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A highlight from YOUR FIRST 90 DAYS AS A NEW (Or Returning) REAL ESTATE AGENT - Part 3

Real Estate Coaching Radio

01:38 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from YOUR FIRST 90 DAYS AS A NEW (Or Returning) REAL ESTATE AGENT - Part 3

"It's for every real estate agent who knows who's smart enough, frankly, to use this time of year as an opportunity to allow themselves to update their operating system. And that's something that all of us must be doing as we discussed yesterday because the rate of change and I'm sure all of you guys are experiencing it, the rate of change, what we're going to be experiencing over probably unfortunately, it could be as long as the next ten years is going to be extraordinary. If you don't believe me, look at all the changes that have just happened in the last two years. It's amazing. Look at the price of food, the price of gas is anyone saying that inflation is transitory anymore? No, what we're experiencing is a new reset of pricing. Your new houses that you're selling now for the prices that you can barely believe a year from now, they're going to seem like they're on sale. That's what's going on. And this has happened before in history we've talked about this in the podcast, and we're not going to be talking about inflation. But what we are trying to impress upon you is you better be using this time of year to allow yourself to have an open mind to how you can be improving your frankly, your business and your personal life. And as a real estate professional, they're sort of intertwined, whether you want them to be or not. That's for sure. As hard as you try for them not to be, they definitely are. They are. It's called the antivirus software that's always going on in your head. So what we're going to be talking about today are the ten must follow a rules as you're deciding which software to upload. That's right. And so for some of you that maybe you're not a super new agent, you can have a hard reset and bring yourself back to that mindset that you had when you were a new agent and you were super excited and everything was fresh and brand new.

A highlight from YOUR FIRST 90 DAYS AS A NEW (Or Returning) REAL ESTATE AGENT - Part 2

Real Estate Coaching Radio

04:57 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from YOUR FIRST 90 DAYS AS A NEW (Or Returning) REAL ESTATE AGENT - Part 2

"Forgot to ask you, why I didn't forget to ask you. What's that? Like you have to make sure that I'm assuming what you want for Christmas is what you want for Christmas. So I'm going to ask you, what do you want for Christmas? Honestly, I'm really into my bird readers this year. Bird feeders yes, I can do bird feed for seed bird feeders books about birds. Birds. Kind of birding right now. And I tell you, I have thought about this probably too much between our plane trips and things between Puerto Rico and here in North Carolina. I don't know if you guys know this if you're in this area, North Carolina and the Appalachian Mountains in general have more variety of birds. I know I'm talking to like three people here, but more variety of birds than all of Europe combined. So amazing. I think it's peaceful. I find it kind of meditative and they're interesting. But you know what's strange is that I've tried so hard in Puerto Rico to get birds to go to bird feeders, but they don't even know what they are. And I think it's because they have such an abundance of that's why bugs and for our interest. There's no winter. They don't feel a whole lot of scarcity, so they just really ignore my fears. It doesn't really matter what I put in them. I'll just go catch a bug. So what you're saying is the birds in North Carolina are the pie is only two big types. They're more pessimistic. And well, I guess it is true because it is pretty chilly. They don't have as much to eat, you know? So I'm going to take care of them. That makes perfect sense. Well, what happens when we're not here, though? Well, I'm going to get the neighbors take care of it. I guess. I'll just string birdseed all over the neighborhood. So we are talking, of course, this week about your 90 day plan as a new or returning agent or really as any agent who is listening. And this is 90 day massive action plan is, of course, accompanied with a fill in the blank plan that you can actually complete yourself. And the way to get that is just text the word Harris to four 737 two text toward Harris to four 737 two. But today we're going to be getting into the levels of learning, which we talk about in this podcast a lot. And the reason I think we talk about this a lot is because it's interesting, but it's also something that forces you if you're willing to to be introspective. And the introspection I think a more whoo term for it is having an aha moment or having an epiphany, right? So if you listen as Julie describes these four levels and there's actually a 5th level two of mastery or of learning and you are honest with yourself, where you are, you will have all kinds of open all kinds of pathways that are opening in your mind. And remember, just take one specific thing. So I'm going to set up a question for all of you and then just going to go through this and we can get to the rules that we have written down actually Julia ended up coming up with more rules. I think we have like 15. Okay, so Julie I'll set this up for you. So levels of learning levels of mastery and with regards to an agent being a listing agent. Yes, okay. So first, I want you to recognize that in life and business and things you're working on, your skills are not always going at the same level. You don't get to a point where everything that it takes in that particular thing you're working on is always at the same level. So let's talk about being a listing agent. And again, this is called your levels of learning or levels of mastery level one is called unconscious incompetence. And you want to write these down because they kind of sound the same as we're talking. So let's give an example. Aspartame for listing. I'm consciously incompetent okay, so an agent gets a call out to go on a listing appointment. And they don't have a list. They didn't pre qualify. They didn't ask the seller any questions. They don't know what the seller O's. They don't know the sellers motivation. They don't know if they're competing. They have no pre listing pack. They have no listing presentation. They don't know how to price. They don't know how to overcome all the questions that they're so exciting to have a listening but they're really excited to have a listing appointment. They might even think they've got it in the bag. That's right. And so the reality of it is is that is somebody who is going to most likely go on a listing appointment and have a very bad experience because they don't know what they don't know. That's the unconscious incompetence stage. And all of a start out with anything new at the unconscious incompetent stage and I'm going to give you a congratulatory pat on the back for all of you who are willing to make yourself realize and accept the fact that you're unconsciously incompetent because that's exciting because you only have one way to go. That's right, and then, you know, sometimes this can be painful and sometimes it takes a few appointments, maybe the first one you go on was your best friend. You lucked out. And that's actually in a way, even worse because now you think you know what you're doing. And then it takes losing something to go, aha. You know what? I've heard about this thing called pre qualifying. And you didn't know to ask about it because you didn't know there was such a thing as a pre qualifying script. To your example, a lot of agents who have picked up listings during this hot sellers market from people that they know their centers of influence and past clients. They're the ones that suffer the most during an inflationary time or a changing market or sellers get more anxious because what's going to happen is the sellers naturally going to be more selective on who they hire. And then is when that's when you have your unconscious and competent moment when you start losing listings. And a lot of agents where they have egos where they'll tell themselves that, well, I lost that listing because the other agent over priced or the seller somehow knew them from brownies or I don't even know what, right?

North Carolina Puerto Rico Appalachian Mountains Harris Julie Europe Julia
A highlight from P11: Feeling Lucky?

Breaking Math Podcast

06:55 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from P11: Feeling Lucky?

"I'm Sophia and you're listening to problem episode 11, feeling lucky. It's all about the same peers paradox and a few other things. But before I go on, I want to introduce my guest for today. She's a new guest of she hasn't been on before. I'm not listen to Ariana. Thank you for being on. Thank you for having me on. My name is millis and Ariana, the host of a new podcast that actually just came out today called nerd forensics and you can find it on any streaming service that you found this great podcast on. And this is also a project of basically overarching organization that breaking out this part of the Santa Fe trail media. It's going to be the second regular podcast, right? Yes. It's going to be the second regular podcast. Although where you're going to discuss things like probabilities and stuff, I'm going to discuss the probability of whether or not I liked a movie. It sounds fun though. I mean, I've been on a couple of episodes during getting ready. I mean, do you want to give a little bit of an idea of what's up, what listeners will have in store? Oh, absolutely. And she's right about it being fun. I mean, it's a regular pizza party. Our first episode is about whether or not Batman is a fascist. And that one was fun to record. We also have other topics. We're going to talk bad about movies that are identical to other movies for one reason or another. We're going to have episodes where we chronicle the worst ideas executives ever had. We're going to talk about the worst movies to come out in the last hundred years. And so for episodes that's two full length episodes and two mini sos of your podcast are out. Now streaming wherever you find podcasts. So whatever you're listening on now, whether it be anchor Apple podcasts, Spotify, whatever, go check out millisecond oriana's podcast. And if you have friends that aren't too into math, but like to hear somebody rant about Power Rangers, send them my way. All right, Millie, have you heard of the gambler's fallacy? I have heard the term, but to say I actually know what it is would be a slap to the face to all you find math folks. So basically, imagine, imagine, okay, you know how like in Dungeons and Dragons and you roll a D 20, if you roll like 5 ones in a row, it's like, oh, come on, house is giving me so many ones. Oh yeah. Yeah, you'll throw your dice and you'll claim they're cursed and demand somebody else's dice and all sorts of other stuff. Yeah, and the fact that people think dice our cursed points, I think, I think you'll agree towards a big psychological component of randomness, right? Yeah. I mean, it's also really, really frustrating though when you keep rolling once. Oh yeah, and then you think there must be due for something that isn't a one is what the brain automatically starts thinking, right? Then you roll a four. But there's actually so that is what the gallbladder does, though. It's believed by some gamblers that if something occurs many times, it's less likely to occur in the future or vice versa. It's a hot streaks cold streaks. That's where white people think they game what are those trust up vending machines called? Oh slot machines. Slot machines. Yeah, one arm bandits, they're also known. Oh yeah, and I think you'll be interested in this story that happened August 18th, 1913, a roulette ball fell on black 26 times in a row. Yeah, it makes sense that that's been documented for over a hundred years. I mean, that is. That is ridiculous. Oh yeah, the chances of this happening are one in 66.6 million. And people lost more than they did on average by a lot, betting against black, more and more as the wall get falling on black more and more. People didn't want to bet on black so they kept betting on red, but the house, therefore, one more. Yeah, and you know, two people came out thrilled and the rest of them lost their shirts. And this falls into a whole group of fallacies like statistical fallacies, another one of them being that it's related to this one that basically any betting system that has random stuff involved, as long as the house ever has an edge, there's no betting system that you could use that will make you money in the long term. However, I think you have a fun story about fallout four and how you were able to game the system. I was actually new Vegas, but yeah. New Vegas. If you have a low luck in the game, there's a trophy called the courier that broke the bank, where you get kicked out of every casino in the game. For me, I was able to save in a spot and I'm sure everybody else who's ever done this has done the exact same thing where you play blackjack and if you're up, you save, if you're down, you go back to your original point and you just keep doing that. If you have it, try it out. It takes a little bit of time, but it's the quickest way I've found of get that trophy. And I mean, this points to this idea, obviously, of like, you can't really trick slot machines and I mean you said it mostly works on blackjack but you can't really trick these games without time travel. No, no. No, it doesn't work without the hard save. Yeah, unless you said you're like the luckiest person in the game. Oh yeah, if you like, you have a luck stat and you have to raise that to like a ten. Didn't you play a character that had really high luck, but like really low like everything else? They had low intelligence. They had really high luck. They had a decent amount of strength and they were they were modeled after Homer. Like from The Simpsons. They were literally modeled after Homer Simpson and oh, the charisma was incredibly high, too. It was great. All right, have you heard of the St. Petersburg game? I have not heard of the St. Petersburg game. Is that anything like Russian roulette? Nope, it isn't, but we will be talking about Russian roulette in a moment. I like what that we're talking about this as though we don't know that Russia lets about to happen because the magic of radio kind of stuff. But anyway, we start with a pot of $2, right? The house has $2. All right. You flip a coin over and over again. If it lands on heads, then you get whatever's in the pot. If it lands on tails, then you double what's in the pot. And then eventually just gets what's in the pot. So what would be the fair amount to charge someone to play a game like this is the question to this very strange game? Well, nothing, because honestly sounds like somebody set you up for a grift where they just knock you out after all your money's on the table. Oh, I know. And I mean, one of the reasons why you got that sense is because I mean, there's a one and two chance that I'll come out with $2, right? Yeah. So and then there's one in four chance that'll come out with $4, when an 8 chance of $8 and so on, right? Minus what I bet. Yeah. So the House either it's either a fast talking con or it's one

Millis Ariana Sophia Santa Fe Power Rangers Millie New Vegas Batman Apple St. Petersburg Vegas Homer Simpson Homer Russia House
A highlight from Community Relations & Communication: A talk with PSBAs president-elect David Hein

Keystone Education Radio

05:46 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from Community Relations & Communication: A talk with PSBAs president-elect David Hein

"Working with and having open dialog with the community represent has always been essential to the effectiveness of a local school board. Recently, with divisive topics on the table and strong, varying opinions felt by the members of the communities. It's become even more apparent than necessity for clear and respectful communication from all sides. As part of the PSBA principles for governance and leadership, one of the principles is to communicate clearly and supportive of this is the guidance to promote dialog with the local community and encourage input and support for the district from the school community. Working together so much more can be accomplished for the betterment of the students. On this episode, I'm talking with school board director and president of the Parkland school district, David hein. He is also the PSBA president elect and incoming president for 2022. Welcome David. Thanks for joining me. Hello, thank you for having me. It's an honor to be here. Absolutely. So I'm going to talk about the relationship between community members and the school board. So let's kind of first define what role does the public or the community members play with the work of the board. How do those fit together? I think the public voice is definitely a very important for us as school board members to have they bring the balance really a lot of it from the parent perspective of what they're seeing, their children are doing and what's going on in schools. A lot of school board members may not have children left in schools. If you've grown up and moved on. So having that parent view of perspective of what's going on in schools really helps to inform us, if there's something that needs to be addressed that we need to maybe bring to the administration to look into. And so how does afford individually and collectively build maintain and strengthen the relationship with their community? How should they go about doing that or how do you go about doing that? Yeah, I think part of that is the agenda items at every board meeting where the parents and the community have the opportunity to come and address the board either for comments on agenda items or later in the meeting comments on non agenda items where they bring their concerns to us. For the audience that we're going to address and hopefully approve in the meeting, if they have concerns or need more clarification. Or just bringing us concerned on items of any topic, really. Having that voice and bringing that to us is definitely one way to build a relationship. I think that is not a dialog. It's just a comment time for the community to come to us. But respectfully listening and paying attention to every speaker taking notes and working with the administration to have somebody get back to the person on their concern, whether it's collectively or individually to get back to them to clarify any misunderstandings or just it works through an issue. Yeah, and so you know, there's a lot of challenging topics certainly there is now. And there can be challenging topics at any time. But how do you as a board work to address the challenges or is there a way at all to preempt challenges with community members? I agree, there are a lot of hot topics right now. But it also goes to anything from turf fields to redistricting to full day kindergarten or whatever the topic of the day is, right? Knowing what the issues are that are coming up that the parents are concerned about whether you're hearing about it from trips to the grocery store or emails or whatever, knowing that people are going to be coming to the meetings to talk about it. I think the way to address it is to be prepared for that. Have the information readily available, work with demonstration is really ours is the governance, not the not the management role from a board. But to work with the administration to really have them prepared for what you're hearing and what you feel is going to come up at a meeting to be able to answer the concerns of the parents in the public. So it's sort of that ear to the ground kind of approach and lots of listening and, you know, so that you can have those answers ready or hopefully be able to address what's being presented then. Yeah, 100%. Yes. It's just really preparation and knowing the audience knowing what's going on in your district. Yeah. Do you have any examples from your own district or even some that you've heard about in other districts maybe? Examples are highlights of what you would consider to be successful situations or maybe successful exchanges that have occurred in working with your community or, you know, with a school board working with their community. Any kind of successful outcomes that you can think of? Two really come to mind off the top.

Psba Parkland School District David Hein David
A highlight from YOUR FIRST 90 DAYS AS A NEW (Or Returning) REAL ESTATE AGENT

Real Estate Coaching Radio

05:36 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from YOUR FIRST 90 DAYS AS A NEW (Or Returning) REAL ESTATE AGENT

"To the rest of you. Make sure you are not unplugging too much unplugging during this next couple months because these are often the most critical times of the year for anyone who's serious about their business let alone their real estate business. Along those lines with Julie and I have prepared for you guys and we spend a lot of time on this actually. I shocking amount of time indeed. As we created a 5 part series and this 5 part series this is designed to give you as a new agent or a returning agent or even a seasoned agent, the direction that you need rolling into the following year. And Jillian and I as you guys know many of you are a longtime listeners to this podcast, this is the number one listen to Delhi podcast for real estate agents. And at least the United States. And by the way, thank you for making that so for years, we've sincerely appreciate it. So we know that a lot of you did have your best years ever. And this time of year, especially when the phone isn't ringing as much, you're starting to wonder if you're going to be able to replicate what you did last year this year, or as the case of this year next year, but you know what I'm saying. So the bottom line is, as you can, but you need to be starting with a fresh approach and we're going to be going through a series of questions and filters to help you isolate what really worked in your business to make it so that you had such a fantastic year. At the same time, those of you who are new in the business or newest in the business, we're also going to be helping you weed through the pick through the weeds to understand really what it takes to be long-term successful in this business. But we do want to give you a warning. And we do have a lot of new listeners that bind us this time of year. Warning number one, Julie and I are no BS. We're fluff free. We're not certainly going to tell you what everyone else is telling you. We're not going to tell you to buy leads, build landing pages work on your branding build a team. What are the other things that buy a CRM? Not doing any of that. Right. We're not going to spend any time whatsoever talking about the fluff. If you want fluff, go someplace else. We're going to tell you exactly what you have to do to put yourself in a position to help others and make money. And stay in this business for a long period of time, like in decades or as long as you choose to stay in the industry. So again, this is going to be your first 90 days as a new or returning real estate agent, do take great notes on this obviously directly applicable for those of you who are in the business who are preparing for next year as well, though we did title it specifically geared towards new or returning agents. I guess encapsulate all of you that you are returning, right? Hopefully. For another year. That's right. Well, and I also had there are agents who have changed markets, especially during COVID. This is especially applicable to them. There are a lot of our grizzled veterans who have gotten their kids, their parents, their spouses, licensed. Some of you guys decided, yeah, you're going to maybe build a smaller team, but you're going to make it a family team. You want your transaction coordinator to be your kid or your niece or nephew. And maybe your assistant is going to be your spouse or maybe they want to take the buyer side of your business on. So really, we're going to go down a list and you're going to check any of the following, but just to remind you, you do want to take notes, you want to get your typing fingers ready, jot down if you're old school like me and you like good old fashioned pen and ink. That's okay, but this is your first 90 days. This is an action plan and again, this is real estate coaching radio. We're going to give you a drill down bunch of details that you have to have now. So we're introducing our massive action. That's right, fluff free action, quick start plan. This is the real estate training plan for you guys to follow. It's going to be very specific. The way to think about this is this is basically we're loading a new iOS. That's what a new year really should be. Yes. Some of the operating system that you've carried from year to year is still applicable, but you've got to assume. And I think it should be obvious to all of you at this point that everything is going to really dramatically change starting really effectively 6 months ago. Inflation and a lot of the other things that we talk about in this podcast really are going to have a dramatic effect, not just on the real estate market, but on society. And we need to all be prepared for that. So you got to open your mind. And one of the things that Julian I always do in our own business and our own personal life is we start with making when we do every year we call it do something called the Harrison summit that we haven't done at this year yet. Yes, but we will. We'll do it in the Woods someplace. Exactly. With squirrels and bears. So we're going to do what we do in Harrison as we write down a list of the things that we know we're doing right. Like things were absolutely almost overly prideful for. And then we ask ourselves, is that really the best version of that? So for example, if Julie might say, we're doing a great job taking care of our rental properties. We're doing a great job taking care of our fitness. And so the problem with saying you've kind of mastered that particular thing is that you're going to stop learning and you're going to stop going to the next level. So then what we'll do is the next question of ourselves will say, what is it that if we wanted to ten X that how could we do it? How could we make the acquisition of rental properties or how could we make our fitness or how could we make our fences or our relationship? How can we make it not just one step better, but just skip a whole bunch of steps to make it ten X better. So we look for the places where we think we might be complacent. And then we root those things out and we think about how can we actually make them better? So what we're asking you to do is use this somewhat slower time of the year to load in new software. And that's what I'm suggesting. Some of the new going through this exercise, we might discover that well guess what? We're doing physically. It's all we're willing to do, right? It could be. I mean, we had a 70 pound. No, no, it was an 80 pound. Yes. Well, we were trying to upgrade 'cause we're used to 70. Yeah, we had an 80 pound kettlebell delivered yesterday. Yes, they will deliver that. Yeah, to Murphy, North Carolina. Shockingly. Not a great quality travel box. No, but what was really funny was the fact that it was an 80 pound kettlebell delivered by a UPS guy. And he had to travel 8 or two hours to deliver it to us. I know.

Julie Jillian Delhi United States Harrison Julian Murphy North Carolina
A highlight from Rachel Creeger: How Parents (and Comedians) Can Help Overthrow Education

Overthrowing Education

08:02 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Rachel Creeger: How Parents (and Comedians) Can Help Overthrow Education

"About education, but with style. Or makes a great gift for those educators, students, and parents, who really care about, well, you know, overthrowing education. Their shirts, hoodies and other clothing, of course, but I also have all kinds of other swag too. I know, have you ever listened to my guests play the 5 minute game show and think? I want an overthrowing education mug just like they won. Well, now you can have one without even playing the game show. So you'll find mugs and so much more on the overthrowing education website. Okay, now my confession. I reused the commercial from episode 34 with Joshua Silverstein. Yep, I did. Originally I was hoping to create an original one and maybe co write it and perform it with Rachel Krieger because that would be cool. But this was Thanksgiving week, which then sags right into Hanukkah for me. So it's been a busy time. And I also needed to take a few days off. So, as they say in the UK, I nicked the foam marshal from another episode. And I picked Josh was because he is also a comedian and a parent who's passionate about great education and like Rachel, he's also been involved in education. And also, I love this commercial. It's the only one that I had absolutely no part in. Joshua, with some help from his kids, did everything. I'm hoping to get Rachel to work with me on a future commercial so stay tuned. But for now, here is my interview with Rachel Krieger. I have a really special guest today, and she's joining us all the way from the UK. It's Rachel Krieger, who is a professional comedian, a writer, director and speaker, as well as host of a popular British podcast, but she is also an educator who has given workshops and classes for many schools throughout the UK and internationally. I am a big fan of Rachel's stand up comedy and was really excited to take a workshop with her that was geared towards adults. But Rachel is also a parent who knows what great education should look like. So that's one of the main reasons I'm having her on. To give a parent's perspective. So welcome Rachel. Hello, thank you very much for having me. I'm so happy to get this opportunity to talk with you. I know we've spoken at length on this topic and that's really why I wanted to bring you in. And so I'm pretty familiar with the American school system. And I'm getting to know the Canadian school system better and better. But I was kind of blown away when you were telling me about the UK school system. So can you tell us maybe what some of the pros are, some of the cons are? Because a lot of my listeners I do have listeners throughout the world. But a lot of them are here. And in Canada, so tell us. I mean, I find the UK school system quite confusing. So I can't imagine what it's like for somebody investigating it from abroad. But generally, we have primary school, which is where you go from about the ages of four till 11. And then secondary school, which I guess you call high school, which is from 11 to 18. And that's compulsory education. And some, of course, go to nursery or kindergarten or play group before that. But we start with a class called reception when you're very tiny and in a lot of other countries that is left for kids to use for exploring the world, learning social skills, playing games, learning interactions, and here it's quite structured. And in fact, the whole education system, which has changed a lot since I was at school. It's changed on a fairly regular basis, almost every time there's a new government, there are differences made to how the education system runs. And over the years, it's become more and more academic and more and more, I guess, like a kind of a jigsaw puzzle that has very set pieces rather than an opportunity for kids to develop and grow and expand their worldview. And that is my major gripe, actually, about our education system here. So for example, for example, arts get reduced on a fairly regular basis. I'd say, when I was growing up in our schools, we were given loads of opportunities to explore arts. We had a music lesson every week. We had drama as a regular part of the timetable. We had art every week, even from the youngest age group you were in until, I guess you're about 16 in U.S. selecting the subjects he wanted to do for your final exams. And every year that not every year, but every cohort, it seemed to be a subject that was reduced and reduced and reduced down. And one of the things I thought was interesting when my son who's now in his 20s, when he was at primary school, is that they started to look on subjects as being humanities rather than individual topics. So for example, history, geography, art, or merged into one homogenous subject called humanities, which kind of made sense because it was saying, let's take what we're learning about people in this particular part of the world at this particular time and we'll write essays about it and we'll draw artwork about it. And we're really think about what was happening in the world and how I've impacted on this group of people. And I think there is some benefit to that. But a water also did was shrink the timetable to prioritize maths and I'm going to say maths with an S on it because I'm British. You go around a negative for you to math if it helps. And no, no, we got it. That's mathematics and math for all of the Americans out there. I saw a very good joke the other day that someone asked why in America, they don't call many of the non butterflies moth. Because we call math instead of math. Totally get that joke now. Anyway, yeah, so they're kind of the advantages of humanity in terms of seeing everything from quite a global perspective or fantastic. But the fact that it was it meant that it reduced all those subjects into smaller and smaller parts of the timetable, I felt was really, really damaging. And we're seeing more and more that the arts has been reduced. And I would argue, obviously I'm an arts professional. That's my field of work. But I would argue that the arts is probably the most important element on a timetable, because it's that freedom of expression that really allows people to learn in an individualized way. And what we don't really have here is that much opportunity for individualized learning. So I don't know if I've answered your question at all there, but yeah, the UK school system primary school is secondary school, very factory style learning on the whole, although some schools are better and some schools are worse at personalizing their education. And we also have a few different systems because we have the state school system, which is funded by the government and some of the faiths schools, like the Jewish schools, the Muslim schools, the Christian schools, their state funded, and also funded by their parents and their families who send their children there. So for example, the state funding will cover the compulsory education, like science, maths, English, et cetera, and then what the parents pay goes towards religious education because in mainstream school you'll learn basic general religious education as a very minor subject, but obviously for families who are or faith they'll want to send their children often to a school where that faith kind of is integrated into their learning and they have specific lessons which deal with subjects that are important to their religious identity and ethnicity. And then you also have the private school system, which is often very

Rachel Krieger Rachel UK Joshua Silverstein Joshua Josh U.S. Canada
A highlight from Rerun of 40: Save the Date (Calendrical Math)

Breaking Math Podcast

03:56 min | Last week

A highlight from Rerun of 40: Save the Date (Calendrical Math)

"But the donation. And it's our tensor poster. It explains tensors from first concepts to Einstein's formula. And you could get that also with our Facebook store. And with this we have odd met barbato, that thanks for beater the podcast. Thanks for having me. I'm just happy to be inside. So what's your experience with math related to calendars, clinical methods is known? Well, I've always noticed that things don't seem to make sense. My birthday is in October and the beginning of that month is art. September begins with septs, and December begins with deck like a dehydrator. So it's clearly ten there was ten months at some point, and it got screwed up somehow. Yeah, we're going to talk about that. It's the Roman Republican calendar that had the Ted mud system. I mean, it was the legendary tablet system. But actually the reason why octa's off is that's not the original reason, because march used to actually be the first month of the year. They moved it to January after a while of actually I think that was the 1600s with a Gregorian reforms. Also, the only thing the other bit of trivia I have Pope Gregory from who also kind of introduced the Gregorian calendar. He's the namesake of the Gregorian calendar. I believe it's also the namesake of propaganda. So that's always fun. So propaganda comes from the congregation for propagation of the faith. So propaganda propagate. So that they have the same kind of root. Oh, totally makes sense. So we're going to be talking about a lot of stuff on this podcast. We're going to be talking about the origins of various calendars. Hello calendar Forbes. We're going to talk about some early calendars and specific, including the Roman calendar, which is Byzantine and I mean, yeah. And the hidden calendar, which is much simpler at logical my unbiased opinion, we're going to talk about the calculation of Easter and Gauss's algorithm for it because more complicated than you might think. And also about modern time keeping systems at how they kind of flip the script on what it means to base time on the year. Okay, so calendars have origins in religion markets. I mean, it's just a very calendar to even have set names for months every religion had their different name for it. But they just said the first month, the second month, that was very severe they did do. Are you familiar with the clouds to the sidereal year? I am not. So this idea of here is how long it takes the earth to rotate once around the sun, with respect to the fixed stars does that make sense? Yeah, so like how the constellations change from our perception depending on the time of year. I think, yeah, definitely. Yeah, I just made that up completely. Yeah, pretty sure that's right. Yeah, so then we have a sidereal month, which is how long it takes the mood to rotate around the earth with respect to the fixed stars. So like if you just keep your eye on a star in the distance and the mood rotates around you once, that's a sidereal move. Okay. But with most color systems use, is a Cedar buds, where it's the average period of the boon's orbit with respect to the line between the sun and the earth, so does that make sense? Do you want to break that down? Yeah, please break it down for me. Explain to me at three as if I'm a very stupid child. So like imagine the earth sweeps a like let's say there's a string between the side of the earth. Okay. Every type of mood passes that, that's wood synodic month. Okay, I

Barbato Congregation For Propagation O Octa Einstein Pope Gregory Facebook Gauss
A highlight from 66: Heyhoe, Let's Go! (An Interview With Climatologist Katherine Heyhoe)

Breaking Math Podcast

05:54 min | Last week

A highlight from 66: Heyhoe, Let's Go! (An Interview With Climatologist Katherine Heyhoe)

"Doctor nao is a lead author on the U.S. climate assessment report, and has spent her time since writing this report on spreading the word about climate change. She was always faced with a difficult task of convincing people who had stakes and things that would be affected by acknowledging the information in her report. In a newest book, saving us, a climate scientist case for hope and healing in a divided world, she discusses the challenges associated with these conversations at both the micro and macro level. So who is Katherine heho? How is she learned to get people to acknowledge the reality of climate change? Energy the best or worst person to strike a discussion with about the weather. All this and more on this episode of breaking math, episode 66, hey Ho, let's go. Let's go. Hey. Oh. I'm Sophia. And I'm Gabriel. And I'm Merrill. And you're listening to breaking math with us, we have on doctor Catherine of who you may know from the introduction, Catherine welcome. Thank you so much for having me. Yeah. Thank you so much for joining us. I actually just saw you a couple hours ago on YouTube on the live. And then I wrote to Laura and said, here's our interview and she said that you are booked from that time in now. I will name you to how busy you are. How do you keep your energy to keep doing these amazing interviews? Lots and lots of chocolate. Okay. Dark as possible. Okay. I actually had a conversation about this at Starbucks because I'm always plugging our show. And I said, what if they had a Starbucks drink named after doctor hayhoe? So I'm gonna see if I don't have to be a chocolate bar. Oh, chocolate bar instead. Okay, okay, yeah, yeah, something called the, I don't know. Hey Ho, let's go triple express or something like that. So totally. I would drink that every day. Nice. Are you coffee or are you more tea? Well, I'm actually more tea. I have a huge cupboard full of tea, and it has to be black, but there's all kinds of different teas that are black. But I do drink coffee sort of like mid afternoon if I need something to keep me going. And with us, also we have on someone who have been wanting to have on the podcast for a few years now. Well, he kind of has been on the podcast for a few years. It's Elliott Smith. I'm not the other one who wrote the theme song for our podcast. Welcome Elliot. Thank you very much. Yeah. And Elliot, we invited you because of course, earlier I had challenged you to write a couple of songs that would be good representations of the climate change conversation. And you more than delivered, we have probably 5 musical parodies, all squeezed into about two minutes. So we'll get to that at a later part in the episode. So that's very, very exciting. Thank you for joining us. So I would like to start off with is a very, very recent event. I know that recently there was the event cop 26. I have a section on my outline. I would love to hear about 26. I included to talk about the good, the bad and the ugly and everything and your take on it at this point. Well, I'll tell you what was the most interesting thing about it. And it was the number of people who were there representing almost every people group in every part of the world that you can imagine. So officially, it's where every country goes with a team of negotiators to negotiate the fine details of the Paris agreement. And the original goal of cop 26 was to negotiate the details of what they call article 6, which is so arcane that I'm not even going to bother to explain it right now. Because the main reason that everybody else was there was to say, we need more. So far, countries haven't promised enough to hold warming below 2° or one and a half even better. And we need more promises, and we need more action. Those are going to say, you mentioned these numbers 1.5 and 2°, which is like everyone who's familiar with climate science. Knows those numbers pretty well, but do you want to kind of just super quick top level go over that? Yes, absolutely. So our planet is warming now faster than any time in the history of human civilization. And it's already worn by 1.2°C, which is just over 2°F. And people might say, well, that doesn't sound like much. I mean, you go outside, it goes up and down by 20° over the course of a day. But what we have to realize is the average temperature of the planet is a stable as that of the human body. Over the history of human civilization on this planet. So our body temperature goes up and down by a few tenths of a degree every day. That's how much the whole temperature of the planet has gone up and down over all of human history on this planet, which is just insane when you think about that. And now it's going up faster and faster. And so at in 2015, all the countries in the world went to Paris, and that was called cop 21. And because it was a 21st conference at parties, and this one now that this year was the 26th conference of parties. So a cop 21, all the countries in the world agreed to limit warming to below 2°C, which is about three and a half degrees Fahrenheit and below one and a half degrees Celsius, which is just over two and a half degrees Fahrenheit if we can't. So that's where those numbers come from. And they're not magic numbers. So, you know, if we end up at 1.49, it doesn't mean everything's okay. We already see impacts today. And then if we end up at 1.51, it doesn't mean we're going to hell in a handbasket. It means we're a lot better than if we're at 1.52. And if we're there, it's better than for at 1.53. So every little bit of warming counts. And these aren't magic numbers, but they're the targets that the world set to get there. So all the countries in the world went to Glasgow to talk about how they could get there more effectively and better because they're nowhere near there yet. But the interesting thing was, 90% of the people there were not country negotiators. 90% of the people there were everyone else you can imagine. There were children and young people and parents and grandparents. There were farmers. They were rotarians. They were artists and musicians.

Katherine Heho Hayhoe Starbucks Elliot NAO Merrill Sophia Elliott Smith Gabriel Catherine Laura Youtube U.S. Paris Glasgow
A highlight from The Keys to Building a Good College List

College Admissions Decoded

04:35 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from The Keys to Building a Good College List

"Next we have Layla, arita takayama, the associate director of college counseling at the iolani school in Hawaii. Hi, everyone. All right, thank you for joining us both. Let's jump on in. I think the first question and just a start and talking about college lists is how early it should begin creating a college list and can one start too early. So, for me, when I'm talking with students, I know that they might have an idea of those particular institutions that they know they want to apply. The name brands or maybe they have a family affiliation, mom or dad went there. And so I get that, but I tried to tell my students, hey, let's be flexible because who you are as a freshman is going to be really different than who you become as a senior or a junior in the process. And so I want to acknowledge for students like yes, I'm listening to you. I hear your opinions, but let's give you some time to add in the other applications or other for other institutions. And so we traditionally try to build in that flexibility in that junior year just to have them do their research, check out schools, and then also use their summer to continue that research. I agree, I think what I would add to that is I typically ask students first, freshman and sophomore year, why do you want to go to college? Often, I don't think we ask that question enough and to get them to start thinking about that first before they start really building that list. And then as students enter and if sophomore year beginning of junior year is usually when we start with a really big list because I want them to dream big. Yeah, we won't even talk about college lists until this seconds master their junior year. First semester, let's get to know each other, 'cause I'm an 1112 dean and so we get them in 11th grade. There's no college talking. Why? Because who are you? Without having college on the table, who are you? What are you about? What do you like? What don't you like and why? And that why question is one great question for the emissions process. So talking about just the basic factors and deciding on a college list, available major size, location costs, all those good things. Are there any unusual or surprising factors that you might recommend? You know, for our students in Hawaii, they're going on a plane to another island or maybe on the mainland somewhere. And so for them, it's really about, okay, if I'm gonna be far away from home, how can I build that community? What does that look like? Who's part of that community? If I go to a college institution, can I get the support that I need? So we usually have a big chat about that just because that transition can be really challenging, but fun one. I think also culture is very important just because we have the native Hawaiian students and of course our history and the culture and respecting that as well. But then kind of understanding, what does it look like if I go somewhere else for college? Whether that be in the United States or internationally, I think when students really start thinking about questions they should ask themselves when it comes to what they are looking for in an institution. I talk with my students about something called the 7 P's. And it's really a series of reflections that I learned about when I was working at Loyola academy in the Midwest. And it is thinking about what they want personally, like who they are as a person, what you talked about as far as what are the things that they need at an institution to be happy and successful. Secondly, the program that they're thinking about thinking about major thinking about what is their area of interest place, location, people, the people that they want to surround themselves with, price, cost, what their parents think, not necessarily something that every student wants to admit, but parents do have influence, and then the philosophy of the institution. So those are all things that I encourage students to do deep thinking on. How often do they actually do this deep thinking? They do. It's kind of like that why question, right? At the beginning, why do you want to go to college? It's kind of the other hand. It's what are those things that are important to you? Not important to what everybody else says that you should be considering in the college process. But really doing that deep internal work. I think can really help students find that right fit. Can you just run through those 7 P is again without all the in between just hear that letter or the name? Person, program, place, people, price,

Arita Takayama Iolani School Hawaii Layla Loyola Academy Midwest United States
A highlight from Express Yourself: How do you support your child in making progress in speech?

The Parenting Cipher

08:28 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Express Yourself: How do you support your child in making progress in speech?

"To have a big impact or we can help set up a more structured practice schedule with specific activities, but help walk through how to make those as supportive as possible. And when you're looking at that, you're just looking at an exponential number of time. 60 minutes a week that they might spend with us or might get in the school versus hours and hours and hours a week that they're working with you talking with you and getting that really good good input. How to intertwine it into our daily lives. Absolutely, yes. That is key. It's key. Right, as well as helping us to be able to talk to other family members about how to support them in their daily lives. Because sometimes, you know, because we're not talking to speech therapists, so we don't know how to actually tell someone what's going on. So that, you know, you have family members and they're like, boy, you talk too fast. I don't understand what you're saying. And it's like, you know, to have actually engaged with your family members and friends and family who are dealing with your child. And apparently, not buying the more I know the more I'm able to explain it to people. Yeah. To be an advocate for them in any situation, that's a fantastic point that yeah, I haven't considered that too much, I think in other conversations with other podcast hosts and that's a really excellent point that you can also not just work with them, but advocate for them with family. It's an important aspect just because what happens is you get a diagnosis someone tells you a child has articulation or that you have dyslexia or an array of diagnosis, but you're kind of disconnected from it because it's on a piece of paper and no one's actually telling you what that looks like in real life. You may know that you can't understand your child. You may know they talk too fast. But you don't know actually how to tell someone else, this is why they talk so fast. This is why you can't understand them. So if you can't understand them, ask them to slow down, and I have to actually start coaching my family on that because my son is like really talkative. But he had rapid speech. Okay. So for anyone who's listening who doesn't know what this speech is because trusting believe that you have experienced it is when a child talks so fast that the words and the pronunciation are running together. So it's kind of like you may catch a word here or there. And my son was very gay and he's happy and it's like, we're looking at him like, I don't know what you're talking about. And my brother would always get him. My brother would be like, I know you're excited, but I don't know what you're talking about. Yeah, it's hard. It's hard. There's an inherent question that we asked back and most, you know, a lot of people are inherently pretty good at saying the right thing, but sometimes we yeah, others who maybe don't have that kiddo or aren't as close to the problem or the concern might not always say this spot on best thing to support that child. So yeah, you may have fantastic point Jeannie that be in there advocating and not just at home, but also at school as well. That's something like you said talking to your private speech therapist about what goals they would recommend. You probably carried that back to the school and took a lot of that education from that SLP with you and were able to really advocate for the care that you felt he should receive in the schools. Yes, and just for everyone to know, at one point, the school actually wanted to take my son off of and that leads to one of the reasons Leanne is joining us today is for Q&A. So I have some questions from the community. About what would you ask a speech therapist if you had the opportunity? And leading to that one of my questions was how do you know as a parent if the school is basically advocating to remove your child from speech therapy, but the diagnosis really is based upon articulation only. That's a good question and that does come up. The way to frame services at school is to know that they're always going to be evaluating and assessing based on academic need. And so that means they're comparing what the kid is able to do to how successful they're able to be in their general education setting, are they able to function in a general education classroom, meet appropriate grades, make age level progress. And so sometimes there are pockets of other disabilities as well, but when it comes to speech and language, there are pockets of communication where the kid who might very well have a concern like articulation or another one that comes up is sometimes stuttering or social skills. They might have an issue have a concern, but if it's not impacting them academically, they won't qualify for services at school because they're always working off of limited resources. And so in a way that's kind of how they keep it to the kiddos that would quote unquote needed to succeed in their classroom setting. So if someone has maybe a list on some of their sounds, if they have rapid speech and sometimes are tricky to understand, if they stutter, but they're still reading at their grade level. They're still making friends. They're still participating in class. This school might come back and say we don't see evidence of it impacting them, negatively and therefore we won't provide services for them here while they're at school. That doesn't mean that there's not a concern. In our setting with expressible in outpatient settings, if you're going through insurance, those evaluations are going to be done more on a functional and medically based need. So, you know, there is the opportunity to seek that outside care if the school is not dividing it while they're at school. Okay, so you said that if they see that it is interferon with their academics. So if the school is saying articulation, like they're only seeing articulation for a parent. Sometimes they do not actually understand that academics and speech common side. And for instance, for me, I realized that my son had articulation. But he also had dyslexia. So, you know, in my studies, I realized that a lot of children who are receiving speech therapy at some point, especially like early on, it can be an indicator that they may have another learning disability. Yeah, that is true. And when it comes to articulation and phenology, that might very often tie in with reading language, delays and disorders can also impact reading progress. So that is what they'd be evaluating for. So when they set out to do their assessments, they'll gather, even if it's a speech only assessment because in the schools you might be referred for just speech and language evaluation, you might be referred for a full disability evaluation. Even if it's just speech and language only that we're recommending will still look at their reading progress or reading levels. They'll talk to their classroom teacher. They come out to do specific assessment tests, but they'll also observe them in the classroom and talk with their classroom teacher and really try to get the fullest picture they can of how that speech and language might be impacting academics or could potentially play a future role in impacting academics. But I say that and I know full well that it might not always be done the best that it can be, it might not always be the decision that winds up being the best and parents have rights when it comes to schools. There's a ton of information online. I would dot com myself an expert in that kind of arbitration and everything like that. But parents and families have rights because of the individuals with disabilities education act. If they don't feel that their child is getting the most appropriate education for them, they have rights to request outside evaluations at the school would need to cover

Dyslexia Jeannie Leanne
A highlight from I'm A Boss: 3 Terrific Ways To Identify Burnout And Steps To Heal

The Parenting Cipher

04:42 min | Last week

A highlight from I'm A Boss: 3 Terrific Ways To Identify Burnout And Steps To Heal

"Hello everybody and welcome to the parents I've heard. So today we have miss Cassandra. From bee wealth is on our show. And just to tell you briefly about her, she's a woman of mini hats, a mother of two young boys, a medical doctor, wife, educator, wellness blogger, and she's a host of the award winning B well since podcast. And she's incredibly passionate about the wellness and self care practices of black millennial women and I just want to say thank you so much for being on the show. Thank you for having me. I'm excited. For the very first episode, guys, I talked about self advocating for yourself in your health. And then Cassandra blessed the show with her presence, and I was like, I don't know. Because this machine does, and I've been following her forever because I just love her self help tips. So it is national caregivers month. So this show is dedicated to the caregivers. I wanted to talk about identifying overcoming burnout because it is difficult caregivers in the streets to recognize that they are burnt out. Yeah, burnout is so real. I think it's become so common in our culture that we think, well, this is what adulting years adulting sucks. No dude. You're just burnt out, you know? And we just keep going, keep judged along and spirals into depression and anxiety and all of those other things. So. And then how do you identify burnout? Because like you said, in our community, is to grind. It's the grit. So it's like it's part of our black experience. And my mom did it and her mama did it. And I gotta be strong. Yep. I'm not weak. Yep. Yeah. So I wouldn't say the first thing is recognizing that you're human. And this is something that I'm actively working on. I'm in therapy and I'm not ashamed of it and I'll probably be in therapy for a very long time. Maybe for the rest of my life because I need that outlet. I need the mirror to be put to my face. But anyway, one thing that I've been realizing working on is that I try to push through things and my therapist is like, you're a whole human. You're not a machine, and I think a lot of us grew up seeing these examples around us like our mothers, our grandmothers, our aunties, just pushing through and really moving mountains and making it seem like it's just a mole hill. So we think well, that's what we should be doing. That makes us a woman. It makes us a strong what makes us a good one makes us, hey, a black woman. And I think we need to take a step back and realize that we're human and you're gonna need breast. We're going to take a step back. You're going to have feelings that don't feel good. And it's okay to be sad sometimes. It's okay to be tired. It's okay to experience all the range of emotion that come with being a human. It's okay. But what I would say in identifying burnout is when for me, I suffered from burnout. And that's why I actually started a podcast. But my burnout for me was that I had a lot of great things going on. My child, my youngest, he had an unexpected birth. My pregnancy was completely, nothing to talk about. But during labor and delivery, everything I could have went wrong went wrong. And his first few months of life were really scary, but at the same time he was doing better because we weren't sure we'd bring him home from the hospital. It's that bad. And so my child was getting better. My older child was okay. I have a supportive husband and my mother's huge support in our lives too. But I would go to bed every night thinking God from my blessings and then praying at the same time that I didn't wake up the next day. Right. And in speaking to my doula, my daughter would check in with me. And she was like, something's not the same. And she knew that I was seeing a therapist before in the earlier part of my pregnancy. He said, have you seen your therapist? I'm like, nah, she's like, do me a favor and go back and see her. And I went back to go see my therapist, and was she asked me and was like, okay, so run me through your day. I ran through my day from before set up to send down I'm like doing things for other people. And she's just like, okay, so I haven't heard you mention yourself in any of this. I just sat there looking dumb because she was right. And she was like, you sound like you're suffering from burnout which is rolled into depression. She's like, you know, for the next four weeks, let's see if you can carve in like an hour a day of doing something just for yourself not for your kids, not for your employer, not for your husband after your parent, just for yourself and see how you feel.

Cassandra Depression Anxiety
US to Erase Student Debt for Those With Severe Disabilities

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 3 months ago

US to Erase Student Debt for Those With Severe Disabilities

"The bike need ministrations announced it will automatically re student loan debt for Americans with severe disabilities who are unable to earn high incomes starting in September the education department will start a racing student debt for some three hundred twenty three thousand Americans listed by social security as permanently disabled the federal government already offer student debt relief but the current rules require that borrowers submit a lot of documentation advocates of complain some people have been dropped by the program for not getting their paperwork in on time like proof of earnings they best the debt relief be automatically implemented for those already in the social security system the national student legal defense network is calling the new policy a life changing step Jackie Quinn Washington

Education Department Federal Government National Student Legal Defense Jackie Quinn Washington
What I Wish I Knew Before Starting My First Adjunct Position

The Heather Monthie Podcast

02:26 min | 3 months ago

What I Wish I Knew Before Starting My First Adjunct Position

"What i wish. I knew before i got my first adjunct teaching position as an it instructor so in this video. I wanted to share with you. One of the major things that i really wish i knew and understood before i took my first position as an adjunct instructor I think that teaching at colleges universities community colleges is a wonderful way to break into teaching. And i am very thankful to have had the opportunity that somebody gave me that opportunity and as i move forward in my career in higher education was able to give so many people their first chance at a teaching at the university level level vocational school level etc. And so what i wanted to do though is to share with you to sort of reflect back a little bit on my own career and share with you. What i just kinda wish i knew. And there's one big day. There's a lot of things that i wish that i knew. But there's a i guess one big thing so i guess i let's go back a little bit so i knew i was going to be a teacher. I've always enjoyed teaching. I love working with people and helping them achieve their goals. i i i Teaching gig was in two thousand. I actually became a certified flight instructor and You taught adults how to fly. I also taught junior junior achievement. And i taught second graders about You know finance economics that kind of stuff that was. Those are really sort of my first gigs. In teaching actually think flight instructing came a little bit later in two thousand and two And then i also started teaching online in two thousand thirteen. I started working with educators for teachers who were bringing technology into the classroom and so Obviously using technology to teach online. That was a fantastic thing to be able to bring all these things together. And then i started my phd in two thousand ten and i completed that in two thousand fourteen with the goal that i wanted to keep progressing in my career in education. What i really wanted to do was i really wanted to start my own school. I wanted to start a school that would help. People advanced their technology careers. Earn a very good income And to be able to change their lives in I was been very passionate about helping. People really just changed their financial situation and oftentimes You know having a larger income higher income really does help level up their financial

University Level Level Vocatio
Destenie Nock of Carnegie Mellon University on Fixing Energy Poverty

The Academic Minute

01:52 min | 3 months ago

Destenie Nock of Carnegie Mellon University on Fixing Energy Poverty

"My research group investigates how energy poverty will be affected by energy transitions an creates methods for identifying who is experiencing energy poverty when people hear the word poverty they usually think of people who have trouble affording their basic needs and the energy space most people assume in individuals energy port if they spend more than six percent of their income meeting their energy needs. The problem is that this assumes everyone is spending all the money. They need to keep their house at a comfortable temperature cook and use all of the other electricity appliances. We have become dependent on this misses. The people who use space heaters and their ovens to heat their homes due to high natural gas and oil prices and what about the people who keep their houses really hot in the summer because they cannot afford electricity in my research group we have created an energy poverty metric called the energy equity gap which identifies the households that are cutting their electricity consumption to reduce their financial burden. The energy equity gap is based on the difference in outdoor temperatures which members of different income groups are likely to start using their a c. We find that. The energy equity gap between low in high income groups ranges from four point seven degrees fahrenheit to seven point five degrees fahrenheit meaning on average low income households. Wait seven degrees longer to turn. On their ac units. Some households will even wait until it is above eighty degrees. This puts them at risk of heat. Stroke and heat. Exhaustion foregoing air-conditioning also increases the humidity in the house meaning the occupants will be at greater risk from mold asthma and allergens. We hope this new dimension of energy poverty will be used in addition to traditional income based energy poverty metrics to reduce the number of people suffering from energy poverty.

Mold Asthma Stroke
What is Social-Emotional Learning?

A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

02:40 min | 3 months ago

What is Social-Emotional Learning?

"Parents know what character qualities are and kind of have an idea that they do want their children to have instilled in them some good character qualities but i think maybe a lot of us parents haven't possibly heard of the term social emotional learning and also how it relates to emotional intelligence so can before we really get into things. Can you explain to us a little bit. About what those terms mean sure so social emotional learning as we define it with lebanon. Big world is helping kids identify. What's going on in their heads in their hearts so they can use their hands to build up in not tear down planet. Simple if you look at castle dot org. That castle is the collaborative academic social emotional learning. They have a very long definition of seal and they identify five core competencies and those are self awareness self management relationship skills responsible decision making and social awareness so those are five core competencies and then with the work that we do with living big world. We break those down into our twenty four character traits. We mapped them. Because as you can tell those five competencies are are very big and encompassed a lot in have extensive definitions. And so we want to provide manageable chunks of information so people get it so the large umbrella of social emotional learning can include everything from mt s s which is a behavioral intervention system in the schools to violence prevention drug and alcohol abuse prevention to all of that can fall under social emotional learning anything that's considered for student support services in whatever we do to help students succeed in school and beyond with emotional intelligence were helping people understand more about how they relate to one another and how they can pick up on those social cues so we hear the term emotional intelligence rather than social emotional learning particularly in corporate settings and interestingly it's the corporate folks that i know who talk most about the need for the soft skills that's another term that you'll hear interchangeably with emotional intelligence in social national running. It are the soft skills. So how do people respect authority. How do they show up on time for work. How did they get along with their colleagues. So these are all part of the same idea of helping people understand what's going on in their heads in in their hearts so they can use their hands to build up and not tear

Lebanon
Bryant Sculos, Worcester State University, Learning From Basic Income Pilots

The Academic Minute

01:43 min | 4 months ago

Bryant Sculos, Worcester State University, Learning From Basic Income Pilots

"Although universal basic income or you. Bi is not a new idea. Recent political campaigns have reenergized interest in it. You be is a broad category policy. Proposals that involve sending direct payments set at or near a living wage to all people regardless of demonstrated need mirrors around the us developing guaranteed income programs for their communities inspired by the idea of you and a time when people are struggling at historic levels. That said many of the local pilot programs fall. Short of the ideal of many are not universal and most do not provide a living wage however even these experiments can still achieve important goals including providing data. The challenges many of the negative. Miss about you. Bi while also benefiting the participants you be i experiments up to this point. Show the providing direct payments to people improve their lives and benefit the economy at the same time understanding how the local experiments diverged from upi can illuminate the ways that these pilots can leave the foundation for progress towards a more far-reaching you bi system in order to be maximally. Valuable in relation to that goal local guaranteed income. Projects need to do at least three key things involved. More people provide larger sums of money to the participants and they need to provide the income for longer periods of time or more expansive. You've i programs which are best funded by increasing taxes on the wealthy are more controversial. The more expansive. Cbi program is the more likely it is that the beneficiaries will make longer term changes to their lives which include going back to school and spending more time with their families and in their communities unexpansive. You can even begin to change how people think about their relationship to work and their views on her capitalist economic system that regularly leave so many behind

UPI United States CBI
Learn Small Talk About Weather in English

Learn English Podcast - English Danny Channel

02:00 min | 4 months ago

Learn Small Talk About Weather in English

"Maybe you're waiting in line or maybe you are sitting next to someone you only know a little or maybe you're just trying to start a conversation. The weather is an easy topic to talk about. So let's look at five conversation starters for the weather number one. Can you believe how. It's ben so here in the blink. We might say. Can you believe a word. My mouse go. Oh there we go sorry guys just a moment. Sometimes my mounts disappears. Can you believe how rainy it's ben. Can you believe how hot it's been. Can you believe how cold or snowy. It's been so any weather that has been happening. Recently we can easily start a conversation. Can you believe so. I am here in florida in the us and it is raining every day. A little sway might say. Can you believe how rainy it's been and someone might respond. Oh i know it has been so rainy. I really want to go hiking. But i can't because it's always raining. Oh i love hiking. Where do you like to hike. And so on so even these small questions like. Can you believe how rainy it's can be great conversation. Starters all right. Let's see our next one so here we can also talk about what the weather will be like in the future. I heard it's going to blink today. Or i heard it's going to blink tomorrow or i heard it's going to blink this weekend.

Florida United States
The Best Investment I Ever Made for My IT Education Career

The Heather Monthie Podcast

02:14 min | 4 months ago

The Best Investment I Ever Made for My IT Education Career

"Etc. The best investment i ever made was listening to In reading business based podcasts. Books audiobooks all that kind of Anything related to business and so it's always a difficult conversation when you start talking about education in business in the same context because You know people don't necessarily want to think about education as a business but for me it was really learning how to run in my career like it was a business and really learning how to promote and market myself. How to package up my skills. In a way that was necessary for employers as i've done some consulting work with With educational institutions and companies. That may be the run at training program. Really just showcasing my skills in my abilities in a way that really makes sense for them. And so when i listened to all these different books audio i had. I had a pretty long commute for a little while and listen to a lot of different audiobooks. Podcasts in purchase went to the library. Had i have an amazon kindle kindle unlimited subscription really just sort of shifting that mindset from one of i m looking for opportunities to teach into become an educator released shifting to one one of i'm going to create those opportunities increases opportunities for myself increase them for other people as well and that was a huge shift for me and i really think it helped Helped my career and helped me build up myself as technology educator. I remember one time. I was at a networking event at you know and it was for cyber security professionals and i was talking to a group of people and somebody had asked me what you know. What kind of degrees do you have to get to be able to teach an into work in administration. That kind of thing. And i said well i have a. I have a bachelor's degree in computer science. I have a master's degree in education. I have a phd in information technology and i was able to merge all those three things together to create. You know some of the opportunities that i've been Ben afforded the wonderful opportunity to do some of these things

Amazon BEN
Why Culturally Relevant Teaching Is Important

The Teachers Impact

02:11 min | 4 months ago

Why Culturally Relevant Teaching Is Important

"To this episode. Let's dive right into it. So one of the think about culturally responsive teaching. I define. It is being attuned and acknowledging students diverse backgrounds. Educating them with the lens that there heritage background and cultural assets are advantages and can enhance their education and having a worked in urban schools. I see that students already possess a genius within them because of their diverse backgrounds and because of the cultural assets that they bring to the classroom and it is up to me to us as the teacher or teachers to facilitate a nurture this genius within the children that we teach and i was made aware of this time and time again in my teaching i saw a second grade poetry lesson using a poem by langston us and the students were able to dissect and find hidden meaning within this boy without a lot of prompting. It'd be difficult for the students to have this kind of insight to have this kind of critical thinking but they were able to dissect it to break it down honest and understand it without me. Having to prompt them and realize how much of a genius students have when they can bring their backgrounds cultural assets their experiences to the classroom culturally responsive

Langston
Kat Cole on the Power of Possible

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

02:04 min | 4 months ago

Kat Cole on the Power of Possible

"I was trying to think about where to start. This and i think good place to start is the dark side of gratitude. What does that expression mean to you. And where does it come from i. It's funny. I'm definitely known for leading with gratitude. So it's an ironic statement from someone like me. But i remember when my mom came to me when i was nine years old and said that's it i'm done. We're leaving and what she meant was we. Were leaving my dad. My dad was an is a very good man but at the time was an alcoholic and he had a wife and three daughters at home nine. Mi six and three. My two sisters and i had been in multiple car accidents with him drunk driving. By the time. I was nine. So i remember when my mom came to me and said we were leaving. I did not cry. I did not get upset. I looked at her at the age of nine and said what took you so long and it was because i was close enough to the bad to realize that even a scary decision was a better one than the alternative which was staying but as i got older and i talked to my mom more about that decision which turned out great for everyone. I asked her again. What took you so long. Because she started sharing with me how bad it was for. How long and and what it boiled down to was the dark side of gratitude that she was so grateful that she had a nice house and she was so grateful that we had gifts for the holidays and she was told by her family. And my father's family and her friends who were very poor much more so than us. We would be considered middle class at that stage that she was lucky to have all these things that she had and that that was a the alcoholism and the things that came along with it were a small price to pay for those other what appeared to be fortunes

Catherine Bondonno of Edith Cowan University on Leafy Greens and Heart Disease

The Academic Minute

01:46 min | 4 months ago

Catherine Bondonno of Edith Cowan University on Leafy Greens and Heart Disease

"Imagine if you could add years to your life and improve your chances of not dying from heart disease imagine if it only took one small change but first why is heart. Disease important is the cause of nearly eighteen million lives lost each year. The sad fact is that a large number of these deaths are preventable. Why because the development of the majority of risk factors for heart disease can be avoided. The good news is that we can reduce risk for heart disease through our diet. We have found that eating one cup per day or vegetables like lettuce. Beetroot and spinach can significantly reduce the risk of heart disease. We analyze data from over fifty. Three thousand participants of the danish died cancer and health. Study over a twenty three year period. We evaluated the died followed by participants focusing on vegetable nitrate intake against health outcomes related to the hot. We found that participants who followed a nitrate rich vegetable diet. Had about a two and a half millimeter. Mercury lower systolic blood pressure and a twelve to twenty six percent lower risk of heart disease compared to participants consuming less nitrate rich vegetables and other key finding was at one cup of leafy green vegetables was enough to reach the optimal levels of nitrate calculated at fifty nine milligrams per day. We did not see for the benefits in people who ate higher levels of nitrate rich vegetables. So eating just one cup of knighthood rich vegetables can therefore have a valuable impact on the health of your heart

Heart Disease Cancer
Why Do We Make Assumptions?

Mindset for Life

01:40 min | 4 months ago

Why Do We Make Assumptions?

"Welcome to the mind. Set for life podcast. Today this is bethany hansen. And i am so glad you are here. We're gonna talk about assumptions today. Have you ever had someone really let you down or expect something of you that you just had no idea about likely that was because a there was poor communication but the there were some assumptions. Either you had an assumption about the other person or they had an assumption about you and that wasn't communicated enough. I've talked for a few weeks now on the mind set for life. Podcast about the ladder of inference. I've never mentioned the letter of inference. So if you listened to episodes seventy eight and seventy nine you're not gonna hear me mention it but that is exactly what i'm talking about. The ladder of inference is this tool. That really tells us what we are thinking. It's interesting because when we think in sort of these steps are brain just flies through it. We don't even realize we're doing it. But the ladder of inference gives us sort of a structure to which we can then slow down think about it and realize where we went wrong in our thinking or where someone else went wrong in their thinking at where we need to fill in the blanks. The crazy thing is a lot of the thoughts in our own ladder of inference. Come from our younger life like our childhood or our youth. We have some experiences as we're growing up or as were young in the world and we draw a conclusion based on those experiences

Bethany Hansen
Improve Traffic Flow in Cities by Banning Left Turns

The Academic Minute

01:42 min | 4 months ago

Improve Traffic Flow in Cities by Banning Left Turns

"Intersections. Dangerous because they are where cars often moving very fast than in different directions must cross paths when drivers make left turns. They must cross oncoming traffic which makes intersections much more complicated one way to accommodate turns is to have vehicles wait until a gap appears in oncoming traffic. However this can be dangerous relies entirely on the driver to make the left turn safely another way to allow left hand. Turns you stop oncoming traffic and give cars turning left their own green arrow. This is safer but it shuts down the entire intersection to let left turning vehicles go which slows traffic instead. A simpler solution might be best. Restrict left hand turns in busy cities. This would be safer and allow the intersection to serve more cars. There's a downside. Eliminating left turns would require some vehicles to travel longer distances however eliminating left turns on grid like street networks would on average require people to drive only one additional block. This would be more than offset by the smoother traffic flow. Getting rid of left turns may be difficult to implement across an entire city but they might not need to be left turn. Restrictions are most effective at busier intersections in the centers of towns or cities than it less busy intersections. Farther away from the town center. This is because the busier. The intersection the more people benefit from smoother traffic flow the central intersections also tend to have alternative routes available than minimize any additional distance travel due to the restrictions. So the next time you're sitting in traffic stuck behind someone waiting to make a left turn know that your frustration is justified. There's a better way in this case. The answer is simple. Get rid of the left turn.

Bas Rokers, NYU Abu Dhabi Takes Your Brain Through Virtual Reality

The Academic Minute

01:32 min | 4 months ago

Bas Rokers, NYU Abu Dhabi Takes Your Brain Through Virtual Reality

"What if you could walk into a room full of strangers and see names another elephant details floating above everyone's head. Augmented reality can make such world possible. The technology may soon be built into glasses. For example so does virtual content can be superimposed on our view of the real world. Engineers are close to solving many challenges involved in augmented reality at the same time however our understanding of the conditions on the which our brains can or cannot take advantage of the additional information is relatively limited in a recent study at the university of wisconsin madison and newark university. I would dhabi manipulated. The virtual content displayed. We found it under naturalistic. Viewing conditions the brain exploits. Small involuntary had movements which we call head jitter to improve visual perception for augmented reality devices to work well debt for they should record your head jitter and update the virtual content accordingly as an imported aside. We founded commonly available virtual reality headsets. Do not work well for large fraction of the population. Specifically some popular. Headsets provide a poor fit to women. As a result females tend to report a poor visual experience and greater motion sickness. I work informs the design of new virtual and augmented reality devices and may help us. Better understand deniro. Mechanisms that are disrupted in perceptual disorders.

University Of Wisconsin Madiso Newark University Dhabi Deniro
Instructional Design and Teaching, Digital Security, Hardware & Software

Trends & Issues in Instructional Design, Educational Technology, and Learning Sciences

01:59 min | 4 months ago

Instructional Design and Teaching, Digital Security, Hardware & Software

"Number one is. Id and teaching strategies. There were a number of articles a large number of articles about instructional design in general and teaching strategies generally over the past two weeks. We're which we always mentioned. We're thrilled to see. We love to see that kind of thing so we saw strategies for designing effective training request forms. That's usually in business. Situations Flipped classrooms discussed multiple articles about flipped classrooms Lesson planning with universal design for learning formative assessment for remote teaching the roles of an instructional coach. All of these things were discussed are recommended. Read in this area is planning for fair group. Work by amir suli and susan m brookhart for asc. Once again i apologize. If i mispronouncing any of our authors names. This was a really good read Describing group work and how to organize a group work setting that everybody finds fair and equitable And i think pretty much all of us who are involved in designing any kind of instruction have had some moment where we've had to organize group work and gets get some kind of pushback from people saying you know. Why are we doing this so this is a really good article. I think in terms of just laying out the the wise and the winds in the house for group work number two our number two Trend is slightly different than normal. Normally we would say that one of our big trends over the past. Few years has been digital security and citizenship. This time around it was all digital security. We had a number a number of articles about just security issues. In general for example microsoft announced security enhancements for dynamics three sixty five viva and teams.

Amir Suli Susan M Brookhart ASC House For Group Work Microsoft
Social Justice for Young Learners

The Teachers Impact

02:05 min | 4 months ago

Social Justice for Young Learners

"I shall be. I'm so happy you're here on the podcast today. I'm so happy that you've reached out so we can learn a little bit more about you. Know your thoughts on social justice and a little bit about your company and Some practical tapes that you might have for teachers so if you wanna just go ahead and introduce yourself to us please. Absolutely i'm so excited to be here and chat with you. Talk about all things social justice and education. My name is shelby kratz. I am the founder of little justice leaders subscription box that helps educators integrate social justice into their curriculum with kids And i'm also phd candidate at ucla Working on my degree in education And i've spent about a decade now working and various roles in education so i really You know love working with teachers. And i'm excited to talk about social justice education today. Wonderful wonderful so you have a very varied background in education very yes. So what experiences made you believe in social justice and social justice teaching. And what made you want to start your company like what were some of the things the catalyst for that. Yeah absolutely so Around the time of the two thousand sixteen election I was spending a lot of times in schools working on my research. And i had just been working In the school for a few years before that so i was hearing a lot from teachers and parents that they didn't quite know how to talk to other students to their kids about what was going on in the media and the news at that time it was a lot of xenophobia. A lot of racism. Sexism sajjan coming up in the in the news all over the media and you know these parents and teachers were just like. I have no idea how to purchase with you know. Let's say kindergartner. Or a third grader. and so a lot of what i heard was okay so i'm just not going to talk about it at all

Shelby Kratz Ucla Sajjan
Caitlin Clark on Chocolate Flavor Through Fermentation

The Academic Minute

01:48 min | 4 months ago

Caitlin Clark on Chocolate Flavor Through Fermentation

"Are you a chocolate lover. Even true chocoholics might not know what their favorite treat has. In common with. Yogurt cheese and wine it's flavors come from fermentation fermentation is the process of improving food through the controlled activity of microbes. The food you know as chocolate starts its life. As the seeds of football shaped fruit farmers scoop out the seeds and pulp into piles or boxes. The seeds are now called. Ca- cow beans they ferment. For about a week before they're dried roasted and crushed with sugar until smooth and ready to eat. Let's go back to that. Fermentation step ca cow from imitation as a multi stage process. The first stage involves east just like the yeast and your beer. Yeast and a fermentation produces alcohol by digesting the sugary pulp around the beans as the pull breaks down. Oxygen sleeps in an oxygen loving bacteria takeover the bacteria generate acidic acid from the alcohol that the produced acetic acid causes biochemical changes as it soaks into the beans and that has a major impact on flavor finally as the acid slowly evaporates and the sugars are all used up. Spore forming organisms begin to grow cows a wild fermentation from his rely on natural microbes in their environment to create unique local flavors. This phenomenon is known as tear warr makers of gourmet small batch chocolate hand select cacao beans based on their distinctive terroir to produce chocolate with an impressive range of flavor nuances for example one bar maybe reminiscent of raspberries. While another has notes of toffee and raisins yet. In both cases the bars contain nothing except cacao beans and sugar these impressive flavor differences are due almost entirely to the power of microbes

Football
Pharmacy and Audiology

Course and Career Chat

01:00 min | 4 months ago

Pharmacy and Audiology

"Hi aaron welcome to colson career hat. Thank you so much being with us today. my pleasure. Thank you so much for having me. Sorry i always liked to go right back to the start. I have a five year old for a long time. He's wanted to be a football of that him. Get for what he'd like to do when he gets old up but just recently actually he's been talking about creating an app so potentially he's down software engineering powerful something like that. What did you want to be when you were five years old. I going back to that time. When i was five years old. I actually really liked being gotten or being around sort of insects and crazy collies and collecting them off to the are very much of going outside and doing a lot of things outside and just being around natsha. When i was five years old. I really wanted to be some kind of biologist or something related to animal insects and things like that.

Colson Aaron Football
Connie Hamilton on Asking and Getting Students to Ask Great Questions

Overthrowing Education

02:11 min | 4 months ago

Connie Hamilton on Asking and Getting Students to Ask Great Questions

"Welcome connie. I'm so happy to have you here. Thank you. I'm really excited to be here. I'll some well first of all. I wanted just I love the title of your book hacking questions. Can you tell us just a little bit about what it is and so forth on your inspiration for it. Sure of course. So hacking questions is part of the hack learning series. It's book number. Twenty three in the series and so it follows a pattern of looking at a specific problem in this case in regard to questioning and that verb of how we deliver questions and then provides a possible solution and then walks readers through how to implement that solution. What is some pushback so in theory things often sound really great on paper but when you go to put them to use in the classroom sometimes you have those. Yeah but kind of thing. So there's a whole section that addresses that as well and each chapter focuses on a different a different hack or a different problem in regards to questioning so for example. What happens when you pose. A question. Could say i don't know there's a whole chapter that's related to that. So that's a little bit about hacking questions that's awesome. I wanna come back to that dealing with the. I don't know answers a little bit later. 'cause i think that's so important we get that a lot right but but let's just look at the overall picture like why are good questions so important and if you anybody who's followed my work at all no i am like this questions are everything to me. That's why i was so excited to be here with you. Follow questioning geek. You know yes all right. So i know i. I think there's i want to hear what you have to say. Well i think there's kind of two facets of questions and questioning there's the noun of the question itself so we're looking at how what are the semantics. What's the level of the question. What's the intended purpose of the question. So there's all of that in the design of the question

Connie
Interview With Dr Noora Ronkainen of the Developer Tribe

The Developer Tribe

02:04 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Dr Noora Ronkainen of the Developer Tribe

"It's my pleasure to welcome to the pod. Doctor nora wrong. Canaan how are we doing thank you. Yeah thank you so much for the invitation. Like listen to your episodes. And i think it's a really nice show so joining where we go. Yeah absolutely what what what emerges from the conversation that obviously you your your own poll cost while you wanna tell us about that first. Yes oh The physical activity researcher. Podcast has been around for a Two years almost at the moment. I'm doing a sympathetic serious with the title meaningful sport. And so i think we're talking about the related themes today but so i've had like That one has been going on since last summer. And so if people interested in those themes there are some really brilliant people who were In that show as well so If you're interested in what we talk about today that might be like a additional thing at some point checkup. Yeah yeah absolutely. I'll i'll put the links to them. it's a it's a fascinating series On and also fascinating that. You've you've moved so frequently in your research. Career has not been out of necessity or opportunity. Yeah i think academic life. It's it's both lake coming from a small country like finland. It's not that you have like loads of opportunities coming up. There was sports science university in finland. Which is in your buskila and so other than that. They're on like loads of opportunities. If you want to be a researcher in the area sport but on the other hand like i always loved traveling. I was already as a ma student. I spend a year as an exchange student in prague and then like a bit later on with my second loss though. So my i. I studied theology and i- domestic rain butts. Maybe it's worth mentioning. It's a little bit unusual for somebody is researching

Nora Finland Prague
Reshaping Your Career Through Change and Uncertainty With Katie Wedemeyer-Strombel

Papa Phd Podcast

01:47 min | 4 months ago

Reshaping Your Career Through Change and Uncertainty With Katie Wedemeyer-Strombel

"Welcome to partic- katie inky. I'm so glad to be here. I'm really really happy that you here. We talked we've We've had some conversations before this interview and Well before going into the meat of what we're going to talk about Maybe i will just let you introduce yourself. Talk quickly about your your academic journey. You know how why you got attracted to the domain that that you that you studied and then Maybe just a also quickly how. Then you transitioned to the non-academic space. Yeah so i'm i'm originally from southern california small little beach town named called summer land actually and I grew up on the beach. I loved being outside and in the water. Just kind of always fascinated with the ocean Ended up going to uc san diego for my undergraduate degree where i studied A few different things started out. As a pre dental major. Actually i was going to be orthodontist and then decided that that was definitely not for me after quarters of school and ended up switching into a ecology behavior evolution. Because i always love the change. Yeah so i just really liked animals. And i liked the idea of studying something not allowed me to go outside and so i did that. Search majored in. that's when i graduated. I had no idea what i wanted to do though. I didn't really know what a career meant with that kind of a major a lot of direction. I just knew that. I liked science. And i really liked communicating science of love talking to people about what i had learned

Katie Inky Little Beach Southern California San Diego
California Launches Largest Free School Lunch Program in US

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 4 months ago

California Launches Largest Free School Lunch Program in US

"California will launch the largest free school lunch program in the country when classrooms in California re opened for the fall term all six point two million public school students will have the option to eat school meals for free regardless of their family's income it really D. stigmatizes those who are quote on school lunch it really does become the program of kids who are hungry get to eat that's Erin primer the director of food services for the San Luis coastal unified school district she says it worked when schools were closed due to cover nineteen meals will continue to be free out side of the global pandemic which is just incredible and that's great news for all students across the state the cast for the program came from an unexpected budget surplus I'm showing employer

California San Luis Coastal Unified Schoo Erin
Biden Says Teachers Deserve 'a Raise, Not Just Praise'

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 5 months ago

Biden Says Teachers Deserve 'a Raise, Not Just Praise'

"President Joe Biden tells the nation's largest teachers union that the pandemic has taught parents the ultimate education in the challenge of being a teacher in a speech to members of the national education association meeting in Washington president Biden says the difficulties teachers have faced during the pandemic shows they deserve a raise he also sees them as a key to the nation's future I think is the single most important component America's future so don't give up on yourself and I know you won't don't give up in these kids the president adding he remembers the names of every teacher who influenced him and a good teacher could have a lifetime impact on the student both of the nation's major teachers unions endorsed Biden as a presidential candidate and he has kept close ties with them since his election Tim McGuire Washington

President Joe Biden National Education Association Biden Washington America Tim Mcguire Washington
Rachael Clark of Northern Kentucky University on Hope in Poverty

The Academic Minute

01:44 min | 5 months ago

Rachael Clark of Northern Kentucky University on Hope in Poverty

"And twenty thirteen northern kentucky university began a partnership with the west side neighborhood in newport a community across the ohio river from cincinnati and a few miles from our campus. The west side would receive help with parks community gardens public art and even a bicycle maintenance class. That was a way to teach science and math while having fun in k. U. students in turn would have experiential education opportunities early on in. Ku's community engagement team asked. If one of my psychology classes could measure hope in the residents of the west side. We agreed and also measured meaning in life. Hope is important because over the last two decades it has emerged at the moderately strong predictor of wellbeing on the west side. Most families live at or below the poverty line you might reasonably expect residents to have lower hope and meaning in life. They didn't my students surveyed west side residents and for the sake of comparison in k. U. students our findings published earlier. This year showed no major difference between the two groups. Indeed the newport residents generally scored higher for hope and meaning in life especially among newer residents. Who share a vision of what the west side might become as residents take greater ownership of the old neighborhoods future rather than seeing it to absentee landlords because of these surprising findings we decide to explore a results with a focus group with learned. That residents while hopeful. Personally were less optimistic about external forces shaping their neighborhood. They felt for example that municipal services were more readily provided to wealthier residents neighborhood and socio political factors impacted their levels of hope more so than individual factors still that didn't diminish their personal faith in their future or their commitment to a better westside.

Northern Kentucky University Newport Ohio River Cincinnati KU West Side
Puerto Rico to Receive $4B in Federal Education COVID-19 Relief

The Guy Benson Show

00:20 sec | 5 months ago

Puerto Rico to Receive $4B in Federal Education COVID-19 Relief

"Puerto Rico will receive nearly $4 billion in federal education pandemic relief funds that will boost the U. S territories fight against Covid 19. Monday's announcement was made during Cardona's official three day trip to Puerto Rico. Roughly half of the nearly four billion will be released as part of the American Rescue Plan Act. Stay at home orders are back in some

Puerto Rico U. Cardona