Books

Calling all book worms and bibliophiles! Listen to the latest book news, reviews and author interviews aired from leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

Doug Knust on using life to influence your book

Discovered Wordsmiths

03:32 min | 4 d ago

Doug Knust on using life to influence your book

"Doug welcome back. Once again, since this is focused for writers. Tell us a little bit about the software and the services that you used when you were writing a book. Well, I I happened upon a r e g just I'm not really sure I probably just did a search and found it and and I use that actually as the the writing tool because I was able to then publish in the in the in the different formats that I needed to pass it on to Amazon for the self-published to self-publishing really Kindle Direct publishing. I mentioned to you earlier. I used my my daughter-in-law was my editor. My son was my graphic artist. And the rest of it was kind of just you know, she was string stuff. Nothing fancy Steven dead. Okay nice, but that's great because you can make a good quality product. Even if you're not spending thousands of dollars exactly you do. I mean, you don't even need a word processor. It's all online if that's what the way you want to do it if you're familiar with if you're comfortable with a word processor or what are I'm sure that works just fine. But God, yeah, you you don't even need the word processor, right? So when you we were talking a little bit about marketing you mentioned your target audience and I loved that because I mentioned may also do middle grade fiction and it is difficult because you want to write a book and you want to give it to the seventh and eighth graders, but they are not the ones buying it. The parents are the ones buying it and the teachers the and you mentioned grandparents that you get a lot grandparents. So what are you doing to try and reach that audience? I've had I've had pretty good success targeting grandparents on Facebook. And I you know being a being a car dealer and I'm doing a little marketing doing a little marketing. I have I I know that that demographic uses Facebook and especially, you know, the last six weeks during the Christmas season that was that was really surprisingly successful for me. I've used some of the Amazon ads kind of targeting some books that had the same subject matter had some reasonable success there as well. And then you know, I I've given a choice of books. I put a little card in there asking people to go online and and give me a review and to recommend it and you know, it's the word of mouth is still a pretty dog. Good way to advertise. Yes. And so I take it even though you were on Amazon that you actually probably sell quite a few printed books. Yeah, the vast majority of my books are printed of the sales are printed books and I think again when you think about the the target end reader off the 6th seventh and eighth grade boy, not many of them are running around with an electronic reader. Most of them are if they're going to read it. I think they're going to read the whole paper version of the book agreed.

Amazon Doug Steven Facebook
Interview With Tovah P. Klein

Doug Miles Media

05:19 min | Last week

Interview With Tovah P. Klein

"Joining us today in our book talk. Great to welcome the book that I'm sure there's got to help a lot of parents out there. it's called. How toddlers thrive what parents can do today for children ages two five to plant the seeds of lifelong success. Joined by my client from a new york today and dot com good to have a chance of chaplain for few minutes. How are you today. thank you for having me. i guess everybody says toddlers They're cute and everything but Those those are not easy time for for parents right. So this is a timely book. I would imagine. I hope i hope. So that's the goal. Because it can be. I think perplexing and quite a challenge. What is it about that age. Everybody goes through it. Obviously i guess some more than others. are worse than others. I should say that Is that is that the biggest issue parents have early on after maybe the first few weeks of an infant bring what happens. We have our infants and obviously we learned their communication and we comfort them. We feed them. We do a lot of holding them and taking care of them. But for the toddler who's up on their feet and certainly once they get language around the age of two. They're really separating and they're starting to realize. Hey my own person and i have my own ideas and they are not always what mommy or daddy wants but hey i really need mommy and daddy and i really love them and so they copy between this excitement about being out in the world and on their own and this real need to know that mommy or daddy are there for them no matter what and so i call it a push. Poll of the toddler years of is this their first attempts at becoming independent. And that's where you get. You know what people call wilfulness or defiance. It's really the that young child is still really baby. Saying hey i have my own ideas and that's where it starts to become a challenge for parents particularly for first time. Parents does the first child That's the first time they They have do disciplining right. Yeah i mean it's really about limits setting you know. We always talk about how much young children need from teens. Because if you have a routine that's like setting limit so for example. Mealtime we sit at a table. We eat our food at the. That's setting a limit when the child gets up. Oh you're all done. What it says to them is when we have a meal. We sit at the table. We don't walk around with food and you don't even have to go so far as discipline when you have a lotta routines routines around getting dressed. Bath time dinnertime. Anything that you do. Every day needs a routine. Because that's what helps children know what's going to happen and feel that they have some control almost a Security and they know what it's coming up next most exactly and they don't. They have no sense of time at this age. I think it's hard for adults any of us to really understand what it would be like to not have a sense of time because we look at our watches or we look at the day of the league. And we say oh. What do i do monday. Whereas young children have no capacity to tell time so those routines give them that organization right and you read. It makes them feel safe. All i know. What's next what what i was doing to remember when i was a little kid. Yeah you're right time As much slower than really an aspect of it to you know you know. That's what that's supposed to delight of. Toddlers is live in the moment so when you're in a joyful with their child they're right in know they're like you know playing with something and their joyous and sharing it with you but they don't think about. Oh i need to stop this in a few minutes and move on so the downside of living in the moment and not having the time is it's very hard to move from one thing to another like finish playing the weekend leave for school is very hard for them from your research talking to. I'm sure many many parents what what's the biggest mistake you see the parents dealing with that age group biggest mistake that any of us make particularly with our firstborns. But we can do this with any child is thinking that they're older than they are so our expectations become much more than what the child can actually do and part of that. Is you know once. Our children have language and can really talk and communicate better. First of all there's relief for us. I think there's relief for the child as well. I can communicate a little bit more but we start to think they're much older so one moment you're having a nice conversation saying remember when we go to dinner at that restaurant used to be quiet. Trust own yes. I know that the restaurant but then you get their now cancelled. Still can't keep quiet. That's because they're two or three or four and we think that they're much older than they are and so we kind of bring our expectations down a bit their level. We actually treat them differently in a more supportive way. And that's really what my book is valid. You understand something about how low development is but this is really also a really important crucial time kind of back off a little. Say okay. I understand what my child's doing and just switching parenting techniques. A little bit can really make life that much easier with a toddler.

New York
Interview With Cory Doctorow

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

04:15 min | Last week

Interview With Cory Doctorow

"Doctor. Wrote welcome to monica. Reads so tell us tell us more about the primus of tax service well attack surfaces the third novel in the little brother sequence at the first two little brother and homeland were young. Adult books about a character. Marcus yellow starts off. His very young teen who is caught in what amounts to a police state when his hometown of san francisco is bombed by terrorists and the department of homeland security swoop in and effectively suspend the constitution and all civil liberties and he and his mates form guerrilla army. Using things like hacked. Xboxes that use cryptographic secured wireless networking to outmaneuver the joss and eventually expelled them from the city and and restore human rights and civil liberties to the population and the third book attack. Surface is a standalone novel for adults and one of the first two are about people who are terrified. By the possibility of technology being used for oppression and excited about the possibility of technology being used for liberation. This third books protagonist is the young woman. Masha maximo who appears in the first two books as a kind of antagonised in the first book we meet her as a vhs contractor. Helping to spy on marcus and his friends even though she's of the same age and from the same background as them in the second book. She's a way bandit working to spy on jihadis and disrupt insurgent networks in iraq for the us government an enormous markup and when we meet her in the third book. she's just gone full cyber mercenary and her job is helping a thinly-veiled version of a company like the ns. Oh group to spy on pro democracy movements on behalf of post-soviet dictator so they can figure out who to round up and torture and murder and she has a reckoning with her conscience. She on the one hand has been spending her whole career finding ways to justify what she does Sneaking secrets out to marcus and his friends so they could blow the whistle wrongdoing or helping marcus escape from the da chest in the first book but by the third book she's really had to Devolve into some pretty self destructive conduct like helping the people that she spies on Defeat the tools that she herself as installing. And that's obviously not sustainable. And eventually she gets fired and worse has to run away from this post soviet republic and finds herself back in san francisco where she discovers to her horror that her childhood best friend who's now on a successor movement to black lives matter is being targeted by the very same cyber weapons that she herself spent her whole life building and while the first two books inspired a really large cohort of technologists and civil rights lawyers and writers and activists and security researchers and cryptographer offers who wanted to use their technical and legal powers for good and to stave off technological apocalypse. And dystopia this. Their book is aimed more at the people who rationalize their way. One decision a time in tech and other industries into participating in a vast confiscation of human liberty and human thriving in service to large corporations and oppressive governments and to talk about what it means to pull back from the brink. When you recognize one day that that you can no longer justify what you've been doing of course corey. That is exactly the situation. We find ourselves in absolutely i mean in two thousand eighteen. We saw twenty thousand google's walk off the job tech won't build it and tech solidarity and no tech for ice and other movements within the giant tech companies are not only organizing around technological issues but also around labor and environmental issues and and you see technologists now reaching outside of their bubble so for example at amazon the movement for justice there within the company spans warehouse workers who are laboring under absolutely ghastly and what should be unlawful conditions and tech workers. Whose initial concern was surveillance and climate. But who discovered that they could not make progress nor could they feel good about their movement unless incorporated the labor concerns of these people at the bottom of the ladder at the company.

Marcus Yellow Guerrilla Army Marcus Masha Maximo San Francisco Department Of Homeland Securit Monica Us Government Iraq Corey Google Amazon
Author Melissa Albert Returns

What Book Hooked You?

05:54 min | Last week

Author Melissa Albert Returns

"Back. We talked three years ago when you were a debut author with a little book called. The hazelwood obviously came out. Hit the best. The new york times bestseller lists so kind of reflect back on that. What was that like to have. You know this first time out this book that had kind of been ruminating in your head for song. Come out and be embraced By large number of people. Yeah okay it was a trip obviously I think when i wrote the book i had the sense that it was very specifically geared toward my own. Kind of odd obsessions like. I had this idea that. I wanted to kind of shove. It full of all of the weird little rabbit hole interests that i have all the like old magic then kind of references to books. I loved as a kid. All that stuff. And i think that i assume that we kind of boil down to something pretty specific so to see it. Get a broader. Thon was so exciting. Absolutely it was headed for sure but but wonderful. And what does that like. Because i'm sure like you know. We talked during your first as we talked about like the books. That broke with from babysitters club to wheezy batson chronicles of narnia. And things like that and a lot of those were. Obviously you know popular books but the have kind of just these little niche kind of books little things little details little fantasy aspects. Did you were kind of into two then kind of does it feel like what's the word i'm looking for that you're kind of it's validating in that. Oh my little like obsessions growing up our other people's obsessions too. I think really. It really was feeling i've gotten as i've gotten older and as i have talked to more bookish people particularly bookish women i think there's this there's this common thread among people who become writers or maybe one anybody who's been adolescent that they had this sense of being like the kid alone at the lunch table regardless of how literally true that was which in my case it was quite literally true and a lot of a lot of times in my life. there's that sense of like. Oh my god. I thought i was so alone but all across the world in every lunch room there was a kid alone pouring themselves into a book and now i'm kind of built now and i can look back affectionately at this earlier version of myself and i can feel like wow. There's this whole group of people who kind of had the same experience and now we can find each other. Because i'm lucky enough to kind of be plugged into this this bush community. Now so it's it's it is validating it is comforting. And it's always gives me that feeling of like oh i wish i i wish i could've known how comforting this would have been And touch that like dorner. i talk. We talked a lot about like the books. Were into growing up. But when it comes to like you as an adolescent you kind of touching on just now what type of kid what type of teenager where you into like outside of books that you read like what we're obsessions interests when you're a young person so when i was a kid i need to kind of feel like oregon stop books. I can't think i would. Not i was not a spotty kid. Wasn't nature kid. I was definitely I have a really dear friend. My best friend amy. She's been my best friend for almost my entire life. She's like a sister and she was an outdoor kid. I got really lucky that i kind of the universe paired up with the best friend. Who's very different from me. She dragon books but in general. She's not like such a big kind of fantasy person as i am She you can outdoor kid. She physical kid She got me out of out of the house out of my own skin and that really helped but aside from kind of her dragging me kicking and screaming into nature which. I grew to love I was really very interior kid. Especially outside of my own house right like i was with my family but a little bit more closed and shy outside of that and then i kinda came into myself as a teenager when i started to embrace You know you have that thing in grade school where you feel like that safety numbers thing and kind of try to flatten out your weird edges to fit in and then in high. You're like oh wait like not fitting in hats. That's what's cool. So i started being able to embrace my own oddities high school and that was absolutely road. Integrator happy deaf. Do you think you know where we've been locked down half of these many months. Do you think if you had to have gone through this. As a young person you would have been okay. You know. I think about that a lot in the early days. I absolutely believe that i would love that. That i would've been happy in my little kingdom of books and hanging out with my mom i think ultimately it would've been really bad really. It would have played into my Natural useful tendencies toward you. Know deadly introspection and Yeah i don't think that would have been good. It was definitely a shock to my system to be forced among my peers and forced to find my way but it was ultimately an arduous journey. That helped me. Be a functioning. You an introvert. Who can function when needed an extrovert. Who can take joy in other people. How 'bout you do you feel. How would you have done

Hazelwood Thon Dorner Batson The New York Times Bush Oregon AMY
A.J. Hartleys Fantasy Thriller Impervious Turns a Normal School Day Upside Down

Charlotte Readers Podcast

05:00 min | 2 weeks ago

A.J. Hartleys Fantasy Thriller Impervious Turns a Normal School Day Upside Down

"Listeners Welcome to this edition. Schaller's podcast is actually our guest house tradition. The first that we've done we're going to be doing in two thousand and twenty one. We're really excited about this We were having guest host Come all these are authors. Who have appeared the podcast in the past and her also supporters of the podcast. To who have a lot to add our guest. Today is kathy. pickens She appeared on the podcast to talk about And reading discuss her true crime. Books She has been under different names. A lawyer a business professor at university provost clog dancing coach. Church organist choir director and a typist Very variety she. She's award-winning writer. For mystery series but her most recent work is create your own crater processed A six step guide developing your individual creativity. A roadmap tested enthusiastically northbound hundreds of workshop participants. From those who already define themselves as creative to those who didn't get an opportunity classes she taught on that and i've got her book and i. I recommend that to you listeners. But let me tell you to who. She is going to be interviewed today. This is part of our author. Conversation were cited to have aj hartley also writing as an heart and He's the best selling author of twenty three novels for adults and the younger raider spanning multiple genres notably mystery thriller fantasy and science fiction and today They're going to be talking about his. Most recent book impervious a fantasy thriller about a young girl. Who's normal day at school is up ended propelling her into unfamiliar world of magic musters endanger and forcing her to try to save herself and her friends So with that. I'm going to turn the audience steering wheel over to kathy. Pickens and cathy Take it away. thanks landis. I'm really excited to talk about this book impervious today. Aj this is an unusual book for you buy. Your books are unusual agenor away. I really like how you have Visited lots of different genres in age groups. One of the reader reviews online for impervious said it really needs lag a young adult urban fantasy until it doesn't and i thought okay. That's a pretty good description for unusual book sing. S lewis in one of his essays in the book on stories said that story start for him with an image started for him with a new image Said often that Contains emotion that prompts the writer. So did this book start for you with an image or images or emotions and created that initial spark. Take this book. Well it it's complicated and this is an unusual book for me. as you know And it actually began a number of years ago at least as a the germ of an idea and it was something that grew out of books that i read years ago A particularly a novel pincher martin. By william golding. I don't know that book which i read. I don't know thirty years ago more forty years ago probably and it's a story in which you'll forced to reconsider the entire narrative when you get to the end of the book right where a world that you thought was real turns out to be in some ways not and this had always seemed to me a fascinating compelling kind of idea for a story and i've always loved seeing those those kinds of narratives not just in books piddles who in tv shows and movies Something that you think real you gradually realize is in some ways Some sort of delusion or constructive of either the narrator or character and. I had been thinking about this in the context of writing a school shooting novel and kicking around this idea in very vague general terms and and never quite figuring out how i wanted to do it and then A little over a year ago as you know I was involved in a school shooting at unc charlotte and that changed the narrative. The project that had been sort of on the back burner that had existed as a vague outline that revisited. A couple of times. The story that i wanted to tell became something quite different but it also became a story that i felt. I had to tell partly. Because i felt sort of trapped by the experience that had

Aj Hartley Kathy Schaller Pickens Pincher Martin Landis Cathy William Golding Lewis UNC Charlotte
The Ethics of Adoption in America

The Book Review

07:58 min | 3 d ago

The Ethics of Adoption in America

"Has america move past. The legacy of secret and coerced adoptions gabrielle. Glaser will be here to talk about her new book. American baby what happens at so called tough love schools and wilderness programs for troubled youth. Kenneth rosen will join us to talk about troubled. The failed promise of america's behavioral treatment programs. Alexandra alterable give us an update from the publishing world. Plus we'll talk about what we and the wider world are reading. This is the book review podcast for the new york times. It's january twenty second. I'm pamela paul gabrielle. Glaser joins us now. She is the author of american baby. A mother a child and the shadow history of adoption gabrielle. Thanks for being here. Thank you so much for having me. Give us a sense of the scope of this book because it is about a mother and a child but it's also about a much larger story. Tell the story through the narrative of my late friend. David rosenberg and his birth mother margaret hats and their lifelong search to find each other. But it really involves. I use that. I use their twin stories as a way to tell what happened to an estimated. Three million american women and their sons and daughters are three million sons and daughters in the years after the war and before roe v. Wade who is david rosenberg. Said he was the late friend of yours. David was a tour in portland oregon. And i met him in two thousand seven. I was reporter for the oregon assigned to write a story about the kidney donation. He was getting for a friend. And i met him in a dialysis center where he asked me to interview him and in the midst of the interview. He told me that he hoped the story would go viral. This was in the early days of youtube. I don't even know. Facebook was a year stories. Were starting to get out there and go viral. And he told me. I hope this goes viral on that my birth mother sees it and it was thought at stayed with me for a really long time. I i wondered what did that mean for him. What the story of having been as he put it given up imply. Was that really possible. I'm the mother of three daughters and the very idea that a mother could surrender a child for option and a not really have that impact. Her was beyond around the possibility for me so in two thousand fourteen. He called me. I'd moved from portland. Back east as we say and i saw his name on my caller. Id and i knew he was sick. He was he was dying of cancer and he said i found my birth mother and she loved me all my life and for him it reversed this narrative that he had been an inconvenience that he'd been somehow stood in the way of her a better life and while he had an incredible life because adopted parents who loved him very much and he them. It didn't mean that he didn't have curiosity about his origins. And it certainly didn't mean that. His birth mother margaret cats wonder and think about her first born son every single day for life. How did he find her. He took a dna test. His wife kim rosenberg gave him a dna test for his birthday. Just to find maybe a little bit more about his medical history his origins and he matched with a cousin a distant cousin who happened to be an incredible amateur genealogist and she was very dedicated to family histories and she sent him an email. That said hey cousin do you know. Can you tell me anything about great. Great grandma schlomo anymore. Back and said i'm adopted. I can't help you at all at your the first blood relative. I know f- outside my three children. I've ever talked to outside my three children and she said. Do you want to find your birth mother. I can help you and she dead within three weeks. She followed an amazing trail of clues. She worked around the clock. She understood that he didn't have much time and she turned up. His birth mother miraculously on facebook. This brings up a whole big question around adoption. that people probably haven't gone through it themselves. Don't really understand which is like what is the difference between open adoption option enclosed adoption and have the laws shifted on this and and it sounds like the whole twenty three in be dna genealogy trend. Has maybe changed this entirely. It certainly has an. It's a wonderful tool for people who happened to be lucky enough to have sleuths in their family or today to match with a half sibling or parent themselves but not everybody is on these databases not everybody wants to turn over their saliva to a massive company and the secrecy disobey couple of at the secrecy began in the nineteen twenties and thirties mostly due to a social worker. Who worked out of memphis. Who was a baby fief. She swept through the south stealing. The baby's of snatching the babies of poor women and selling them to celebrities and wealthy people in california and new york and through. That is complicated through that. That began a culture of secrecy and laws that were enacted in from state to state actually forty eight states every state at alaska and kansas that seal the original birth certificate of a child and issued an amended birth certificate in its place listing the child as the birth child of his adopted mother and father and it it it made it sound as if this was the original document but what it did was the expert version of that logic was that it's going to shield the child from the taint of illegitimacy and and by the way not all those children who georgia tann. That was her name. snatched were illegitimate but regardless the theory was it's going to cheat the child from the tainted. Illegitimacy it's going to protect the birth mother. If the child was born out of wedlock from the shame of her wanton ness but we'll certainly it would protect the adopted parents from the threat of birth parents trying to interfere with their newly created family and over time that spread from state to state and in the years after the war there was a huge rise in unwed pregnancies. The sexual revolution was simmering. There was no sex education. There was no birth control. Men had come back from the war not celebrate and they were very unlikely to wanna be celibate with their stateside girlfriends and suddenly there was newfound privacy for young people everywhere. Suburbs were booming. They had space space in rec rooms. We all remember the house and most importantly in the backseat of the family. Buick but illegitimate births. Were so shameful. That families sent their daughters away. Abortion was still illegal and in the twenties and thirties gotten pregnant out of wedlock. You would have had a shotgun wedding.

David Rosenberg Glaser Kenneth Rosen Pamela Paul Gabrielle Margaret Hats Gabrielle Margaret Cats Oregon Kim Rosenberg America Portland Alexandra The New York Times Facebook Wade Youtube David Cancer Memphis Alaska
James Comey and Truth in Government

The Book Review

05:41 min | Last week

James Comey and Truth in Government

"Joe klein joins us now to talk about a new book. From james comey. It's called saving justice truth. Transparency and trust. Joe thanks for being here screwed to be with you. All right joe. You don't need any introduction but for those who are not familiar with. Joey is a former writer for the new yorker former columnist for time magazine author of many many books including perhaps most famously when that did not appear with his byline primary colors And a follow up novel running meat and this week he reviews for us at james. Comey's second book so the obvious question. I have to ask i is. How does this book differ from his previous book. Well it doesn't differ very much at all actually except for one thing. He rehearses all of the confrontations he had with donald trump in both books but in the second book he places that in the context of the need for truth and transparency in government. Which i think is a valuable thing. The book is the repetition of the first book but it's not an insignificant repetition because of the the context that he now placed it so the first book higher loyalty was kind of hybrid memoir both from his earlier days as a prosecutor in the department of justice and then for his brief period at the doj under trump but it was also kind of manifesto about justice. It feels like on the surface this new book saving justice is kind of exactly the same thing. Well yeah it is. It is the same thing and it's obviously something that cody feels very strongly about. But i think you know the important thing here is his view of justice and his view of the fbi remember he was the fbi director. Whom trump fired because he allowed the russian investigation continue which resulted after he was fired in the hiring. A bob muller as special investigator but komi has a very distinctive view of justice. And i and its ecclesiastical he sees the members of the justice department all the way down to assisted. Da's out in the country as being part of a sacred priesthood sworn to absolute honesty to complete probity to conducting the business in entirely facts based and nonpartisan manner and you can see how that might conflict with donald trump right. Does he talk about what's happened at the department of justice since his departure. He doesn't talk about that all that much except to say that it has been corrupted by trump trump spent the last four years trying to make it into a partisan weapon to go after his enemies in. Kobe is appalled by that. One of the things that you do in your review is draw the distinctions between trump's view of justice and company's point of view. Is that something that komi himself dozen. The boker was that you. He doesn't to a certain extent. But i teased it out a little bit from me. The most important thing that is kind of gone overlooked about trump if anything can be said to have been overlooked is his view of the world which came out in the second debate with joe biden where he said only low. Iq refugees showed up for their refugee hearings in other words. The smart ones absconded. Only stupid people abide by the laws. Smart people get around it. Only stupid people pay off their creditors. Smart people stiffen and that is donald trump's operating philosophy and unfortunately it seems to be the operating philosophy a lot of his followers and that stands in direct contravention of commes operating philosophy. Which is you gotta tell the truth. I don't think you could find two more temperamentally opposite. People trump and komi. But what's interesting at least in the little bit of this book that i read it seems is a slight shift in tone from the last book i mean in part it seems like he's he is trying to draw contrast he opens up the book with donald trump sort of leaning back in his chair and telling him that putin showed off to him apparently about russia having the best prostitutes in the world. And he's telling that james comey. Yeah that would not go over very well. Comas is a religious catholic and And as i said he's religious about the notion of justice and truth. I mean he tells a story about his early days as a us district attorney where he was working a drug case and he had a government informant named vinny and it turned out that they put vinnie in the witness protection program and vinnie took the opportunity to get married. The problem is that he was also married in his former life which meant he was now a bigamist which is a crime and komi says that it was his absolute responsibility. Even though the bigamy had nothing to do with the drug case in question to tell the other side the defendant's lawyers that vinnie was a bigamist. And that shows you the degree to which komi will go in the defense of the truth almost to the point of myopia. I

Justice Department James Comey Donald Trump Comey Joe Klein Bob Muller FBI Komi Trump Trump The New Yorker Time Magazine Joey JOE Cody James DA Kobe
CYOA Live! Deadwood City & Third Planet from Altair

Covert Nerd Podcast

04:33 min | 6 d ago

CYOA Live! Deadwood City & Third Planet from Altair

"Live event is in. You can participate in the fun with so without further ado. Let's write in and it up with eddie and choose your own adventure. Well it looks like we've got a few few people watching so if you're watching and want to chime in we just read these books and when we get to a decision page you get to decide so just type it in the the comment section there and we'll go wherever you want to go so if we get to a decision that says go to page eight to go to the saloon or page twelve to go into the desert will go wherever you want us to go so you you guide us. Yes this choose your own adventure. Leeann i are. Just you're humble narrators. Exactly hey matt dis in the chat. And he says sugarcane island sounds like lost section of candy. Larry actually does cain. Island is actually like the flat. Earth of candy land. Don't believe the sugarcane island propaganda. It's not real only the real peanut brittle that leads over to you. Don't want go there. We'll get started here dead wood city. Ooh we've already got three choices. So let's let's get in. Get the choices going. Imagine yourself on horseback riding long. A desert trail humming the tune in the distance. You can see the snowcapped peaks of the rocky mountains. You have been working as a cowhand in the old west but your last job was boring about a week ago. What's that i didn't know cows had. Am that's crazy how that happened. You've been working as a cowhand and the old west but your last job is so boring. In about a week ago you decided to pack it up and head onto dead city now. You are finally approaching destination. It's late afternoon. It's a warm dry day and as you ride into town. A fresh breeze blows the dust into swirling clouds. The streets are nearly deserted and a few people seem nervous and tense. You wonder what to do. You might go over the to the saloon and see what's happening there. You know that in a western town. There is no better place to pick up the news than the saloon. But maybe you should go to the hotel the clerk at the front desk and probably tell you what's doing in deadwood city the clerk at the front desk can probably tell you what's doing in deadwood city must be older western old timey talk taka. Guess besides he doing nothing. That's what you need to say tomorrow. What's doing. I will angry phone. Besides you need a place to stay for the night then again. You might go to the sheriff's office if there is trouble in deadwood city. The sheriff is likely to know about it. There's our logic. I liked that. We work in deadwood city for a week and we already are expert on the on. Deadwood city never quit. How correspondence course taught me that. We've got three choices. Everybody do we want to go to the saloon. The hotel or the sheriff's office. You help us decide which of the three places we should go. Vote for three over here. Even though he's not commenting and go to the saloon. Go to the hotel or go to the sheriff's office and see what's go to the hotel you get to see. What's doing deadwood. City doing in deadwood. We got we got one for saloon. We got to host salud and one for sheriff's office both from eddie and the cruisers Reserves we've got admin admen rights runamuck know all right and with the The vote here. Oh okay so. We are going to the saloon. then. I guess it's two out of three so majority wins. Saluted is so page five. All right eddie. Wanna grab that. One ended podcasting pond eight. A chip kids right into the microphone.

Deadwood City Matt Dis Sugarcane Island Leeann Eddie Cain Rocky Mountains Larry
Marc and Salamishah Tillet discuss Salamishah's book; "In Search of The Color Purple: The Story of an American Masterpiece"

Coffee and Books

01:31 min | 10 hrs ago

Marc and Salamishah Tillet discuss Salamishah's book; "In Search of The Color Purple: The Story of an American Masterpiece"

"Hey everybody. I'm marc lamont hill. Owner of uncle. Bobby's coffee and books. I am a professor a scholar and most importantly buchner book nerd. Because i don't just love to read books. I'm the person who loves to read about the book. I love hearing all this talk about how and why they wrote the book and i love talking to other book nerds about their favorite books. That's why i started coffee in books. It's podcast all about books. Every episode i sit down over a cup of coffee with the world's biggest authors to discuss the most interesting controversial fund and important books. Can sometimes i hang out with experts and other special guests to talk about some of the greatest books of all time and today is an extra special episode for me because we do things we get to talk about a wonderful new book and we get to talk about a classic book all at the same time. I'm joined today by solomon shatila. She is the henry rutgers professor of african american studies and creative writing at rutgers university newark. She's also contributing cultural critic for the new york times. She is well known widely acclaimed. And she's here to talk about her wonderful new book in search of the color purple mission. So good to see you okay. I'm so happy here so you decided to write a book about a book and as a professor as a literary critic. That's not foreign territory for you but you chose to write a book for the general public and to write one on a black people a sacred texts color purple for so many of us means so much. What made you choose choose that it's actually really kind of practical

Marc Lamont Hill Solomon Shatila Henry Rutgers Bobby Rutgers University Newark The New York Times
Alexandra Heminsley

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

05:03 min | 1 d ago

Alexandra Heminsley

"Hello this is meet the writers. I'm georgina godwin. Guest today is a bestselling author writer and journalist in the uk. Initially beginning her career in publishing she made the move into journalism in two thousand and four whilst also ghost writing for a number of major publishers including collins and hatchet following that she held the position of books editor at l. and continues to review books on the bbc and for grazia magazine. Her latest book is some body to love. It's an honest and thoughtful memoir. Alexandra headingley welcome to meet the writers Alexandra you've had a long career to do with books but publishing was your sort of entry point. How did you get to that position though. Was what books always a big part of your life. They were they definitely were probably the last generation for whom teenage as have no internet to fill them and so it was great. She's reading aw Fanzines say they were. I was definitely always a massive rita especially as a teenager. But it just. I was completely from known artie background. My dad's in the food so it seemed like career that was not. It didn't seem realistic. It was something that other people did die. Did you could just sit down and write a book whistling. that didn't occur to me until i see many other people. Do it in my job in publishing an anti to get into publishing at the time that you did. It was quite kind of quite a click. Wasn't it you had to be connected to get in sort of. Yeah i just did that thing of writing to. I went three my bookshelf and picked up the books. I really loved and looked a colorful designs. And so he's a publishers. Were and write to them. And said i want to. I can publishing. And could i come and do experience and my parents lived abroad time so i did a weight. I worked in a restaurant at seek rich review. Westwood always east. Go and so. I used to do that in the evening in d work experience various people in the day. So that wasn't that wasn't a kind of kindly uncle with a study. The island sadly. But i i am under elision. My education Accent helps when i walked up and reception varies working experience. I mean still a tremendous achievement to get in without a kind of helping hand in that way. What was your first rolls off to work experience did you edit no i did the classic publicity assistant works way up and i was properly in when i began. I was really highly specific moment either. I left university. The net book agreement had passed so books was selling in barrel loads in supermarkets in a way that they never had before. So the concept of what bestseller was or could be shifted. The year that i started it was also the year that blair came to power and we kind of coming out of years of recession. So i thought for the first half of my twenties. The being grown up in having a job men in everybody made load of money was incredibly interesting. And they'd be like sandwiches in the boardroom. Harder were works once a week and they would not the sales figures and everyone would clap and share. And then i moved to macmillan when they were making it. Bridget jones film and i worked alongside renee zellweger when she was doing her work experience. And it was just completely e gilded age where all i did was potter around with Pop cultural office of interest but also coolness and yet when when when t- thousand seven rolled around it was a bit of a hard for. Can you give us some renee zellweger gossip. Well she's exactly as she as. I didn't realize it was her. We i was most junior person at macmillan Jean what was i was the last one in so i was still learning weather near the fax machine on the second floor. Is things like that and we were told that we had a newark experience coming in. She was told she was cool. Bridget and we were told to be nice to her because she was. Ceo's gupta we kind of you remember ever being horrible work experience Cheat us let delicately that. We might otherwise have done and because i was the newest in the department i was always. It's it was quite big building. And i found it quite a big change after that would be my first job. And i've been there two years stills to finding my feet so i was quite Overwhelmingly helpful to her.

Georgina Godwin Grazia Magazine Alexandra Headingley Alexandra Artie Collins Rita BBC Renee Zellweger UK Macmillan Jean Bridget Jones Blair Macmillan Newark Bridget
Some Body to Love?  Alexandra Heminsley

VINTAGE Podcast

03:43 min | 1 d ago

Some Body to Love? Alexandra Heminsley

"If you've got two hours writing times apparent of small child you've actually got one hours writing time because at least an hour of your time is the decompression chamber of letting go of the parental hyper awareness and the less you brain so to think long thoughts than the tiny increments of time and infant thinks it. Hello and welcome to the vintage books podcast. I'm the oath imaging. Unsworth down here today to talk to alexandra hemingway about her new book. Somebody to love. Here's a bit about the book on the ninth of november twenty seventeen. Alex just been told her then husband was going to transition. The revelation threatened to shatter that brand-new still fragile family. But this footage moment represented only the latest in a series of events that had left alex feeling more and more associated from her own body turning her into a seemingly unreliable narrator of reality. Somebody to love is. Alex is open hearted memoir about losing her husband but gaining a best friend and together bringing up a baby in a changing world. It explores what it means to have a human body to feel connected or severed from it and how we might learn to accept our own. I'm really excited to talk to alexandra his story and ask about parenthood family and writing. We hope you'll wrap to warmly and have a hot drink to hand settling and enjoy firstly. I won't say congratulations on. What is a bold beautiful and gripping also enlightening book that is laden with love. I absolutely loved reading it. And i think israel tonic for these grim times as well to read something with so much heart and also great title. It's a great love. A good person. And i think he's unopposed with carrie. Fisher's wishful drinking and makoni cited with the road. Both voter which i really love is putting title and ties put some body to love is fantastic to tell me how title came out. Yeah it does it. It isn't the most comfortable thing in the world to say like to make the point that it's two words like somebody to love easier when you go our contact. Oh it's written down or whatever but yeah. It was just in in a meeting through the book in that it now is a tool someone says oh and you see something like somebody love some to love nuts like some body a bit of body and and then i went home and listened to the queen and george michael at live eight thing about six times in a row just as like uh so good yes. It's perfect it's perfect and speaking Do welcome speaking of bodies. The body is the book's main theme alongside the themes like family. Parenthood honesty friendship reality courage and creativity. Tell me about when you first started to write the book and how you even began to approach it. My last six running like again and lee pin were both about and all of the body and so two

Alexandra Hemingway Unsworth Alex Alexandra Makoni Carrie Fisher Israel George Michael Lee Pin
The state of news media in the US

Monocle 24: The Stack

04:26 min | 2 d ago

The state of news media in the US

"Hello and welcome to the stack on this week's show. We speak about the state of the news media in the us with jennifer brand-new founder of harkin and to keep two thousand twenty one fresh. We have another title out. Boys boys boys on queer and gay photography enjoy the show law from housing loan. This is the stack thirty minutes of print industry analysis. And i am used by schickel coming up on the show yet. Another title out. Boys boys boys but i. We had the united states. Us president joe biden's inauguration this week his calls for unity and an end to divisiveness welcomed by manny at home and around the world. The new president also called for a renewed focus on truth and for upholding facts. Something there was an important signal also to news media in the united states that have faced four years of a president describing many of them as fake news. An enemies of the people for more on the state of the news media in the us. Monaco's news editor. Chris chairman is with jennifer brand-new. She's the founder of harkin. Us media consultancy that helps newsrooms across the united states to radically change the relationship with readers and listeners jennifer. You've really been a pioneer in getting news. Rooms to really listen and incorporate the needs of their audience into their reporting. Tell us a little about your approach and particularly what you were doing in the run-up to the presidential election in november. Yeah so the company. I started called in which the word itself means to listen is really built around processes that are public powered which means the public is involved in a meaningful way. It's not that the newsroom makes decisions and then says hey public way in. It's actually the the public is part of the process of even deciding what's worth covering and what What information needs day half. They're the best equipped to tell reporters in newsrooms. What they need to know. We know they're googling all day long for information so it's not that they don't know what they're interested in. Its that newsrooms. Don't have a way in a process and jobs really for people to listen to what the public is asking for and then respond and so our whole approach has been to help newsrooms over the past scottish seventy years create these openings these invitations for people to tell them what they don't know that they would like a newsroom to find out which is different than saying pitcher story idea. You know it's someone saying. I haven't information need. Can you fill it. Which is what journalists are really meant to be doing anyway. But in typical newsrooms the editors and the reporters act as proxies for the public. And we know that that's really imperfect because there's no way a handful of people can represent the information needs of so many people they're serving especially if they're not demographically representative of those people and so we've been doing this approach for time and we know that when the public is involved in this way they find the newsroom more trustworthy they find it more credible they have deeper appreciation for how journalism works and how difficult it actually is to do the job well and they also are more likely to consume more stories from that news organization so it increases loyalty to now. Obviously these are things that are breaking down in media landscapes across the world especially in the us. Trust the feeling that you think journalists are telling you the truth that you respect their jobs or feel like they're not just lying to you. So i do believe this powered process is one way of fighting back against the misinformation nightmare. Really that we find ourselves in and so this past year we've been really focused on taking this model and applying it to electoral coverage. So we worked with this professor and media critic. Jay rosen out of york university to adopt what he calls. The citizens agenda which is essentially public powered journalism applied to electoral coverage.

Jennifer Brand United States Harkin Schickel Joe Biden Manny Monaco Jennifer Chris Jay Rosen York University
'Avengers: Infinity War' (Part 1) | Marvel

Binge Mode

01:29 min | 2 d ago

'Avengers: Infinity War' (Part 1) | Marvel

"Be like no time has passed. It'll be perfect. Everybody five or older. I stay the same. It's incredible what deal for the people who got snapped. It's true honestly if it incredible deal for everybody who got snapped. You didn't have to walk through the ruined. Streets of san francisco. Live without the new york mets. All things considered would you not rather be snapped knowing that everybody gets to combat and actually this question gets to the heart of everything. That's a big one. Would you rather be the person who brought everyone back. But had his over. Harry graver netted misery for five years. It's so overrated like it was so much work and scott turning to a baby and then turning old and then the whole rigmarole tony every to give his life. it's like they. They did so much work on it. I don't want it. I just want to step through the portal. Be there for the big fight and then go back to school with people who i don't know. Meanwhile i'm the same age and it's five years later like peter. That's a weird one. Right is like still at high school in everybody else's in college ostensibly or should be the far from home. Thing is an interesting highschool dynamic dive into when we

Harry Graver New York Mets San Francisco Scott Tony Peter
#126 - January 2021 Book News

Books and Boba

07:50 min | 3 d ago

#126 - January 2021 Book News

"Mervin. And i'm rewrite you and welcome to our first books in boba bid month news review For the year. Twenty twenty one rira. How's your new year been It's been going okay. I've been avoiding social media which has been reporting a lot of garbage. That's been happening as of late to this country so it's been pretty mellow on my side. How about you. That's probably a good call. I've been am. I a on social media. I noticed you know how on instagram people do your top nine for the year. Your top narayan images In twenty twenty. I only had nine xers total. Yeah i'm not. I'm not a big instagram user. Either which is probably why books boba. Our instagram is. Pretty bare and i apologize for that. We do have content. It's just we upload as my thoughts who i've been. I've been being a little lax in creating audio grams of our episodes but I'm working on those where we're going to have some highlights from someone are best author interviews over the last year up soon. I promise But just this whole lockdown quarantine pandemic situation. I think i mentioned this on the podcast before. But i feel like i'm becoming more and more with sudden like i know i'm being forced to be a shut in but finding that actually like it. It's gonna it's not. It's not a bad life being a being a shot in well. We're here today to talk about the latest book news in asian american literature We always start with the latest publishing deals And it's a pretty light month. January is typically just not a big month for deals said it's a it's a debt month mainly because the holiday season has passed but there are a saw. Let's get to them. What's i deal. I deal is amulet acquired. My sister's big fat indian wedding by patel. The why romcom follows an aspiring violinist. Who must secretly juggle the obligations of her sisters extravagant wedding week with auditions for a prominent music contest. On top of all this. She must dodge her nosy families matchmaking. Schemes publication is scheduled for spring. Twenty twenty two awesome title. The way i feel like we've been seeing more and more of these asian wedding stories. You know what bring it. I love wedding stories. I love movies. That take place during weddings. And it's just. I don't know i just like big party. Seems yeah annoy mentioned that. I've never been to indian wedding. But i hear they're per t nuts Chinese weddings would just eat a lot. korean wedding. I don't think i've twinned with those neither well. Korean weddings have definitely transformed a lot from the traditional crean weddings Sort of like for the korean traditional weddings like you wear like humble and there's like specific rituals you drink alcohol and you catch dates with your skirt and whatnot and a lot of a lot of couples. Don't do that anymore. It's become very streamlined and westernized so Actually have a pretty funny story about about korean wedding so last time i went to korea I went for my cousin's wedding and it was my first korean wedding that it was going to and it took place at a wedding hall. There's there's a bunch of wedding halls in this district and seoul and pretty much like what they do is like the bride usually doesn't buy address. They can rent it from the wedding hall. And they have like makeup artists and hairstylists. It's all part of the package. So it's much cheaper and the bride usually sits like in a sitting room where people come up and say congratulations and then they take pictures. So it's literally a place for people to just take pictures with the bride and once the wedding starts for my cousin's wedding. There was like a runway like it wasn't like an eye on it was like a platform runway show. Yeah it's kind of like a modeling runway and every everything in the wedding hall was like super. It seemed more kind of like Like a press conference in way. It didn't it was definitely like not like the romantic decorations that you see in american weddings. But they don't have bridesmaids they don't have groomsmen but what they do have our wedding singers. So what happens during the wedding is that they have like a performer. Sometimes it's a friend who can sing really well or professional wedding singer and they serenade the couple but the thing is it's very awkward because the couple is just standing there watching the wedding singer like saturday to them. And it's like it's just like okay. Well like no one is. Dancing is just like them standing there and watching the strangers sing to them and you have an option of having like a dinner and show pretty much so people will be like eating while they watched the wedding hap. It happened sometimes. it's a buffet style so for the buffet style. Which was what happened with my cousin's wedding. Everyone who is invited to wedding. They have to like pay because that is like the wedding tradition. You pay money to help. Cover the cost of housing for them. Or whatever. if you go to like an asian wedding attorneys wedding everyone brings. There's no wedding gifts. Everyone just brings down belowps. Yeah bring envelopes. And there's like a set amount depending on how close you are to the bride and groom so. If you're just like a coworker it might just be like like twenty five dollars or whatever and the closer you are you pay more and they give you a ticket after you give like the money and that ticket is your ticket in to the buffet. So it's like very it's very commercialized. Very streamlined and. It was very strange. Because i was overdressed for the wedding. Overdressed like possibly. But i. I was just like oh like like there are people who are just wearing button ups and slacks. A there are women who are just dressed in business casual clothes and and whereas like. I'm wearing a cocktail dress. It was it was very very weird but like the the wedding ceremony was very quick. It was like fifteen minutes tops and then people went to to the buffet and then people will yes so literally like the whole wedding lasted maybe like an hour and a half including the food there is no reception. There is no dance floor. It's just people get married in the morning or early afternoon. They go take pictures and then they eat and then they leave and sometimes they go back to work. Wow that's

Romcom Mervin Patel Korea
A Nerdette Inauguration Special

Nerdette

05:29 min | 3 d ago

A Nerdette Inauguration Special

"That's friends without the our best fiends. An insurrection attempt at the nation's capital. If you've been paying close attention it came as no surprise. These people have been girding for a civil war for years. Subscribe to motive from. Wbz chicago wherever you get your podcasts from wbz chicago. This is nerd. And i'm greta johnson and you have made it through another week and twenty twenty one which means we are here to help you get ready for your weekend coming up. We're going to hear about what this week's inauguration was like from someone who was there in real life. Carol moseley braun the first black woman to be elected to the us senate. But first we're gonna take a look back at the week. That was with two excellent. Panelists joining me this week. We have travel anderson there. An entertainment journalist rebel. Hi liz do. And we have jared hill. He's a journalist and writer. Jared welcome thank you for so you to host the podcast fanti together which you call a show. All about the complex and complicated conversations about the grey areas in our lives. I wanna talk about the week. That was which especially means of course inauguration. But i'm curious like where y'all think we fall in sort of like the gray area spectrum. These days feels to me like there's more of it than ever before. I don't know if that's because i'm older or just because like pandemic and political insurrection. Or what but. I don't know i was just curious what you to think about that. Yeah i mean. I think that i think it's actually a good thing that we we see so much gray area now right. I feel like we got used to just like wanting to like throw people away or throw things away the cancel culture of it all and i think now we're at least willing to to recognize the fact that like some people at least ride can be redeemed some things you can actually still love. Even though they have some aspects that you rather not talk about you know. I feel like you know. Times have changed beautifully. In that way i at our show is being kind of like the the counter to cancel culture. If you will right because like everything is a little bit more complicated than i. Just hate that and when we look at the world right now we're kind of in this space of like. I don't know how much i believe in the american experiment anymore but i also really want it to work because i don't want it to fail right And i think we're in this space of like china figure out. I have all of these issues with something. How do i try to make that work. And that's that's really what i think. We feel that way in so many different areas. Even if we're not looking at politics ever looking at the ways that we look at our our entertainment system if we're looking at capitalism if we're looking at racing gender and sexuality there's so many different ways that we see that in our lives. I love that because they feel like it embraces the idea of like both being optimistic about something but also being like adult enough to call it out when it's not perfect absolute right. I mean i think a perfect example of that on our show we. We had a conversation about tyler. Perry black folks and how we love the fact that he has this whole studio and he owns it all right. He's putting people to work but right some of the content is like and like we can hold both of those things at the same time. Both of those things can be true for sure so obviously a big story from the week was the inauguration on president. Biden's you heard about it on president biden's first day in office alone. He enacted seventeen executive orders reversing former president trump's actions on issues ranging from climate change immigration policy. The inauguration celebration itself still pad a fair amount of pageantry. I think especially given the circumstances So jerry you said you heard about it. Did you watch. I assume. I think. I probably put in like fifteen hours yesterday By the time i was done i was like i can't watch another second but i also don't want to turn off but kind of one of the veggie were kind of going through the list of things that happened yesterday. We're talking about the gray areas where it's complex complicated. I remember over the last four years. I continually thinking to myself. I hope that someone is keeping a running list of the things that have to be overturned. Rescinded rejoined whatever. It is And like you know. Joe biden kinda hit the ground running with that list right but also like if we back out we kinda look at it from thirty five thousand foot level. The reason i was saying. I don't know how much i believe in this american experiment anymore is because like all of those things are so like they can be shifted in a day right. What are they international allies. What did they do tenderness folks who are concerned about their their livelihood. What does he do are immigrants. That are trying to come to the fence. Or what did they do to black people who are concerned about racial inequality in those kinds of things and so it is a very mixed bag of things when we're like yes. I'm really excited that we got rid of the muslim ban and that we are helping separated. Children find their parents. But i'm also concerned like what happens if we just go back and four years to donald trump again or to just holly ted cruz. Jesus christ or whatever like what are we doing situations. It's it's frustrating and confusing and complicated court will in like that.

WBZ Greta Johnson Carol Moseley Braun Jared Hill Chicago Us Senate Perry Black Jared President Biden LIZ President Trump Anderson Tyler Biden China Jerry Joe Biden Holly Ted Cruz Donald Trump
Monocle Reads: Lyndsey Stonebridge

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

04:06 min | 4 d ago

Monocle Reads: Lyndsey Stonebridge

"This is monica reads. I'm georgina godwin. Today i'm speaking to lindsay stonebridge the professor of humanities and human rights at the university of birmingham. Her work focuses on twentieth century contemporary literature. Theory and history. A prolific author is well as an academic. She's earned a number of accolades for her writing including the british academy rose crucial would and the modernist studies association. Best book prize. Her work is writing and writing literature. In the age of human rights lindsay. Welcome to monocle. Reads an tell me about the the the spark for this book will they had to spokes. One was the classroom as it often is for people who write and teach. I was teaching a course on the history of human rights which we are teaching through literature so it was a really ambitious course which are taught with coach was a specialist in eighteenth century history that went foam nineteenth century man up to the present day and rather than teaching history or philosophy. We were introducing students to some key ideas in the history of rights through reading of novels poems and plays etc and it was fabulous coast to teach students. Were put into this river exciting. I this was in two thousand and ten exactly as teaching. The course things began to go very wrong for human rights we were dealing with the fallout of the iraq war where the idea of western human might succumb on quite a bit of criticism also in the twentieth twenty ten started to get direct attacks on human rights whether it will as through new national states or indeed closer to home. The twenty fourteen election was lottie fort on a question of whether we keep the nineteen ninety eight human rights. Act here in the u. k. And then you had the war in syria and the civil war in libya and you had the refugee crisis and sunny refuge. human rights. The question of powell treating other people. The question rights exploded into the world. So this is very strange. Experience of teaching history in human rights whilst watching human rights undergo very tumultuous threatened out of its history so the book is actually a collection of teaching notes and pieces of journalism and essays. I put together in that period. Chine respond to that sense of uses wonderful history of imagination and human rights which was disappearing in front of our eyes. It's so it seemed that point. I mean the book demonstrates the value of bald literature in intesting times. Do you think that we're now seeing a wave of authors and writers. That really can make a difference. I think we are. Georgina quite excited about the kinds of writing the coming into our world. Now i mean as someone who teaches that should history. I get very frustrated with the idea. That is just the solace or for escapism. A nice to have in a very bad world and you know those of us who spent time reading and teaching and writing really want people to know that literature is transformative. It sets new norms. It can set new norms for the ways in which we treat each other. It's very very powerful stuff. There's a quote by hannah. Arendt the political theorist is one of my favorite favorite thinkers where she says some point there are no dangerous. Thinking itself is dangerous. My often thing about writing. There's no one dangerous book. Fighting itself is very bad dangerous. So yes i do think we might be entering into a new age of the kind of writing that can help us learn how to live with one another you say in the book. The literature carves outer space in the world from which we might begin to grasp injustice from the inside from the position of the populace. How important can literature be as voice for people who may often have been silenced. And do you think it can also encourage empathy from decision makers in in a more effective way than just perhaps a kind of dry report.

Georgina Godwin Lindsay Stonebridge Modernist Studies Association Lottie Fort University Of Birmingham British Academy Monica Lindsay Libya Syria Iraq Powell Georgina Arendt Hannah
Azora Zoe Paknad, founder of Goldune, talks Sustainability

Bad On Paper

07:12 min | 4 d ago

Azora Zoe Paknad, founder of Goldune, talks Sustainability

"So becker doing. I'm doing well. I'm doing very well. I'm i'm feeling very good. Now that we are solidly in january. I feel productive. I feel in control of my calendar. A good deal of I feel motivated. Like i'm feeling good across the board. And i. this is a preemptive. Were recording this on friday but also feeling very joyful about having a new president and not to rub that in for anyone who voted a different way but i just feel very excited her bigoted. Just kidding i feel very excited especially given how long the pandemic has dragged on to. Have you know somebody new charge of that plan. And i'm excited to turn the page. I am to gives me a lot of hope me to meet you. So that's feeling like just like a weightlift. Yeah i agree what about you. What's your high well as so it's funny. A lot of he'll be widened. You talk about it on the podcast last week and i. I decided this past tuesday night at like eleven. I was like i'm just slide my big news into a blog posts because i don't know just like announcing vote so dramatic but as you know i m moving to charleston in april. I know i'm so i'm happy for you. I'm sad for me. I'm holding both feelings. Yeah i mean. I'm really sad like people have been like. Oh you must be so abby back in new york. I'm not like i love it here but i just feel like the next step. I'm ready for that. And new york's always gonna feel like home to me. I'm gonna come back a lot once. Were allowed to in it safe. But i'm ready. I'm excited also. I was getting a lot of concerned. Dmz comments about whether the podcast will continue. Yes and yes. It totally will. And when grace's in charleston in december we recorded three episodes episodes. I think yeah. I can't remember. I think four because we took two weeks off. And i was there for six weeks. Yeah so We will continue to record remotely and grace will get some new tech year that she has to learn how to use a follow still beckett dollar tech stuff. It's my strong suit. I'm even more excited to have the podcast. Because that means. I have like a weekly very solid catch up with you. Yeah so. I think it'll be fine steps in change or very scary. I am such a change of ours person. But you have to go with your gut and i my guts telling me that this is. It's time changes great. Yeah i like change. I don't. I'm whatever the opposite of a change. Verse person is oh see. I don't like change. I like to like be in my little bubble habits. Stayed the same. I think i have more anxiety around the deciding part but once i've decided i am very excited. That's how i feel right now. I i had so much anxiety about telling people like isla back for almost a full week before. I told anyone and i was holding that secret. And like before i told my close friends like you and alex like i was just having a lot of anxiety about sharing it and having those conversations so i kept it in but that just made it. Worse so yeah. It's how down the open out in the open entering that excitement phase. Like i told you this earlier. But i was dealing with aaron gates from elements of style and i have read her blog for. Oh my god like since she started it. I think she had her blog before i did. I love her style and her taste and she was messaging me said congratulations. And she's like. I'd love to help you design your charleston house when you do decide to buy a house like awesome and i actually used some help for the new place. And she was like done done so We're still talking about like rates in all things like. But i think i'm work with her. That's exciting yeah so now to bring down the mood but like what's your low So while it is also a high. I'm having a lot of just nervousness about the inauguration and potential violence share that concern. And i i don't want to because we're recording mess beforehand. And then this episode is gonna come out on inauguration day. Yeah but i share that concern. So mostly i'm really happy and i think for me. Joe biden is a big symbol of hope right now but there's always that nervousness. It's been a really hard year. And i don't know i feel uncertain and just hoping that everything goes off without a hitch. Yeah i feel about how about you. We have another low. What's your other low. There is an animal living inside the ceiling. between alex. and my apartment's what kind of animal like a mouse. I don't know it's bigger than a mouse. It scratches on the level of noise. It was making last. Night is on par with noise that tehran could make sure your shirts. Not officer and pause alex's cap. Yeah we've we've established that there was like thorough digging and burrowing going on and was walking across the space between our two ceilings it. I'm so scared of it. And i don't think it can get in because it's all sealed off and like pretty firm by like if it was like really strong couldn't get through the ceiling so last night it was the most aggressive because before i left for charleston i'd have been hearing it a little bit kinda just hoped it would leave or die or go away and like last night i was like the animal is back. I don't know what it is. I'm imagining wreck raccoon. I don't know why there would be a raccoon in brooklyn. It feels too big to be a rat okay. I don't know what it is. Okay i don't love that. No i don't love it either. So guys like our building is great. But it's very old. So we've mentioned we have cockroaches like i mean look. Everything is all sealed off so it's been a while since i've had a cockroach but there's something in the wall it's big yeah. Great no Have about you. Milo is much super. So i had so much panic this week over mentioned last week in my resolution the resolutions episode that i am. I am writing a book and it's very stages i'm not yet talking about any details about it yet but I i had this panic. Because i was writing it in present tense and like you know when you say a word so much like it loses all meaning and i was like is this right i was like oh should it be in the past tense. Yeah and then. I started googling. And then i realized that there's this whole contingent of people who hate any book that's written in the present tense like they won't read a book that's written in the present tense osa. Change book what. I don't know that's so dumb. I don't i don't mean to demean anyone's beliefs. If they believe that but

Charleston Aaron Gates Becker New York Alex Abby Isla Grace Joe Biden Tehran Brooklyn Milo
Denise Leith and Sarah Thornton

Published...Or Not

02:49 min | 4 d ago

Denise Leith and Sarah Thornton

"This is a three cr podcast and this is published or not. We can't travel overseas now. But i must say even when we could. There was one country that was never on my back least. The knee slate has opened my eyes to this country in her book the night letters. Welcome to niece and kitchen. It's lovely to be with you. So fierce father and i share the same desire for sofia to get out of this country and come home to australia. Star win is Living she gets in kabul in a place called shaheen square. It's magic place. Of course. I'm roger fiction and his square is near the old city so it's thick in the middle of kabul and it's a rather large square in its cobblestoned. It has to trees in the middle of stuff share tree and fig tree. angel trees the h. e. garden because his square used to be part of a very wealthy man's home and poverty. Scott and the around the square the shops and the houses of the people who live in shape his square so win afia stab from her apartment. Which is in a house and she square. She has the balcony when she looks down. She's looking down over the talk with the trees and to the shops and a couple square and across opposite is with the doctors. Surgery is says she can see her surgery from says she s to walk across the square. Every day from you describe it with so much cologne and you give all the inhabitants their own history. We know that it's all square because it hesitate house in the teahouse but buzzed family had for generations. That's right in fact he's unshakable and this is not that he exists but the uncle that i talk about insists he was one of the conquerors ethical and afghanistan and he loved. Becky knows days. I think was fifteen. Sixteen hundreds he loved kabul so much. It was so beautiful that he said that when he died he wanted to to be buried there because if there was hidden on earth it is. This is this is this. And that's not how we see kabuki more or afghanistan. It isn't it isn't what we do see quite often have kenniston is old people and they've there's quite a few of them in the square is etc the cobbler and he learned coupling from the age of six. Now he's old. These has fanning.

Kabul Shaheen Square Afia Sofia Roger Australia Scott Afghanistan Becky Kenniston
Episode 425: Stephanie Clifford

Longform Podcast

05:23 min | 5 d ago

Episode 425: Stephanie Clifford

"Welcome to the long podcast. I'm erin lamour. I'm here with my co hosts. Evan ratliff and max lansky higher hey We have a great show this week. i got to talk to stephanie. Clifford who is a longtime business media reporter She was formerly reporter at the new york times where she reported on courthouses and that was how she ended up covering the martin shkreli trial. Martin shkreli being the so-called disgraced pharma bro and another reporter was also reporting on that trial and they became friendly That reporter ended up pursuing a romantic relationship with martin shkreli After he was sentenced to prison. Time and stephanie wrote this article about it in l. I feel like it went as deep into the internet as an article can go. You probably saw it if you didn't see it. Check it out. But i really wanted to talk to her about it and in following her career for a long time and she does tons of really interesting. Work was a great conversation. I'm glad you got her man because they feel like A couple of times a year. I think that story came out on like a sunday night. And i feel like maybe twice three times a year. There's like I will go onto the internet and the my entire internet is talking about one article that happened with this one and i feel like most of the response to it was just people being like what what now but So there are lots of questions. Aaron and. i'm glad you've got to ask them stephanie. I saw that article in many newsletters Quite a few of them sent out by Mel chimp malcolm is the best way to do an email newsletter and they helped make the show possible so thank you to them and now. Here's errand with stephanie clifford. Welcome stephanie clifford thank you. I really want to talk to you about this story. You did involving martin shkreli but maybe we can work our way forward to that moment. I understand that some of the backdrop to getting the story was that you were sitting in on the original. Martin shkreli trials. Where were you in your career at that point. And how did you end up there in your career. So i was at the times then at the new york times reporter covering courthouses covered the skelly all the arraignment since oh fourth leading up to the trial and then the fall shkreli. Trial is well cordless. Beat i mean. Correct me if i'm wrong. It sounds like a kind of a good umbrella to catch a lot of stories. it's like the courthouse israeli john. Run to itself now. That's exactly it. And i think that's what people didn't really realize about the card house. Beat because you can cover anything like as covering animal rights. I was covering family card. I was covering custody and the death penalty and fraud. Trials like shkreli and like crazy fraudsters. Who were you know bilking investors out of millions of dollars like you to do so much interesting staff to get documents like eleven document so for someone who's never reported from a courthouse. Are you like just looking at the docket every day going like circling at like your movie hopping. You're like a little of column a little column be. Yeah like that's a big part of it. I was at the times you ask to be switched every couple of years. And you say what you want to be. Switched to you. Talk to the editor. But then you just dropped it with nextradio training sicily working out of the brooklyn federal courthouse. Like my wife wasn't working wasn't working. My editors texting me saying like you need to go cover arraignment and is like yes then on my phone to google. What is in arraignment. 'cause i just had no idea seattle. A lot of it is figuring out what's going to be interesting so you source up with prosecutors your source up with defense lawyers with judges to get a sense of you know out of brooklyn fed outside their thirty cases being heard today out of the state courthouse. A hundred to figure out which of those are worth covering in which might lead to bigger stories for someone picking up the story at the stage of day one of a trial like where is that as a place to enter a story. And where are you expecting to. By the time you write about it if you start on day one of a trial there will usually been a year or two of hearings and motions before that so if you come in fresh on day one without having read the pleadings without having read the previous transcripts or the motions or having talked to the lawyers to understand beyond the obvious criminal charges in a case like what are some of the interesting things in this case as their first amendment issues there issue on how they might tell the jury to follow instructions. Anything you can pull out for a bigger story. I was always taking a friend of mine. Peter latin who's great courts reporter told me think of it like a sports game. It's you and it's all your competitors. You're all watching the same game like it's your job to come up with the most interesting take for your readers and with a

Martin Shkreli Stephanie Clifford Stephanie Erin Lamour Evan Ratliff Max Lansky Pharma Bro Mel Chimp Malcolm New York Times Clifford Skelly Brooklyn Federal Courthouse Aaron John Seattle Brooklyn Google Peter Latin
1408 (2007)

Chat Sematary

06:03 min | 5 d ago

1408 (2007)

"Everyone chat cemetery is back today. We are talking about the movie. Adaptation of fourteen eight. And i am joined by a brand new guest. Robert yannis junior robert. How are you doing today. I'm good deanna. how're you. I'm doing well. I was pleasantly surprised by this movie. I have to say it's one of the ones where we have a short story being adapted or a shorter story for stephen king. You know and this is a movie that i had only heard a little bit about. And i don't know if that's just because it's not a book adaptation. I feel like sometimes the short story or novella adaptations kind of fly under the radar. A little more than the big ones like pet cemetery. It i think shawshank might be the biggest novella adaptation along. Stand by me so for me. I hadn't heard too terribly much about this. Had you watched this movie prior to signing up for it for the podcast. Yeah absolutely actually. That was one of the ones that really jumped out to me. Because i i saw fourteen away in the theaters and loved it and And you know about owned the dvd for many years and actually hadn't revisited in a while so this was definitely a movie that really resonated with me and continues to do so even more. So now he had. This was something that was very interesting to watch at the tail. End of two thousand twenty because is very much of one person being isolated movie. Yeah yes absolutely is but to jump in. I want to quickly talk a little about the casting crew because this is the first of two movies that john kusak. Samuel jackson are in together. And it's always interesting to me. Who returns to stephen king movies and how small or big a cast will be for any given patient so aside from the two of them you know you have kusak playing the main character. Mike ensslin you have samuel jackson playing mr roland but then you really only have three or four other characters that are of significance in this. You have mary mccormack as lilly. Who is mike's not necessarily estranged wife. But they've clearly been separated because their daughter katie died and she comes into play. And then you have. Tony shalhoub as sam farrell. Mike's agent from what i can tell and a lot of people know him from monk and then you have lend care ru. I hope i'm pronouncing that correctly. As mike's father but you know other than john. Kusak and samuel jackson. Everyone else is sort of just a side character. Yeah yeah absolutely. I mean this is in large part a one man show by john cusak dean we spend the vast majority. I'd say at least an hour of the hour and forty five minutes or so long. Run time in the room with him and Even the other characters that show up a lot of them are either. You know specter's in the room or just like some kind of manifestation of his own site psychosis like there's there's a lot of there's a lot to dig into in this one and that's why i think it's an interesting one to talk about because as you said a lot of people haven't heard about it and it came out and was a hit and it's it's kind of fallen under the radar a little bit over the years and this is one that i often see paired with other movies and you know. Sometimes you'll get these. Stephen king sets where it's like. I think there's an eight movie box set or something. That's like the master of horror or king of horror. Something along those lines. But when i was looking for fourteen o eight in particular. You know i've run into this problem. Where sometimes on the like one movie or tv miniseries. And then it's only bundled with other things that i already own and i'm just like why are you doing this but i think this was one that you could fairly easily find on. Its own but it is included in some double set. Maybe it's this and sell because kusak in jackson are both in those. I can't recall right now. But i feel like those two even though the actors are both very big. You don't hear too much about them and sell. I imagine it's because it's not that great. But i think fourteen pleasantly surprised me with how good it was. Yeah i think there's there's a lot about the movie that that makes it stand out. I think the the sort of isolation aspect of it. There's also a lot of classics. Stephen king tropes sort of add player to focuses on a writer he. He's he's dealing with family trauma. That's dinner scene where he is. He's having dinner with lily. That felt like straight out of the end of misery to me. Like there's a lot of elements in here that the their riffing on other king stories. And you know better known adaptations and i feel like that may be one of the like. Maybe if i had to criticize something about this movie that might be one of the things i would. I would throw at it at it. But i think for most part. It's it's really fascinating. Like i put it on last night in preparation for this episode. And you know. I didn't pause it. I didn't go get a snack or nothing. I was like enveloped in it for the whole run time and i think that it really holds up to rewatch in that way in a way that a lot of a lot of movies. Don't you know what i'm saying. Yeah and because this is a movie that came out in the mid to late two thousands. Yeah it was two thousand eight. I think at least for the blu ray release of it but i felt like even though a lot of this relies on you know some sort of trickery with the camera and cgi.

Stephen King Kusak Robert Yannis Samuel Jackson John Kusak Mike Ensslin Mr Roland Sam Farrell John Cusak Dean Shawshank Deanna Mary Mccormack Tony Shalhoub Mike Robert Lilly Katie Specter
S3. Ep. 6: No lvarez reads an excerpt from "Spirit Run"

Storybound

02:00 min | 6 d ago

S3. Ep. 6: No lvarez reads an excerpt from "Spirit Run"

"Welcome everyone to a new episode of story bound this week on the show. We're joined by no alvarez who will be reading an excerpt from his memoir. Spirit ron six thousand mile run through north. America's stolen land. No alvarez was born to mexican immigrant parents and raised working class in yakima washington which are both topics covered in detail in this book. Which by the way is the debut and some debut. it was garnering a starred review in publishers. Weekly and editors choice selection from the new york. Times this is one of those rare stories that skirt the edge of travel adventure outdoors family memoir and spiritual one of story bounds producers. Read the book and was blown away by how it was able to capture the freedom that comes from running with no regard to self and just enjoying the act reading. The book is a lot like that too. He'll be joined by daniel frank wise of locator who has managed to elevate the excerpt even further through haunting keys rhythm and strings. Let's start the show my know alabama's and you're listening to story bound. I'm going to read a short excerpt from a spirit. Run six thousand mile. Marathon to north america stolen chapter seven titled the arrive. Hey if you love listening to the show. Please consider giving a rating and review on apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to podcasts. We want to continue bringing you the show for free and part of our ability to do that means we need a big audience. It may not seem like it but rating and reviewing the show will help more people find us. You just search story bound on apple. Podcasts scroll to the bottom and push five stars stat easy. If you'd like you can even a note explaining why you love the show. Thank you welcome to story. Bound presented by hub radio and the pod. Glomming i'm your host. Judy brewer

Alvarez Daniel Frank Yakima Washington America New York Alabama North America Apple Judy Brewer
Marc and Bevy Smith discuss Bevy's new book; "Bevelations"

Coffee and Books

07:18 min | Last week

Marc and Bevy Smith discuss Bevy's new book; "Bevelations"

"Hey everybody. I'm marc lamont hill owner uncle. Bobby's coffee and books. I am a professor a scholar and most importantly buchner. I say book nerd. Because i don't just love to read books. I'm the person who loves to read about the book. I love hearing authors talk about how or why they wrote the book and i love talking to other book nerds about their favorite books. That's why i started coffee in books. It's a podcast all about books. Every episode high. Sit down over a cup of coffee with the world's biggest authors to discuss the most interesting controversial fund or important books. And sometimes i hang out with experts fans another special guest talking about some of the greatest books of all time and today is a big honor for me. It is a big honor for the show. We got a living legend in the building right now and she has. A new book is called beverly lessons from mother. Auntie best bevy. Smith is here good to see you. I'm so happy to see you the be with you. This is like a dream to be on your show dreamed of being uncle. Bobby's i love. I'm so excited to have you on. You know a lotta times on this show. We get people who write certain kinds of books and tell certain kinds of stories not said when we started to show. I wanted to all kinds of stories and have all kinds of people and this is by far the most fun but government is yes. It's the most fun is the most funny is the most personable book is one of the most engaged in books. I've read that we've had. It was fun to read. And even though i know you see you and talk to you all the time working in the industry i learned so much about you by reading the book and i hope that's what you wanted from people that's definitely without one eight. I wanted to set the stage for magnetic in life and so when you are kind of like shrouded by these personas that we build up. That will only do service at some point in time and then all of a sudden you find that. They're kind of like gilded cages ahead. So i set my gosh. This book is an opportunity. Let people know all about me and all my different interests also my background and then that will open up new doors for me in the already has been out one day. I see it everywhere. You don't have a bookstore. So i save a people come in asking about it for the last two weeks and that's a good sign like a lot of times. People will buy a book if they see on the shelf. But i always get excited when people don't see it on the shelf and ask about it. People that michelle obama they did it with tiffany haddish gabrielle union. And they're doing it with your book and so there's a lot of energy behind this book. And i i'm super excited about it. What major do a book. There's a lot of content out that you can do videos. You could do y honestly. It's because the people want me to do a book. It was literally everyone from people that i interact with on social media Celebrities that interviewed many was also my agents. Were like you should do a book and win by agents said it to me on with ca at a time when the largest talent agencies and when she said it to me. I'm like yeah. Okay yeah. I should do a book like you. I'm a book nerd. But i'm also older than you and so for me. People wrote memoirs when they were in their seventies eighties nineties so for me to write a book in my fifties was just like right now. I don't i. The story still had so much left to be told but then. I realized that i could do this. Take one part of my story. Intel that done with bev relations and so wants to agent said that to me. And and once i secured the book deal quite easily. You know. knock wood and give thanks. I was like all get in the book now. And that's what happened was book. You definitely did. You got a book deal. What i thought was interesting was that the book is on andy. Cohen's book imprint yet. Which i was excited about. Obviously you know we got all kinds of connections to show has a lot of professional connections to india and watch what happens. But i like andy personally and like kind of product he puts out and i was curious to know what kind of books come out on a book imprint for any you know and the ambiance which i was a little bit worried that the book might be just about celebrity gossip that it wouldn't be a did i read it. I was like oh no we go learn something today. Yeah we all learned something today and also to mark. I don't really care about celebrity gossip so when my shook my radio show babylon. I literally do not ask celebrities about their personal. I believe kia. Will you sleeping with any of that craft. I care about how you got to wig. Are those kinds of things. I like origin stories with. So i don't care about sleeping with us and that's why even talking to another interview and they were like those interesting that you have slept with prominent people that you don't name them in the book last year because it's not about that and i certainly didn't want him to be defined by the famous midnight slept so i'm certainly not on the name them also to Toward tacky so the book deal exactly. I'll talk trash about tawdry tacky. But i will read it but but that's a hard thing i mean. Was there any temptation or even. Some station was any pressure from publishing industry to get you to write a different kind of book of daily. Do whatever you want to do. I'm so blessed highly paper. I came in with one page of what what the book would be and they were like we love it. We wanna buy it. Wow okay for you. Book nerds an aspiring writers. Maybe it's scrap it. Something almost like sitting in a diner getting picked for like a hollywood movie or like most of a lot of people like thirty forty six hundred pages to get a book proposal in agent might take you and then you have the publisher. Mike read it and you might get up offer but you're standing on a reputation you're standing on the platform already have and people know at a great story. Obviously that you offer and so i. I think it's not just look. This is a testimony talent in which built them. And most importantly what i think everyone can relate to it's about relationships and how you carry yourself in this world in this life you know mark i love and respect you so much i love what you do and by the time i became aware of view. I'm very seasoned person in a lot of different spaces so a lot of people may or may not have wanted to even take the time to even know the new people that come up in buzzing the law. That kind of stuff. But the. I'm the person i was when the was new was next. You will what's new. What's next was hat I have a real vested interest in making sure. I'm up to date on what's going on. And what that means is that my relationships spam from an eight year old multi millionaire who lives on the upper east side to a young ace effort united mean related to spend that kind of think now. I think that that's something. I really wanted to give you the question. The book too is that you know a lot of time to talk about networking. And i don't like the use term that were because i feel there's predatory and said i'd like to connect with people in the gannett way so when i meet lem marc lamont hill. Because i've heard so much about the nice seen on tv. I'm meeting him. Not because i'm angling. Get something out of him. There's nothing for me to get out of. Marc lamont hill. Initially right at that point. When i meet you. You don't have this podcast. You don't. You're not doing all the tv that you're doing all of that but to are hella

Marc Lamont Hill Buchner Bobby Tiffany Haddish Beverly Andy Michelle Obama Smith BEV Intel Cohen KIA India Hollywood Mike Lem Marc Lamont Gannett
The Bloater by Rosemary Tonks

Backlisted

05:58 min | Last week

The Bloater by Rosemary Tonks

"Yeah were jennifer wairoa. You how you doing. What's been happening and in my bedroom in southeast. London have been since march could be anywhere. I'm all right there. Yeah i think that's all all you can say. I think he's been quite bad. One another still getting the energy through tax. Everybody spitting good now. Well st where all you will. I'm in no home in the office. Bit of my house in stunt newington and today my wife was in running park and she's so johnny trump of trump records at lots of radio stuff and the to how i was. He said he hadn't seen me around was worried. The i'd spend the whole of look down just sitting in a dog room for the full cds. That's exactly was cut room reading. Rosemead salts eight. the objectionable definitely definitely definitely bulky smith. Rosemary talks of great. Yeah definitely got early right. Hello and welcome to the podcast that gives new life to all books today. You find us in late sixties. London were on a lunch break from the electronic sound workshop. Sitting in a cd pub drinking stingles eating cheese sandwiches that might come smart and trading cryptic stories about i. Love lives will the lack of them. I'm john mitchelson publisher of unbound the platform where it is crowd from the books. The really want to read. And i'm andy miller on of the year reading dangerously. And today as you heard we have joined virtually boy a new guest shuli and an old guest jennifer hudson lost on that list for the an quin episode which was number sixty seven in 2018. Hallo both view welcome. Thank you for coming on this talk about. Stewart's started performing yield of comedy in one thousand nine hundred eight. He's been called. The world's greatest living stand up comedian by the times and britain's worst stand up comedian by the sun. He's currently number. One culture shots quieting the anglo saxon. The wonder oh. Have you up foundation on the coming over here. Single raka the documentary. He co-authored with toast of london director. Michael coming about booming and punk survivor. Row but lloyd off the band the nightingales on sky arts. On january the thirtieth. How long have you been. Have you spent making actually been moved to the february now. Well which took about two years to make lead. It was finished in march last year. And now it's then we were supposed to take it runs through the and so he's sort of been in limbo for year steers to snowflake tornado is currently on hold with fifty final dates to be rescheduled for later in. Twenty twenty one. He's fifty two years old and most people have never heard of in. The pharmaceutical was actually on the on the account. Remember if you've played the giggle not pay. It was really down here in canterbury. What happened was it was a monday. Annoy was cancelled on the tool. Boris johnson told people that they shouldn't judge the this but didn't tell stage that they had to close that was five o'clock which caused a massive confusion and People on the committee if they had to turn up against we decide what to do in the public cats decide whether it's the guy that was a matt atmosphere on the night which was nothing to do with me on of gasoline think people knew it was the last time they around one australia. I was hanging around Waiting for confirmation as to whether we would go ahead or it and It was pulled that night and we were in the stage from acts up and everyone was so saying when long issue lost and not my set was that she put in the to drive emerge sister's garage because we thought we'd be back on the road. Brayson us coming up to a year ago. Matt when you get back out onto a you can. Do you going to stick to that material from however long the guy in the second for the show was a story about dave shebelle's backstage reuter and that as far no hasn't changed. It may have been the first off the of about the culture. Wars bows as her in two thousand and nineteen the show which is going to be three years ago. By the time i finished. Yeah it will need in. So many things have changed. You know. the things have changed in the last twenty four hours over. The last few days is a really good. So i know it's happening and then could've taken brady and join rewrite the first off so it's not like a description of the news of eight thousand nineteen but in a way that doesn't mess up second home so he's going to be a real little puzzle and i think i've got a recording of the. Oh i think oh put out that somehow but yes would weird difficult thing in makes you realize how much was talking about issues about -ception of rice. Whatever black lives matter was happened since went down so many things. Well keep working on my selection health so pleased to have jennifer hudson came. Eli always like jennifer. Hudson is a russian critic and twenty. I saying she added to the collection of anchoring shoot stories.

Jennifer Wairoa Johnny Trump John Mitchelson Shuli London Andy Miller Jennifer Hudson Hallo Rosemary Smith Brayson Stewart The Times Boris Johnson Lloyd Dave Shebelle Britain Canterbury Michael
Little Atoms 666 - Ivy Pochoda's These Women

Little Atoms

05:28 min | Last week

Little Atoms 666 - Ivy Pochoda's These Women

"They say little atoms a radio show about ideas and coach with me naoto any this week. Ivy pagoda on her latest novel. These women koda is the author of the art of disappearing visitation street which was a guardian amazon best book of two thousand thirteen and wonder valley los angeles times book place finalist and a winner of the strand critics award for many years. She was a world ranked squash player. She teaches creative. Writing at the stereo in skid row los angeles screw up in brooklyn but now currently lives in los angeles is an obvious. Latest book is another los angeles novel. These women ivy. Welcome back to latham's. Oh i'm so glad to be here. Although i wish i could be doing missing person so actually i was going to say before. We took them out. What this book is about. This is your second los angeles novel now. obviously you. You wrote a book about red her and brooklyn. Also what about vegas. But i'm ignoring for the moment but question is do you feel more like a los angeles writer now. I both love and hate this question on yet. You know i'm from brooklyn i'm not one of those transplants. I'm not gonna run the down. But i'm actually from brooklyn sue rating a novel about brooklyn. Was you knew brainer for me. I grew up. And where i lived at the time but i realized that i have to write about the place i live in. You know so and my last two books have been in la. And i still live here. I've been here for over ten years. Which is extraordinary. And i feel very close to the los angeles literary cultural sane of which there is a very nice one sue for that reason. I definitely feel more like a los angeles. I feel like with the writers here. i feel. I love the idea that you know. We aren't quite as beholden to the east coast literary scene. I don't know if my like los angeles novelist in terms of material. It just happens that. I live here. And i'm very comfortable about writing about the places where i live. I can't imagine that's why we're not talking about that biggest novel. I can't imagine why. I wrote a novel out of place. I didn't spend a lot of time or a novel about a place where i wasn't Enmeshed so yes. I feel like los angeles novelist. But if i were to move to omaha nebraska for a few months. I probably would wind up writing about that. So how would you describe these women. Then let's see lots of people do that for me. I guess it's not my strong suit of because what i see in it. You know it's so important to me to get it all out i. It's definitely a feminist serial killer novel. In which i punched a serial killer size hole in the narrative. I find serial killers a little bit boring. So this is a book about Women who live in the wake of violence whose lives have been affected by a serial killer. Who's been preying on women in south. La but a pivot entirely focusing on this man and to the voices of the women who he's harmed and people don't normally hear from in this kind of stories you now we still although crime rates are doing their best live beholden somewhat the industrial dead girl complex. So this is a book that is more interested in the lives of the victims and those around the criminal and with the crime solving at serial killers. That they're big business star of netflix's true crime dramas. Oh you know million books. What is it the boring question. I'm sure you've answered many times but it is a novel so we should talk about before we talk about the approach taken. One is it with samuel killers. Why are we fascinated by it. I think there's a lot of answers to that question. The fact that you know. I think people just generally are obsessed with things that are so gruesome. They can't imagine it. I feel that i. It's hard to imagine being a serial killer. I also think that and this has been written about by people besides myself. I think people love to inflate the idea of serial killer Grandiosity and we love to imagine especially infection even more than in real life on which i think is a problem with a lot. Serial killer fiction. That criminal has to be some grand mastermind alluding hampshire and doing all these nefarious brilliant plotting and the truth of the matter is they're not you know but we imagined that a serial killer is some incredibly smart incredibly rich various incredibly dangerous clutter and schemer who's operating on his really high level simply because the person has escaped after you know so we can't imagine that it's just the guy on the bus and if you look at the golden state killer which is a case that captivated california but recently and also michelle. Mcnamara's book i'll be begun in the dark. This guy you. They couldn't catch and for decades. You know he. He raped and killed and tortured people and he was just a random dude. He was not doing anything particularly exciting with trying to evade the cops because they couldn't catch him he gets still puffed up and i think that's where this obsession with. We build these people in the images to match the like huge amount of energy as going into finding a million cops are looking for this guy. He's got to be smart as a million cops put together.

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Tim Sainsbury

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

03:13 min | Last week

Tim Sainsbury

"This is the writers. I'm georgina godwin. My guest today has been responsible for the development and strategy of one of the uk's largest supermarkets aside from an illustrious initial career in retail. He's perhaps best known for being a conservative party politician for over twenty years during which time he had spells as minister of state for trade and minister for industry and other art collector in his spare time his book among the supporting cast details his fascinating and varied life story. Tim sainsbury welcome to meet the writers. Good morning nice to hear from you and tim across. Your name is synonymous with one of the biggest supermarket chains in britain. Can you tell us how the business began way back in eighteen sixty nine my great grandparents both working instructing ground just victoria st and they met and fell in love and wanted to marry. Religion is identify. This really true. That my great. Grandmother's parents who will shopkeepers. They had several shops told my grandfather. You can't marry our daughter until you have a shop of your own. And so they go to shop and another legend is Since he's been told is when these they started producing several sons they had six sons He's old. I better have more shops. So each of them has got a shop of their own when they want to get married whether that was really the reason anyhow the business fatty earlier and it's time in about eighteen seventy four they started shop and of course you go into the whole birth of supermarkets. How the business model. Basically changed a retailers switching to self service. Tell us a little bit more about that. What it was a a remarkable time of course during the wall from thirty nine through really about nineteen fifty retailing was frozen was never new development. New ideas ready. And then the idea of self service supermarkets with imported from america and the fest buckets Started appearing in one thousand nine hundred fifty but it was very difficult in those days. Because if you want to do building you had to get a license Building materials very short supply so the start of supermarket. Retailing britain was snow and hesitant when i joined the company and fifty six. It was ready just talking to take off on any scale worst. Their any effort doubt that you would join the family fund Yes woes both in my mind. And i think in my father's mind and my grandfather's mind And indeed. I did discuss briefly with the provost of my college oxford what i would do if i didn't join the family business when i said i thought i wanted to become a lawyer.

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