Business Development

Biz Dev - the intricate art of growing a company, understanding markets, pursuing customers and building relationships. Listen here for the latest advice, success stories, tips, tricks and long-term strategies, aired on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

A highlight from MBA1931 Why We Launched a Free Plan

The $100 MBA Show

02:04 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from MBA1931 Why We Launched a Free Plan

"No money is coming in, but money is going out. So initially, we started with a free 14 day trial. One of the things that we really believe in in our company is that you need to be close to the customer. So we do as many customer interviews as possible. We've talked to our customers who do surveys. We run webinars, and in that process, what we've learned over the years is that people need more time. 14 days is just not enough for them to evaluate their webinar software to figure out if it's a good fit for them to actually get a webinar up and running with their content and their slides and everything. And no, hey, this is a solution for me. And we would get that feedback in our cancellation feedback. When people cancel their account, we have a process where we collect feedback. It's like a survey when they cancel their account. In those surveys, many people would say, you know, I didn't use it or to have a chance to do it, or I needed more time. So I'll be back. So we were faced with the dilemma, okay, we have this free trial where it gives them all the power, all the solutions they need, all the features, but they have 14 days to decide. After the 14 days, they will be charged for their plan. So hence they might cancel before the 14 days so they don't get charged for something they're not sure about yet. Sounds reasonable. So what are the options for us? And let me just tell you that successful businesses don't work alone. We learned that we don't have all the answers. So we reached out to people that do have the answers. We reach out to pricing experts and freemium experts like Patrick Campbell from prophet who was generous enough to coach us on this. We reached out to Marcus Rivera, who is the founder of pricing IO. Also gave us some really solid advice when it comes to freemium. And what they all said, these experts is that if you're going to go freelance, understand this is a customer acquisition model and not a pricing model. Meaning, you've got to see this as sort of like a glorified opt in, a way to get really good leads. You're paying for these leads by offering your software. And that's really

Marcus Rivera Patrick Campbell
A highlight from MBA1930 Q&A Wednesday: How do I tell my spouse I want to start a business?

The $100 MBA Show

04:07 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from MBA1930 Q&A Wednesday: How do I tell my spouse I want to start a business?

"Having that talk with your significant other about starting a business is an important one. And at first you might think this is going to be an emotional discussion. It's going to be emotional talk. My significant other knows me more than anybody else, I'm afraid that there will judge me or maybe shoot down my idea and it's going to hurt even more coming from somebody I love so much. So it's safer just to keep it inside and not tell other people. But the reality is that this business won't be a reality. If you don't start working start doing start implementing, and you're going to need the person that's closest to you to be in the know to be supportive because eventually when this business grows and becomes your full-time thing, their life is going to be effective. It's who you are. You are changing. My advice is to try to remove the emotion as much as possible. And almost see yourself like you're pitching your business to an investor. Kind of like what you see on Shark Tank. Now, the sharks bite, you know, they invest when they see facts. They see information to see numbers. They see action. They see proof that this business is viable and they're convinced this is a good idea. I think we should do this. I think we should go to business together. And in some way, the person you live with the person you're involved with emotionally and practically every day in your life, they're investing in you in terms of being a partner in your life. They need to be sold. They need to be understood that, okay, this is actually not a bad idea. This is actually a good idea and you have a plan to move forward. This is probably your most important pitch because you can pitch to several investors, but you can't pitch to civil partners. You've got your partner. You want to stick with them. What you don't want to do is you don't want to just approach them and say, hey, I'm thinking about starting a business. This is my idea. Ideas are dime a dozen, and it's easy for somebody to be like, okay, this is a great idea, but I deal with reality, right? They might say, hey, what about your day job? That's what's stable. That's what pays the bill. This will help our house or family. Why would you leave something that's secure for something that's totally risky? And in their defense, that's a logical argument. I wouldn't be advising coming into this conversation with more than just saying I have an idea. If you weren't hesitant. The reason why you haven't shared this idea for over a year, Fred is because you're afraid of the reaction. You're afraid of maybe you're going to get shot down or maybe you're going to be talked out of it. Some people are worried about that. So you're going to come into this with some information with some facts and with a game plan. That also addresses your partner's concerns. Just like if you sell a product to somebody, they have concerns. They have rebuttals. You need to address these or they're not going to buy. So this is a good starting point. What are some of the concerns your spouse might have with you sharing this news? And list them out because they might be different for you versus other people. I can suggest some right now and say, hey, they might be concerned with the stability of the household. The amount of time that's going to take, if you can pull it off, if you have the experience, did you have any data to prove that this idea can be fruitful? It could be a whole list of things that you know your partner better than I do. So go ahead and list them. And then you gotta have some information some research something prepared for that. And by the way, they're not wrong. This is actually great preparation for you. You need to prove to yourself and to them that this is a good idea. This is something you should pursue. And this S.W.A.T. analysis really will allow you to do that. Next, most people do not like spontaneity. They don't like extremes. They're like consistency. So if you have a plan forward to get to the end goal, let's say, for example, you want to start an online business like you mentioned, you want it to be your full-time thing, you want to be able to make more money and have more freedom. That's the end goal. Maybe that's where you're at in 5 years from now. But what are the steps to get you there? And what does that look like for you?

Sharks Fred
A highlight from Ep117: The Ultimate Podcasting Secrets You Must Know - Aileen Prak

The Podcast On Podcasting

04:30 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Ep117: The Ultimate Podcasting Secrets You Must Know - Aileen Prak

"Grow your show dot com. And just let us know that this was episode 117. What your name is, and we will add you to actually win some free shit. Some good shit. The good shit. All right, with that said, I don't want to interrupt the episode too much because I know that the episode also has a ton of value. So let's jump right in. And today I'm joined with a friend. Somebody that I've known for quite a while. Eileen Pratt, her husband Saleh started a podcast quite a while back. It's called how did they do it real estate? It's a real estate investing podcast. And I remember when they reached out to me and said that they wanted me to be the show. I was incredibly honored and I was like, yes, I want to do it. I must have been one of your first. Like close to it, right? Yep. And actually, your episode ended up spanning three episodes on our podcast because you provided so much great value on that that we had to break it into three episodes. That is so funny. I appreciate that. You know what's funny? When I tried to add value or whatever, when I try to answer questions, I'm always trying to think, how does this matter to the person listening? And so sometimes I think that I go into just so much detail to make sure that the tangible takeaways are there. And so this is definitely the first time that it's been turned into three episodes. But it wouldn't be the first time that somebody said, I usually go 20 minutes and then we take like 45 minutes or whatever. So I think that's interesting. It's a blessing and a curse. Eileen, I want to talk about going back to how do they do it and your podcast, there is so many questions in my mind that I think the listener wants to know and if you don't mind me starting here and just share what you feel comfortable with, I started a podcast with other people. I would say I'm grateful none of them were married to me. Because honestly it didn't end up working out with them as co hosts. And it was especially challenging for me to make that change with two co partners. And so something that I'm always thinking about is most people that want to start a podcast, they think to themselves, I want to start a podcast, but I don't want to do it myself. Either because I'm not fully confident in myself by being by myself or because I'm not sure I could sustain if it was just me. I might do like three episodes and drop off. But if I have an accountability partner with me, it'll help. see like so many people who are thinking about starting a podcast might decide I want a partner so that it solves these problems. You not only started a podcast with a co host, but you're also married to the co host. So I'm wanna know pros and cons for you what we should be thinking of before we launch a podcast with a co host. Yeah, so exactly to your point, when we first started the podcast, me and my husband were thinking to ourselves, well, we wanted to create the thought leadership platform. But how are we going to do it? And of course, when you do it, when you go into something new together with a partner, things just seem so much better because you're able to share in your nervousness, you're able to share in the experiences and you're just able to spread that a little bit more when you have a partner. And so that's why we decided to do it together first. Because both of us are very, I would say when we first started even now still, we're very introverted people. We never put ourselves out there before. So starting the podcast was a huge challenge for us. And so having to talk about ourselves and everything like that. So having someone there, especially your spouse made it so much easier because we could brainstorm together like at all times of the day we had access to each other. We could brainstorm how we wanted to structure the podcast. And then we could go in and we would take turns asking questions to our guests and then we try to make it as smooth as possible because you didn't want to start interviewing the guests with your co host and stepping on each other's toes and then mess up the flow of the podcast. So we would kind of structure it where he would take the first couple of questions and then I would take the couple of seconds and we kind of play around to see where each person best fit within the podcast interviews.

Eileen Pratt Saleh Eileen
A highlight from 234: Primed to Disbelieve Sexual Accusers - with Deborah Tuerkheimer

RISE Podcast

05:32 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from 234: Primed to Disbelieve Sexual Accusers - with Deborah Tuerkheimer

"Okay, if you are looking for a kick in the pants, if you are looking for an accountability circle, if you are looking to level up your life, you should know about inner circle. Every single month I meet with people from all over the world for two hours of live coaching and Q&A. Topics are anything and everything that is inspiring us this month manifesting, success habits, how to grow your business. Why we self sabotage. How to start a health journey, or how to achieve a really big goal in small bite sized pieces. It's an incredible group who is dedicated to the idea of becoming a better version of themselves, and we would love to have you join us. Here is a little snippet from our latest coaching session. What do you believe? What is the belief that you have about this area of your life? So based on what you believe, determines the potential that you think that you have in any area of your existence. Let's use an example. Let's say you're starting on a health journey because this is the example that I used, your belief about what you are capable of when it comes to health determines the potential that your mind thinks is possible for whether or not you're actually going to pull this off. Based on the potential that you think you have, you will take action. The action that you take is going to give you some kind of result. The results that you get is going to inform the belief that you have in yourself and this cycle just repeats forever. Let's change our way of thinking. Instead of saying, I don't believe that I have that. You're like, but Rachel, I really don't believe that great. You don't believe in yourself. You don't believe that you think that you're qualified to take on this to get rid of your finances to save your relationship. You don't believe that. But what if you did? That's the simplest question I want you to ask right now. I don't care if you actually buy into it. I just want you to ask yourself if I believed if I believed that I was the healthiest, fittest, greatest runner in the world. If I believe that I had the potential to make a $1 million and get my family out of debt, if I believed in myself in this way, what potential would I have? And based on that potential, what action would I take? I mean, y'all, I have times where I'm like, this shot, I am aiming big, right? I am aiming so big in a certain area of my life and it feels impossible and I don't know how I'm gonna get it. I will come back to this over and over and over again. And I'll simply ask myself this question. If I believed in myself, what potential would I think I had? And if I believed that I had that potential, what's the action that I would take? Because what's crazy is that when you actually find the courage to just take this action, the results change instantly. This can destroy your dreams if it's used in a negative way, and it is for most of us. This is the self sabotage loop. This also can change everything. If you use it in a positive way. Today on the show, I am sitting down with Debra, Turkey mer, a former prosecutor, legal expert and leading authority on sexual violence to examine why we are primed to disbelieve allegations of sexual abuse and how we can transform a culture and a legal system structured to dismiss accusers. Look, it's a hard conversation to dig into abuse. And abusers and the people that they hurt. But it's an important conversation to understand why culturally we tend not to believe the people who are getting hurt the most. In this conversation, we look at it from a bunch of different angles and Deborah very graciously allows me to ask a lot of really ignorant questions so that I can better arm myself with information that we should all have. I hope that you will listen in and learn as I did from professor turkheimer as we discuss a really important issue. Hi, I'm Rachel Hollis, and this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week, reading and listening to podcast and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life, and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guess are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast. Deborah, I'd love to start

Turkey Mer Rachel Deborah Rachel Hollis Youtube
A highlight from MBA1929 What Does Facebooks Metaverse Mean For Your Business?

The $100 MBA Show

01:29 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from MBA1929 What Does Facebooks Metaverse Mean For Your Business?

"And in today's lesson you will learn, what does Facebook's metaverse mean for your business? A few weeks ago, Facebook announced that they're changing their name to meta, which is short for metaverse. A virtual world that will be the next iteration of Facebook. Some are saying it's the next iteration of the Internet. We're talking about a totally immersive virtual world, something out of a sci-fi movie. Some people are equating it to the real world version of the fiction novel ready player one. This is not fiction. This is actually real and in fact, Facebook has been working on the metaverse for years now. In fact, in 2014, well over 7 years ago, Facebook bought the virtual reality, hardware company, Oculus, knowing that this is the future they will pursue. But what does this all mean for your business? Are there going to be opportunities? Are there going to be threats? How soon will this affect your business? When is a meadow versus going to be real? And mainstream. That's what we get into in today's lesson. One of the things that I think makes a strong business in a strong entrepreneur is preparation. Being prepared for the future, like Wayne grizzly says, look where the puck is going, not where it is right now. So we're going to get into what the metaverse is, what it means for your business how to prepare, and what are some things you just don't need to worry about. So let's get into it. Let's get down to business. Support for today's

Facebook Oculus Wayne Grizzly
A highlight from Ep116: Questions As Content

The Podcast On Podcasting

02:10 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from Ep116: Questions As Content

"I'm excited to hang out with you. I'm excited to share with you something that I learned from good friend of mine. His name is Chad. Chat woodfield. Do you know what time it is? I was just thinking me and my kids watch this movie. I don't know how many times. I would say 9 ish times. Give or take. And it's called guy. It's free guy. The blue guy's shirt. The blue shirt guy. If you haven't seen it, dude, see it. It's good. It's really funny. And basically what I had just said is part of the movie. I won't spoil it if you haven't heard it. This is episode 116, and I need to interrupt it just because Jesse reached out and left us a review that's Jesse D 9. Helped me level up as a podcaster Jessie says. Awesome content that is both motivating and useful. That's so good to hear. Like motivating and useful. We do want to motivate you and it needs to be useful. I want you to be able to have actionable takeaways. So thanks for saying that, Jessie, and you finish off your honest written review by saying, I strongly recommend this show to those of you who are looking of starting their own podcast. Great job, aa and if you don't know who triple a is, that's Adam, a atoms, that's me Adam Adams, your host, and a lot of people call me triple-A because those are my initials. But at any rate, Jesse, I really appreciate you. I'm stoked that you took the time after listening to episode and number 100 to leave an honest written review. And by the way, on Apple, couple of people have asked, where should we be sending these? Apple is the best because it's just kind of like connected, certainly you can use Spotify or Ghana or audible or listen notes. But I find that it's just easier to have it all in one place. And I'm not going to miss it. So yeah, on Apple podcast would be very, very helpful. By the way, in episode 100, this is kind of what we shared is that you need to

Jesse D Jessie Jesse Chad Adam Adams Apple Ghana
A highlight from Live Episode! Tofurky: Seth Tibbott (2019)

How I Built This

01:34 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Live Episode! Tofurky: Seth Tibbott (2019)

"Hey, really quick before we start the show, a lot of you have lots of questions about how I built this, like, how do you pick guests or where do you record the show? Or how can I get in touch with Howard Schultz? Spoiler alert on that one. We can't help you. But we can try and answer any questions you might have about the show our work or even me. If you'd like to submit a question, please visit guy raz dot com and fill out the form and we'll answer some of your questions right here on the show in the coming weeks. Again, that's GUI raz dot com. You know, one thing we're really hoping to start up again next year is our how I built this live shows in real theaters with real human audiences because there is so much great energy in those shows so much joy and I have to tell you, I really miss them. So this holiday season, I want to take you back to a very joyful conversation. I had a few years ago live on stage with Seth Tibet, the founder of tofurkey. We did it in Portland Oregon and it's hard to figure out who's having a better time here. Him or me or the audience. So happy holidays and enjoy. 20 years 20 years of losing money. I mean, how are you paying your employees? How are you, you know? Well, that was the question that my tax guy always asked me every year. He would say I got two questions for you. How much

Howard Schultz Seth Tibet Portland Oregon
A highlight from MBA1928 Guest Teacher  Tanessa Shears  How to Eliminate Brain Fog for More Productivity, Energy, and Growth in Your Business

The $100 MBA Show

01:12 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from MBA1928 Guest Teacher Tanessa Shears How to Eliminate Brain Fog for More Productivity, Energy, and Growth in Your Business

"Hello welcome to the $100 RBA show helping you to get better every single day with our daily ten minute business lessons for the real world. I'm your host your coach your teacher, Omar is at home. I'm also the cofounder of webinar ninja and independent software company are my cofounder back in 2014. And today's episode is a guest teacher episode. On our guest teacher episodes, we bring out an expert to teach their area of expertise. Today we have tennessees. For more productivity, more energy, and growth in your business. Are you burning the midnight oil? Are you taking on the advice of hustle harder and harder? Do you find yourself having to have a few cups of coffee a day? Just to stay focused while you're in for a treat today because we got Tennessee's who is a professional. She's a health consultant as well as the host of the becoming limitless podcast. Where she helps entrepreneurs scale their business by optimizing their health. Hey, if you've been a listener of the show for some time, you

Webinar Ninja Omar Tennessee
A highlight from Ep115:  Don't Let Fear Stop You! - Lynda Sunshine West

The Podcast On Podcasting

04:15 min | Last week

A highlight from Ep115: Don't Let Fear Stop You! - Lynda Sunshine West

"That'll go to the management staff at my team. And we'll make sure that you're added. We've got this really nifty computerized like wheel of fortune, and we put all of the tickets in for you. And what we did for Matt as well for a couple of episodes back and I'm going to read a couple other people's reviews over the next couple of episodes as well. But this computer program is pretty neat. We put all of the amount of tickets that you have. We literally just push a button and it automates everything for us. So we don't have to put it on paper. And we can record the whole thing and everybody knows that we're being legit. So it's kind of rad. But taco taco, I want to read your review. For those of you who don't know what's going on, you're like, why did you interrupt this to read a review? We're actually giving away we're gifting our services in exchange for just connecting with you. Your support with the show. And we're giving out some of these because we think that it's a mutual beneficial. We want to add value to a couple of people who want our services, but might not want you know to pay our prices. We are not cheap. I mean, we're really affordable when it comes to just edit only. I think we're the most affordable for all of the stuff that we do. Like marketing the podcast and all that. But our launch services and our marketing services, their high dollar amount for most people. And so this is just an awesome way for you to get involved. So this is episode one 15. We are reading tacos review. He says, Adam, he or she, because actually, tacos are gender, neutral, aren't they? Adam rules. Exhumation Mark exhumation Mark. Been working on a podcast with my close friends for a few years now. The horror junkies, podcast. Guys, and gals, go check out the horror junkie podcast. So taco taco can get some love as well. Been working on podcasts when they close friends for a few years now. The horror junkies podcast. It's always been a good time, but it is easy to get burnt out from time to time since finding your podcast, you've inspired me to grow our show as much as possible. You have made podcasting fun again. And I have set a bunch of goals that I'm excited to work toward. Keep doing what you do, pop, pop, pop. And if anybody doesn't know a pop means, that's podcast on podcasting. We call ourselves the pop. So, hey, taco taco, 69 Z gracias. We are excited. We're adding you right now. One ticket. And if you respond, I think you are going to respond. But when you respond, we'll add three more. So you have a total four tickets in actually as of now. It's only you taco. It's matte. And then there's going to be Jesse and donetta, who are going to be added as well over the next two days. So really stoked. Make sure you do that. And let's jump right back into the episode. Let's get you some value today. What's kind of cool is Linda, who's with us today? She actually launched her podcast only about a week before we're recording this. So what I think you're going to get from this is real life in the trenches. I haven't been doing this for ten years and I know every single thing or I forgotten what it really took. She's in it. She knows exactly what's going on. So that's where we're going to come from today. What's really neat about Linda is a couple of years about maybe two, three years ago, she started this brand called women action takers. And she's got all of these different avenues, helping people publish books. She's got networking events for it. She's got additionally, a few other things plus. She just launched her podcast. Women action takers, TM, because she's trademarked in that bad woman. That bad girl? I don't know how to say it. That girl. Yeah, because that just sounds terrible. We're gonna have to make it explicit when we say bad girl that makes me think of other things for

Mark Exhumation Mark Adam Matt Donetta Linda Jesse
A highlight from MBA1927 5 Low-Cost Ways To Increase Revenue + Free Ride Friday

The $100 MBA Show

05:05 min | Last week

A highlight from MBA1927 5 Low-Cost Ways To Increase Revenue + Free Ride Friday

"Find a group an organization. A business that will have people that are interested in what you offer. For example, I sell webinar software, a good demographic or audience for me would be a coworking space. Like a WeWork or a startup space. These guys, these spaces are fantastic because they give you the space to do an event. And many people are doing events anyway, like they have pitch nights. They have holiday parties. They have guest speakers, all that kind of stuff. You don't even need to organize the event, but you can be the headline sponsor. And often, these organizations, these groups are not really looking for a lot. Often you can be the headline sponsor by just buying some pizzas for the event. Being the food sponsor. And what I love about this is that it's a very non traditional so there's a lot of room for negotiation. You can ask for a lot. A lot of these events I say, hey, I want a table. I want to put up my banner. I would love to address the audience for maybe a few minutes, maybe give a mini workshop, maybe even run a contest. So I can give away some of my product and give people some awareness. You can even be the sponsor of some sort of award like, you know? Startup of the year presented by webinar ninja. So you get the point here. You can supply the awards and the plaques. Part of the award could be a sample of your business or your services or discount or a voucher or something like that. The point here is that you're getting in front of an audience in person. So the ability to build trust quickly is incredible. You're getting exposure. You're finding your people. You're becoming a household name to many people that would like to use your services. I like to take a step further because I like our return on my investment and I like to have a table at these local events. I'll give you about swag. I'll talk to people. I will encourage people to sign up for a free account or free trial or whatever. I highly recommend this and you can make it contest. So if you sign up you enter the contest and the winner gets XYZ. You know, a massage package or something. What I found is that a lot of times I spend 304 105 $100 sponsoring an event and I get that tenfold in business. There are a ton of organization, sports teams, reading clubs, you name it fine organization that has the audience that you're looking for and sponsor an event. They're already doing. All right, that's strategy number one in the books. Strategy number two swag bonuses. People love bonuses. They love getting more than what they bargained for. And one of the ways that get more sales is a tap into your existing customer base. It's to offer your current customers some swag, a T-shirt a hoodie, a cap, something with your brand on it to make them proud. Something that looks great, by the way. We love to use print full, which is a great, great place to create your own swag and sell it. In fact, we are launching our own swag store called sewn ninja to facilitate this. So basically what you can do is you give away swag that you order to anybody that upgrades their account that buys another product that takes you up on an offer. You want to get fancy, make it limited edition have only a hundred pieces of each item. People love something that's special. And make it special. Don't just put your logo on the T-shirt. Go to fiber, go to freelance or get a graphic designer to create the design of the T-shirt and make it look really, really cool. Something that you would wear to dinner. Something that you would wear that on a night out how that looks cool, what is that? Have fun with your brand, put it on a piece of clothing on a piece of swag. And show it to your audience. Hey, you can get this if you upgrade if you take on the offer. By the way, it costs you nearly nothing to do this. You can get somebody on fiber for $20 or something to design a beautiful, beautiful T-shirt. And you can mock it up on an actual T-shirt digitally on printf, for example or custom ink and you can go ahead and show your audience, hey, here's an image of what the T-shirt looks like of this hoodie of this cap. And you only fulfill that order when they buy. If you're wondering the logistics, don't over complicate it. You don't have to have a digital sore Shopify store to try this out. You could literally just manually do when they take on the offer. You take their name and email address. You get their mailing address. You can just sip the email them. Hey, can you give me your mailing address so that I can send you your bonus? Order the bonus, send it out. You can even hire a VA or something to handle this process for you, or you could just do yourself. I did it myself in the beginning. Swag bonuses, huge, huge winner. All right, number three, we talked about sponsoring an event, but you can host your own live event. And here's the kicker. Don't just make a conference. Don't just make some sort of lunch and learn. You can, and you probably would do pretty well, but instead make it an experience.

A highlight from Ep113: How To Support Your Podcasts Growth - Kenneth Kinney

The Podcast On Podcasting

04:42 min | Last week

A highlight from Ep113: How To Support Your Podcasts Growth - Kenneth Kinney

"My job is really to make things understandable to people, whether it's something super technical, or even simplistic, but make it in a way that resonates with people so that they understand I'm talking about often a lot of times the fear and anxiety that people go through and how to overcome a lot of them. Most hosts never achieve the results they hoped for. They're falling short on listenership and monetization, meaning their message isn't being heard, and their show ends up costing them money. This podcast was created to help you grow your listenership and make money while you're at it. Get ready to take notes. Here's your host, Adam Adams. And we're back with another episode of pop the podcast on podcasting. And today we're swimming with sharks, we're swimming with the Kenneth shark Kinney in the house. I should have like, yeah, here we go. Kenneth in the house. Thank you. How you doing, man? Doing well, how about stuff a long time, no talk to. Long time, no talk. Yeah, we met on Clubhouse. I've avoided Clubhouse, not because I wanted to, but because clients, we have a lot of clients and we have just been needing to serve them at a high level. And you've been swimming with the sharks. Wait, literally. Work Trump's social media? I don't know how to answer that. Social media is super duper important. But when you're busy and you're training new staff just to keep up with the workload, you can't maybe do both. And so my goal is within the next 6 weeks, I want to be able to be 5 hours a week on Clubhouse. So we brought on so many different clients, excuse me, yes, that is true too. But we've brought on so many different teammates. And so we've grown the team huge, more than doubled the team. And that's going to be able to support me to be able to do it. But applause again. Yeah. button. So Kenneth shark as they call you. You've got a podcast and you've been swimming with sharks for a while and you're a speaker. You speak all over. And I loved something that you mentioned to me just while we were kind of shooting the breeze before we started recording. You mentioned that one of the things that you do is when you're speaking and going around and doing your job, you try to create it to be fun as well. So anytime you can speak in Florida, you can go and swim with the sharks. So I want you to start out here. Why did you start your podcast? That's the main question I want to have. What's the why behind the why for you starting a podcast? And if you wouldn't mind adding on top of that, just your process for starting that first show. Sure. So about 75 years ago when I was young. I started on the radio, and I was doing sports talk in a small market, a hundred years ago. What feels like a hundred years ago anyway. And so I did that for years, got out of it and then had a normal working career. And in between a couple of stints in that working career, I was a public speaker. I spoke at college's universities all over the country for several years, kind of got out of it back into some family duties with a father that ended up passing away. Then got back into media again was on TV and radio here in the local market and also produced a show that was seen all over the world years ago. And I took that radio show, this is about a decade ago. And I took the radio show and I repurposed it as a podcast. And so it was fun. You started playing around with what bumper music you could use on the radio and all the fun music you couldn't and you're still interviewing guests, and it was just it was a fun way to repurpose content a decade ago. So I did that for quite a while. And then it took another pause when another parent, my mom got sick and passed away. So as I was itching after by got through that period of my life, as when she was gone and settled, I was itching to get back into radio and had the opportunity to go back into it. But I really wanted to figure out a way to grow specifically what I wanted to do without necessarily be holding to a lot of advertisers or focused only on the money aspect of the new I had a message that I wanted to try to get out there with better forms of marketing, advertising, customer experience, that kind of business acumen that I had learned and been able to fail at many times before and recites and better ways of doing it.

Swimming Adam Adams Kenneth Shark Kinney Kenneth Shark Sharks Kenneth Donald Trump Florida
A highlight from 232: Handling the Stress of the Holidays

RISE Podcast

03:12 min | Last week

A highlight from 232: Handling the Stress of the Holidays

"About the holidays. Guys, I want to talk about the holidays. In my coaching community, I have this community of mostly women from all over the world who join me once a month I teach on a different topic and I pose the topic to my community. So I say, hey guys, here's three things that are on my heart. What are you interested in learning about? I'm going into my second month of them choosing manifesting to really popular topic here on the podcast and definitely in coaching this month I was like, well, I just taught on it, but I had some more info, so I said, okay, I can do manifesting two. I can do a conversation about how to overcome and rise above holiday stress. Or I can do a conversation about continuing your health journey through this time of year. And overwhelmingly the community picked manifesting because they just love this conversation. I do too. I geek out over it, so I totally understand. But really close second was this. Overcoming, rising above, handling the stress of the holidays, particularly if you're going to be interacting with people, family, Friends, in laws, that can trigger you, that can sort of make the situation not great and honestly, I think that this still ties in really beautifully with the idea of manifesting because you know I'm obsessed with the idea of manifesting the life of your dreams and manifesting a life that feels really good. And I think that there's a way to bring that intentionality into your holiday season. So that's what today's episode is about. And as usual, I have written down all kinds of crazy notes like a serial killer here in my notebook. And I'm just going to go through and kind of share some thoughts for you guys on things that I feel like have really helped me over the years in managing all of it, right? In hosting and traveling during the holidays and having kids and dealing with in laws and going through holidays post divorce and what that looks like. So this is just a bunch of ideas that I think will be helpful that I hope will be helpful to you as you navigate from now through new years. Hi, I'm Rachel Hollis, and this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week, reading and listening to podcast and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life, and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guess are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast. The first thing

Rachel Hollis Youtube
A highlight from MBA1924 Selling Your Product or Service on Groupon

The $100 MBA Show

05:05 min | Last week

A highlight from MBA1924 Selling Your Product or Service on Groupon

"So many amazing deals on groupon, because the business realizes, hey, groupon is getting me customers. And I might not see that first interaction with my customer that first exchange as a profitable one, but now I'm building rapport and hopefully people will come back to me. Now, there are some businesses and products that actually do make a profit through the group on deal. After groupon gets its cut. Speaking of cut, let's talk about how groupon structures the deal for the merchant. You and a representative from groupon will negotiate a deal. They will take a certain percentage of the price that the customer pays. Groupon is collecting all the money and then they'll pay you out. Things might have changed since I ran the groupon. But it's about 60 days out when you'll get paid. So say, for example, you're running a deal that is $50. Groupon is going to collect the $50 from the customer, and they're going to take a percentage of F $50. That's the rate you're going to negotiate with groupon. It could be 30% 40%, 50% depends on a lot of factors, and things change all the time. But let's say it's 50%, that means groupon is going to collect $50 from the customer, take 25 and give you 25. Now part of being on groupon is having an exclusive deal. Like a groupon doesn't want you to be on their platform if you're not going to give a really good deal that they can only get on groupon. So if you're selling your product on groupon for a minimal discount, it's not really going to make waves and groupons really not going to be interested in listing your product or service. They want a wow deal. So what many businesses do and this is what we did, they create a specific version of their product or service that's for groupon. Let's say you're a dentist and you do whitening services. And your full fledged whining service may take four weeks and costs, let's say $500. That's just walked into your dentistry. Groupon wants a deal that is exclusive and very, very attractive. So you might say, hey, my winding services are a $100. Now, it may not be the full fledged four week version it might be the express version, something you create specifically for groupon. It might be two sessions or two and a half sessions and the deal on groupon is a $100. Now we're talking groupon will be interested in that because it's a really, really attractive price. Now your job is once you get the customer to buy the group on and come through your doors is to upsell them. Is to become their now new dentist. Do all their checkups, do their x-rays, filler cavities, and top up their writing services when they need it. This is what groupon is great for. We did something similar with our digital product the $100 VA program we created a core hundred ombre program that wasn't the full fledged program, but had some really great courses in it. And then once they signed up, we were able to offer them other coaching, other products and other services. So again, groupon is a primarily a customer acquisition model and not really a place for you to really make lots of money. Having said that, the volume of sales is huge in groupon. I was shocked how many people signed up for our deal? We're talking thousands upon thousands over a course of 6 months. I believe we got an influx of 6500 students. So they definitely have reach. And one of the things that groupon does is they don't launch their deals across the world in one shot. They test the market out. They may be tweaked the price tweak the imagery, then they expand to another market and another market. They're quite sophisticated in that regard. But in my experience, it's a fantastic way to get exposure to a new audience because they have so much reach. Not only do they get 31 visitors every month to their site, they have 43 million users that use their app, whether it's a web app or the mobile app. So they're getting notifications or getting emails. They're getting promotions sent to them. So you are getting access to lots of people. So let's address the question how do you get on groupon? How do you reach out to them? What do you do? So I've spoken to some people that have reached out to groupon and got on groupon. And I also had my own experience with groupon approached us. And they said they wanted to feature us on groupon. In both scenarios, you need to have some level of credibility. Groupon will back a business. If you have some sort of write up, been mentioned on some article like on Forbes or anchor, your local newspaper, you need to have some decent reviews on Google or TripAdvisor if you're a local business. They rarely do business with a totally fresh product or service or business for that matter. They want to make sure they're backing somebody that is going to be able to deliver and has a track record. If you are approaching group on them, by the way, you can literally just go to their website, go to

Groupon Google
A highlight from Ep112: Podcast Marketing Strategy That Really Works

The Podcast On Podcasting

07:49 min | Last week

A highlight from Ep112: Podcast Marketing Strategy That Really Works

"And what he has shared with us is that somehow Facebook has some type of algorithm where they see the slow tortoise at marketing style as something we can count on something that is going to stay with us the company has longevity. And they see the hair the rabbit adds, like the let's just pop out a quick ad and put some money behind it for like a weekend or a couple of weeks and just see what happens. Is more of like a fly by night, storm chaser company, or podcast, for example. And so they have a little bit less credibility, therefore they're unable to share it with the same amount of people or they're unable to find the qualitative to correct exact person because they don't have enough time to do the split testing where they're putting it in front of certain people. So there's a lot to be said about you being the tortoise in your marketing strategy. And we have a lot of different clients that we work with to do marketing. And the thing that I want to share with you now is what you should be thinking about for how long you should have your ads up, how long you should be doing as staying in front of people. And what I want to share is that when I first started marketing for other people, I went as low as one month. I was like, hey, well market for you for one month. And I'll just throw out a number. 2500 bucks. 2500 bucks will market your podcast for one month. And we actually had a couple of clients that did it, tried it for one month. And then they stopped and then they'll listeners dropped off. Pretty quickly. Well, I'm saying within a few weeks, the listeners just many of them, not all of them, obviously, but many of them just kind of came download a few episodes that we weren't staying in front of them. So even if they downloaded them, they never listened to the episodes. So they were unless and unplayed in the algorithms worked against that client. And I felt like I really wasn't serving to clients. So what I did is I really wanted to do a really wanted to do a 6 month minimum as we were working with clients to market their podcast. That was my goal. I was like, hey, we're going to do a 6 month minimum. But something in the something scared me from having a 6 month minimum. I actually was afraid to tell clients that that was the minimum because I thought some people would want like three months or four months. And they wouldn't quite pay for 6 months or 12 months. And so I was personally afraid of offending people or making them think that, man, I'm locked into this contract and it was uneasy for me. I was not actually in all honesty, I was not serving the client at the best level because I was offering one month term. And that didn't last long after a couple people joined for a month and we actually let's just say it's $2500. It literally cost me way more money to only work for somebody for one month because there's a ton of upfront costs learning, learning how to market the podcast, learning where to put the money, split testing, everything. You can't figure everything out that fast. You just can't, we can't. And I don't know any good marketer that can. So, with that said, I moved it up to four 8 and 12 months. I was like, I'm going to do a four month 8 month and 12 month. And what's interesting is four month was like the bare minimum that worked for anybody. And Derek Wilson is one of our clients that it worked for. And usually, and I would say only about a third of the clients that we worked with there was Derek Wilson and a couple other clients that it did work. And then there was a good handful of like 5 different clients that it did not work for with the four months. And that hurts my heart. If you're like me and you have a business, you're main focus is to serve people, serve them with integrity, serve them at a high level. And randomly enough, you want them to be happy. I'm a people pleaser. What can I say? I want other people around me to be happy. And I will go out of my way with our clients with my family, with friends, and even with people on the street. I've been known to pull over on the side of the road to help somebody who looked like they might need help with their car. And people are like, why are you pulling over? Do you know them? I'm like, no, I don't know the person, but look, I don't want them to have a bad day. Who knows what's going on? They might be broken down. They might need help. They might have a flat tire. They might need an engine. They might need a ride. They might need a cell phone, maybe they can't even charge their phone because I think of all of these possibilities. And I just want to help others. This is the reason for the podcast. And with that said, I felt extremely bad that two thirds of our clients that did the four month package, it didn't work for them. Because I want everything to work. And so I finally did it. I said, I'm going to do with marketing. We're only going to do 6 month packages in 12 month packages. How does this relate to you? Here's how it relates to you. If you're going to do your marketing, I want you to have an absolute minimum of a push as a 6 month push. Now, this means how can you do this? What resources do you have? Do you have time or do you have money? If you've got money, where are you going to place that money? Here's a few places that we put the money in case it can help you. For example, we place a lot of money on actually, I was going to say almost every client, but I can clearly say a 100% of our marketing clients we do this. We put up their face their Facebook. I don't know why I'm talking about Facebook. We put up their well, yeah, we do Facebook ads also. I'll get to that in a second. We put up their banner ads. We go to different blogs and websites that might be industry related or podcast listener related. And we always find at least one in most cases at least two. Actually, if it's a woman podcaster, we're automatically going to go to two places immediately. There is a podcast women's network that we pay for your podcast to be on. It's really cool because it's only female podcasters. And there's a lot of people that are looking for just female podcasters. So if we have a client who is female, well, obviously we're going to put that on the all female podcast network where there's women that are literally searching for podcasts. It'll help them. And that's where we put the banner ad. We put a banner ad there in multiple places so that it's easy for other women to find that podcast. We also use larger networks that are more generalized and we can go by category as well. Like for example, we will pay to get all of our clients in 5 places. And we do this usually it's a 7 month contract. We pay for the first month, and then we add 6 months for basically the price of three months. And these banner ads will be like your podcast. It'll talk about usually when you do your banner ad, it's going to

Derek Wilson Facebook
A highlight from Stasher and Modern Twist: Kat Nouri

How I Built This

07:09 min | Last week

A highlight from Stasher and Modern Twist: Kat Nouri

"It worked. Sure, everyone laughs when they see it. Just the other day when I pulled it out to pay my barber, he sarcastically asked me if my ziploc wallet was made by Prada. Now, imagine a world before ziplocs will call it B Z 1968. That was the year Dow chemical introduced the product to grocery stores. All of a sudden, sandwiches and carrot sticks and apple slices could be kept separate inside lunch boxes. The problem is that we started to use a lot of them. We still do. And ultimately, that's not a good thing. Because plastic is a huge environmental problem. There's too much of it, and it's finding its way into our oceans and into our bodies. A 2019 scientific study found that the average human will ingest as much as 40 pounds of plastic in their lifetime. Microplastic that floats in the ocean and seafood in the air in sand, it's all around us. Only a tiny sliver of the plastic we use gets recycled, less than 10% according to the EPA. That little recycling symbol on your single use water bottle, it's basically nonsense. So over the past two decades, more and more social entrepreneurs have been trying to figure out how to reduce plastic. One potential solution is an a polymer called silicon. It has properties that act like plastic, but is more sustainable and lasts much, much longer. And Kat nori, a parent of three who packed a lot of lunches realized that, like many of us, she was using a lot of disposable baggies. Cat had a small business that made a home goods out of silicon, things like placemats and coasters. So she had some experience with the product. But could she figure out how to turn that silicone into a ziploc like faggy? Well, if you've heard of her brand stasher, you know the answer is yes. She did figure it out, but it would take a lot of work to convince people to buy the bags. Stasher bags are expensive. One sandwich sized bag might last several years, but for the price of one, you can buy a 120 ziplocs, which is an important part of the story because in 2020, cat actually sold stasher to SC Johnson. The company that happens to make zip locks. It's a sign perhaps that over time, SC Johnson sees a future without single use plastic. But how that acquisition happened? Well, if you listen to this show, you know there is a story behind it and it starts with cat. She was actually born in Tehran in Iran in the mid 1960s before the Islamic revolution. In the mid 70s, her dad decided to move the family to California to search for new opportunities. He had heard that California's like heaven. He said, you know, California is so green and there's so much opportunity for us to have our own business and to start a new life together as a family, and you guys can get educated. You can all have the best education and not wonder what you're going to do after school if there's work opportunity for you. And that was just something that was really important to him because he was three years old when he lost his mother, and he was brought up by his brother, in fact, when we my dad lost his father, and his brother, my dad just couldn't stand living there anymore and being associated to his business where he sort of saw the shadow of his brother every day by his brother wasn't there any more. And that was such a blow to my dad that he pretty much like picked us up and said, we're packing up our bags, and we're going to California. And he moves you guys to the Bay Area to Walnut Creek, California. First of all, why did he choose to go there? Did you have relatives in that area? So we had an English teacher in Iran, whose brother lived in Walnut Creek. And I remember to this day when he picked us up from the airport and driving over the bay bridge and we were two kids, my brother and I, my mom and dad. And I remember distinctly that the guy kept turning around and looking at us. And I kept asking my parents, why is he like looking at us now, of course, you know, when I was 16 and I learned how to drive, we learned that that's what you do when you're changing lanes. So those were kinds of the and then other things that I remember is that I remember right when we got here, we just didn't want to be apart from each other, and we went to Montgomery words and we bought blankets and pillows and even though we had three rooms and apartment, we all huddled up around a TV with the blankets and the pillows in one room together the four of us, and none of us wanted to use the other rooms. We just wanted to be together because I already felt like we had left our home, and now we were going to be in separate rooms. So it was just it was very lonely when we first got here. And how did you all adjust to life in America? For example, what is your parents do for a living? My parents did from the get go, they started investing in property. And that was probably one of the best things they ever did. They started buying some real estate. My dad was really both of them. They were such a good team when it came to managing their money and working together to start a business and just thinking of how they would support us. We never felt like we lacked anything as kids. Even if they felt it, we never felt it. All right, so you're ten year old kid. In the U.S., new country, how is your English at the time? Did you have you had gone to a Catholic school in Tehran, so did you already speak English? You know, it's really that's a great question because when I got here, I actually felt like I didn't speak English at all barely and I remember that. I used to mix up the word want and have. And it was so difficult for me when I got here. I was in fourth grade and my parents put me into school and I remember her that I pretty much didn't understand anything that the teacher said, and at one I had really poor eyesight and my parents didn't know that because on top of not speaking the language, I didn't want to be called four eyes. So I didn't want to tell them that I couldn't see. So it was a pretty miserable move for me. I felt really out of place and the kids laughed at me all the time.

Sc Johnson Kat Nori California Prada Iran Tehran EPA Apple Walnut Creek Bay Area Montgomery U.S.
A highlight from MBA1923 Extended Interview: Amir Salihefendic  Building a 25 Million User Business

The $100 MBA Show

01:06 min | Last week

A highlight from MBA1923 Extended Interview: Amir Salihefendic Building a 25 Million User Business

"This is a special type of episode a new format that we've been experimenting with recently. We've been getting a lot of positive feedback about this type of episode. It's a little bit longer, a little bit more in depth so you're in for a treat. Today, we are so lucky to have today's guest. I sat down with a mere cell offended who is the CEO and founder of. Duis is the company behind two newest, which is one of the most popular apps, period. A productivity app that has over 25 million users. Over the years, I'm here and I have become fast friends, but I wanted to bring them on the show. I wanted to have a discussion with him and get into his beautiful mind because it's really a gold mine in there. So many great things we discuss and uncover in this discussion from his biggest failure as an entrepreneur to why he doesn't really stress his numbers too much to the power of freedom and his advice for those who are starting out. Today's episode is so, so interesting. I love the discussion. I can't wait to share

Duis
How to Avoid Sacrificing Quality Work for Speed and Deadlines

The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

02:32 min | 2 months ago

How to Avoid Sacrificing Quality Work for Speed and Deadlines

"This week. We're going to talk about whether or not we sacrifice. Quality in the name of speed or deadlines or something to that effect. This was a topic recently in conversations in in thoughts that i've been having if you've been on a team that has a very very tight deadline whether or not you've decided to trade off scope or certain milestones or even potentially changing some of the standards with which you develop software there. There's some things that we can control so while while quality can be subjective. Certainly there are. There are items with which we can agree on. Yeah that's a good question. I mean i think. I think i think that you can i. I think that you can have a team agreed. Standard or especially a majority agreed standard. I think that you can definitely have a team standard. But it's very very very unlikely that it will be your personal standard so with that in and we started talking a little bit behind the scene just to get a feel for what types of things we wanted to discuss include brought up your standards versus their standards versus team standards. Even i i would when i joined a team or when i'm new to a team when the team changes significantly whether that's new team members added or team members leave or for various other reasons. It's worthwhile often. I find to have that kind of team norms discussion. So that you can set the expectation so that you can discuss what what you expect from from each other what you expect from one another the types of things that we determine what quality is in how we define that. Maybe i think those things can certainly be valuable I it's good to have a discussion It depends on how the discussion is held though. Like if you were to stop air if you were to say some time in the in the in the team like oh well. I think that we should all be doing unit tests and the rest team kind of sit there for a second and looks at you and they're like oh okay i mean we can. I guess we can. We can do. We can try unitas than they're probably not going to do. Unit

Unitas
CEO of X2, Mark French, on How His Product Has Disrupted the Market

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

02:06 min | 2 months ago

CEO of X2, Mark French, on How His Product Has Disrupted the Market

"Now. A couple of questions. I have here for you one. Is you guys are operating this business. And i would say that it is. It is disruptive what you're doing from what i can tell. The brand seems to be disruptive. What do you accredit the the rapid growth to do. What do you attribute the rapid growth to why is it. Being such a disruptive success. I would say there's more people coming to the category now right so there's certain people that would never try an energy drink right that more health conscious consumer really was not interested in putting in other bodies some of these beverages that had you know some you know ingredients that you can't even pronounce so as more people. Are you know looking for energy solutions. Whether it's a coffee drinker. That wants something. A little bit cleaner lighter Or you know somebody that might be drinking other energy drinks but is trying to live a healthier lifestyle. You know. i think that's really where the disruption comes in also. There's never really been a brand that you know was built in the locker room in this energy category right so you know. We're really fortunate that Death net recently featured us as a sports drink. Innovator we're not really a sports drink. We're not a hydration drink or something that you might take Before you want to do some exercise or if you wanna just have a little bit more energy and focus throughout the workday but you wanna have it with clean healthy ingredients and you know the other reason why people might consider us to be somewhat. Disruptors is just because of you know this athlete a model. there really haven't been athletes like saquon. Barkley labonte david kawhi leonard and now kendall tool who's one of the top peleton athletes That are joining a company like ours as shareholders and partners in the business. I think it's just you know shedding some light that there is renovation innovation in the energy category and that's where we could probably be looked at as being somewhat

Barkley Labonte David Kawhi Le Kendall
Google Search Console API as the New Table Stakes With Noah Learner

Voices of Search by Searchmetrics

02:23 min | 2 months ago

Google Search Console API as the New Table Stakes With Noah Learner

"Talk about a google search consoles. Api you know. I think of what's on google. Search console is being directionally interesting. I understand if my sites being crawled. I can get a sense of what are the queries and position and rank. I never know what to do with half of this stuff. And just doesn't seem very actionable. And i always look at it. I'm like wow. This date is really powerful. Bo what do i do so talk to me about a how you're able to make it so performance and then be what are some of the takeaways you can glean from pulling data out of google search console. So how did we make it so performance so the first thing that we did was we knew we had to get the data up into big query or another database platform like it because that is a data source would be screaming fast and data studio so learning all the technology to get the data from an api into big query. Was kind of that sweet spot or the skull that was necessary in terms of what we actually learned from looking at all the data which is really the important part in. What how we make it. Actionable there's a couple care is that i think are really important. To focusing on the first is this concept of position bucking and that's where you can look at The query neural by position. And then we split up all the serbs into different segments whether it's page one positions one through ten or striking distance which depending on the type of agency that we're working with might be positions four through fifteen if the really all about getting stuff into the local pack or maybe in if there were mainly inorganic than its position six through fifteen so position but getting like crazy powerful. The next thing is this concept of striking distance which i just sort of alluded to is trying to find all the queries that are just on the edge of being super visible and being Look at them analyze them and then understand what we need to do by adding content in meaningful ways on page to drive results for those striking distance. The third thing that i think is really killer and something. I'm really proud of. Is this concept of multi-layered filtering. So you'll have your data and then have unp teen different ways to filter it really quickly so you can go from all of the data to actionable insights really

Google BO
Re-using Your Entrepreneurial Skills to Build Amazing New Businesses with Doug Goldstein

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:10 min | 2 months ago

Re-using Your Entrepreneurial Skills to Build Amazing New Businesses with Doug Goldstein

"One thing that i admire about you as a you do a great job. Leveraging virtual team members to create not old but new income streams so for fire nation. Share some examples of how you've done this most recently. I was thinking about this concept of gratitude. And in fact john i will tell you again. You inspired me. Yes you've been a journal or for many many years you manage spoken about and you got people going. I like a certain. Take on it. That i thought was different. Which was i thought that the concept of constant happiness was something that people should be talking about. My concern was people would write in their journal once a week twice a week when tonight and i wanted i believe that by by writing in a journal about your your the things. You're grateful for that's how you're going to develop happiness so this was my idea and i decided you know i wanna share this with people and i experimented frank bay experiment that i myself a lot and then i said i'm going to make this happen. What resources do i have so having now been an entrepreneur for thirty years. My day job is that i'm an investment advisor but i've done a lot of a lot of other entrepreneurial things let's say frequently around books but but the book is just the platform that i can launch an idea so i said i'm gonna write the constant happiness gratitude journal. But who do. I have to help me and i have a whole list of people. I've got my video guy who was able to make fantastic videos about it. I have all my five or and upward people and of course using and finding new ones. There was fantastic. You know attacked john. When i wanted to do the internal layout for the book i said i'm just gonna hire to interior layout companies and see which one i like best. Ooh just the idea that. I was able to to have people around me. Who would be able to help me do everything that i shouldn't be doing. That's an eye opener. And i mean you've spoken to many entrepreneurs and you know it's so hard for them to give away the work because they think only i can really do the layout because i understand the cover design or the writing the editing and that's just not true every the best entrepreneurs focus on one thing that they do

Frank Bay John
How To Create Your Own ROI-Driven B2B Content Strategy

Voices of Search by Searchmetrics

01:31 min | 2 months ago

How To Create Your Own ROI-Driven B2B Content Strategy

"Live in a more distributed world because everybody was forced into their house. It's a more digital age to talk to me about how that is impact. The creation of content and how people are staffing out their content production teams definitely so personally for autho didn't affect us a whole lot and that's because one of the drums banging for a while that i think like the rest of the world has kind of had to light. Come up wake up to a hard way is that i think more marketers sent a focus on like creativity and ingenuity and those things are good because it comes more natural to those types of people. But i think that they need to be more process oriented. And i think about operations kinda hat or the operations might set something that's often lacking and so what i mean by. That is the way we think of content seo and all. This stop is a huge factory. Right where you have. It's like a manufacturing process where you have specialized roles and you have an seo person or a strategy person working with a writer who's also working with an editor who's also working with an account manager designer. And he's i since collaborating a synchronous -ly across time zones and everything else and until you have that infrastructure built outs you're gonna struggle hitting both quality and scale meeting. Most people like for example companies can find one good writer but they can't find like hundred writers or they can't they do ten articles. A month of began do one hundred articles a month and so usually one of those things breakdown when you try to hit longer. Bigger scale usually quality starts to drop. And that's usually an indication of you don't have the processes and figured out you have the team and infrastructure figured out

How Agile Can Change How Marketers Think, Work, and Succeed

Marketing Spark

02:02 min | 2 months ago

How Agile Can Change How Marketers Think, Work, and Succeed

"We've danced a little around the idea of agile marketing. Maybe you can take a step back. And i don't want you to dumb it down. But i'd like you to explain or define. What is agile marketing. And what's the difference between agile marketing and the way that we currently many companies currently do marketing so to start with very. I'm gonna make it simple because we can carried office in the nomenclature and then here that with really down that rabbit hole. It really is a better organizational effectiveness in. I like to call it. Modern marketing management simplest way. To think about it is that it's the ability to change the way that we think that we were in that we share and we get to creating that highest customer value power is mentioned in in the mindset values and the volt enough the core everything about the swot analysis again it really quits position of building new internal strength and then take Disease new opportunities put in this way. It at leader changes its transformative. Because it changed our beliefs again about how we move from selling more servicing our customers Change our behaviors in terms of looking at the highest value that we can create and produce market and learn from immediately and the actions of you take also are transformative in terms of being more empirical more iterative and again more transparent in what we're doing and an howard driving value and then how we're looking at ourselves to continuously improve thing or something a lot of work Sometimes it works sometimes. It doesn't we need to kind of bring that as an inch people what we do how we go about it and how we're learning long way. I think there's this notion that marketing is just the you know the arts and crafts under department covering between the lines words on things we talk about stuff and metrics that nobody else cares for marketing. I think this is our chance to really start to marry up where we come from and where we find ourselves with digital and really put the stamp of business strategy and and business comes on

Howard
Becoming Technology Forward and Data Reliant in Marketing with Roku's Sweta Patel

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

02:13 min | 2 months ago

Becoming Technology Forward and Data Reliant in Marketing with Roku's Sweta Patel

"How do you think about driving. Growth within marketing. And what do you feel like has changed over the years And the businesses that you've worked in can i. It's a really really complicated place to be right now to be a marketa it not only. Do you need the traditional side of marketing. But you really need to be technology forward and data the line. I think i think of them in three buckets like the way i look at these. Three levers are just kind of poke into a minute. And i looked at them in every job that i've had but it's just gotten much worse. Not only is is in enough growth to be had but you'll losing resource is having to just become more and more efficient and those three things i tend to focus on. Everything is moving so foster and humans can't keep up with it. I mean you need to be able to mock it and deliver personalized experiences at i. Cool at the speed over tick-tock swipe if you get to the consumer that quickly especially five years from now the relevance of you being around is just is just going to get northern and then with talking about like things like ticked off. The media. Landscape is so fragmented right. Keep her on instagram. In their own take talkin will watching. Tv they're watching multiple devices. And so you warm often channels than we've ever had before people are all over the place and they need to get to them quick us. So that's a challenge at roku the way we're trying to handle these things is we've really started to invest into a crm. And so all go. But before i got here we have channels. You know what they call multichannel marketing. We did that. Everyone's trying to do that and everyone's trying to do on me channel marketing but the way we're focusing about is really trying to now and get the power about platform out and one of my roles here at here. At roku is becoming hyper focused on really building tools automations so that the marches can actually be feeding the systems and and making the systems v. The brains of what we do is all this manual curation and execution that needs to happen.

Roku
A highlight from Ep111: How To Be Powerful Around Your Podcast - Tate Siemer

The Podcast On Podcasting

04:37 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Ep111: How To Be Powerful Around Your Podcast - Tate Siemer

"Our listener today. One thing about your podcast is you started out your show as I think a co host. Yes. And then something happened, something phased out and then you became solo. Yeah. And I want you to kind of talk a little bit about that. And I was the same way. There was three hosts in the very beginning and it went down to two and then sometimes two and then it ended up being just me. And I think that there's pros and cons to hosting your own show. And I think there's pros and cons from connecting with others and starting a show with co hosts, there's quite a bit. So I want you to start if you don't mind, go back in history as you're starting your podcast. You have one or two co hosts. While you were thinking and why it went to one and kind of any lesson that you have for our listeners, should they be starting maybe with a co host or by themselves? What's better? And is there any tips or tricks or strategies? Before I get there, I should say something else that Tate and I have in common. We both love mountain biking. So he and his dog Joey, they hike and bike all the time. And the last time that I visited Utah, I'm a huge mountain biker. I'm not very good. So we'll just get that out first and foremost if people are thinking that I'm doing all these crazy jumps. I don't really do that. But the point is that I love it. And Tate and I and one of his business partners, we went biking out in it was like Draper? Yep. That was a lot of fun. That was a really cool trail. Jump in, and let's just start from when did you start this podcast? Yeah, so I got to say, first of all, that you know this atom and I've said this before and other forums, but I have you to thank for being in the apartment space to begin with that particular speech that you gave at the Rhea event got me to your event later that spring in April of 20 19. It was at least 18 back. Yeah. That was 18. That's correct. And that was really a foundational weekend for me. So listeners like whatever your industry go to these national events, they are life-changing. And by the VIP passes, go all out, really participate heavy because my life was changed by Adam, in particular in a very big way and by all of the people that he's surrounded himself with and at this event and his life. So thank you again sir. So one of the things that you taught started teaching me very early is to start looking at being a thought leader at some level. You got your start in the meetup group world. And I believe that came before podcasting for you if I'm not mistaken. And then man, you did amazing things with your podcast and other thought leadership. Throw on a huge national events with 600 attendees and that sort of thing. So you were a great example of what to do in the thought leadership world. But it wasn't until I was in a paid mentorship, coaching mastermind with Corey Peterson and mutual friend of ours. And he looked at all of us where there were about 15 of us in the room at this mastermind he said, you know, you guys are paying me a fair amount of money to teach you here. And I'm telling you each that you should all have your own podcast. And that's when I really took note and really started to take it seriously. Before I thought about the podcast thing, it was going to be very daunting. A lot of hard work. And overwhelming, like, from all the different tasks that need to take place from scheduling the recruiting the guests recording the episode editing doing the marketing, like getting the word out, all that stuff is, there's a lot to it. And it felt very big at the time. And so there was a guy with me, a good friend. He's still a good friend. And the mastermind and he and I kind of looked at each other and were like, let's do this. It felt a lot less daunting to have a partner that I was accountable to. That would shoulder ideally half the workload, if not more and we would work together and he and I just had a great friendship, good chemistry and everything. So we got off to a good start and what I found pretty much immediately

Tate Draper Joey Corey Peterson Utah Adam
A highlight from MBA1922 A Different Way to Charge for Services  + Free Ride Friday

The $100 MBA Show

04:34 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from MBA1922 A Different Way to Charge for Services + Free Ride Friday

"And my current website just does not look professional enough. So I made this offer to them. I said, listen, how about you don't pay me anything? Nothing upfront. But I design your website. We launch it to the world. And if it helps convert more customers, then I want to percentage of the additional sales. Basically, I became an investor of their business. And they're like, well, how is this going to work? Well, I said, well, how much money are you making right now with your current website? And they quoted me their figure. And I said, okay, anything above that figure, I want 50% after we launched the new website. If we launched a new website and it helps convert more customers and get you more sales exactly what you want. I want 50% of all the sales that come in. They were kind of shocked that I offered to do this as something they'd never heard of before. But then they said they're not sure. Then I was like, well, why aren't you sure? You just said that you don't have 5 to $10,000. I will do it for you without you paying anything right now. If the site generates more sales, I want 50% of all the new sales above what you're getting now. Well, then they said, I'm afraid that you'll do an amazing job and you're going to generate so many sales that I'm going to end up paying more than your original flat fee. So I said, let me get this straight. You're afraid that I'm going to help your business tremendously. And you're going to get all the sales that you want and you're going to end up paying me for that. But at the same time, you don't want to pay me up front for the work that's going to help you grow your business. They said, reluctantly and laughing, yeah, I guess. And I said, well, that's the choice you need to make. I'm going to take on all the risk. I mean, I'm putting in all the work and all the time, betting on myself and betting on the fact that I can help your business get more sales. And if you believe in that, then we can move forward. And in all honesty, the counter offered and said, hey, so what if we do this until I pay you $5000? Meaning that I'll give you 50% until it equals $5000. I said, no, I'm not a bank. This is not alone here. I'm taking a risk. I'm taking risk I can launch a site and your sales might not increase. So I need to be rewarded for that risk. You could see me kind of like as a founder in your business that is taking equity for the time I'm putting in in the work I'm doing that's a major part of your business. At that point, they kind of saw it and they were like, yeah, I guess you're right. I can't have my cake and eat it too. And then value pricing was born in my business. And I did this with all my other services as well. And I actually pass this on to my friends who had other service based businesses. People that ran Facebook ads for their clients, and they said, hey, I'll run your ads for free, but I'm going to use my affiliate link and get 30, 40% commission on all the sales. Is that okay with you? That sounds great. I'm making money and you're making sales for me and you're running ads for me. So at the end of the day, value based pricing is based on what the outcome is. What does the customer actually want? Give them the outcome and get yourself a better price. Even if that price is not sort of like an investment or you get a commission, even it's helping the customer, and you can show the benefit. A good example of this is a service that profit well offers called retain. And it's basically a dunning service, which means that sometimes when you're running a business, credit cards fail, customers have a failed transaction because maybe the credit limit or the card has expired or various reasons. Their job is to chase that down and try to secure that payment try to recover that payment. Normally, without the service, you're just doing it yourself, or you're just losing money. Retain recovers this for you and charges you a fee for it. And their fees based on how much they recover. So it's like a percentage, like 20% of what you recover. So if they recover a $1000 a charge you $200. And for the business owner, this is an O brainer. You're making me a $1000. You're recovering a $1000. I didn't have before. Paying you $200 is a no brainer. And in fact, that you recover the cash flows and then charge you. So this is a great way to offer a service at a no brainer type of pricing. At the end of the day, the job I need done is somebody to recover my payments, and therefore, when they do it, I'm happy to pay it because the value they're giving me is way more than what they're charging.

Facebook
A highlight from 231: Faith and Courage - with Jedidiah Jenkins

RISE Podcast

00:49 sec | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from 231: Faith and Courage - with Jedidiah Jenkins

"So many hours of every single week, reading and listening to podcast and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life, and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guests are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast. First

Youtube Rachel Hollis
A highlight from Ep110: How To Get Booked As A Guest On Other Podcasts

The Podcast On Podcasting

07:58 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Ep110: How To Get Booked As A Guest On Other Podcasts

"Before he even got started with him. Just to be honest, I think he was already ranking like either top 10% or top 5% in the world before we ever got started with him. And it's like doubled. I think it started at ten and now it's top 5% literally in the world. Out of two point 7 million podcasts. Not only that, but Steven is in the real estate space. So he and I have known each other and been, I wouldn't say close friends. We don't go and hang out, but we have a good mutual respect for each other. And we know each other really well, which is one of the reasons why you reached out when he found out that we can help him with his show. And somebody that works with him like his right hand person basically called me out on something that I said. I said, yeah, we'd be happy to help you with a template for getting Steven on other people's podcasts. We would be happy to put this out and create it with you and so she recently reached out to my team. And she was like, hey, where is this basically? Can you still do this? Are you still happy to do this for us? So I took a little bit of extra time. Today, just so I could create this template. And I thought, you know what? Since I know that it's not just Steven that needs this. It's probably you the listener who needs this as well. So I spent a little bit of time making sure that this template would work for almost anybody out there and you can literally just go to grow your shutout com for such templates. It's yours for free. I basically worked for them. And I want to give it to you, too. So here is some of the reasons why it's worded the way that I worded it in this template. Hey, a lot of people have reached out to me personally with the two different podcasts that I've run. The creative real estate podcast that I sold to Jason. And to this podcast, the podcast on podcasting, many people, many companies, many third parties, constantly reach out to me and basically ask, would you like this person to come on your show? Or they'll suggest, I think this person would be great on your show because I took all of those, actually, I can not take the credit for it. Who works with me, shout out treasury. She is amazing. She's my right hand person. I had her put together in one Google Doc. All of the outreach. Well, okay, she probably didn't put all of them. But she put a lot of them. There was a good handful of all of these. And I'm like, that's garbage. I would say no, I would say no, that's garbage. I like this one. This one's really good. I like half of this, but I don't like the whole of it. So I created a template from all of those other templates. And I think that it's something special. And as I go through the template, now, I think it's important, not only do you download the template if you want to get on other people's podcasts. But I think that it's important for you to listen to this episode as I explain why some of these things. Because a lot of it is the way that we say things generally can support our agenda. Can support us in making sure that these things don't fall on deaf ears. We don't want them to be ignored. And so I've read a whole bunch of sales books, right? Different never split the difference. And how to win Friends and influence people. And they're just a bunch of other ones. I couldn't name them all, but great books that I've learned small things here and there. And in this template is a little bit of all of those things. So let's just dive right into it. I'm going to pause every now and again. I'll read the thing and then I'll say, why did I word it that way? Instead of a way that I heard. So here goes. Number one is the subject line that I put in here. And you can definitely change the subject line. It's totally fine. It basically says name, I've got a suggestion for your podcast. So it's basically like that. You're saying you're talking to the host, and that's actually in the subject line. Suggestion for your podcast. And the reason I did that is because I was thinking to myself, I wanted to be clear, what is this all about? I don't want to bait and switch anybody. I don't want them to think they're going to get one thing and get something else. I want it to be pretty freaking clear. What are they going to get when they open this email? So it's got their name in it. The host name. And then suggestion for a podcast guest. And then it just says hi host. Now, most people that send things to me. I wouldn't say most, but yeah, it's slightly more than half, so technically that's still the most often the most used is deer atom. When someone is sending something into me and they want their friend or their boss or the person as their third party, we've had a couple of those people on this podcast. When they say the word dear, I already don't like it. It already doesn't seem like I would normally talk to regular humans. And so I get rid of the deer. I don't use that word. I say hi or hey or even what's up? What would I say if I was talking to a friend? That's what I want to say to this person. Not dear John, dear Adam. Hey, Adam, hi Adam. And I put an exclamation. So that's how it starts. And then I put in the salutation. Happy new year. A happy holidays. I hope you're having a good summer. I hope your week is going well. Happy Labor Day. Happy Thanksgiving, whatever it is. Whatever part of the season that you might be outreaching, you put the salutation happy that happy Labor Day. Do people say happy Labor Day? Well, whatever you say, I would put the little salutation in there. It's short and sweet. And then I just basically say, I'm reaching out to see if it's helpful for me to share a great guest recommendation or not. Question mark. With question marks when we use them in our copy when I say copy, I really mean our sales copy, our virtual cells letters. Our social media posts and things like that. The question, what I love about it, is it really gets the person to basically stop and think. It helps them to basically stop the scroll. If it's on social media and you put a question mark, it stops them from scrolling. You have to think more about a question than you do when somebody just tells you. And most people that are doing these outreaches are just telling. That's all they do. It's just tell tell, tell, they don't really ask or propose any questions. And so it's kind of like we ignore it. It goes in one eye and out the other when we're reading these emails. And so for me, I am reaching out to see if it's helpful for me to share a great guest recommendation or not. Now most people when you say if a great guest recommendation, they're like, that gets them curious. So it incites some curiosity. It piques their interest. Well, what does that mean? Tell me more about that. Yeah, a great guest. I'm going to continue to read on. And I put in the or not with a question mark because look, when we only are doing the positive, human beings have learned over time that it's like, hey, I want to see if it's helpful for me to do a great guest recommendation. Question mark. If that's all we'd said, people are like, well, this person is trying to sway me. This person is trying to sell me this person's has an agenda. And so I just let it be in their court by saying, should I do this or should I not? That actually does help human psychology to be more open minded to the thing. And then it just says email is to let you know about guest. I put in parentheses

Steven Adam Treasury Jason Google John
A highlight from MBA1921 How to Easily Write a Valuable Blog Post

The $100 MBA Show

03:17 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from MBA1921 How to Easily Write a Valuable Blog Post

"One of the easiest ways to produce great valuable blog posts is to break down the process into small steps. Running a blog post is like building a house. It can seem overwhelming. How am I going to do all the things you need to do to build a house? From serving the land to building the foundation to the exterior to the anterior to the furnishings to the lighting to everything you think, oh my gosh, this is so much. Where do I begin? How do I start? And for most people, they just spend so much time wasted on Instagram looking at beautiful homes. Same thing with a blog post. Many people will just spend lots of time on the Internet, searching how to write a blog post, what makes a great blog post and it really isn't helpful because you're really just wasting time or procrastinating because you don't have steps to take. Now, I'm not a prolific writer. But I know how to put together a pretty good blog post. Thawing the steps that I created for myself over the years. So I want to share these sips with you to make things simple for you. Let's start from the beginning. Every blog post starts with a topic. And the topic is really half the work, okay? But maybe they come up with a topic and they write the blog post and they put the multimedia and all that kind of stuff in the post all in one shot. I think it's actually quite easy to come up with all your top topics. So you want to write in the future of your blog. Separately from the time you write it. So you just go and take the next topic and start going. So my first step is actually taking a big step back and saying, you should dedicate some time to just coming up with all the topics you want to cover on your blog. Now, I want to put a little note here. Your topic is not necessarily the title of your blog post. Titles need to be crafted, they need to be molded. We're going to get into SEO and all that other stuff later on. But right now, all you're just thinking about is ideas. What ideas you want to cover? So these topics don't need to be well written. They just need to be written, and you'll be putting down. I literally have a spreadsheet with all my topics. They do this to the podcast as well, by the way. Later on, I craft a better title. And actually, I work with my team on the title after it is written, but right now, the first step in this whole process is have a topic bank. Now, some of these topics you're going to know you want to write about, because you know your audience, you know your product, you know your topic, you know your business. You know your market. You know there's certain topics you want to cover. But those ideas will run out quickly. And I like to have 30, 40, 50 topics in my bank at all times. One of the easiest ways to come up with great topics for your blog is to use an SEO tool. You can use something like a refs or serpent is what we use and basically these tools will allow you to know what people are searching for when it comes to your website when it comes to your topic when it comes to your business, your market, what phrases what titles what things are they putting in the search box and Google when it comes to your market. For example, for webinar software ninja, on

Instagram Google
A highlight from MBA1920 Q&A Wednesday: Do I Need to Offer Free Shipping?

The $100 MBA Show

01:23 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from MBA1920 Q&A Wednesday: Do I Need to Offer Free Shipping?

"Not. First of all, it's really important to understand your customers. A lot of people hear this a lot and they're just like, okay, I get it. I need to know who my customers are. No. When I say that, I mean, talk to them. Get on the phone with them. Get on a video call with them, and you'll also talk to hundreds of people, you could talk to half a dozen. But the point here is that you need to understand your customer, what they value and what they're happy to pay for. By speaking to them, you might find out that shipping is really low on the priority list. They don't really care. They're willing to pay for shipping as long as the quality of products gray. Or maybe that the shipping is fast. Or maybe they're just concerned about being able to find their size. Your customers have needs. And not all needs are created equal. A lot of us think that our customer as well. Everything and they're all have the same value. No. You need to understand what they value and at what priority. What level do they value each thing? And you're not going to know this unless you ask them. And one of the easiest things is just to ask a current customer that has bought for me before, ask them what they're buying journey was like, how they found out about you why they bought from you. And then you can get into the details of what they value. Is it price of the product itself? Is it shipping? Is it the speed of shipping? Is it the process of buying? How much of each of these things do they really care about?

A highlight from Ep109: Powerful Strategies To Create Content - DK Jonah

The Podcast On Podcasting

05:50 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Ep109: Powerful Strategies To Create Content - DK Jonah

"Today we have DK dal kourou Jonah on the podcast. She's an interesting person. I think you're going to enjoy listening to her story. I had to look up word and I had to look this up because she claims herself as one of these. It's called a multipotentialite. And so I was like, what does that mean? And apparently it's someone with a lot of different passions and interests. And so part of what I'm saying here is she's got two different podcasts, but she actually has like ten podcasts in her brain that need to get out and she's excited about, and she wants to add value in all of these ten ways. And so we want to go back DK. We want to dive back to the day that you started that very first podcast. What were you thinking what were you going through? Or are you scared about what are you excited about? What did you do right? What did you do wrong? And I know I just asked you like ten questions. So let me turn it over to you. Fantastic. Hi, everyone. My name is decay. Thanks Adam bob and me. As you describe multiple. So I had the idea for ten podcasts and I was always giving people that did podcast advice on saying, why don't you do this? Why don't you promote to dismantle, why don't you start? I'm like, okay, so I did a poll and I asked people for the name suggestion. I think once we need to understand is we're creating podcasts for people to listen to. So I asked if they wanted me to call is the antisocial media managers podcast guide because I'm an introvert and acting I could be antisocial sometimes. And people loved that name. And then we add the introverts guide to content creation. And everyone was like, it was 50 50. The introverts guide was a little better because people said, we know you're not antisocial. You are reserved, you're an introvert. So if you're calling yourself antisocial, then you're just doing it all wrong, and I said, okay, so I went for the name. But first I was nervous because I had a mic. I had everything. I didn't know what to do about music. I tried audacity. It didn't work for me. I tried garage, but it didn't work for me. I just wasn't the tech person, so I'm like, oh, okay. I've announced it. Now I'm stranded. So the first mistake I made was I created an episode and then I went silent, complete silence. Everybody's like, DK was happening. And I'm like, I'll be back soon. I'll be back soon. And then I add to tell myself what I tell others because I think sometimes people that do brand in and stands for orders. We always give it advice, but we don't take it. So we meet the first mistake I made was giving out advice that I did not take, not to have in a script, just freelancing and speaking from the top of my head. And I would just come. My name is DK junior and I say everything I want to say. But I do have a script. I could have points, I didn't have an intro. I didn't have an outro. I was just like, all right, good job. Bye. And those are the mistakes I made when I started my podcast, but it's been interesting because I think sometimes we learn by doing. If you don't start, you will never know what's right or wrong. So you could do all the research you want to do. When it's time to implement, that's when you have to start getting the work done. So for me, my first mistake was starting and stopping. And then starting with a script or a plan, no intra no outro just full on talking. I know what it feels like DK to not quite practice what you preach. I understand the feeling of so DK, one thing that I've noticed is with me, I hear what you're saying and also I have been listening and learning from you. And I noticed that you and I have a lot in common. One thing not put you down or to put me down, but I think all of us are really like this. A lot of times we don't really practice what we preach. We'll say, hey, this is the right thing to do. This is what you need to do. This is, but then when we put ourselves into the picture, we kind of let ourselves miss on a few of those things. You've shared quite a bit of really good stuff. And I'm curious, what are the big takeaways that the listeners needs to do? And if they're going to preach it to someone else, they've got to practice it in order to get success with their podcast. Okay, thanks, Adam. I think yes, good at telling people what to do, but the implementation, execution? No. I think for me, before you start executing plan, I have a strategy. And the very first thing you have to understand is you, your voice, how you talk, and as an introvert, most people feel that introverts will not be able to offer that a podcast. So we looked down on ourselves and I was interested to understand that you have a voice on introvert as a place in the market, so does an extrovert and we can both exist in the same markets place. So what you need to do is understand who you are and accept yourself. If you are not a comedian, don't try cracking jokes. If you are not someone that speaks fluently and can do it impromptu, don't do it. Understand yourself. So I understand them and introverts and I learned in a different way from people from other people. That was a frosting I had to do. Understanding myself understanding my voice, then I also understand something else that I have skills experiences and what I call your own fat advantage. Everyone has an advantage that they over orders that is unfair to orders. Some people say, oh, I don't have the experience. I never went to school. I did not have the education. So I can not speak on certain topics. But the truth is, everyone, your life experiences are major depressing you are today.

Adam Bob Adam
A highlight from 230:  What Makes Us Different, and Alike - with Khalil Gibran Muhammad and Ben Austin

RISE Podcast

01:49 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from 230: What Makes Us Different, and Alike - with Khalil Gibran Muhammad and Ben Austin

"Today I'm sitting down with the hosts of the new podcasts, some of my best Friends are. Khalil gibran Muhammad is a Harvard historian and author of the condemnation of blackness. And in every episode, he sits down with his childhood best friend award winning journalist Ben, Austin. They talk about their interracial friendship, using pop culture and history to explore the absurdities and the intricacies of race and racism. And today on the show, we are talking about a little bit of everything, exploring what it looks like to talk openly and honestly about the hard stuff. And about the good stuff, what makes us different what makes us alike. And what are the things we can learn from each other along the way? This is my conversation with Khalil and Ben. Hi. I'm Rachel Hollis, and this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week, reading and listening to podcast and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life, and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guests are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast. What I've really curious about is how you guys met. All right.

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A highlight from MBA1919 What Metrics Should You Track in Your Business?

The $100 MBA Show

01:38 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from MBA1919 What Metrics Should You Track in Your Business?

"You're a listener of the show for some time, you know how much we stress profit. You gotta make sure that you're making more than your spending. And many online merchants struggle to keep track of their bottom line. This is why I'm excited to share with you be profit. Be profit helps online sellers discover their true profits and keep track of all their expenses in one intuitive dashboard. Profit supports top ecommerce platforms such as Shopify, Amazon, whoo commerce, Wix, and more. In fact, their app was chosen by Shopify as their staff pick of July 2021. Would be profit you'll get a daily overview of your profit trends, marketing performance insights, generation of customer ports and a variety of predefined report templates. You'll be able to calculate your customer lifetime value and best of all optimization of profits. Get 15% off be profit using the discount code MBA 15 at be profit dot co. Again, that's be profit dot CO use discount code MBA 15. If you've been an entrepreneur for some time, if you've been in this world for a few years, you know that things can get complicated after a while. Many people will tell you you have to track this and that and the other thing in your business. I'm here to tell you sometimes when you're trying to focus on many different metrics, you don't focus on any. You got to have simple metrics so that you are focused and that you can actually practically measure your progress easily every day. Think about it. When you're driving a car, it's pretty simple. The dashboard tells you the most important

Shopify Amazon
A highlight from Ep108: Why You Should Be Your True Self

The Podcast On Podcasting

06:34 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Ep108: Why You Should Be Your True Self

"If you're holding back your natural personality because you want to seem more professional, if you're holding back your natural personality because you don't want to offend, either of those, cut it out now. Most hosts never achieve the results they hoped for. They're falling short on listenership and monetization, meaning their message isn't being heard and their show ends up costing them money. This podcast was created to help you grow your listenership and make money while you're at it. Get ready to take notes. Here's your host, Adam Adams. Welcome back to the podcast on podcasting. It is your friend Adam Adams. And I'm jumping in just discussing being ourselves. And I think it's interesting because it is a super fine line to try to be ourselves to the core and not everyone is natural or good at it. Now, here's the interesting thing. Some of us are little bit more reserved when we are with people that we don't know. And so in general, we're going to say that that's us being ourselves is being more cautious, more calculated, more careful, more conservative, those four cs. And what we're doing is we've learned through many years of being alive, we've learned that sometimes it can bite us if we're too forward. Sometimes it can hurt us or harm us or scare us if we just act like our real human self. Like we will feel judged we will feel a number of other things by simply being ourselves. And so we've decided that ourselves make sure you're understanding what I'm trying to say here. We've decided that our new self, the self that we want to portray is quiet and conservative. And we're not going to rock the boat. We're not going to be too energetic because if we're too energetic, it's going to come across as inauthentic. And so we actually hold ourselves back. From our normal energy. And there is a flip side to that. There is an opposite side to that. Some of us have watched a lot of YouTube videos and of people that are famous. And some of those people are more energetic than we feel we are. And they have lots of followers. They have lots of good content. It's inspiring and helps us feel like we aspire inspirational and aspirational. So we're looking at these, we're watching these, we're seeing them on a regular basis, and we're thinking to ourselves, man, if I want to add value, if I want to be famous, if I want to insert whatever you think that that person is getting by being loud and voiceless and outspoken and whatever, energetic, then will get the same results. So we need to be not ourself, and we need a copy what that person is doing. So this happens to almost all of us, like, if it doesn't happen to you, I'm quite impressed. And I still don't believe you. It happens to all of us. We're either holding ourselves back so that we don't rock the boat or we're pushing ourselves forward so that we get noticed. So we can leave our legacy. So we can make money. And I've got an example. As I mentioned, if you listen to the episode that came out, episode one O 6, today's episode is one O 8, by the way. If you listen to episode one O 6, we were talking about Maya and we're talking about her and getting into the groove of podcasting and things were holding her back, stuff like that. And I mentioned in that episode that I got inspired and as I got inspired, what I did is I wrote down a few people that have either been on the podcast or they have podcasts and I watched them or their clients of ours or somebody who's calling me and just literally asking me a question. And I wrote down a few names. And today we're talking about my good friend, Phil, better. And if you read it, it's just and then better. But if you hear it, it sounds like you're saying get well. Feel better. And I think that that's interesting, because I love the name. And my name also is memorable. Adam Adams triple-A. And I just think it's cool to have a name like that. So Phil is a genuine guy. He has a good guy. He is a helpful guy. And he always means well. I'm going to share an experience where I saw I think it was a Facebook story or a real or something. I'm trying to remember what it was. Or maybe it was a real that was turned into also repurposed as a Facebook story. So I saw it on Facebook, but I saw that it could have maybe been a TikTok as well. So I'm going to share that story about did I feel like Phil went overboard? This is a tongue twister, right? Did I feel like Phil was going overboard on his story or did I feel like he was holding himself back so that nobody would judge him? I'll share that here in a moment. But I would like to share that Phil and I are doing interview exchange. I actually don't know if his episode has come out on our podcast yet, nope, he's not on the list yet. So Phil, let's make sure you're coming on our show. I was actually on pills show. She'll actually has two shows. He's got the Phil better show. And he's got investing in yourself as well. And I was on the episode that came out, I think was may, I'm going to look it up. May 18th is when it released. I'll link to it in the show notes for you. But I was on his show as well. The point is that

Adam Adams Phil Youtube Facebook Maya
A highlight from Coinbase: Brian Armstrong

How I Built This

05:27 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Coinbase: Brian Armstrong

"Somebody has to be a little crazy to join something so early stage, where it's like, okay, it's two people with a laptop and a dream. And it was incredibly difficult to hire the first people. In the early days, I was just relentless. If I went to a networking event in Silicon Valley, I'd walk up to every single person, how you interested in crypto. I'm doing this company. It's early stage. We just, if you have any interest in joining, I'd love to catch up. Can I get your email? No, no, no, no, I'd get one guess after ten. I'd go 30 more. Brahman PR? It's how I built this. A show of innovators, entrepreneurs, idealists, and stories behind the movements. They built. I'm guy raz, and on the show today, how Brian Armstrong bought into Bitcoin before most people knew what it was and built coinbase, one of the biggest cryptocurrency exchanges in the world. In Yuval Noah harari's book sapiens, he argues that our societies are almost entirely constructed around stories. The story is we collectively believe in, have made it possible to invent the idea of a nation or a people or even a faith. So let me ask you a question. What is the value of gold? Why does it cost almost $60 a gram? You might say it's pretty and shiny, or that it's difficult to mine, or that it's useful in certain industrial applications. But all of these factors apply to many other metals that are much cheaper. The reason we value gold is because we believe in a story about gold, a story that tells us its valuable. Same with diamonds, same with the dollar bills in your wallet. None of these things have any intrinsic value. But they do have value because we all agree they do, which brings us to today's episode because we are going to be talking about something that is very challenging for many people to believe in. In part, because we can't see it or feel it. Digital ones and zeros with names like Bitcoin and Ethereum and polka dot and thousands more. In fact, there are more than 6000 cryptocurrencies in the world right now, with more being generated weekly and not a single one is issued by a central government. At least, not yet. As of this recording, the total value of these cryptocurrencies is hovering at around $3 trillion and the reason you know where I'm going with this because lots of people believe they have value. And some of the most powerful forces in global finance are starting to come around to the idea that the future of finance is like cryptocurrency, decentralized, untethered to any single government or Central Bank. Now, to be clear, there are still a lot of skeptics out there. But the people who are totally committed to crypto at least for the moment seem to have seen something long before the rest of the world did. Brian Armstrong is among them. Back in 2010, he was a talented computer coder with ambitions to start a new company. That year, he came across a mysterious document on the Internet about a new peer to peer digital currency called Bitcoin. That document envisioned a digital ledger that would guarantee the value of that currency. But we now call the blockchain. It's an idea that would change Brian Armstrong's life. And lead him to develop a way for people to buy and sell cryptocurrency. In 2012, when he founded coinbase, most of the people Brian came across, were deeply skeptical. But when the company went public 9 years later, coinbase's valuation hit $86 billion, and today, the company is among the largest crypto exchanges in the world. Now it's possible this is all a bubble and in 20 or 30 or 50 years? We'll look back on this time and wonder how anyone could have placed a value on any of this stuff. But Brian Armstrong is betting that he's right. Brian grew up in San Jose, California, the unofficial capital of Silicon Valley. Both of his parents were engineers, and as a kid, Brian would take apart computers and design websites for fun. In college, at rice university in Houston, he was always trying to figure out ways to start businesses. You know, I remit at that time, he and I were trying to think about how to make extra money around campus. And you could get a job at the library or the coffee shop and it paid, I don't know how much per hour. But one thing we realized, I think in upperclassmen told us this and they said, hey, you know, if you tutor high school kids, you can make like $60 an hour, and I was like, what? That's crazy. It was like 6 X, you know, the price of these other on campus jobs. Yeah. And so I think we just put like a small classified ad in the rice university newspaper.

Brian Armstrong Yuval Noah Harari Silicon Valley Coinbase Brian Central Bank Rice University San Jose California Houston
A highlight from MBA1918 Must Read: How to Win at the Sport of Business by Mark Cuban

The $100 MBA Show

00:48 sec | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from MBA1918 Must Read: How to Win at the Sport of Business by Mark Cuban

"For today's show comes from Google domains. I've been using Google domains for years. Why? Simply because they're the best value they are the easiest to use to register domain name and they have all the tools you need to run a great business online. A lot of entrepreneurs feel overwhelmed when it comes to starting a business, but when you're ready to introduce your new idea to the world, it starts with a name. Google domains makes it simple to establish your business identity with a domain name, a website, and a ton of other tools to help make your business a reality. Establish your business online and domains Google slash one zero zero MBA and use code one zero zero MBA for 20% off a new domain purchase or transfer. Terms and conditions apply, visit domains dot Google slash one zero zero MBA for more details.

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