucker. They're comforters everywhere. So it was good. Good shared privation. Or I wasn't actually shared. It was isolated Tim privation, but that's okay. There must have been some health benefit from doing that cold. It's like a cold plunge at night for you, basically, is what you're doing. Yeah, that's great. That's great. Yeah, it was fantastic. But what the hell were we doing in Marfa, Texas? And why is Marfa Texas noteworthy? I can also chime in. So yeah, we were out at Marfa Texas, which, for those of you that don't know, it's kind of in the middle of nowhere. It is quite the trek to get out there. And so we have a little easier time getting out there. But we got out there and it was the art blocks conference. And so they were doing their first kick-off event. They have a house out there for those of you that don't know art blocks is an NFT generative art platform. So they were the very first generative platform, meaning that artists come in, they write code that creates art. So the code actually, you don't know what you're going to get when you're minting it. So when you come in to our blocks and you see a project that looks cool because you've seen a testament, you go ahead and connect your wallet and when you connect your wallet, you choose make one of these, and then it's all random. And you get some beautiful new kind of creative piece of artwork that is defined by the code that was written by the artist. So generative art has been around for quite some time, but this is the first time we've been able to capture it. It's always been art installations. And now that it's captured in NFTs, this platform really took off and you and I were like, heck, let's go check out the kick-off event and see what's going on there. And it was awesome. I said, Kevin, heck. Let's get out of here. Kevin. What? This is exciting, Kevin rose. I'm keeping a PG. That was good. You're ready to move to Utah. We had fun though. It felt like early south by, didn't it? Remember, you know, southwest south by southwest. Yeah, it felt like it felt like south by interactive 2000 7. To be really specific where you could tell there were the seeds of something that was going to grow to be much larger. But it was still being largely as a phenomenon. It wasn't even considered phenomenon. It was sort of the new curiosity that wasn't taken terribly seriously. If that makes any sense. And then it started to gobble up everything else in terms of interactive. And the same way that some people think nfts will be ubiquitous. In some respects with the ownership economy. I should say also, for people who are listening to this, if you're like good lord, is this going to be another entire episode on nfts? We are going to talk about NFTs, but we're going to also touch on many, many other things, including my experience with finally contracting COVID. We'll talk about that. We'll talk about all sorts of tools, bio hacks, many other things, largely. We've got to pull agenda today. All kinds of stuff, full agenda. Holiday gift ideas. And we'll cover a lot of ground. So nfts will be part of that, but not all of that. And it was great to hang then. It was so nice to finally be able to spend some time just the two of us in person. It's been a very, very long time. When would you say the last time is that we were able to do that if we think about the old days just Kev Kevin Tim Tim. My bachelor party, remember that? Yeah. So it's been more than a few years at this point. I do believe we did my 40th birthday in Japan together. That was the last time we got some real good quality time. That was four, four years ago, which is crazy. Wow. Yeah. So it was great. This is great to actually hang and be stupid and drink lots and lots of Soto. Oh, speak of which. Yeah, we should talk about what that's a tall is because I thought that was a fantastic drink and you ended up being an investor in this company that was based Marfa, which was crazy. And then also we talked about the old school we're drinking drinks now that we used to on the random show. We used to talk about what we were drinking. Yeah, so let's check off the drinks. I'll describe Soto first. So so tall, SOT OL is a really fascinating plant that is found in a few different places. Certain parts of Texas, like West Texas and also a few distinct portions of Mexico. And when you create a spirit from this and the company and Marfa is Marfa spirit, so it's easy to find Martha spirito. And we had a lot of Soto when we were there. It is taste wise somewhere between tequila and mezcal. So the cooking process is actually very similar to Mexico, which has a smoky feel to it. And that's actually what I'll be drinking today is some mezcal. So I'll just show what I'm drinking today. This is Aquino mass Aki nomas from Oaxaca, which is a artisanal mezcal. And

Marfa Kevin Tim Ferriss Texas Kevin Rose TIM Kev Kevin Tim Tim Utah Soto Japan Martha Spirito West Texas Mexico Aki Nomas Aquino Oaxaca
A highlight from Draw a Line in the Sand

Rework

05:39 min | Last week

A highlight from Draw a Line in the Sand

"I'll get the mic on. Yeah, let me know if you need help. I don't need help. I just wow. It's just sitting over there. I haven't looked it up yet. Sorry. All right. Welcome to rework a podcast by base camp about the better way to work and run your business. I'm your host, Sean Hilton. For any new listeners, this season we're going chapter by chapter through the bestselling book rework and taking a deep dive into what's changed and what stayed the same in the last 11 years since it was published. Now, you certainly don't need to have read the book. You don't need to have used space camp or hey, I think the advice we give in this series can certainly help anyone looking to start a business, calm down their workplace or just learn what to complain to their boss about. For instance, this week we're talking about drawing a line in the sand. Whenever you start something, especially a business, it's important to know why you're doing what you're doing. You should stand for something and let your customers or potential customers know what it is you're standing for. This provides a couple of fantastic benefits. First, it helps you decide what to build and maybe more importantly what not to build. And it also has the potential to create superfans, customers who will defend your decisions for you. As always, here to discuss all this and more are base camps cofounders, the authors of rework and no strangers to being opinionated, David hein and Meyer Hansen. How are you? I am good, good, good. And Jason freed, how are you? I'm okay. How are you? Oh, can't complain. Good. This week we're talking about drawing a line in the sand, and you start out by saying that great businesses have a point of view. So what is base camp's point of view? What do you stand for these days? On what? I think it's a question. We have a lot of different points of view. There's product points of view. There's cultural points of view. There's things we stand for around privacy and pushing back on antitrust or pushing for, I should say antitrust regulations on big tech. I mean, there's a lot of different points of view that we have. There's things around how many hours should you work in a given week and the fact that people should have more time off in the summer, there's a whole bunch of different things. Some lines move some lines stay. I think there's some principles we've had for a long time and other things that we've changed. What's important is that we do have a sense of on a given topic what we believe versus which way is the wind blowing? I think what's interesting about the stance to are that they're not neatly summarized in like 8 bullet points. This is one of the exercises we've gone over several times at base camp is can we summarize what we stand for in a mission statement? And we're like, no, that's why we have 78 essays in this damn book because there are a lot of stands that you can take and we take quite a few of them on very specific topics such that they mean something. Yeah, I think we're talking about mission statements in next week's episode as well. Yes. And I think it really goes together this idea of drawing a line of sand is about committing to something. Turning some things off. I'd say almost more so than turning certain things on. They're about off switches, and we're not going to do that. We're not going to go there. We're not going to market here. We're not going to do all of these things because that's what defined who we are. Did you draw some boundaries around what you want to do and how you want to do it? And what's interesting about this this connects to an essay I think we had getting real, which is constraints or liberating. When you say we're not doing this and you draw the canvas in which you want to operate, it's just such a nice feeling. If you don't have any boundaries, we could be anything. We could do anything. We could go anywhere, and then you're left with essentially the core of capitalism. Let's just go where the money is. Not super interesting, I think. I mean, let's also go where some money is, but also let's try to fulfill some of these other points that we're trying to take a stand on. And of course, some of the points are almost against the money, right? We've taken a bunch of stances over the years that have cost us dearly in terms of the money. So you used to have the blog signal versus noise ten years ago. Over on when you wrote this book, how do you get that point of view out to the world these days? Part of it is writing books. So, you know, it doesn't have to be crazy at work with our latest book, a couple of years ago. And then we write on Hayward, our own personal blogs. We will, you know, post stuff on LinkedIn will share updates in the product. We'll take a point of view there. We'll do podcasts. We're kind of trying to broaden the exposure of the message versus just kind of focusing on one place, which is signal versus noise. Which kind of felt like it had a run and it was time to try something else. But I think we've always, we've always tried to put our point of view in different few different places and I think now, especially we're trying to broaden it. I think this show is a good example of that. And I also think though that there's moments when you have said a lot and there's not a whole lot to say at the moment and then you kind of recharge and you do some other things and you come back with some different points of view. So I think we're kind of also a little bit in that phase at the moment where we just don't have another 90 essays that we could write today that are brand new with new point of view. I think a lot of the things we believe we've set and we're living those right now and focusing, kind of heads down on the work. And we'll see where we are in a year or two with new things bubble up. This reminds me of the Hemingway response to a new writer when someone asks him anyway. How do I write the next great novel? What are you talking about? You shouldn't be focusing on writing. You should be focusing first on living. You have to live first. And then you write, because you have to have something to write about.

Sean Hilton David Hein Meyer Hansen Jason Hayward Linkedin Hemingway
A highlight from Use This HOLIDAY Survival Guide to Make This Holiday Season the Best EVER! | Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

07:08 min | Last week

A highlight from Use This HOLIDAY Survival Guide to Make This Holiday Season the Best EVER! | Tom Bilyeu

"And loneliness and anxiety and depression and sadness. Everything that's just ick that goes along with that. I am a single mom. I'm an empty nester. And I don't have a lot of family. Most of my family is, most of my family is deceased. So this year feels harder and it feels heavier. That being said, anything that you can suggest that would help me avoid ending up in the fetal position, the entire holiday season. So I could truly focus on what matters most in life. Thanks Tom. Man, I wish we were together because I really want to know what matters most in life to you. So here's what I would do without knowing what that answer is because certainly if what matters most is family, then we want to map out how and when are we going to be able to spend time with the family that we do have. So whether that's your kids and traveling to them or having them travel to you and figuring out how many days there are going to be of that. But really mapping this stuff out. Now, let's take a really hard approach this. Let's make it like the just absolute Dire Straits issue. Let's say that every single friend that you have and every single family member that you have is unavailable and you're not going to be able to see them. All right, we're going to want to do a couple of things with our time to make sure that we're getting more energy than we're losing that we're doing things that are fun. We're doing things that fill us up. So some of that is going to be just what are the things that excite you, right? So for me, for instance, I have no problem watching movies by myself. So putting out a slate, this is what I would do. So one thing my wife has taught me is you can take an average Tuesday and make it special by doing certain things. So, for instance, when COVID first kicked off and we thought it was just gonna be a couple of weeks. We completely changed up our routine. And so normally, Monday through Friday, if I'm awake I'm either working or working out to make COVID special, we invited my sister over to my house, we played video games, starting at 5 o'clock. We were watching anime, it was really, really fun. And just by breaking out of our routine and doing something that was more enjoyable, it completely changed the dynamic. So if you're not able to hang out with people, but there are things that you like doing and you can break yourself out of your normal routine, for instance, I would if I were going to be alone, I would schedule out different Christmas movies that I wanted to watch and I would schedule them out in a way where I couldn't change them. Because then, what ends up happening is you're like, oh man, I can't wait till Tuesday or whatever when I get a watch this movie that I'm saving for myself for that day. So there's something about and I would leave some wiggle room. So I would let's say I had two things planned that I was gonna watch. When a scheduled one is not. Then, I would also, you have to find the things that make you happy. So I'm gonna give you the things that make me happy that I enjoy doing what I'm alone and use slot in whatever those things are that you like. And then we're going to get to the grand finale, which is the real thing that all of this is building up towards, which is like the guarantee thing that's gonna work. So bear with me if these easy ones you're like, nope, I'm still gonna be sad. I'm still gonna be lonely. None of these things are going to help. Trust me, I've got an ace up my sleeve. We're gonna get to it. Okay, so I would build out all of the things that I like doing. So for me, it's gonna be a Christmas movie every day. I love that the most. It's gonna be time playing video games. It's gonna be time reading, and then if you can't be physically with the people that you wanna see, and let's just I'm going to assume for now that you have a good relationship with a few people whether they're friends or family. And I would schedule out when they can a Zoom call. It makes a huge difference being able to see them. And if I really felt like it, I might try to reconnect if none of my current group is available. I might try to reconnect with a few people. I'm gonna obviously leave alone big days like Christmas Eve or Christmas or new year's. It's like, you know, you pick the random days in that period. And you make a game of it like how many people can I reconnect with how much joy can I send out, okay? And this is now starting to get into the secret a sub my sleeve, which is if you stop thinking about how can I get people to pour into me and you start asking how can I pour into other people, then you could be doing things like going on a Discord group and finding seeing people that you can connect with their you could go and this is like this is the ace of aces right here. Go find an organization, a charity organization that will connect you with people or animals. I see that you have a dog and doing something there where you can pour into people that really need it. Handing out toys to kids in need. Going into a shelter for homeless, going into a hospital and talking to people there, old folks homes. Oh my God, the number of people there that truly have nobody left in their life. Human connection is such a beautiful thing, and when you are serving other people, man, it seems like it would drain you but in reality, when you know that you're doing something for other people, you feel this deep sense of meaning and purpose. And so doing that around the holidays, I think could be a huge, huge, huge win. That there are other people. I promise that have it way worse than you that don't have any friends don't have any family left don't have any pets, don't be any animals. Don't have their own freedom, right? They're now living in an old folks home in this example or hospice. I mean, there are thousand ways that you could go and serve other people in a way that will bring you, I think a tremendous amount of joy. Now, it's also okay to mourn the loss of an old life like when you had the kids and they were young. So things like that, it's okay to spend some time with that. But you want to be very careful not to allow yourself to spend more than 20% of your time there. That means you're going to have to pattern interrupt, okay? So as you find yourself looping on the negative stuff, you have to interrupt it. You have to stop it. You can't allow yourself to think about those things. And I mean that literally, what's going to end up happening, I can promise you is you're going to start on that loop. And if you let yourself loop, then the negativity, then the depression, then the anxiety is just gonna keep coming and coming and coming. You have to pattern interrupt that stuff. You have to then fill that with something else. So it can be sitting down and doing a gratitude journal, it can be doing arts and crafts. It can be doing a puzzle. It can be whatever it is that ends up filling your cup, but you have to stop yourself from thinking those thoughts. Look, as somebody who dealt with crippling anxiety, I know this seems like I'm giving you some BS, oh, that's far too simplistic answer, but I'm telling you, I got to the point,

Depression TOM
A highlight from S5 E24: Thejo Kote, Airbase

Code Story

07:57 min | Last week

A highlight from S5 E24: Thejo Kote, Airbase

"Companies. All this and more. On code story. Seizure Cote grew up in southern India. He came from an academic intellectual family. Both of his grandfathers were authors, and in the house, they had built up a large library. But not just a few books here and there. Say Joe grew up with 3500 books in his house. These were a combination of everything, but with a lot of reference and historical books. And if you don't, they don't appreciate it really until he got older. However, no one appreciate it when it was time to move. He was influenced a lot by what he was reading and watching, which he noted allowed him to learn from the experiences of others. Ultimately, his path took him down the road of tech and entrepreneurship. He's always been fascinated with how impactful tech can be to the world. You sit at home, write some code and make an impact. Prior to his current venture, he cofounded automatic, connecting cars to the Internet. This eventually sold to SiriusXM for several $1 million. Looking into another problem, he saw that the way people spend money lacked true visibility in connectivity between system. He asked some questions, got some feedback and set out to capitalize on the opportunity to build a better solution. This is the creation story of air base. It was what I think of as a spend management platform and the core problem we saw is think about any business. One thing you have all of them have in common is that hey, they spend money. And what kind of money do they spend? You can put it into big buckets. Payroll, it's all the sadies that you pay employees. And then everything else. If you think about how financial operations happen in a business, you know, managing payroll is relatively easy, rather than a pair of systems. You set them up and you keep it updated and it works, but all of the other dollars, which could be marketing spend and software subscriptions and travel and food and have a hundred other things that companies tend to spend money on, the process of managing that is very messy, especially for small, mid market businesses, which are most of the businesses out there, right? There are not that many businesses that have more than a few thousand employees out there, which means that the majority of businesses out there really struggle with how those non payroll dollars are spent. Primarily because it happens in many different silos. Every business has a corporate car system. The deceiving invoices would have some kind of a bill payment system for that process that they're doing it from the bank account directly in terms of wiring money out to vendors, employees are spending their own money and trying to reimburse it and there are systems like inexpensive and things like that dedicated to that task and on and on and on. So you end up with four, 5, 6 different systems involved in the process of managing all the workflows and payments that have happened. It's just a bit for every single persona in the company, especially for the finance and accounting people. I've been dealing with so many systems. But even if you're an employee, like if you're requesting span if you're approving span, just having so many systems, so many workflows. You know, it's just a big pain. And I faced that challenge when I was building my first company automatic and it was a very different business. It was a connected car platform and had nothing to do with spend management, but it was a problem I learned about. It is in the process of building that company and long story short I went to that journey and we sold the business through serious exam, satellite radio company. I was thinking about what I was going to do next and this was the problem I kept coming back to because I thought it was fundamentally broken, just the way in which companies spend and manage money, lack of real-time visibility into how money is being spent by all the budget owners, they're just the nature of how decisions are made to spend money where most people are just winging it and how information does not flow in real time to help people make good decisions. All of that is just was frustrated to me. And it seemed like a big enough problem. And I started taking it to why, you know, it's a stop to school the way it is. Why so many systems and why did the ecosystem develop the way dead and again and after doing a lot of research speaking to dozens of CFOs and controllers and counting managers, I became convinced that there's a big opportunity here. You can go create a much better solution, which essentially for us is to bring all of those elements together into a single platform. So every single non payroll dollar workflow, all workflows and payments are going to have it in one place. How can you have a copper card system? Bill payment system expense reimbursement system and all the related request approval workflows accounting automation and all of that. Bring it all together. And it's a tall order and I think that's the future. And there was a reason why you couldn't solve it that way, even about 5 years ago. And that's a longer conversation. But that's what we're doing. And I'm confident that that is going to be the default expectation of the market over the coming years. And I don't think I'd be able to get up in the morning if I didn't believe that after seeing what that experience can be when you have everything working out of one single system end to end. Would anybody go back and say, no, I prefer three four, 5 different systems. I just don't think that's going to happen. And that's what kind of keeps me going and convinces me that hey there's a really big opportunity ahead of us. Let's jump into the MVP then. So tell me about the first product you build. How long it took you to build and what sort of tools you use to bring it to life. I've done it the wrong way and I'd like to think I'd hit it the right way with air base. And the wrong way that in the cloud that a lot of engineers fall into and as an engineer the clap, I've fallen into in the past is that you think of a problem. And then you jump in and start writing code to build the solution to that problem. Which in my experience is almost always a mistake. Because it is so much more expensive to correct mistakes once you've committed it to code. You know, it takes a lot more time auto money and also that is the psychological aspect of not changing or giving up on the thing that you have built, which is also expensive in its own way, right? So with air base, what I ended up doing was I didn't write a single line of code for the first 6 to 8 months of me working on the project. Initially, I had a hypothesis, obviously, about what the problem was and how I could potentially solve it. And as I said earlier, I spent a good 6 months talking to a dozens of CFOs controllers account to manage the people who live this problem every single day. Of course, learned a lot about the problem during that process even more than I already knew myself through my exposure to it. It just became a lot more smarter about it and built the opinions and hypothesis about what the solution should be in a much more granular way. And after that, what I essentially did was, again, no quote, I went back and I sat down and I sketched the solution to that problem, like your first DP understand the problem. And I just started, how would I solve this? What would the tool be to solve this? What would the workflows look like? What would the UI be? And I kind of sketched that out and I worked with a designer to create high fidelity markups of what those workflows would look like. I went back to a bunch of the people I've been speaking with. Just to show them, we talked about the problem. You agree that there's a big problem here and here's how I think it can be solved. So

JOE India
A highlight from How Tom Cruz Built a $25,000,000 Section 8 Portfolio in Less Than 8 Years with Tom Cruz

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:57 min | Last week

A highlight from How Tom Cruz Built a $25,000,000 Section 8 Portfolio in Less Than 8 Years with Tom Cruz

"Say what's up to fire your nation and share something that you believe about becoming successful that most people disagree with? What's up fire nation? Yeah, the most obvious thing that I could think of when I was asked this and putting that together is I think it comes back to passion. I think there's that platitude and cliche where everyone says you have to follow your passion in order to be successful and I don't think that's true. I think passions are great for hobbies and passions can also overlap with success. But I think the key to success is providing value. And I found that providing value through real estate in a basic need is the way that I found that success. For example, I'm also very passionate about paintball. I've been playing paintball since high school, but there's no future no professional paintball or any type of income or success from that. So I keep it as a hobby, but I would say that's a pretty big common misconception about success that I've found. Well, let's be honest, maybe there's no way to earn revenue yet. But hey, in this new metaverse, I mean, who knows what's going to be happening as far as Atlas star Atlas and vaccine infinity and everything that's going on in this world. All of these parents that are yelling at their kids were playing video games. Now all these kids are making ten times more than their parents were ever making. It's a crazy world we live in. So you never know, but I mean, let's be honest, as I mentioned fire nation in the intro, Tom is generating $400,000 a month in passive income. And we're talking less than 5 hours per week of work, which we'll get to at the end here. But I want to talk about your beginnings right now. You're beginnings in real estate. Because a lot of people in financial are like, well, this should be cool. I talked about what you've done in the introduction. But you're already at 390 units and probably much more right now. That's a high huge number. So let's talk about your path from one to ten. What did that look like? I mean, it's started very normal. I bought my first House. I got the Obama tax credit. I did an FHA loan, which is the first time homebuyer alone. I put 3% down on that property. It was a condo that kind of got me started on the path of real estate and homeownership. It was very humble beginnings that there's like a $120,000 condo here in Wilmington North Carolina. I lived there for a little under a year. I decided to buy a dog, so I needed a bigger house and yard and they didn't allow dobermans in that condo. So I tried to sell that condo and come to find out that I was upside down. You know, 2008 was not kind to the real estate market. I only had very little equity in it, so I put very little down payment. So I was forced to rent it, and that's kind of where I had that aha moment. I posted a not on Craigslist and I mean an hour later it was pretty much rented. I had a hundred people responding to the ad. Just threw it up there $500 was the rent over my mortgage, so I think my mortgage is 600 and I put it up at 1100. And it rented very quickly. And at that point, I was doing marketing. I was doing web design and SEO. And I was killing myself for $500 a month, you know, with a client. And here I am passively making $500 a month off this condo rental for doing nothing except signing at least with this tenant. So from that point on, I started getting into real estate wholesaling. I knew that I couldn't continue to put 20% down on every property, which is kind of the investment requirement for a lot of loans. So I started doing what's called real estate wholesaling. I would find properties that were undervalued. I would put them under contract, and then I would find like a flipper or a landlord that wanted that property, and I would essentially assign the contract to them. And I would make 5 to $8000 per deal doing that way. And that's really how I got started. I essentially took that cash, combined that with my side hustle what I was doing with marketing. And now I also have that rental income from that first condo. I would put that together and got my second unit from that point. It just kind of turned into a snowball. You know I was continuing to reinvest all that compounding, rental income. And when I got about 5 or 6 units, I learned about cash out refinances. So I was able to start pulling equity out of those properties in order to continue buying more. I had a revelation at around 7 or 8 condos. That's when I realized that condos just weren't scalable. There's a ton of issues with homeowner association fees and condo association fees and assessments that these apartment complexes were charging, the monthly fees were eating into my cash flow, like crazy. So I knew that I had to go into the single-family realm. So I started doing that around 7 to ten units. And then that's essentially how I grew from there. And we can get into maybe ten to a hundred units in a little bit, but yeah, that was kind of the progression was starter home loans, reinvestment, aggressively. I mean, I was living very lean during that time. Focusing solely on down payments, you know?

FHA Wilmington TOM Craigslist North Carolina Barack Obama Homeowner Association Fees And
A highlight from How 2021 taught Gallery Media to quickly adapt its TikTok playbook

Digiday Podcast

05:49 min | Last week

A highlight from How 2021 taught Gallery Media to quickly adapt its TikTok playbook

"And we're starting to see a lot of these other platforms take note of that and start to. I don't want to use the word copy, but like really take note that music and these native features that made TikTok explode. They are starting to adopt them in their own way, shape or form. So that's kind of how it all got started in terms of like really being best in class and intimate with what works and what doesn't work on TikTok. And of course, it's evolved over the last two years as well every day it evolves. So you do have your own I guess owned and operated channels like your brands, PureWow, one 37 p.m., and a couple of those other more vertical based channels that you mentioned. But you also run brand channels, right? Like you have clients that you are responsible for their own performance on TikTok. Can you talk about how you got into that and maybe how you convince brands that you're the best person or best company to do that? A 100%. So I'll take a step back because I think it context on that matters. You know, the way we think about publishing, we think about the publishing landscape a little bit differently. We've shifted our mentality to what we call internally digital publishing three, which is really a true hybrid of a media publishing company and then some service related arms like social creative and influencer marketing. We almost think of it as like the anti publisher mentality, if that makes sense. And it's really what it is is it's basically not being self serving. It's not trying to sell high margin publisher products or try to force owned and operated simply because it's the most profitable. Your clients, platforms and publishers are smarter and savvier than ever before. Consumers included, by the way, and the platforms are garnering more consumer time and attention than ever before. So the way we think about it is when I ask my whole team to come up with ideas and plans of what we're going to do with brand partners, I try to frame it up in a way that what would we do if we own this brand? What can we do to drive the most impact and relevance for this brand to drive consideration in the long term rather than thinking in the short term by selling inventory or publishing products to maximize product? I'm sorry, profit. So what ended up happening there is when we started getting questions about what would you do for us? What do you think your best at? We had to look ourselves in the mirror and one of the things we were best at was building TikTok channels. It truly was. But it's interesting because the first time it happened, we actually didn't come up with it. The brand asked us for it. They saw all this stuff we built and they were like, could you just do that for us? And for, you know, that caught us off guard a little bit. We were like, we could. We haven't sold that to date. We don't know how to do that necessarily but let's try it. Let's Guinea pig it. And we did it, and we learned a ton and it was a great success. And yeah, now we do it for about ten plus clients. So but a lot of it stemmed from the fact that the whole mentality now is this anti publisher mentality of like, do not just do what is best for us, do what is best for them and consumers. Got it. And so you said you have about ten brands that you do this for now. Who was that first brand that asked you to jump on board and do their TikTok channel? The first one we ever did it for was revlon. How did that one kind of pan out that I guess indicated that this is a product you should be selling to other brands? Yeah, so it was a great situation because we had a great relationship with them and we were very transparent because there was a Guinea pig. So there was a lot of kind candor able to be delivered from both directions in terms of like, okay, this is not Instagram. We're not everything's not supposed to be polished. You're able to have a different brand personality. You know, what I always like to say is Kaylee is very different in the boardroom than she is in a bachelorette party probably. A brand could also have multiple personalities. And that is not accepted normally in the brand world, right? Everyone look at the term on brand is something that gets thrown around that we think is an interesting term because I do think that consumers expect more from brands now to have personalities depending on where they show up. Your Twitter personality could be very different from your Instagram personality versus your TikTok personality as a brand. So that was a learning curve. And then vice versa, like I remember when we started it with revlon, we didn't use external creators as part of this. We did all internal content creators solely. And that was a learning experience too, meaning like we now mix it up. We use some external some internal, some UGC, it's a mixture of a lot of stuff. So we learned from them as well because they were able to teach us that. It was important to have external creators as well because the diversity and everything. So that was a big part of it as well. Is the partnership with revlon still ongoing or have you, I guess, ended that particular relationship. We work with them ongoing in a lot of different ways, not necessarily in that specific way.

Guinea Revlon Kaylee Twitter
A highlight from MBA1924 Selling Your Product or Service on Groupon

The $100 MBA Show

05:05 min | Last week

A highlight from MBA1924 Selling Your Product or Service on Groupon

"So many amazing deals on groupon, because the business realizes, hey, groupon is getting me customers. And I might not see that first interaction with my customer that first exchange as a profitable one, but now I'm building rapport and hopefully people will come back to me. Now, there are some businesses and products that actually do make a profit through the group on deal. After groupon gets its cut. Speaking of cut, let's talk about how groupon structures the deal for the merchant. You and a representative from groupon will negotiate a deal. They will take a certain percentage of the price that the customer pays. Groupon is collecting all the money and then they'll pay you out. Things might have changed since I ran the groupon. But it's about 60 days out when you'll get paid. So say, for example, you're running a deal that is $50. Groupon is going to collect the $50 from the customer, and they're going to take a percentage of F $50. That's the rate you're going to negotiate with groupon. It could be 30% 40%, 50% depends on a lot of factors, and things change all the time. But let's say it's 50%, that means groupon is going to collect $50 from the customer, take 25 and give you 25. Now part of being on groupon is having an exclusive deal. Like a groupon doesn't want you to be on their platform if you're not going to give a really good deal that they can only get on groupon. So if you're selling your product on groupon for a minimal discount, it's not really going to make waves and groupons really not going to be interested in listing your product or service. They want a wow deal. So what many businesses do and this is what we did, they create a specific version of their product or service that's for groupon. Let's say you're a dentist and you do whitening services. And your full fledged whining service may take four weeks and costs, let's say $500. That's just walked into your dentistry. Groupon wants a deal that is exclusive and very, very attractive. So you might say, hey, my winding services are a $100. Now, it may not be the full fledged four week version it might be the express version, something you create specifically for groupon. It might be two sessions or two and a half sessions and the deal on groupon is a $100. Now we're talking groupon will be interested in that because it's a really, really attractive price. Now your job is once you get the customer to buy the group on and come through your doors is to upsell them. Is to become their now new dentist. Do all their checkups, do their x-rays, filler cavities, and top up their writing services when they need it. This is what groupon is great for. We did something similar with our digital product the $100 VA program we created a core hundred ombre program that wasn't the full fledged program, but had some really great courses in it. And then once they signed up, we were able to offer them other coaching, other products and other services. So again, groupon is a primarily a customer acquisition model and not really a place for you to really make lots of money. Having said that, the volume of sales is huge in groupon. I was shocked how many people signed up for our deal? We're talking thousands upon thousands over a course of 6 months. I believe we got an influx of 6500 students. So they definitely have reach. And one of the things that groupon does is they don't launch their deals across the world in one shot. They test the market out. They may be tweaked the price tweak the imagery, then they expand to another market and another market. They're quite sophisticated in that regard. But in my experience, it's a fantastic way to get exposure to a new audience because they have so much reach. Not only do they get 31 visitors every month to their site, they have 43 million users that use their app, whether it's a web app or the mobile app. So they're getting notifications or getting emails. They're getting promotions sent to them. So you are getting access to lots of people. So let's address the question how do you get on groupon? How do you reach out to them? What do you do? So I've spoken to some people that have reached out to groupon and got on groupon. And I also had my own experience with groupon approached us. And they said they wanted to feature us on groupon. In both scenarios, you need to have some level of credibility. Groupon will back a business. If you have some sort of write up, been mentioned on some article like on Forbes or anchor, your local newspaper, you need to have some decent reviews on Google or TripAdvisor if you're a local business. They rarely do business with a totally fresh product or service or business for that matter. They want to make sure they're backing somebody that is going to be able to deliver and has a track record. If you are approaching group on them, by the way, you can literally just go to their website, go to

Groupon Google
A highlight from S5 Bonus: Shinji Kim, Select Star

Code Story

03:12 min | Last week

A highlight from S5 Bonus: Shinji Kim, Select Star

"This episode is sponsored by imagery. If you're ready to add photo or video editing to your application. Is a great place to start. Image Lee provides a software development kit that handles all the technology for adding photo and video editing right inside your application. Their SDKs are fully customizable and can match your apps look and feel and support all major platforms. Let users share beautiful photos or videos create imagery for marketing campaigns, build photo books or even automate design with templates. Their video and photo editor SDK is used by Shopify, hootsuite, Shutterfly, and hundreds of other companies, helping them ships offer faster. The image they software development kit is the fastest way to add photo or video functionality to any application. Visit IMG LY slash code story today to try the web demo. That's IMG LY slash code story. This episode is sponsored by ratable. Are you interested in joining a team that encourages intellectual curiosity problem solving and openness? Not only that, but one that provides the support and mentorship needed to succeed learn and grow? Meat routable. The team at routable has built a world class platform for modern bill payments, payouts, and invoicing. Ratable helps companies speed up their business payments using a secure invoice and bill payment system. And not just for accounting groups, the company is solving problems for the CFO controller, the accountant and the developer. Ratable is engineering lead and fully remote. They're looking for the best engineers and operators to join their team and drive forward their mission of removing the burden of business payments. To apply today, go to routable dot com slash about and click view open roles. That's rou, TA BLE dot com slash about. Check out routable today and join a team who's changing the face of business payments. The main part of the design is really initially about the documentation of data warehouse tables and columns. And then what I would call context information. For the owner, what are the other tables that are that look similar so there were what I regarded as the fundamental features of the product that we needed to have at the same time for the design perspective, we did have other features too. I would say even now, some of these features are not implemented yet. My name is Jinja Tim. I'm the founder CEO of select star. This is code story. The podcast bringing you interviews with tech visionaries. Who share in the critical moments of what it takes to change an industry and build and lead. A team that has your back. I'm your host no lab part. And today how Shinji Kim built the tool that takes you beyond the data catalog and makes discovery easy. All this

Routable Ratable Shopify Shutterfly LEE Shinji Kim
A highlight from You've Got To Be HUNGRY For Greatness with Les Brown

Entrepreneur on FIRE

01:13 min | Last week

A highlight from You've Got To Be HUNGRY For Greatness with Les Brown

"Boo shake the room fire nation. And welcome to entrepreneurs on fire brought to you by the HubSpot podcast network with great shows like my first million. Today we'll be sharing why you've got to be hungry for greatness to drop these value bombs. I brought less brown into eo fire studios. Less as regarded as one of the top 5 motivational speakers of all time and was the recipient of the golden gavel award. The highest honor awarded by toastmasters international. He has spoken to audiences as big as 80,000 people and has worked with countless Fortune 500 companies, known for being the ultimate storyteller, Les is dedicated to showing the world that you can't afford to be complacent and that it is your duty to aim high, achieve your goals and live a life that will outlive you. Now, Les is dedicated to coaching the next generation of motivators who will go out into the world and make a positive impact. And today, foundation, we'll talk about Les new book. You've got to be hungry. We'll talk about what keeps him going after 77 years. What we need to do to thrive during and after this pandemic. And there's a question I've always wanted to ask less.

Golden Gavel Award LES
A highlight from How to Navigate Stress at the End of the Year with Dr. John Delony

The EntreLeadership Podcast

05:16 min | Last week

A highlight from How to Navigate Stress at the End of the Year with Dr. John Delony

"You can tell Q four we're not going to make it or we're going to barely make it or I've got to you start having a fantasy about whether you're going to make it or not make it or you're going to have the best Christmas all that. And then your kids are busy and you got travel plans and people coming over all that. It's easy to try to do everything all at the same time. And so it's an important thing for me to remember. And I'm in the middle of the season, too, is if I'm on the road if I'm doing work things, I need to be fully there. And it doesn't help my kids any if I'm somewhere not with my kids thinking about I should be with my kids right now. It's not helping them at all. It's just making me crappier at my job. And when I'm with them, if I'm trying to half get work done on my phone, whatever. I'm doing a half job on my work. So be where you're at and just be intentional about setting up some time. My wife and I are setting up some pretty strong boundaries at the beginning of every week to get us through these weeks where we stop smiling our faces every day. Yeah, let's talk about boundaries. Describe what boundaries you've put in place, maybe in the past, and especially around the holiday season with work and family. Because it can be hard to turn off and go all right, I'm not in work modem and family mode. I'm not gonna check the email, not gonna have the laptop out. What do those boundaries look like? Can I back up for a second? Yeah. We have a habit of when you wake up and you check your phone or you wait till 9 o'clock or whatever you listen to Jocko and Ryan holiday. So you don't check your phone until you get to work. Whatever the thing is. When we're on holiday when we have time off when you're with your family, you're working half days, whatever that is. We stay in that same habit. And so I think it's important to be intentional and say, I'm not at work, so I need some new routines and new habits. And so I'm going to put my phone in a drawer. I'm going to completely disconnect. So to answer your original question, some of the things an important for us boundaries is no technology. Be really intentional about technology use. And the kids are in the room, all screens are down, right? Focus on them. If I need to be on my screen, I'm going to go to a separate room, close the door so I can get in and get out of that thing. We're hypertension in my house about the things that we talk about and don't talk about, whether that's no politics, no COVID, no, let's talk about religion. There was a season when a lot of my family members we all worked at the same university. We all ended up talking about work all the time. And this leader is doing this. So no work to just talk about human stuff, laugh. Tell the same old dumb stories over and over. And find ways to poke at each other. Whatever brings your family joy, but those are really important for us. And with boundaries comes this really fancy word, it's two letters, no. How do you know when to say no, as you make plans? You can be stretched in a lot of different directions when it comes to the holidays. How do you do that appropriately without hurting a relationship? So I think the cool hip thing to say is if it's not all yes, it's all no, right? And the holidays are done because sometimes you drive 8 hours to honor your grandmother who's still with us. And so my rule of thumb is, does it honor me or does it honor somebody else? And if it doesn't do one of those things, then I'm gonna start leaning towards pass on this. And so does it honor me? Is this going to be a restorative activity? Is this something I have time or energy to devote to? Or is it going to honor my kids to go to their play? You know what I mean? Or is it going to honor my grandmother to drive 8 hours and get there? In that trip, once I say I'm in, the trip's not about me anymore. It's about honor my grandma's, but honoring my parents is about honoring my aunt and whatever thing we're going to. So does it honor me? Does it honor my workplace? Did Dave ask us hey, I want you all to be at this holiday event. It's going to be important for people who work with us who support us. Then I'm going to go. Because got under Dave's gone on this company. So it's an honor me to honor somebody else and then outside of those things then I'm more like me. But the whole it's either, I don't think the holidays are that simple, man, because we have multiple roles in multiple areas of our life. Yeah. And we're talking about honoring yourself. It reminds me of this idea of taking care of yourself as a leader, especially if you own the business. It's hard to focus on anything but hey, as a team okay, how are the numbers? Everything good on that. On that side and the word self care has kind of been destroyed a little bit by influencers out there. Everything is self care. Just have a warm bath in a candle and it'll all be better. Yeah, it's just a blanket word you use to say it's all about me and what I need and what I want. It's grown up Yolo. How do you do this the right way? Taking care of yourself is important. But you can't be selfish either. I think it goes back to that word intentional, and you know the things that recharge you, and they're different for everybody. And I think anybody tries to tell you that you've got to join yoga or if you just be keto or vegan, they're trying to sell you something. You know what recharges you, and you've got to be intentional about it. The one trap I've fallen into and bajillions of folks business leaders that I've worked with on closed doors fall into is you run so hard that when you finally hit vacation, you aspire to quote unquote do nothing. And that's a recipe for disaster. You find yourself just sitting there, you're eating chips and nachos for breakfast and you're drinking beer at ten 30 in the morning. I'm just doing nothing, bro and it's a disaster. So set up some things that you're gonna do, whether it's good for a walk, take care of yourself. If you're gonna get off the rails, and eat not just for breakfast, do it, but do it with intentionality. Don't just set up to do this thing. I'm just gonna do nothing because it's a wreck. So you can't plan to do nothing. It's okay if you want to watch the Netflix, but plan for that, so it's not just you floating.

Jocko Hypertension Ryan Dave Yolo Netflix