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A highlight from Brooke Shields on Learning To Compartmentalize

Skimm'd from The Couch

07:54 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Brooke Shields on Learning To Compartmentalize

"I was going to have to. I'm Carly Zac and I'm Danielle weissberg. Welcome to 9 to 5 ish with the skin. We've run into so many questions over the years and had so many moments where we needed advice and we got it from women who'd been there. And that's what we're bringing you at this show. Each week we're helping you get what you want out of your career by talking to the smartest leaders we know. Because we know your work life is a lot more than 9 to 5. All right, let's get into it. Today, our guest is Brooke Shields. She has been a household name almost since birth from doing her first commercial at 11 months old to a Calvin Klein genes campaign at 14. She achieved notoriety through blockbuster movies in the 1980s, like the Blue Lagoon and endless love. Since then, Brooks becoming a Broadway actress starred in sitcoms and TV dramas, written two books and raised two daughters. And now, she is starring in and producing the upcoming Netflix Christmas movie a castle for Christmas. Brooke, we are so excited to have you. Welcome. Oh, thank you. Thank you for welcoming me. So before we get into the conversation, we like to warm up. We're going to do a lightning round. Quick questions, quick answers. Let's do it. What is a secret hobby or skill that you have? My secret hobby is needlepoint. Oh, that's a really good one. I am needle pointing a backgammon board. Like I have to be on the set doing something like some kind of craft or something. Okay. What is the last show that you binge watched? Oh, I haven't seen it, but I heard I would really like it. Oh, please, Rhonda walk. Okay, my next question, you have starred in many things that are beloved shows and movies of mine. But one of my most favorite roles you've done is when you were on Broadway and you played Rizzo in Greece. Oh my goodness. How old were you? You must have been a baby. I was a child, but I remember vividly. What is your favorite line or song from Greece? There are worse things I could do. Fair. When was the last time you negotiated for yourself? About 20 minutes ago. Where did you negotiate? I negotiated someone's fee for a perspective job. How does taking time to slow down fuel you to move forward? I never slowed down in my life till more recently in the past few years. And the fuel that I get from just doing something healing for myself sometimes that can just be hanging out with a friend or watching movies or doing something where there's where the regular noise is stopped. I find that I reemerge from that even stronger and more powerful. I just it's almost like that time the energy starts and it starts building up. Okay, we're going to move into the meat of our show. You started working when you were you couldn't even walk. You were less than a year old. And then you became famous as a teenager. You've talked a lot publicly about what your family dynamic was and what a unique childhood you had. But what was your support system? How did you basically stay normal? There's a few elements that I think my mother set in motion. She never moved us out of the east coast. We never went and moved to Hollywood and pursued all of that, which is rushing to high school and basically only being educated onset. And I think that even just that element for sure gave me a perspective and a more grounded way of being in the world. And when that's all you know, regular great schools, regular high schools. I think you really do have an understanding that the world you may inhabit at certain times is not real. It's just not your real world. It's kind of crazy. It is something that you can go in and out of to a certain extent. And the other piece is my mom always made sure I had someone my own age around me. So I always had a partner in crime. You know, I never felt like I was the only kid in a sea of adults. And my parents never spoke ill of the other. I mean, they got divorced when I was 5 months old. My father's family is so the opposite of any way that I grew up with my mother or my working life. And I was talking about this today, I've got this movie coming out and it's coming out the day after Thanksgiving. And everybody in my life outside of my family, they're all going to watch it. And I know for a fact that I'm going to get to my family in Florida. And it's not even going to be mentioned. And it's funny because my feelings aren't hurt or anything, but that's how I grew up. My youngest sister grew up with not an inkling of what I did. And it wasn't until she got much older and friends of hers would say things like that's your sister. And it's so interesting that sort of power of that kind of compartmentalizing. And sometimes it's not good, but it really served me. You know, I'm going to go down to be like, no one's going to watch my movie, but it's okay. Well now because they're going to listen to this podcast. No, but it's like, you know, and I never hurt my feelings that actually just helped me understand that, you know, it's not everything. It's not the only thing. And if I sat and said my sister down and said, look, this is really important to me. Please watch it. They would watch it. You know, it's interesting. On this show, Danielle and I were cofounders and we're friends and we talk about how unique it is that ten years in, we're sorely friends and cofounders of a business. We've had people on here that also are cofounders and friends or work with family or work with spouses and just kind of the unique dynamic of bringing work home, home to work into your personal life. You and your mom in particular were infamously just this tight type duo for so much of your career where she was your manager. She was with you for all of your early success. I would love to understand how you dealt with that, both the good part and maybe the parts that you're like, I wouldn't repeat. Your advice to those who think about working with family or working with those kind of closer to them. You know, I think it's always brought no matter how you look at it and boundaries are the most important thing. On the one hand, I think family you can trust more than anybody. Friends, family. On the other hand, if money is involved, that's when it gets tricky. I think full communication has to happen. I was very enmeshed with my mom. I knew nothing other than being in this industry that I was in kind of it happened to both of us and not knowing any other way in hindsight. I think it would have been healthier to have a bit more of a delineation between my professional life and my mom, however the way she protected me in an industry that basically devours its young. You know, I never had a me too moment when all the other young people were, you know, I was she was so avaricious sleep

Carly Zac Danielle Weissberg Greece Brooke Shields Calvin Klein Rizzo Netflix Rhonda Brooke Brooks East Coast Hollywood Florida Danielle
A highlight from 234: Primed to Disbelieve Sexual Accusers - with Deborah Tuerkheimer

RISE Podcast

05:32 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from 234: Primed to Disbelieve Sexual Accusers - with Deborah Tuerkheimer

"Okay, if you are looking for a kick in the pants, if you are looking for an accountability circle, if you are looking to level up your life, you should know about inner circle. Every single month I meet with people from all over the world for two hours of live coaching and Q&A. Topics are anything and everything that is inspiring us this month manifesting, success habits, how to grow your business. Why we self sabotage. How to start a health journey, or how to achieve a really big goal in small bite sized pieces. It's an incredible group who is dedicated to the idea of becoming a better version of themselves, and we would love to have you join us. Here is a little snippet from our latest coaching session. What do you believe? What is the belief that you have about this area of your life? So based on what you believe, determines the potential that you think that you have in any area of your existence. Let's use an example. Let's say you're starting on a health journey because this is the example that I used, your belief about what you are capable of when it comes to health determines the potential that your mind thinks is possible for whether or not you're actually going to pull this off. Based on the potential that you think you have, you will take action. The action that you take is going to give you some kind of result. The results that you get is going to inform the belief that you have in yourself and this cycle just repeats forever. Let's change our way of thinking. Instead of saying, I don't believe that I have that. You're like, but Rachel, I really don't believe that great. You don't believe in yourself. You don't believe that you think that you're qualified to take on this to get rid of your finances to save your relationship. You don't believe that. But what if you did? That's the simplest question I want you to ask right now. I don't care if you actually buy into it. I just want you to ask yourself if I believed if I believed that I was the healthiest, fittest, greatest runner in the world. If I believe that I had the potential to make a $1 million and get my family out of debt, if I believed in myself in this way, what potential would I have? And based on that potential, what action would I take? I mean, y'all, I have times where I'm like, this shot, I am aiming big, right? I am aiming so big in a certain area of my life and it feels impossible and I don't know how I'm gonna get it. I will come back to this over and over and over again. And I'll simply ask myself this question. If I believed in myself, what potential would I think I had? And if I believed that I had that potential, what's the action that I would take? Because what's crazy is that when you actually find the courage to just take this action, the results change instantly. This can destroy your dreams if it's used in a negative way, and it is for most of us. This is the self sabotage loop. This also can change everything. If you use it in a positive way. Today on the show, I am sitting down with Debra, Turkey mer, a former prosecutor, legal expert and leading authority on sexual violence to examine why we are primed to disbelieve allegations of sexual abuse and how we can transform a culture and a legal system structured to dismiss accusers. Look, it's a hard conversation to dig into abuse. And abusers and the people that they hurt. But it's an important conversation to understand why culturally we tend not to believe the people who are getting hurt the most. In this conversation, we look at it from a bunch of different angles and Deborah very graciously allows me to ask a lot of really ignorant questions so that I can better arm myself with information that we should all have. I hope that you will listen in and learn as I did from professor turkheimer as we discuss a really important issue. Hi, I'm Rachel Hollis, and this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week, reading and listening to podcast and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life, and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guess are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast. Deborah, I'd love to start

Turkey Mer Rachel Deborah Rachel Hollis Youtube
A highlight from Matshoshi Matsafu

Revision Path

07:07 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from Matshoshi Matsafu

"Now for this week's interview, I'm talking with matti matsa fu and illustrator and creative who is currently working as a senior UX designer at a Microsoft in the Minneapolis Minnesota. Let's start the show. All right, so tell us who you are and what you do. So my name is macho shiko fellow mazar fu. I am originally from South Africa and I've been based in the U.S. for almost 5 years, 6 months and a couple of days. I am currently working as a senior UX designer for Flipkart, which is a subsidiary of Microsoft. And essentially it is like a video exchange software where it became really popular during this pandemic because it was really useful in the education field. And yeah, I work in tech and I create digital artwork from time to time. And I illustrate, and I into music into a lot of things that just like equal creativity. I guess that would be the sum of me. Yeah. Okay. I was going to ask you about flip grid because I had not heard of it before. So I'm guessing this is a company that Microsoft acquired and you work on the team? Yes. Yes. So it was a quiet, actually not too long ago. And essentially we make a really robust video editing camera and software that's available online, predominantly for students in educators now, but you know, it's expanding. And what I love about it is that I get to work directly with real educators and we'll get into this a little bit later, but I spent some time doing ESL teaching myself and there was always a need for tools to help students that aren't necessarily comfortable speaking out loud in front of a classroom for giving them prompts and creative ways to elicit a response. And this is one of the things that I get to build on a day to day. And that's what really is exciting. Yeah, I could see how something like that would be really useful, especially with so many classrooms sort of over the past two years now, geez. Like adapting because of the pandemic and things like that. But also not just schools. We've done some work in the past with the Smithsonian, and I know that they do, or they tend to have curriculum for schools like summer programs and things like that. And I could see where they could even use something like that because like, especially in terms of curriculum, a lot of schools will look to museums and such. For, you know, field trips and things like that. But when you can't travel to the museum for a field trip that how are you supposed to get that same sort of, I guess, cultural exchange, so I could see how flip grid might be super useful for something like that. It sits in the is. And I'm really glad that you went into that because looking at some of the very surprising use cases that have come about, it's exactly that it's families connecting with each other when being divided because of COVID sending each other video messages on a private secure platform. It's teachers obviously connecting with their students. It's a book clubs and choirs and auditions for plays that are happening on this platform because it's a way to be able to kind of ruminate about what you want to create, but not have so much pressure to have a completely perfect to still be able to express your creativity. So I think that's kind of why I love it. So how has 2021 overall been for you? Oh, I can say there's a definite shift in terms of my feeling of not being tossed into the wild, like 2020 was. I think the acclamation that has happened whether it be from a mental health perspective or from an understanding how I work what works and what doesn't like a lot of people, the introspection helped a lot. And it has definitely been a year of revelation for me as to what's important, you know? How do I want to spend my time? What do I think is worthy of my attention and what relationships do I need to foster and how do I hold myself not so much accountable, but how do I grow in a non pressurized and from a perspective of love standpoint? You're located in Minneapolis, which last year was such a nexus point for so many things happening just in this country around police brutality and protests and things of that nature. How was it being in the city during that time? It was incredibly wild because little bit of history. I grew up on in the dredges, the end or not quite end of apartheid in South Africa. And so when I saw the tanks patrolling the streets, it just drew me right back to memories of growing up in a police state where white people were trying to kill us. And they were holding AK 47s and there were tanks patrolling the areas that we were essentially forced to live in. We call them townships. And if you speak to a lot of South Africans, kind of like if you speak to a lot of indigenous and black people here, there's been a kind of a reclamation of areas that we were sent to die. Essentially, by calling them townships or the hood and not actually calling them what they are, which was essentially a concentration camp. Wow. We are resilient people and all I remember is seeing those riots and understanding what is driving people is not about actually the incident that occurred. That was just the tipping point. This iceberg has been building. And like everywhere else in the world, I was really intimate about the conversations that were being had and the ones that were being avoided. There was so much focus on the masses of people, black and brown bodies showing up and demanding to be heard, but there was very little talk about what would lead to folks to be so desperate and so disenfranchised and so broken to have to break up our own resources. That just doesn't just come from nowhere, you know? And thinking about, you know, looking at, we need to talk about colonization. We need to talk about settlement. We need to talk about the remnants of capitalism. We need to talk about all of these things that show up in these ways. And it's incredible to me that a lot of those things were not being talked about. So it was hard for me because I had a little bit of PTSD, not a little a lot. I was afraid to go outside some days. Because I couldn't reconcile seeing tanks and young kids, younger than me in uniforms holding rifles ready

Matti Matsa Fu Mazar Fu Flipkart Microsoft Minneapolis Covid South Africa Minnesota U.S. Ptsd
A highlight from 232: Handling the Stress of the Holidays

RISE Podcast

03:12 min | Last week

A highlight from 232: Handling the Stress of the Holidays

"About the holidays. Guys, I want to talk about the holidays. In my coaching community, I have this community of mostly women from all over the world who join me once a month I teach on a different topic and I pose the topic to my community. So I say, hey guys, here's three things that are on my heart. What are you interested in learning about? I'm going into my second month of them choosing manifesting to really popular topic here on the podcast and definitely in coaching this month I was like, well, I just taught on it, but I had some more info, so I said, okay, I can do manifesting two. I can do a conversation about how to overcome and rise above holiday stress. Or I can do a conversation about continuing your health journey through this time of year. And overwhelmingly the community picked manifesting because they just love this conversation. I do too. I geek out over it, so I totally understand. But really close second was this. Overcoming, rising above, handling the stress of the holidays, particularly if you're going to be interacting with people, family, Friends, in laws, that can trigger you, that can sort of make the situation not great and honestly, I think that this still ties in really beautifully with the idea of manifesting because you know I'm obsessed with the idea of manifesting the life of your dreams and manifesting a life that feels really good. And I think that there's a way to bring that intentionality into your holiday season. So that's what today's episode is about. And as usual, I have written down all kinds of crazy notes like a serial killer here in my notebook. And I'm just going to go through and kind of share some thoughts for you guys on things that I feel like have really helped me over the years in managing all of it, right? In hosting and traveling during the holidays and having kids and dealing with in laws and going through holidays post divorce and what that looks like. So this is just a bunch of ideas that I think will be helpful that I hope will be helpful to you as you navigate from now through new years. Hi, I'm Rachel Hollis, and this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week, reading and listening to podcast and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life, and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guess are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast. The first thing

Rachel Hollis Youtube
A highlight from ACP337 Should I Build Hours For The Regionals In My Own Airplane?

Aviation Careers Podcast

07:57 min | Last week

A highlight from ACP337 Should I Build Hours For The Regionals In My Own Airplane?

"In scholarships, and we update that monthly. But first, before we begin with our primary question, let's answer a few emails and also a correction that I had from the last podcast that we did. In the last podcast, we talked about the median pay. I said something different, but I wanted to make sure that the medium pay from the regional airlines that I have had experience with is $46,000 a year or $46 per hour. That's the median pay. Something that came up in one of the comments as far as pay for the airlines and pay for the regionals is how about pay for air traffic controllers. And air traffic controllers, their median pay is a 130,000 for 20 and the median pay is a 134 40 for pilots. Not much of a difference there as far as pay is concerned, but there was some discussion as to the difference between those two online, just remember the median half are above and half are below as far as numbers are concerned. That is the median pay. It's the one number that smack dab in the middle. These numbers that I've given you, I usually get from the borough of labor statistics. If you're a labor statistics, you can go to BLS dot com. I'm going to have all those links down the show notes. So you can check those out yourself. But anyway, so I just want to make sure that really you understand what the median pay is and make sure that I got that right. But another thing I want you to know is that it's really important that you don't just do this solely because you want money, do it because you really enjoy actually your career. Anyway, let's move on to some of the questions. The first question says, I'm 58 years old I'd like to know if there are scholarships available for someone like myself who is not able to complete his private pilot certificate several years ago due to an I injury, and now wants to get back into flying. I do fly a cold fire star ultralight, but like to continue my education by getting my sport pile license. I would continue to be a private, however, I don't want to jump through all the hoops and barrels that I would need to go through to renew my medical due to the injury. And I understand that hats off to you for continuing to fly, I think that's absolutely terrific. Yes, their scholarships out there. Most scholarships are primarily for the younger folks. What we've done is in our scholarships guide, we've put in scholarships for adults and try to kind of think outside the box as to different organizations. You might get scholarships from. So yeah, it's going to be a little more difficult, being a little bit older to get scholarships, but more and more people, more and more organizations are realizing that, yeah, it's important to put scholarships out there for people of all ages. That's for sure. Anyway, hopefully that answered that question. Moving on to our next email is this. Hello, I'm from Chile, and I have been listening to your podcast. You have a very good information in its excellent. Well, thank you. I have an inquiry about work in the USA. I have an ATP and FA multi engine plane and I'm a three 20 captain with 2300 hours and 5500 hours of total jet time. Also I'm a helicopter pilot in Chile with over 1500 hours. Chile and the U.S. have an agreement about H one B one visas. Do you have some kind of information about jobs with contracts that allow me to work here in the U.S.? Thank you very much again, and I'm a tentative to your answer. Best regards. Well, great question. Yes, there are airlines out there that'll work with visas. You know, I don't think there's a list out there, but I don't know if I want to commit to putting them on together, but it's not a bad idea. I do have a couple that I do know that work with H one B one visas and I'm not going to name them now because I usually have to go back and ask them, are you still doing this? But a lot of the regionals will do that. So most importantly to ask, will you folks actually work with my H one B one Visa? So yes, there are some out there and I think it's important to just kind of do your research in our resources page. You can see airline pilot central. They have some of those regionals out there that don't mention that. Usually, but I know there's companies like I'll throw a one out silver airlines, silver airways, they've actually worked with people in the past. Don't know if they are right now. I'd have to reconfirm that, obviously, because things do change, but that's one that you could actually look towards. And think about that. But actually, a terrific question. Let's move on to our next question. The next question is from somebody who wants to build hours. Let me go ahead and read his question. Says hello, Carl, I'm a CFI double I currently sitting at about 600 hours short of ATP minimums. Due to my full-time job, I can't teach as much as I want to. The road to ATP is long, but I want to assess one 50, which I've used to get all my ratings and build the majority of my time. My question is what recruiters see it as an issue if I build majority of mother remaining time with a safety flying around in my personal cessna one 50? Or do you think regionals wouldn't pay much attention to this? What would they consider quality time if I chose this route? Thanks. Well, there are a couple of things I'm assuming from your email as far as the airplane is concerned. First of all, you're flying in the system. I'm assuming that it's an instrument airplane and IFR certified so you can actually fly in the system. That's great experience. If you're flying in the system, it doesn't matter whether you're getting paid as an instructor or whether you're out there flying on your own. Flying is flying. So I've had this is interesting. I've had clients in the past that I've actually purchased an aircraft. One in particular purchased a one 72 and built all their time in that one 72 so they could get to the airlines and were able to get an interview with the airlines. Remember this flight time is flight time as flight time. Is some flight time better than others? Yeah, flying in the system helps. So obviously you're flying in a system. Going back to I think another thing you mentioned on the safety piled side of things, you remember there's some really large flight schools out there that I won't name that actually do this as a matter, of course, where they fly all over the country and they have a safety pilot with them. So if you're flying with a safety, any operate say as a crew, pretend like you're in an airliner. Have the other person do checklists, et cetera and be the flying or non flying pilot? No, I think it's terrific. Just be careful about the time that you log when you have a safety pilot. I'm assuming the safety pilot is there trying to log time also. And make sure that you're in a situation where you can both can log the time. So be careful of that. And as far as, you know, if you're flying under the hood, that type of thing. So just be careful what you're doing there as far as logging that time. But absolutely. If you have your own airplane and you're getting flight time, I would say go for it. I think that's absolutely terrific that you're able to do that. And it's a blessing to be able to do that. So yes, they will look at your time. But let's look at this. If you had a twin, a baron say. And you flew around the country and you're barren. I would look at that as great time. You're flying in the system. IFR and a multi engine aircraft. So yes, most definitely the airlines look at that time as good time because what's the difference between you being a flight instructor on a one 50 and you fly in your one 50 around? So again, flight times flight time. I do when I'm looking at someone's logbook, by the way. And I'm looking at the time they've had to ask them, hey, you know, what did you do during this period? You're not a flight instructor, but you got all this time. You know, what kind of flying did you do? And they said, oh, I went out on adventures, flew around the country, gives you great experience. And I actually really like that. I love that type of experience. So yes, absolutely do that. Go out there if you've got the time. You've got the money, go out and use your aircraft. Maybe look outside the box and think about if you can afford it, getting insurance, maybe even teaching in your own plan. That's also another possibility. But I get it. The time is coming slow,

Chile U.S. Silver Airlines Silver Airways Carl IFR
A highlight from Terell Cobb

Revision Path

07:57 min | Last week

A highlight from Terell Cobb

"Brevity and wit creative excellence without the grind. Now for this week's interview I'm talking with Terrell Cobb, a design lead at Microsoft in Dallas, Texas. Let's start the show. All right, so tell us who you are and what you do. So my name is Terrell Cobb. I am a design lead over at Microsoft as part of the digital transformation studios. Digital transformation studio. That sounds super lofty, and I'm sure we're going to get into that. But before we do, how has 2021 bin for you so far? How have things been going? 2021 has been a great ride for me. I believe that last year during the pandemic, it was learning how to be more self sufficient at home and also taking care of the family, all while taking care of myself as well. And I think within 2021, I've gained the appreciation of changing states and moving, and then also starting to center life around just taking care of me and also taking care of the family. So that's been a good ride so far. Nice. Also, you moved to Texas this year then. Yeah, so when Microsoft had the opportunity for flex work, I took advantage of that and got an opportunity to come back to the Dallas area and get to some familiarity and also just enjoy the atmosphere that we're in right now. Sorry to rub that into what was it in northwest folks? I was gonna ask what's changed for you last year, but clearly location's been a big part of that. Yeah, and the sun. Being able to see this one. Nice. So being a design leader Microsoft over the platform that you mention, can you tell me about that? Like, what all does that entail? Right. So the digital transformation studios is a conglomerate of several spaces within Microsoft. One of those faces in which I work in is the business applications group, business applications group are the parts of the business that actually build applications for large enterprise customers. And being able to sit in that part of the arena of Microsoft, it allows me to see how businesses are specifically using supply chain and provide certain intelligent solutions to that supply chain space. What does your team make up look like? Yeah, so my team today is made up of a couple of designers and also a researcher, however, one of the things that we kind of anchored to within Microsoft is being able to go with an a one Microsoft mindset. So I also consider my engineers and PMs as part of my tetrad or my team as well. So have an amazing group of people that I get to build amazing things with on a daily basis. I feel like that's been a fairly new development within companies to have like a researcher on the design team. As it relates to what you're doing, how does that work? I appreciate research so much. I believe I'm one of the biggest advocates for research and also content design. But specifically research, I believe that they're the silver lining of experiences. And if we don't have their heartbeat of what the experience should be, we're building in the wrong direction and that could be expensive over time. I can see how certainly if you feel like you're going in one direction and internally, you might think that's a good thing and then your users are using it and it's something completely different. Responsive to it a receptive to it like you want to and you have to go back to the drawing board. Exactly, exactly. I think just being southern and being from the south, those properties, like it's wrong to run a 100 mph in the wrong way. You would want to go in the right way so that you're not making program mistakes. So yeah, they're essential to a start of the project, they're essential to the midpoint of the project and they're essential to the delivery part of the project. Welcome me through what a typical day looks like for you. So a typical day from be these days are just a bunch of negotiating. It's either negotiating confidence of how much confidence the user is going to be exposed to by the options or things that we're building. It's also the negotiation of time of how much should the team be leveraged against a certain initiative? What are we talking about 6 months from now? What are we planning for a year from now? How do we engage the team itself? And I think recently, really taking a step back away from just design as a delivery as a process to more of enjoying the process of actually designing in the delivery will get there, but actually taking the time to enjoy the process of discovery going into definition, going into actually defining from the research and actually delivering something that's far off. And I'd imagine like in that process, you're also working in sprints and making sure everyone's up to speed in other parts of the company or maybe the other parts of your team because you mentioned engineers as well that you're working with. Indeed, indeed. So it's a healthy balance of speed and quality. And I know not a lot of other designers out there have to deal with most of that, but being at a large enterprise company like Microsoft is just there's nothing new under the sun. And you have to bring in your best footing on what that solution could be next. If that makes any sense. No, that makes a lot of sense. Yeah. Yeah. Now also at Microsoft, you're the cofounder of an employee resource group they're called black designers at Microsoft, which is for black designers at Microsoft. Tell me how that whole thing came about. Yeah, so the amazing story behind that is that I came into Microsoft and previously started other groups like Dallas black UX and also while I was that Capital One, with a couple of folks that kind of cofound the black end design employee resource group there. When I got to Microsoft it was more of, hey, I'm just going to focus on my career and a climb. I'm going to leave the employee recess group to the side. I'm going to just stay focused and do this. First day walking in, I meet another black designer and say, and she basically says to me, cheering Porter, from Houston, it's misses to be that, hey, I've never worked with a black designer before. You are my first black designer that I've ever worked with before. Wow. And that was the inkling of, okay, here we go. We're about to do it again. You're like the Grand Theft Auto meme. You're like, oh, shit, here we go again. Here we go. Here we go. No, so and then was intensified by both of us being on the same team and actually going to orientation. And when we went to orientation, we saw on the screen another black designer that was a part of the studio. We were like, well, wait a second. Where is she? And it's Zoe in and she's been inside of the studio, but pretty much could not find her. And then lo and behold, the next all hands, we meet with each other and we're like, huh. Okay, there has to be more of us. Where are we? I think along with that and just how big the company is, along with some of the understanding of designers being disenfranchised from not even being inside of the world of design from a black designer standpoint, we took that as an opportunity to build something ourselves inside of Microsoft and grow the talent that's internal. But then also attract talent that's

Microsoft Terrell Cobb Dallas Texas Porter Houston ZOE
Marketing Your Self-Published Book With Awards

Self-Publishing with Dale L. Roberts

01:55 min | 2 months ago

Marketing Your Self-Published Book With Awards

"So we're going to start out with number one awards programs now. This applies to some. Not all you probably saying. Hang on a second you just. You told me that. I'm going to do a book award now. The book awards could be my way of marketing. Absolutely believe it or not. There's a lot of book awards out. There that will showcase all of their winners on a site. They will share it across social media. Heck there's even some other marketing and promotional opportunities for instance. I've done a couple book awards where they've given me editorial reviews that could then use and other areas so that part was really kinda cool. You got to dig and sift through some of the awards to figure out what's going to be the best fit or you should get book award pro. I'm just going to go ahead. And just over that. Because i don't even have to think about it. I just leave them in charge of but the nice thing is you can sift through those book awards and see what you're you're gonna get for submitting. What could you get if you win. So moving forward number two remember. I mentioned editorial reviews whether it's going to be a place. You're going to go ahead. Showcase this on amazon author central. You're gonna want to showcase your award. Submissions or nominations. If you will and winnings if you've never done it before all you gotta do is just over. Two author central that's author dot amazon dot com. And you sign in with your katie p log in and such and you go to the specific book that you want to place it on now. Remember if you've got kendall paperback or hardcover you'd have three different listings. You're gonna wanna make sure you put all of your awards status on all three of those iterations it's not available yet for audio book There's other opportunities. We can do an audio book for for the most part if you want it. Put on a specific product page. Those three iterations are the way to go.

Katie P Amazon Kendall
What Is the Value of a College Degree?

the NewsWorthy

01:15 min | 2 months ago

What Is the Value of a College Degree?

"Hi brian. Thanks for coming on the newsworthy fisher. I appreciate it. So i let me just ask. What's your take on the value of a college degree in today's world. Shoot we wanna value in having that college degree but when it comes to employment and job opportunities in some ways it's becoming less valuable because of how competitive the labor market is become as you look up and down the labor market from not just hourly employees retail employees but salaried up and down the continuum what companies are finding is that there's not enough people for all of the jobs that they want to hire for so one. They're relaxing a lot of the historical constraints that they've had on the jobs that they're hiring for and that includes things like previous experience educational certifications and different degrees. That people have had so a lot of companies in particular across the last two or three years have been relaxing many of those constraints. The other thing that's going on is that for people that might have some of those degrees or experiences or whatever it may be. They're also able to ask for more money in the labor market so the other reason why companies are expanding their horizon of who to hire. Is that for people without college degrees. They're able to find that job and they're willing to extend an offer them. But perhaps at a slightly lower compensation level than people who do have a college degree

Fisher Brian
How To Keep Your Job On Vacation With Hubspot's Pamela Bump

MarTech Podcast

02:14 min | 2 months ago

How To Keep Your Job On Vacation With Hubspot's Pamela Bump

"Pamela as marketers. Get a break as well. Some of us wanna take a vacation but you know marketing never stops how marketers keep their job while they're on vacation i think there's two elements to marketing teams keeping their jobs while on vacation. I you look at the marketer the marketer which i'll use myself as an example we've all been through a wild year we've had a lot of pivots. Twenty twenty was so wild and unprecedented. We all wanna break. I wanted a break. Everyone on my team definitely wants a break but we want to take that break without throwing any of our processes off so one of the things that i do is focused on really strong communication. I regularly have one on ones with teammates that i work with most often and at these one on ones i might give them a heads up saying. Hey i'm gonna take some time off at this time. If you're going to take some time off let me know. And then we'll come up with a plan of how we can best prepare each other for this time off so we make initial plans there and then on top of that. I will email my team. And i'll say just a heads up that next week. I will be off from this date to this date. Here is my out of office. Plan for example when i'm running emails. I usually schedule the blogs emails a week or so ahead of time. If i'm going to be out. But i will pick another responsible person. A. dr is what we call them. A designated responsible individual to take over the email of something needs to be changed or content. Isn't gonna go out that we've scheduled so that's one of those things l. Include in my out of office plan of who to reach out to. If something urgent happens. And i will also remind people of when they can reach out to my manager could she can make calls for me usually end. That's just a good way to remind people that i'll be out. Usually nothing urgent will happen in the summer. When i when i have taken time off but it's good to have that information and people know whether something is something they should email me about and i'll return the message as soon as i get back or if it's something needed to reach out to another teammate. About but i usually try to schedule as much in advance as possible and then make a little out of office plan.

Pamela A. Dr
The Theory Of Relativity in Consumer Decisions

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

01:45 min | 2 months ago

The Theory Of Relativity in Consumer Decisions

"All know about uncle. L. e. equals m. c. squared. But that's not the relativity calculation that i'm talking about what i'm talking about is a calculation that we pretty much all make before we make a purchase certainly before we make a non essential purchase and it goes a little something like this. Let's say i'm at the pub. And the price of a state is four dollars more than the price of a boo coincidentally. The price of a beer is also four dollars so now the relativity calculation. I need to make ease. Do i have a stake and one beer or do i have a burger and to bees. Pretty easy decision. Or let's say you booking a flight and the price of an upgrade to business class is two thousand dollars now you could use that two thousand dollars when you get to the other end to have two nights in the suite at a fancy swanky hotel in town so the relativity discussion and calculation. You need to have is. What's the relative value. Is that gonna give me more value at the other end or am i better off spending the two thousand now to sit in a slightly bigger box and maybe have metal cutlery. Instead of plastic utensils on the plane these are the sorts of calculations that you will consume as a making whenever. They're buying something especially when it is non essential so you need to be aware of that when you have both setting your pricing and also sending your marketing you need to make sure that you are conveying the values and the benefits of your product. Because you know damn well that they are making a calculation relativity calculation of what else they could be doing with their money so when you think about the theory of relativity you've got uncle. Albert's theory equals mc squared uncle trance theory. It's all about how many bees you can have with your steak

Albert
The Manager and the Vaccine

Manager Tools

02:08 min | 2 months ago

The Manager and the Vaccine

"Cain that pandemic of cove nineteen has made our lives much more interesting to say. The least interesting is the word we're gonna use for the purposes of this context and the roles of us at work and of us as managers at work have become much harder as we've been saying for years. Remote management is much more challenging then managing in person and most managers. Let's be honest. We're barely keeping up before they moved remote and now this new world the remoteness of it all the complexities. That come with all of this whole situation throws even more at us. Remote management the lack of communication zoom. Burn out with shop. Priorities supply chain disruption travel restrictions budget. Layoffs tension challenges. I mean there's a lot and here we are one more to add to. Our list of stressful items is vaccinations. What is the manager's role in terms of nations. And how do we do our duty and as always we've got the answer for you so we are gonna cover four things today. I private organizations are within their rights to mandate vaccines second managers. First responsibility is to the organization third. The manager must support organizational vaccine roles. Fourth and finally effective managers will communicate frequently with their directs. We start with the fact that a private organization is within their right here. Yup obviously we have suspect or we assume that you know this and in case you don't private organizations at least in the united states are entitled to enforce any reasonable precaution that is in the service of the organization's mission mission and

Cain United States
It's Time to Reconnect With Your Early Year Business Goals

Purposeful Social Selling

01:19 min | 2 months ago

It's Time to Reconnect With Your Early Year Business Goals

"A little bug. I want to put in your ear. want you to be thinking about the last ninety days of this year and i want you to ask yourself when you sat down and wrote out your goals january one this year. Are you where you wanted to be at this point this year and i want you to get honest with yourself of why you think that is and maybe what store you might be telling yourself of why you haven't either gone as far as you thought you would or you haven't hit your goals or may maybe why started to negotiate on your goals. But you know the last ninety days of the year. It's the last quarter of the year and it truly is a really critical time breda dig in create a lot of consistency and create your sustainable business habits now because the work you do now is going to position you for the fruit that you're going to see the first of the year because that's a lot of people you know. They have some christmas money. They're ready to buy of you know if you're in the wellness wellness industry. That's when a lot of people are ready to recommit to their health goals. The new year is a really big time of year for this industry. So i really want to encourage you to be thinking about that now and how you need to be serving and adding value to your audience. Because like i said the work you put it now is going to help. Create the results for the first of the

Breda
Is There A BigBox Retail Opportunity for eCommerce Sellers?

Amazing FBA

02:47 min | 2 months ago

Is There A BigBox Retail Opportunity for eCommerce Sellers?

"The first major question. I've got ask you then is the dumb question. The that is nevertheless anyone is in e commerce and they kind of self identifies an ecommerce seller or whatever. Why even bother with that old school offline brick and mortar world. Isn't it just dying especially under cove. It is even an opportunity anymore. No it's a dining whole. There's a lot of talks about the retail apocalypse. And i've been hearing this for like almost decade but there is no apocalypse and it never happened. And it's not going to happen. Let me explain as of today. The numbers are showing statistics. Not what i think what. I see statistics from everyone. Can google that that your first of all the three hundred twenty thousand physical stores in the states. Which is i mean people. When won't win. They wanna say something big talk about millions but when you talk about not billions three hundred thousand stores. This is like a huge number huge huge number huge potential. That's number one number. Two moving forward be numbers. Amazon is still between ten to eleven percent of the out of the retail marketing. The state's not the online market the whole retail market and wants to know and understand that this data you know that does like another ninety percents that your products are most probably not being exposed to and this ninety percent is built from. I divided too few blocks. It's easier for me to see that way. But brick and mortar is just one block. It's a huge block but it's one block now inside the brecon motor. You have like discounters. You have high end meat and a big boxes. You have different different kinds of companies. If you look at macy's they have more than eight hundred stores. If you look at the small retailer like Vollmar thirty six stores. But if you look at big with tj maxx. They have four thousand stores. Cvs has almost ten thousand stores when talking about you know. They're big companies. These company's needs products to sell now before we go to the products. And so this is one block okay. It's divided inside of your sleep. This is like the retail. What what you call old school and this old school exist. There's still you know teachers and students and everything. It's it's still sending something very good. Whatever you do does no you know. There's no way to change the fact that going on on shopping with friends with wife with the with the kids or whatever it is is like an experience. You know it's like having fun. It's a part of something it's not just going. They're buying it and that's it so a lot of people you know especially in the states they would. They would by amazon nobody. There's no no doubt about it and they would buy on the other like online platforms but the brick and mortar is not going anywhere. It's you know it's something that's gonna last. I think like still for

Vollmar Thirty Amazon Google Macy CVS
How to Achieve Your Greatest Purpose With Serial Entrepreneur Michael Koenigs

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:06 min | 3 months ago

How to Achieve Your Greatest Purpose With Serial Entrepreneur Michael Koenigs

"Let's go through the stages of purpose you broken down into three different stages. What is that all about her right. So think of like this our first stage or what i often call are doing stages imagine when you get paid to do something that you could be flipping burgers working at a gas station or whatever that may happen to be. It's task oriented. Where really you are a meat puppet. You know you're just doing something for the money and also you're trying to just cover your basic needs your maslow's hierarchy of needs in the grand of things and the next level is where you're at your knowing phase and you are maybe getting paid for knowing something's got to be a white collar job But then you go through your next phase in life for your at your being phase and that is where you're paid for who you are not what you know not what you do and i think there's a fourth level to this so this is different than the stages but the force level is being a full human expression. Not just a human being meaning to to express yourself where you're being rewarded for your expressions in life now. What does that mean in terms of the first second and third stages so first stage is the basic needs. The maslow's the second stage is The experiences you're providing in the third stage has to do with true transformation your true purpose in life where you've done the work you know who you are. You know your greatest value. Your unique abilities are what we call your superpowers and you found a way to provide huge transformative value. But here's the big kicker. The highest state is when you help other people find their purpose and you help them. Identify and and In help them achieve and be in that state all the time so that is really usually the final stage of most people's lives is helping people identify find live inside their

Maslow
Leading Effectively Under Pressure

Negotiate Anything

02:06 min | 3 months ago

Leading Effectively Under Pressure

"David, thanks for joining us today. Kwame is an absolute pleasure, my friend. Yeah, it's a pleasure to have you. I've been excited about this since we first spoke. So let's jump into it. How about you tell us a little bit about yourself and what you do? Cool. Well, my name is doctor David arrington. I have over 15 years of leadership development experience. I have 20 plus years actually of leadership experience. I am the COO of errington coaching. I am the author of promotable and most recently I have created leading under pressure, which is a an executive leadership development community. Fantastic. I love it. And so leading under pressure. David white, why do you think it's important for us to understand how to do that? Well, 2020, I could just stop there, right? You know, 2020. But if you notice the leadership landscape has changed fundamentally and indelibly, it's not going back to the way it was. And we have in this one year, these 12 months or so, leaders have been put through a lot of changes. And what I've noticed working with leaders in a number of different industries is that they weren't ready, right? The changes that happened moving from in person to remote handling remote teams still being able to adapt on the fly as other leadership needs changed. There was definitely a gap for a lot of leaders. So right now, we're going to see change continue and it's going to speed up and most leaders again still aren't ready. So what I've done is, I think that this is the time for leaders to learn how to lead under pressure. You can argue that leaders are always leading under pressure. But this is one of those moments that is a standout moment where the pressure is so it's so heavy. The pressure is so great right now that people can actually step back and say yes, I need to step up what I'm doing as a leader.

David Arrington Errington Kwame David White David
What It Means to Understand Your Power

RISE Podcast

02:12 min | 3 months ago

What It Means to Understand Your Power

"To recap last week. I talked about the first step in having resilience. Which is this ability to bounce back from hardship to stand back up and go again. What does it mean to be resilient and to be strong and to keep going last week. I talked about the idea that for me. I think the first step is making peace with what is and the way that we make. Peace is through our mindset and the way that we look at things so that's what last week's episode was about. Go dig in and start there but assuming you've already consumed that one this week. I wanna talk about power. I wanna to talk about your personal power from a few different perspectives. Because resilient really is about string and nobody comes into this world resilient you come into this world completely dependent on other people to keep you alive in fact my friend. Tom and i were just talking about this. And it was in tuesday's episodes if you didn't listen to my interview with tom bill. You go check this out. He talks about this idea that humans are the only animal that come into the world with just zero skills and ability to keep themselves alive. Think about a horse horse comes into the world and twenty minutes later. It's walking we come into the world and we can't do anything and if you're designed in such a way we have to presuppose that there's a reason for that yes. We are much more complex than we can think and we can speak and we can do things that animals can't do and so it's easy to think that it takes longer to evolve and become functioning human beings because we have more things to evolve but you could also look at it another way and ask if there's something more at play than just the facts that your wiring more complex maybe what's at play is the reminder that we always have the ability to grow and evolve.

Tom Bill TOM
Can I Use Another Job Offer in a Raise Negotiation?

Money Rehab with Nicole Lapin

00:56 sec | 3 months ago

Can I Use Another Job Offer in a Raise Negotiation?

"You tell your company got another job offer it could signal to your employer that you're looking elsewhere. Then they could start thinking of you as a short term employees here for a good time but not a long time and looking for the next big opportunity. You don't want your employer to think of you this way you are. Employers are more likely to give you more opportunities at that job if they think of you as a long term investment. That said i do think that a new job offer can be excellent leverage. You just need to approach it delicately but a word of caution. You should factor in the possibility that this conversation may affect your relationship with your employer or be prepared for your employer to call your bluff and tell you go head. Simon take that offer by. Don't let the door hit you on the way out. That's why you should never make up a second offer. If that doesn't exist for everyone else out

Simon
The Importance of Having A Clear Vision Towards Your Goals

The $100 MBA Show

01:33 min | 3 months ago

The Importance of Having A Clear Vision Towards Your Goals

"The end of the day it starts with a clear vision. I didn't make this up. I actually picked up from out of all people. Arnold schwarzenegger arnold schwarzenegger is probably the best example. I can think of when it comes to vision. He says it's very important to have a very clear. Simple vision that you can look at the. You can imagine your head in a second because that's your driving force for him. He had multiple visions so at start. It was becoming mr olympia. Which is the highest title for a bodybuilders. And then he wanted to become an a list actor and then he the fill that vision that he wanted to be the governor of california which is the largest state in the us. And i think the eighth largest Economy by gdp in the world. And i picked this up in his book. Total recall his autobiography And it's really important because there are days that are tough. There are days that are harder than others were. You're required to do things each just don't feel like doing Your might be a little burnt out. You might be a little bit tired and might be dealing with are annoying thing and I often have to go back to the vision and say to myself okay. This is what i'm doing this for. This is why it's worth me going through this slog a little bit because it's one step closer to my vision by doing this. It gets me closer to my vision. And that's how arnold schwarzenegger puts it together like every rep. He did got him. Closer to mr olympia. Every set he did gone closer to that. You know that title.

Arnold Schwarzenegger Mr Olympia California United States
A highlight from 231: Faith and Courage - with Jedidiah Jenkins

RISE Podcast

00:49 sec | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from 231: Faith and Courage - with Jedidiah Jenkins

"So many hours of every single week, reading and listening to podcast and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life, and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guests are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast. First

Youtube Rachel Hollis
A highlight from Shawna Thomas on Making Yourself Stand Out

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:20 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Shawna Thomas on Making Yourself Stand Out

"A fresh take on all things life money and what really matters featuring stories from real people and tips from real pros. We'll explain more in a bit, but first, let's get into the episode. To succeed as a black female in the world that we live in, that I needed to try to be basically the best at what I was going to do. And that I couldn't be scared of anything. I needed to be prepared as much as I could be at all times. I'm Carly Zac and I'm Danielle weissberg. Welcome to 9 to 5 ish with the skin. We've run into so many questions over the years and had so many moments where we needed advice and we got it from women who'd been there. And that's what we're bringing you at this show. Each week we're helping you get what you want out of your career by talking to the smartest leaders we know. Because we know your work life is a lot more than 9 to 5. All right, let's get into it. Hey everyone, it's Danielle. Today, my guest is Shawna Thomas. When Shauna was just 13, she won a college scholarship for promising kids in Houston. From there, she started her career in journalism, working her way from intern to senior producer at NBC. She's won multiple awards throughout her career Emmys, Howard scripts, a Gracie and a Peabody. Now she's the executive producer for CVS mornings, which millions of people watch every day. Shauna, welcome to the show. Thank you for having me. And we worked together at NBC for a brief period of time. I was going to start off by saying that my intro would not be complete without saying that when I first started at NBC News, Shauna was working there. We were in the D.C. bureau and I was in total awe of just watching her work with such confidence. And I still remember one of my biggest fails that I always tell people to do is don't be afraid to email someone. Don't be afraid to ask someone for coffee. Take them out, like, worse thing they can do is say no. And I must have written ten draft emails to send to you. That was one of the times where I was too shy to send an email. So I'm very excited to have you on today. Well, I mean, with what you've created with the skim, there was a period of time where I was like, I really should have gotten a know her. We like to start things off with a lightning round. So quick questions, quick answers. You ready? Sure. First job on your resume. NBC News is the first thing and I do still list that I was in news associates program? It's basically a minority recruiting program for NBC News where they bring in at least the year I got into it. They bring in 5 people from usually my group was grad students or people who had just graduated from grad school to come in and do four different experiences at NBC. So I'd spent three months on The Today Show, three months on the network desk, three months with meet the press, and then three months on the political desk and then the political desk position turned into my real full-time job at NBC News. I always say that the interview for the news associates program was the hardest interview I have ever done, probably up until the interview process for this particular position that I'm in now because I was an almost graduated grad student from USC and they fly you to New York and you go into this room and it has ten executives from like the president of NBC News at that point on down in the room and they all just ask you questions for an hour and I remember it to this day. It was a nerve wracking interview. But if you get through this process, what happens is all those people do remember you. And that kind of helps you along the way too. Do you have any hobbies or skills? I love to sing karaoke. I also am actually trained in musical theater. And so I love to sing. And when I was younger, I played piano and cello. I played in the Houston youth symphony for four years. True or false? Did you go to school with Beyoncé? True. I did go to school with fiance. Any other details you would like to add to that? The truth of the matter is it was performing our high school called the high school for performing in visual arts in Houston, Texas, so sort of like the fame school in New York. I was a theater major Beyoncé was clearly a vocal music major. And I didn't have any glasses with her. I wasn't really friends with her and also another mistake in my life apparently. But I know people who are still friends with her weirdly, but I'm sure she would not remember me. What was the last TV show you binge watch? I binge watched squid game two weekends ago. And let me tell you, actually, not a show one should binge? I very much agree with that assessment. Do you watch the morning show? No, I do not watch the morning show. What's your go to karaoke song? My go to karaoke song almost without fail is something to talk about by Bon grate. That's a good one. Yeah. Who's someone you would want to have at a dinner party living or dead? It's going to sound cliche. Madonna. Oh. Yeah. Huge Madonna fan. Okay, finish this sentence. What best describes your work day, working 9 till blank. If I work day doesn't start.

Nbc News Shauna Carly Zac Danielle Weissberg NBC Shawna Thomas Emmys Beyoncé Danielle Houston CVS Howard D.C. Houston Youth Symphony Grad School High School For Performing In USC New York Texas Madonna
A highlight from 230:  What Makes Us Different, and Alike - with Khalil Gibran Muhammad and Ben Austin

RISE Podcast

01:49 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from 230: What Makes Us Different, and Alike - with Khalil Gibran Muhammad and Ben Austin

"Today I'm sitting down with the hosts of the new podcasts, some of my best Friends are. Khalil gibran Muhammad is a Harvard historian and author of the condemnation of blackness. And in every episode, he sits down with his childhood best friend award winning journalist Ben, Austin. They talk about their interracial friendship, using pop culture and history to explore the absurdities and the intricacies of race and racism. And today on the show, we are talking about a little bit of everything, exploring what it looks like to talk openly and honestly about the hard stuff. And about the good stuff, what makes us different what makes us alike. And what are the things we can learn from each other along the way? This is my conversation with Khalil and Ben. Hi. I'm Rachel Hollis, and this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week, reading and listening to podcast and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life, and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guests are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast. What I've really curious about is how you guys met. All right.

Khalil Gibran Muhammad Rachel Hollis BEN Austin Khalil Youtube
A highlight from Roneka Patterson

Revision Path

05:19 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Roneka Patterson

"I've been an associated corrector creative director, excuse me for a year and a half now. I think it'll be two years in January. And so prior to that, I was just seeing art director. And so a lot of what I was doing was kind of the associate creative director level of things where I'm kind of having to kind of lead presentations and oversight on jobs. It hasn't changed much, but yeah, a lot of it was just kind of getting familiar with the company, getting familiar with the team, kind of establishing a name for myself on the team, and then again, just starting to do that next level of work that, you know, finally, they're like, okay, yeah, you should definitely be doing this job because you should be getting paid for this because that's the job that you've been doing so. Yeah. What's like a typical day for you working at hawkeye? So typical day for me now, a lot of meetings. So whether it's kick-off calls, like we're kicking off new jobs, status calls, just to kind of see what everyone on the team is working with and help kind of a lot resources for the different projects. We do a lot of check ins. Our account is very agile, so they love to meet. They'd much rather over communicate than things get dropped. And so we'll do a lot of check ins with internally with our creative folks like, you know, like this is how the work is coming along. We'll give feedback. We'll do check ins, Capital One has their own robust creative department, so we'll do check ins with them to make sure that the work that we're creating is meets the brand needs and then we'll do check ins with the client, you know, the business managers who've actually requested the work. So a lot of meetings in between there, there's time for brainstorms and occasional sketching, but a lot of it is just kind of making sure that things are moving properly that create a folks have the help they need. So if they're stuck on something or if they need an extra set of eyes on something providing that support, but that's pretty much how my days go nowadays. What's something that you think people underestimate about your role? So when you're at like a seedy level and this may be me making assumption about that level, there's a lot more strictly oversight, it's understood that your job is to lead and to direct with an associate creative director, you're kind of in this in between area where there's an expectation that if we get in a jam, you're going to have to help out designing something or laying out something. And so because of that, even though my workload made, it may look like, oh, well, ronika is only designing on a couple of things. I'm actually overseeing 7 or 8 things. And so I think sometimes there's the assumption that because you don't see me doing the art direction stuff that I'm not doing direction. And so it's one of those things. I'm not, it's not like a what was me type of thing, but it's something that I didn't realize about the role before I got into it was just that there's a lot of oversight takes time to make sure to check in with projects to be able to switch on a dime to remembering like, okay, where are we at with this one? What kind of feedback can I give here that would be helpful presenting to clients, you know, just being able to manage if something goes wrong and, you know, like, how do you talk to that? How do you speak to that in the moment? There's just a lot of that kind of stuff that I think I wasn't cognizant of before. I got into the role. I've heard that from other folks that are kind of in advertising as well. So what you're saying, definitely lines up lines up with that. I want to go more into your background. I know you're at hawkeye, which is located in Dallas. Are you originally from Dallas? So I'm from Austin, which is about three hours south of Dallas. So I didn't go very far. Yeah, most of my family is from the Dallas Fort Worth area and my parents just kind of branched down to Austin. And had me. And so just kind of stuck down there while I grew up and then I ended up back to Fort Worth for school. Did you know early on that you were sort of into design and advertising and all of that? Yeah, so I always loved art. I love to paint, I love to draw, I love to, you know, sculptures, always had a passion for that, just always, I mean, I can think back to grade school and just being super into that kind of stuff. So I didn't necessarily understand how to make a career out of that. In terms of what design was, what advertising art direction all that kind of stuff. But I knew that I was really passionate about that. And so funny, I actually, when I was in middle school, I used to run track. And so pretty good at it. You know, we were city champions. My 8th grade year, which was very highlight for me. And then I got to high school. It's a different ball game with, you know, when you're changing sports in high school. And so there was a lot of practice for running track in high school. And I remember going on with my mom one day and I was like, I don't want to do this anymore. I was like, I want to just focus on my art. And my mom was like, well, whatever you do, just make sure you go a 100%, so she let me get out of track and I really started focusing on art. So I was taking art classes. I got some AP credit and art that I was able to take to college with me.

Dallas Austin Fort Worth
A highlight from 229: Manifesting for Beginners | PART 2

RISE Podcast

01:38 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from 229: Manifesting for Beginners | PART 2

"With another episode of the Rachel hall's podcast. This is part two of my beginner's guide to manifesting. And I promise you all in last week's episode that I would take a deeper dive and that I would give you some more tactical advice for how you can incorporate manifesting into your day. I just want to say if you are listening to this episode and you did not listen to last week's, please pause, go back to last week's episode and listen to part one of the beginner's guide to manifesting. Because I really lay the groundwork for the basis of today's conversation and I think you need that info before we jump in to today. Hi, I'm Rachel Hollis, and this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week, reading and listening to podcast and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life, and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guess are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast. Can we start with

Rachel Hall Rachel Hollis Youtube
A highlight from Emily Ratajkowski on Being Your Own Best Advocate

Skimm'd from The Couch

06:31 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from Emily Ratajkowski on Being Your Own Best Advocate

"Fidelity, a fresh take on all things life money and what really matters featuring stories from real people and tips from real pros. We'll explain more in a bit, but first, let's get into the episode. When you're younger, people say to you, like you're lucky to be even having this opportunity, but that's where people take advantage. And if they are actually somebody who's respectable, they won't have a problem with you doing your due diligence to protect yourself. I'm Carly Zac and I'm Danielle weissberg. Welcome to 9 to 5 ish with the skin. We've run into so many questions over the years and had so many moments where we needed advice and we got it from women who'd been there. And that's what we're bringing you at this show. Each week we're helping you get what you want out of your career by talking to the smartest leaders we know. Because we know your work life is a lot more than 9 to 5. All right, let's get into it. Today, our guest is Emily ratajkowski. She's a model who's been on the cover of Sports Illustrated and walked the runways in Paris and Milan. She's also acted and blockbuster hits, including gone girl. Recently, she's launched her own swimsuit line, which won her awards as a fashion designer and Emily was named on the Forbes 30 under 30 list. And last fall, she published an essay that went viral in the cut, which zoomed in on objectification and abuse of power. She's now about to release her book. My body, Emily, welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me. We are going to jump in the way we like to jump at all conversations with a warmup and a quick lightning round to get to know you better. Quick answers, are you ready? Yes, let's do it. Okay, first job on your resume. Model. What is your most recent job? Writer. Any secret hobbies or skills? I'm not terrible at interior design. I'm sitting in my living room and I'm like, you know what? It looks good. It looks terrible. I'm really good at it. So I love this is totally more of a hobby floral arrangement. I also got really into that during quarantine. Really? What's the last show you binge watch? Oh God. I guess white lotus I binge watch. That's just the one that's coming to mind, but I feel like there was probably another one that was more terrible. Finish the sentence. What best describes your work day, working 9 till blank, working 9 till 9. I feel like my work kind of never stops, which is good because it's like can be on the go. So it means, you know, I'm not sitting at a desk and clocking in and out. But also it kind of means that finding true time where I'm not working is very rare. When was the last time you negotiated for yourself? I'm negotiating an hour ago. What were you negotiating? Some outlet leaked something that they weren't supposed to, and I'm trying to decide if I'm going to still talk to them or what I'm going to try to negotiate out of their mistake. To be clear, it was not the scam. It was not the skin. Thank you. No. On a bad day, what is your go to snack? What's the food that will make you happy? I love a massaman curry. When did you feel like you made it? I don't think I have ever felt that way maybe. For better and for worse. And probably our most important question of the show, what is your go to karaoke song? Okay, so it used to be doo wop that thing or in film. Which is so hard. Yeah, that's a challenge. Also the wrap. I appreciated that you put it in your book as something that was ambitious. It was a hard song. Yeah. Yeah, it's very ambitious. Okay, so let's talk about your new book, my body. It's a collection of self reflective essays. What made you want to talk about the experiences that you go into the book at this moment in your life and your career, why now? So it started out as a real personal project for me more than anything. I just, you know, was processing a lot of ideas and thoughts I had less around personal experience, but more about my political beliefs and things I believed in general about our culture and our world, or my experience as a woman. And how it had led me to these kind of systems of belief. And through that I ended up revisiting a lot of specific experiences. But I certainly I didn't sit down at any point but think I'm going to write about this thing that happened or whatever. And actually, a lot of the things that are in the book were things that I had never talked about before, or moments that I had forgotten until I was writing and thinking about these ideas and really asking myself, why do you feel that way? Or what are the experiences that have led you to think in the ways that I do? Why did you choose essays? I love essays. I've always liked reading them. I feel like in our day and age, short attention span wise, it's a really nice way to pick something up and put it down and feel like there's an idea. I also just like the liberty that you can have with an essay where you can really make big kind of stylistic choices and we four different narratives together or just kind of try something totally out there. And I don't really like reading memoirs. It's interesting because when I was reading it, you actually hit on what I didn't really put together, but that I'm used to reading memoirs or novels that are going on. And when I was reading the essays, I was like, oh, like, bam, bam, bam, and it was feeding into what I do all day, which is look at things in vignettes and pieces and moments in time. But I think it does speak to the moment that you're writing all of this in and piecing it together. Yeah, I'm happy to hear that because I'm not a musician, but I love a really good album where you're like, and then that song comes on and it's just like, what you need after the last one. So I think of books that way. And you know, it's harder to do that with a memoir. I think just nonfiction in general can be kind of constrictive

Carly Zac Danielle Weissberg Emily Ratajkowski Emily Milan Paris
A highlight from 228: Being Open without Expectations - with Danielle MacDonald

RISE Podcast

00:47 sec | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from 228: Being Open without Expectations - with Danielle MacDonald

"Many hours of every single week reading and listening to podcast and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life, and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guests are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast.

Youtube Rachel Hollis
A highlight from Taken for Granted: Esther Duflo wants you to think like a plumber

WorkLife with Adam Grant

02:44 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from Taken for Granted: Esther Duflo wants you to think like a plumber

"For sponsoring this episode. Hey work lifers, it's Adam grant. Welcome back to taking for granted. My podcast with the Ted audio collective. I'm an organizational psychologist, and this series is about rethinking assumptions we often take for granted about how we work, lead and live. Today's guest is Esther duflo. The MIT economist who won a Nobel Prize in 2019, along with two of her peers Michael Kramer and Apigee fatigue, her husband. Esther was tenured in her 20s and has done groundbreaking experiments to fight poverty in the developing world. She's the cofounder and co director of Jay Powell, a poverty action lab. She's a prolific writer and widely cited scholar, and she served on the global development council at The White House. Her work challenges conventional wisdom about what motivates people, how to break glass ceilings, and what it takes to solve big problems. Fantastic, Esther, it's great to meet you virtually. Nice to meet you. How did you end up becoming so passionate about studying the developing world? So I think it started relatively early. I grew up in a very sheltered intellectual middle class life with my mother being a doctor, my father being a professor. But the one sort of wrinkled to that or a slight difference to that is my mother was and still is very active in organizations of doctors dealing with kids, victims of war, and therefore she spent quite a bit of time in various countries starting with the Moroccan Zara and then in El Salvador and in places that were dealing with various kind of crisis usually man-made. And when she came back from the trips she always organized a little slide show from us. We had this slide shows that looked like actual little squares. If you remember those probably not. And of course I do. And we would watch them and she would explain to us what was happening and we would and then she would also said this is your contribution to this kid that have a life that is so much less good than yours. And frankly, I thought this was pretty minimal as a contribution. And from then on, I kept sort of comparing my life to the life of the kids that I saw in this picture and thinking that it gave me a sort of responsibility to do something about it, went to something was very ill formed and unclear until much later. So what happened that led you to get excited about economics as a tool for tackling poverty? Because it's not the first place that I would have looked.

Adam Grant Esther Duflo Michael Kramer Jay Powell Global Development Council Esther Nobel Prize MIT White House El Salvador
A highlight from Gabe Gault

Revision Path

07:53 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from Gabe Gault

"Now for this week's interview, I'm talking with Gabe galt and artist and muralist in Los Angeles, California. Let's start the show. All right, so tell us who you are and what you do. Hi, my name's Gabe Gaul, and I'm an artist from Los Angeles, California. So gay, what's on your mind? How's the year been going for you so far? Oh man, it's been a amazing year. It's kind of been ups and downs, obviously COVID has happened and is here still. But on the bright side of things, I've been working on a pretty big project myself, that's been kind of keeping my morale up, where there's been other pretty cool projects going on. Nice. What is kind of a typical day like for you? Like as an artist in LA. Okay, so I wake up, I make sure I kind of get a good start in the morning if I'm heading to the studio. So I'll wake up, I'll make some breakfast. I'm trying to go on a smoothie kind of diet right now because I'm getting married in about three weeks or so. Oh, are we? Congratulations. So this by the time this comes out, you'll be a married man. I will be a married man. That's gonna be that's a new life journey for me. Yeah, so it's pretty simple I feel like my mornings. I usually get to the studio when it feels right, but it's usually around 11 a.m. I don't have everything kind of prepped out and ready to go. I'll get there. And I'll just, you know, have a jam session for the rest of the day until I feel like it's time to leave really. But it's kind of all flow for me. So you kind of just get in the zone once you get to your studio and then to see where the day takes you pretty much. No, definitely. And besides that, I'm usually running errands about my manager, he lives on the west side of town. So sometimes we'll you know drop off paintings or go to meetings and stuff. I try to keep it pretty relaxed. I don't want to stress over my work anymore. That's kind of been a big thing coming up as an artist is, you know, there's a lot of stress sometimes only if you let it. But I feel like every day is a pretty good day because I get to wake up and do this. Yeah. Now we talk about this a little bit before we started recording, but you're one of like several black artists that I discovered via TikTok. Dude, and say, absolutely. Still blows my mind. It's like when anybody tells me they found me through TikTok. I'm just like, I would have imagined this. A year ago. How does social media help out with what you do? Social media is a powerful tool for the better or for worse. And TikTok specifically is one of those things that really twisted my mind because it changed the way I thought about social media. I was on Instagram for a number of years. It took me a certain amount to get certain amount of followers, not that that's like end all be all, but you know, that's what I was kind of working up on there and getting decent views on my work. And then I went to TikTok and I think like in the course of a couple months, it's like I'm almost about to surpass my other social media platforms and all the hard work I put into those kind of seed irrelevant how compared to TikTok. So it's a great tool because you get to interact with people and you get to talk to people in a way, just couldn't really do in real life. You get to show people a little bit of your life. Or whatever you want to show them really. It doesn't have to be your real life, I guess, as most of you would know. Yeah, it's an amazing, powerful tool, but it is at the end of the day, just the tool you can use to better yourself. Yeah, I mean the interesting thing about TikTok and I've been on there now for I don't know, maybe a few weeks now, just kind of casually observing is one it really has the spirit to me of like the old web. I've been around on the Internet for a long time and I remember the early web and how really just sort of wide open it was, like, you really could just go down these deep rabbit holes of information and find all kinds of weird things. And I think what's interesting with TikTok that platforms, like, say, maybe Instagram or Twitter don't do is how they take like your one piece of content that you make and it almost like splinters it out into these different ways that people can discover you. So like, of course, say you do a video, right? So there's the video that people can see if you come up on your for you page. But the video also has audio and the audio can be your own audio or it can be like prerecorded audio that you select from their database or whatever. And then as you type up, you know, the description on the video. You can have hashtags. All of that stuff is also its own search portal in a way. So people searching for that sound can now come across your video or people searching for that hashtag now come across our video. And so you get people discovering your work and all these kind of weird and interesting ways that maybe they wouldn't before on another platform because it's only funneled into one mode of discovery. Yeah, and I feel like it's just so, so different from everybody else's like, you can have a completely different TikTok from the person sitting right next to you, just like in the algorithm and what videos you see like, I'll be sitting next to my fiance and she'll be like, oh, how have you never seen this video? And it's like her videos are all pumpkin spice lattes. Which is like astrology and like I'm on the completely other side with people dabbing and doing art and doing murals and like everything just completely different. Mine's like video games and it's just crazy how big it really makes you see how big the Internet is and just only on TikTok, but it's saying space and platform. Yeah, and the creativity is just it's out of this world. I mean, of course, like, the tool itself has all these different kind of features that you can edit video and change the duration and the speed and all that sort of stuff. But just like the trend that I've been seeing recently that is really dope is I don't know if you've seen this, but it's funny because by the time this comes out, it may have already passed, but there's this trend out of like, you know, remember like fighting games, like tekken? There's like the you lose screen where the opponent talk smack. And so you've got all these different people doing these different versions of what that looks like, but like to the same sound. So if you search that sound, there's like hundreds of videos of people like you're the vaguely weird character with the random move set or oh yeah. You know, you're the sleepy character with all the power. It's crazy. It's so wide. I love those so much. I'll be on there for hours on a and it's just unhealthy. But at the same time it gives me so much joy, so I think it's healthy. But yeah, it's a crazy platform like I feel like I did a video that did, I think the glass city river wall video I did of my Ohio project. They did like 1.3 million views, but I remember shooting it. And I was like, oh, you know, I'll just take a picture of this, like, just like some random clips and put it together and that was like the biggest view count I had on that page. But it's just crazy like you never know what's gonna hit or what's not gonna hit. I feel like you kinda have. You put together just something random and somebody's gonna appreciate it. You know, it's just like putting that stuff out there. Yeah. Now you mentioned this mural the glass city river wall project. Talk to me about what it is and

Gabe Galt Gabe Gaul Los Angeles California Instagram LA Twitter Ohio
A highlight from 227: Manifesting For Beginners

RISE Podcast

08:17 min | Last month

A highlight from 227: Manifesting For Beginners

"The beginners guide to manifesting. Law of attraction manifesting, we're digging into it today. Because this month in my last 90 days challenge, I pick a new theme every month and the theme for November is manifesting. Now, if you do not know about last 90 days challenge, oh my gosh, I'm so glad you're here. It is a totally free challenge. I will put the link in the show notes below, but it's just this commitment within our community. It's totally free to join in. But the idea is that we live out the last 90 days of the year as intentionally as we tend to start the first 30 of a new year. So you know in January everybody gets really fired up to change your life and make all these goals happen and I think there's something really powerful about not crashing and burning into the end of the year, but actually saying, what does it look like if I'm intentional with this time? And I sort of use it as an on ramp so that I can start January 1st on fire. So we are in our second month, but the beauty of our community is that none of us are perfect. We're all just people all over the world who are focused on becoming a better version of ourselves. So you are welcome to join us at any point. It's a 90 day challenge. But if you do it for 60 days or 22 days or 5 freaking days, we are happy to have you. And you can jump in. Like I said, totally free, and then we have an elevated experience inside the rise app. So you get, you know, weekly lessons for me and weekly meditations and all sorts of fun stuff. So all the details are below, but I just wanted to explain why I'm talking about manifesting and why it's something that feels really important to me. Hi, I'm Rachel Hollis, and this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week, reading and listening to podcast and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life, and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guess are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast. You know, it's interesting I had a team meeting, we do a team meeting every Tuesday and I was sitting around with my team who's so amazing and we were talking about this month. And we're going into the second month of our challenge and we made a commitment as a team when we started the last 90 days. This is our 5th year doing this challenge. And I asked the team back in September, I guess. What we wanted our goals to be when it came to this challenge. What was our intention? And there are years in the past where our intention was to get a certain number of people to sign up or convert people into buying a journal or doing something, some sort of business thing because the challenge has always been free. And so we always had some kind of goal that we were aiming for because you got to have a goal. And this year, beautifully, just to a person everybody said some version of, I just really want to make something I'm proud of. I really want to make content that I'm proud of and I want us to get to the other side of this challenge and have every single one of us feel proud of what we made and how we served our community. And number one is freaking awesome to be in a group of people with hearts like that. And with artistry like that because every single person sitting around the table is a creative. But also it's the intentionality that we bring to our work. And if you're in last 90 days with us, I freaking hope you felt it. I hope you have felt it in the emails. I have written every single one in the beautiful design that Darren has pulled together in the podcast that we've been doing interviews along our theme as well as solo episodes like this one. And the reason I bring that up for you today is because in a lot of ways, manifesting and law of attraction is about intention. It is about are you being intentional with the kind of person you want to be with the life that you want to live with what you want to create? And I thought of it today in our meeting because I was sitting with a team I said, okay guys, the theme is manifesting. Let's all brainstorm, like, how do we make this month even better than last? How do we show up better, bigger? How do we inspire the community and get them fired up and the sort of response from more than one person was like, you know, you've been talking about manifesting a lot, but I feel like you're speaking at a very high level, and we still kind of don't get it. And isn't that always the way that when we're teaching something that we know really well? We think we're explaining it to people. We're like, okay, we know this at level ten. So I'm gonna bring it back down to level 7 so that you could understand it too. And I think it was Donald Miller who has the best podcast if you've never listened to it. I think Don is the one who said that you actually have to explain things to people at like level three. You have to be so specific and so granular when you're trying to explain a concept to someone that's new. And it was a good reminder for me that here I am thinking like, oh, I'm teaching all of this stuff, but my team is like, but how do you do it? Literally, Nicole on my team said, you know, I really want to get into manifesting more. I want to manifest. I don't manifest at all, and I really want to manifest more. And I was like, oh, shoot. Shoot. You've missed the most basic principle for Nicole for the rest of the team for all of you listening or watching on YouTube. You are always manifesting. In this podcast, the beginner's guide to manifesting the first thing that you need to understand right now, you are always manifesting. You can't actually control whether or not you are manifesting. The question is, are you manifesting with intention? Are you creating the life of your dreams or are you creating a life that you don't want, but you're not aware that you're the one who is putting that who is creating that who's calling that to you? You are always manifesting the question is whether or not are you doing it consciously? So that's what we're going to talk about today. And as always, got my handy dandy journal and I've written 10,000 notes, which I probably won't even get to because there's too many, but I'm going to do my very best to tell you everything that I could think of on the most simple levels of just where do you start? Where do you start? So let's let me better explain the idea of the law of attraction or manifesting. The law of attraction says that you can attract anything that you want to your life. And I know that this sounds cheesy, but I'm gonna keep telling people this. If you want like the most basic overview, set to some pretty ridiculous B roll and some sometimes not all the time, but sometimes sketchy speakers. The old school classic, the secret is a great place to start.

Rachel Hollis Youtube Darren Donald Miller Nicole DON
A highlight from Huma Abedin on Defining Your Own Legacy

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:20 min | Last month

A highlight from Huma Abedin on Defining Your Own Legacy

"I was so scared of putting my voice out in the world. And before I would go to events, the 2016 campaign, I would be nauseous. I could barely function. I had two choices. Walk away, stay in my shell or do the thing that scared me the most. I'm Carly Zac and I'm Danielle weissberg. Welcome to 9 to 5 ish with the skin. We've run into so many questions over the years and had so many moments where we needed advice and we got it from women who'd been there. And that's what we're bringing you at this show. Each week we're helping you get what you want out of your career by talking to the smartest leaders we know. Because we know your work life is a lot more than 9 to 5. All right, let's get into it. Hey everyone, it's Danielle. Today, our guest is Houma Aberdeen. She started as an intern at The White House when Hillary Clinton was First Lady and has stayed close to Hillary ever since. She was an aide and personal adviser, deputy chief of staff at the State Department and a crucial figure in Hillary's 2016 presidential campaign. Whom I is also known for her personal life, including her previous marriage to former congressman, Anthony Weiner, and huma is now telling her own story in her own words. Her memoir, both and a life in many worlds is out on November 2nd. Puma, thank you for joining me. Danielle, as I think you know, I'm a huge fan of both you and Carly. So I'm thrilled and honored to be on your show. This had to be like a tough book to write for a lot of reasons. And just as someone who has seen you in various roles at various points, congratulations for getting it out there. So I want to tell you actually this book was great therapy. I mean, there were definitely moments that I was wandering around the sidewalk outside my building saying, what did I do? Why am I doing this? But everything I went through, it took processing. So I'm so excited to be sharing this book with the world. Okay, lightning round. Quick questions, quick answers. Here we go. First job on your resume. Working in my dad's office, office assistant. Most recent job on your resume. I haven't had to do a resume in 25 years. So chief of staff, Hillary Clinton. I think actually author is the most recent. You know what? I'm switching it. I'm updating my resume right after we hang up author. I love it. Yes. I'm gonna brag for you. How many languages do you speak? I speak three, one fluently to not so fluently, Arabic and or do. What best describes your work day, working 9 till blank, working 9 till ten, 12 hour days. I would say still. Are you an inbox zero person? Oh, God, no. I wish I was. I can't be. My mind doesn't work like that. What is the last trip abroad that you took? I went home to Saudi Arabia in July to pack up my family home after 42 years. Wow. It was really hard. Really hard. But also really amazing. Last TV show you binge watch. I just finished manifest the last season, which is excellent. I gave up after the first 5 episodes. I really wanted it to be like a new lost, but it did not get there for me. See, I never got into lost. I was working too much with the thing to watch, but I really got into manifest. I don't know what it was. It was the divine versus the earth. I don't know. I mean, it had a lot of things going on. What is something there's a lot that you can Google about you? But what's something that someone can't Google about you? I am a really, really big eater. If I have an addiction or a proclivity, it's like, dude, I love food. That's your vice. That's a 100%. That's the word I was looking for actually. Yeah. That was my next question. I mean look, I had my first big day interviews today, Ryan. I wanted to feel good and you don't want to aid for dinner last night. What? Three slices of pizza.

Carly Zac Danielle Weissberg Houma Aberdeen Anthony Weiner Danielle Hillary Hillary Clinton Huma State Department Puma Carly White House Saudi Arabia Google Ryan
A highlight from 226: Tricked Into the Life of Your Dreams - with Yvonne Orji

RISE Podcast

01:58 min | Last month

A highlight from 226: Tricked Into the Life of Your Dreams - with Yvonne Orji

"I was not expecting to laugh for an hour. But that is exactly what happened when I interviewed my next guest. Yvonne orgy and I have been social media Friends for a couple of years now. And we've traded a million text messages and a million DMs. And I've definitely laughed getting to know her on the phone, but getting a Zoom call with her was something else entirely. You probably know Ivan from the hit HBO series insecure, a favorite of me and my girlfriends or from her stand up special on HBO as well. But you are about to fall in love. She's written a new book and just based on this conversation, I'm positive y'all are gonna buy it immediately. We talked about love and religion and what it was like for her to grow up in a Nigerian family and to come to America when she was a little girl. And how she's built a wildly successful career by following her intuition and walking in faith. This is my conversation with a von orgy. Hi, I'm Rachel Hollis, and this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week, reading and listening to podcast and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life, and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guess are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast. We used to walk listeners

Yvonne Orgy HBO Rachel Hollis Ivan America Youtube
A highlight from Taken for Granted: Indra Nooyi Says Its Time for Leaders to Care

WorkLife with Adam Grant

01:06 min | Last month

A highlight from Taken for Granted: Indra Nooyi Says Its Time for Leaders to Care

"I want to tell you about a new podcast from Ted. It's called am I normal with Mona chalabi? Mona's a star data journalist, and in every episode, she investigates a new question like how many close friendships do you need? And can you actually trust your dentist? But since studies and spreadsheets don't tell the whole story, she's talking to experts, strangers, even her mom, to fill in the gaps. Ultimately, it's a show that asks does normal even exist? Follow am I normal with Mona chalabi wherever you're listening? Thanks to the Hartford for sponsoring this episode. Hey work lifers. It's Adam grant. This is taken for granted. My podcast with the Ted audio collected. I'm an organizational psychologist and this series is about rethinking assumptions that we often take for granted about how we work and lead and live. This is my second conversation with CEO extraordinaire, Indra nooyi, who let a remarkable transformation of PepsiCo. You recently sat down on stage for a live conversation in the authors at Wharton series that I host. Along with dispensing her trademark

Mona Chalabi Adam Grant Mona TED Hartford Indra Nooyi Pepsico Wharton
A highlight from Terresa Moses

Revision Path

04:43 min | Last month

A highlight from Terresa Moses

"Let's start the show all right. So tell us who you are and what you do. My name is moses as by tirupati her pronouns and i am a designer educator and an organizer. I'm an assistant professor graphic design at the university of minnesota as well as the director of design justice for the college of design. And then. I own a studio called blackbird revolt in which i work on a lot of credit projects for justice oriented you know anti-racist projects and my also am heavily involved in community work. So wow so like with with all of that going on. I have to imagine you've had probably quite a year so far like how things been going. I would say the most interesting thing is starting my position at the twin cities campus. 'cause i was at the duluth campus Teaching and so starting last year in the middle of pandemic moving and all that has been a little weird. And it's like you meet your colleagues online and then they see you in person. They have masks on and they all know each other. And i don't know them but they know who i am because i'm the only black person so they like come up and talk to me and i'm just like You know and not really knowing who they are so that's like the really interesting prize. I kinda get nervous around they. It's like some social anxiety stuff. But so that's been a really interesting part. But i would say the year overall has been okay considering the world in which we live in. I think there was definitely a lot of. I guess turmoil in the city. You know we're in many. I'm in minneapolis here. So dante right is another black man. Shot by the cops in brooklyn center and so around. April april may june. We were just out there doing what we could To protests that injustice. It's been eventful and that's like to say that lease ended on top of that working on my phd. Right now so i yeah. I didn't consider that. Yeah you're in minneapolis. That's really kind of the epicenter. Certainly everything that has went on. Regarding george floyd and the protests and everything like that like. How's the city now like as we're we're recording this right now. Kind of at the beginning of october twenty twenty one. Like how's the city. Now i wanna say like the city is the same you know. There's definitely not the heightened presence of like national guard and police everywhere however. The city is still hurting. And you know. We still haven't got the demand for justice that we wanted with. floyd and so i mean i would say the city is still were waiting for justice. I think we're just kind of there. And then like i think. Also one of the things i think about is kind of the performance ally ship that showed up last year and Out so much different now like they are just you know i own my studio and it was like everybody has to do business with black people now and it was like i had just started to exist or something last year and now you know it's kind of dying back off again and so you can. You can feel the fickleness of especially folks that have the power in the city. Yeah that's a common thing with a lot of people that i've had on the show within the past year is like like you mentioned that performed ally ship is real strong and then it sort of just died off in some ways it's died off gradually and in some it's been like a pretty abrupt shift away from it. One thing that i thought was interesting. And i talked about this in my interview with joseph courier who runs the black school. We were talking about how you think it was last year and maybe probably years before that everything was like black lives matter black lives matter and how now. It's just short to like beal him. Yeah i mean. I feel like that is like an absolute mirror of society. You know like people. It's like when people are talking about black people but they say poc and it's like no let let actually be specific about what we mean here. And i think it just allows wide denial to continue to exist. If we don't have to actually say black and we don't have to say lives reconcile with the fact that like black people are dying. So yeah i mean even the almost meteoric kind of rise of by talk as an acronym. I swear that came out of nowhere you for a long time and then last year everything was like bypassed by park like what are you go from.

Design Justice For The College Duluth Campus Teaching George Floyd Minneapolis University Of Minnesota Dante Brooklyn Joseph Courier Floyd Beal
A highlight from 225: The Victims of True Crime

RISE Podcast

01:44 min | Last month

A highlight from 225: The Victims of True Crime

"It's Halloween week, so I'm bringing you a little bit of a spooky kind of creepy topic. Today I'm sitting down with Hallie Rubin hold. She's a British historian whose previous work has been adapted into the TV series harlots and whose most recent book reexamines the victims of Jack the Ripper. To ask the question, does our society and be immensely popular true crime genre value the murderer more than the victim? To really fascinating conversation about the way bad women are seen throughout history and what we typically do with them inside of media. I hope you enjoy this slightly creepy conversation, but one that's interesting and necessary, nonetheless. Hi, I'm Rachel Hollis, and this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week reading and listening to podcast and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life, and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guests are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast. Let's start by

Hallie Rubin Rachel Hollis Jack The Ripper Youtube
A highlight from Alexa von Tobel On Personal Finance And Venture Funding

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:47 min | Last month

A highlight from Alexa von Tobel On Personal Finance And Venture Funding

"When the world's egg, you have to sag when the world runs one way, run the other way. Go find the place that no one else is looking. I didn't need other people to say, hey, great idea. I bet everyone at that time told me I was a complete idiot. And I had to trust my instincts and learn to be okay with being alone. I'm Carly Aiken, and I'm Danielle weisberg. Welcome to 9 to 5 ish with the skin. We've run into so many questions over the years and had so many moments where we needed advice and we got it from women who'd been there. And that's what we're bringing you with this show. Each week we're helping you get what you want out of your career by talking to the smartest leaders we know. Because we know your work life is a lot more than 9 to 5. All right, let's get into it. Hey everyone, it's Danielle. Today, our guest is Alexa, von tol. In 2008, she dropped out of Harvard Business school to start her first company, learn best, a set of tools to help millennials navigate personal finance. In 2015, Northwestern Mutual acquired learn best for $375 million. Alex has been pretty busy since then. She has three children, two books, and as of 2019, another company inspired capital. And this year, she and her cofounder penny pritzker raised $281 million for their second funding round. Alexa was on this show back in 2018 before inspired capital. So we're very excited to have her back. Alexa is a longtime adviser to the skin as well. So we're really excited for this conversation. Let's get into it. First of all, hi Daniel. I'm so happy to be here. It's so fun. I feel like we may as well be sitting by a fire to have this chat. I'm pretty happy about it. I am too. Okay, so let's start with a warmup. We're going to do lightning round, quick questions, quick answers. First job on your resume. I worked at my parents office when I was 13 years old. Ten, 11, 12, 13, 14 every summer. And I loved it. I was literally back office of a medical practice. Most recent job on your resume. Inspired capital managing partner. Do you have any hobbies or special skills? I love that I'm like, do I have any skills? I'm also like, I don't know how you would have time for a hobby. I have this joke, which is that I literally my hobby is building companies and it just became my job. And so I always joke, I have no hobbies because it's just what I do full time. Honestly, I would build anything all day long. I love building. It took me till I was mid 30s to realize, I would literally start companies help people build them all day long for free. It's my favorite thing to do. And I particularly like the really hard parts when it's not going well and it's breaking and things are hard. How many more meetings or events are on your calendar today? 19 more. Oh my God. When and where was your last vacation? I just took one. My husband and I went by ourselves for three days to saint Bart. And honestly, didn't know what to do with ourselves. That's amazing. Last TV show you binge watch. Oh my God, so the morning show and the undoing both. Finish this sentence for me. What best describes your work day, working 9 till his third end of the day. Yeah. I would also say your days start pretty early. Pre COVID, at least, I feel like I was summoned at like 7 a.m. before at the time two kids got up. mean, I'm just up sometimes four or 5. And so I just go with it. And then I don't really know how to stop until 11. Okay, how do you relax? So you probably would assume I don't know how to relax. Yeah. I actually think I'm pretty good at it. But it's taken practice. So I think I know how to shut off. You can ask any of my best Friends. There's a switch. I'm like, dancing. We're done. And I can kind of put the day behind me. And I think it's actually an important skill set being an entrepreneur, is that you can actually shut the day off. I think that is a very important skill set. Do you check your email on the weekends? Like any tips that help you turn off? So I try Friday night is like family night with our little pod and often just just family or like immediate best Friends. Saturday is a family day. Start early. And I will not check email for the most. I mean, I checked, like you'll make sure nothing urgent is happening. We're pretty much from mourning until probably really do a check in in the afternoon just to make sure nothing's popped up. And so Saturday really is like a day that I kind of shut off. All that said, I think that the best method is a mindset shift.

Alexa Carly Aiken Danielle Weisberg Von Tol Penny Pritzker Northwestern Mutual Harvard Business School Danielle Saint Bart Alex Daniel
A highlight from Taken for Granted: Indra Nooyi wants us to reimagine the return to work

WorkLife with Adam Grant

03:50 min | Last month

A highlight from Taken for Granted: Indra Nooyi wants us to reimagine the return to work

"Got them. Any questions or comments before we dive in? No, I just nervous like hell no, it looks different in front of you. I think you've already cleared that bar a few times in your career. I mean, you retired as CEO of PepsiCo. I think at this point, you can't make any mistakes. You know, I'm still learning from people like you. So thank you for inviting me to your podcast. Well, sentiments are mutual. I finished reading the book last night and it is remarkable in how candid you are and how much you open up about your whole life. It really caught me off guard. Well, thank you. I mean, and it's a tough journey to talk about because you sometimes bury a lot of the things from the past. You don't talk about it. And then when you have to write it, you realize that one experience led to another experience led to another experience. And they all link. And you're a product of all your experiences. One place I wanted to start is just with the contradictions in your own upbringing. I thought it was just riveting that on the one hand you grow up in this conservative home in India where you have separate living rooms for men and women. Your parents had an arranged marriage. What was that like? You know, in those days growing up in India and that environment you just talked about was the normal environment. Nobody's parents hugged them and told them I loved them. I think it's almost like a new phenomenon to have parents hug and kiss and say, I love you. The emphasis was on providing a stable home life, creating a frame, giving you freedom within the frame. But it ended the day it was how do we give you the wings to fly and teach you to fly? And that's about it. And there was nothing else involved. And if you had any concerns or issues you want to talk about, everything resorted to. Okay, go pray. Or just ask God to give you away forward. So that was the upbringing we had. We never questioned it because there wasn't another model we could look at, you see? So we never questioned it. I love the question that your mom asked you when you were growing up. want to be? What was it? It was, well, how are you going to change the world? You know, she always pushed us to say, what do you want to contribute to the world? How are people going to remember you? My grandfather was the same way. He'd say, if you're not going to make a difference in anything you do, don't do it. Why bother to waste your time doing it? So it was always this notion of think of a broader society, a broader canvas, and how you can draw a picture that people appreciate on that broader canvas. It seems like early in your career that canvas was mostly about solving problems in businesses. Did it feel like there was a disconnect between what's my contribution and wait a minute, I'm making companies more profitable, but am I really making an impact in a meaningful way? Interestingly, when I was selling thread as my first job, you can say, what the hell is purpose and thread? But I didn't look at it that way. I was selling thread to those cut and so shops, which were 5 or 6 tailors making Madras cotton shirts to export. That was their livelihood. And I looked at the thread as making or breaking the livelihood because the color had to match, it couldn't run. So I had to deep sense of responsibility about those pools of thread, purposeful projects kept me whole. Whether it was selling feminine protection to women and giving them more liberation without a belt in their personal protection was a big thing. In India, selling branded personal protection itself was a big liberating factor for women. And that gave me a sense of great emotional involvement in that project. So if you really put yourself in each of these business situations Adam, you do a better job than saying, how do I maximize value for this company? Because then you might cut quality.

Pepsico India Madras Adam