Be Kind... Unwind

Close your eyes, put your feet up, head back, and relax. It's 'you' time. A selection of topics chosen to keep you mellow yet focused when it's time to kick back: a mild blend of mindfulness, self-improvement, meditation and wellness.

A highlight from Reading the Signs of your Body

Bodies

02:55 min | just now

A highlight from Reading the Signs of your Body

"No one talks to girls about their cervical fluid. It's like denying semen exists. It's denying that you sneeze and blow your nose. So your cervix do you know what your cervix is? This is me about four years ago. It's like taking a lesson with a woman named Tammy Rubin. She's a certified fertility awareness and reproductive health educator. I can't guarantee anything for you. I can just tell you the science and what I've learned and what I want to touch on. So the events leading up to finding Tammy a chronicled in the first episode of bodies, sex hurts. You can listen back if you want all the details, but to summarize, when I was 24, sex became painful. I told my doctor, but I was dismissed. And I was having a really negative impact on my relationship with my then boyfriend. And then, through a friend, I learned that it could be the birth control pill that was causing the pain. I'd been on the pill since I was 18 and never given a second thought. But then I started looking into it more and yes, painful sex, as well as low sex drive and trouble lubricating were all potential side effects of the pill. So I went to an o-b-gyn specialist who confirmed that it was indeed the pill that was causing my issues. He told me to stop taking the pill, use a topical hormonal gel to get my hormone levels back to normal and go to pelvic floor physical therapy. I did all three things and after about 6 months, the pain went away. And honestly, my sex drive was better than it had ever been. And so after I got off the pill, I did not want to take hormonal birth control again. But I didn't want to get pregnant either. Condoms are fine contraceptives for the time being, but they didn't seem like a sustainable solution for the rest of my reproductive life. I started researching and came across this thing called the fertility awareness method. And at first I was like so the rhythm method that very unscientific way of guessing where you're at in your cycle. But as I learned during my sessions with Tammy, it's not the same thing as the rhythm method. Once you see that fluid, the fertile window is opening. And the change in cervical fluid marks the beginning of your fertile time. Turns out my body and the body of anyone with a menstrual cycle since two major signals over the course of a cycle. And if you can learn to read those signs, you can figure out on your own when you're fertile and when you're not fertile. This truly blew my mind. And so for the final episode of season three, I wanted to devote this episode to the fertility awareness method. How it works, how it can be used for contraception, why it's vital information for people trying to get pregnant and why it especially matters for people with polycystic ovarian syndrome or PCOS. I'm Alison berenger and from KCRW, this is bodies. And a heads up,

Tammy Rubin Tammy Pcos Alison Berenger
A highlight from Anxiety Sisters Unravel the Panic & Anxiety Spectrum

The Psych Central Show

07:27 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Anxiety Sisters Unravel the Panic & Anxiety Spectrum

"Thanks so much for having us. We are delighted to be here. Can you explain to our audience what anxiety is? So here's the thing about anxiety. If you're human, you've had it. It's a broad topic because we've all experienced it. But by the same token, the type of anxiety that mags and I like to work with and deal with is the kind when your brain gets a little bit wonky and the part of your brain that responds to fear is a little trigger happy and therefore creates a situation where a person experiencing anxiety thinks he or she is under a threat that actually is not there that doesn't exist. You know, fear is protective. If you see a grizzly bear chasing you, you run, because that's going to save your life. And that is not anxiety that's fear. But if you're standing in the grocery store, reminding your own business and suddenly start feeling all those symptoms like you're being chased by a bear, that's anxiety. That's where your brain is perceiving danger where it doesn't in fact exist. And there's a huge continuum of anxiety, right? I mean, it goes from just mild stress over things, which we all experience, all the way up to folks who can't even leave their home because they have so much anxiety they don't want to leave their house. And I'm glad you came in with a continuum because that's definitely really important. So many people think that anxiety is just like one size fits all, right? We don't think physical health is one size fits all. I mean, we don't think that every broken leg is exactly the same, but many people do believe that anxiety or any mental health is just, oh, I have it too, where exactly alike? Yeah. Yeah, and another problem with another difficulty that arises because it's mental health is that it doesn't get the same. It doesn't have the same gravitas as physical health. For example, if you break your leg and you're wearing a cast, no one is going to ask you to climb a flight of stairs. In fact, they're going to help you to the elevator. They might even bring a casserole to your house for dinner later on. But if you have anxiety, people can't see it. It's an invisible disorder. So people are not going to be so inclined to help. As a matter of fact, a lot of us, the help we get is someone saying, relax or calm down. And we all know that in the entire history of calming down, no one's ever calmed down by being told to calm down. Full disclosure, I suffer from panic attacks where I'll just be standing there mining my own business and my heart will start to race. I'll get all sweaty. I become just paralyzed. That's part of that continuum, right? That would be in the very serious disordered category if I'm stating that correctly. Is that common for people to have when they say I have anxiety or is there a more centralized anxiety that people are discussing when they say I have anxiety? When they're saying I have anxiety, I think panic attacks are pretty common. There are many different types of anxiety that people can be talking about so some people just have worry, they just worry excessively about everything. Some people catastrophize things, which means that they kind of make a mountain out of a molehill about everything. Some people have specific phobias where they're scared of, I don't know, driving on the freeway or driving or flying or some other type of situation. But I think panic attacks are a very central part for many people of anxiety. And gave in any given year, 284 million people suffer from anxiety disorders in the world. So it is exceptionally common. It's so surprising to me that you say that it's exceptionally common because I always felt like I was alone. Whenever I had a panic attack whenever I had anxiety, I thought that I was the only person in the world who was suffering. Is there a reason that people don't talk about this so much? Because you would think with 284 million people, nobody with anxiety would ever feel alone. You know, the most common thing we hear from people in our anxiety sisterhood. And we should just say that when we say sisterhood, we really mean any one of any gender. But the truth is the most common thing that we hear from our community, people say to us, I didn't know anybody else felt this way. People are reluctant to talk about this. There's been a mental health stigma since way back. I think in many places it's still very stigmatized and there's a lot of shame and blame that goes around with things that are called mental illnesses. So that's why mags and I love to call it brain illness because it really locates it in a place. It's in your brain, in fact, it's an a part of your brain called amygdala. You can see this part of your brain on an MRI. It's not a made up ethereal thing, and it's not something we should be ashamed of. I think also sometimes it's very hard to understand like you may hear that your friend has a panic attack, right? But it's very hard to understand what that actually feels like in reality. So a lot of times what abs and I do is try to describe some of the things that may happen when someone's very anxious or when someone's having a panic attack. More often than not, people tend to say to us, oh, I didn't realize other people felt that symptom too. A good example is we just were talking on our Facebook page about itching, getting very, very itchy when people are very anxious or even when they're panicked. And so many people said, I thought I was the only one that happened to. I never heard about this before. So a lot of times it's thinking that a symptom or an experience is your unique symptom of it or experience, but it's really much more universal than. You might believe. So just to make sure that we're all on the same page, how would I know if I was having a panic attack? Well, you could have any number of symptoms because each of us is different and we have our own unique presentations. But as mags pointed out, there are some really common ones that we all share. So I guess the classics would be cardiac symptoms like maybe racing heart or palpitations or even chest pain, shortness of breath or dizziness, also stomach upset is very common in a panic attack either nausea or excess gas can have things like headache. You could have itching, you could get a rash or develop hives. One thing mags and I always say is that anything the body can do, any sensation it can produce any sound can make in any fluid it can produce can happen during a bag of that. And if you find yourself having a panic attack, what should you do? Well, the first thing we like to say is the hardest. Which is, do not fight it. The goal is not to stop your panic attack because the more you fight, the more intense the panic attack can get. So we often use a rift tied analogy. You know if you're in the ocean and there's a riptide happening, you can't swim to shore. If it's a strong rip tide, no matter how good a swimmer you are, you can not make it to shore.

Anxiety Disorders Facebook Panic Attack Dizziness Nausea Headache
A highlight from 2183: On The Importance of Trying New Things by Helene Massicotte of Free To Pursue on Curiosity & Courage

Optimal Living Daily

01:10 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from 2183: On The Importance of Trying New Things by Helene Massicotte of Free To Pursue on Curiosity & Courage

"Are you the best blogs that I can get permission from? To you, covering productivity, minimalism, personal development, all that fun stuff. And with that, let's get right to another post, and start optimizing your life. On the importance of trying new things, by a land massacre of free to pursue dot com. How often do you try something new? Every year, every month, every week, likely the answer is not often. I don't know about you, but I feel like standing still makes my brain rot. Period. Keeping abilities, experiences, likes and dislikes, views, and beliefs, constant, stunts are growth as individuals. The familiar becomes too comfortable and starts feeling like it is the only way life can be. Just give a thought to who you admire most, the people you find interesting, intelligent and insightful. I guarantee they do not follow a predictable routine and thought and action, and if they do currently, it's not likely to be for long. In my experience, the benefits of continuously increasing my willingness to try new things, are numerous.

A highlight from Do You Think Like a Happy Person?

The Daily Boost

01:32 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Do You Think Like a Happy Person?

"Nobody's coming to help you do anything different. You have to do it yourself. So it is. If your positive person, you know that already, if you're negative, you're like, it shouldn't be that way. Don't do that. Step up. Do you have a brilliant mindset for everything that life throws at you? I think you do. Let me give you another clarity of that as well. Another learning if you will. I'll bring in mindset meeting any challenge comes your way up. Bring it, let's do this thing. That's cool. But I'm gonna give you the advanced version of the brink and let's do this thing. For those of you who recognize that sometimes in life, that's not a good idea. Maybe I shouldn't have done that. So for the things that mean something to you for the things that are important, you know, that you've got to bring it, you've got to turn into to give it your all self a 1000% and go after it. Yes, do you have a brilliant mindset? A happy person does. Okay, let's do this thing. But a happy person also says, well, I gotta bring up mindset, but I'm bringing it to that. Some rules understanding who you are. Understand what makes you happy. Understand that whatever the world brings your way, you're going to deal with it a happy upbeat way, but it doesn't mean you have to, right? That would be silly. There'd be another podcast that I don't do. If you are expecting a great night's sleep tonight, no matter what happened today and no matter what tomorrow will bring, I am guessing you're kind of a happy person.

A highlight from Heart Meditation: Taking in the Goodness (2021-12-01)

Tara Brach

04:23 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Heart Meditation: Taking in the Goodness (2021-12-01)

"In these heart practices, we're really moving from this realm of thinking. Conceptual to the heart and keeping the heart in the body at the center of awareness as a way of homecoming. It has to be an aesthetic. This particular practice today will be really emphasizing goodness. Because of our negativity bias, we don't really immerse and take in and sense the feeling of what it's like to observe goodness in ourselves or others. And with ourselves we rarely acknowledge it, we're so organized around what's wrong. So that's where we'll pay attention today. Rumi says whenever some kindness comes to you, turn that way toward the source of kindness. So we'll be looking for the source of loving and turning in that direction. Finding a posture that allows you to be alert sitting upright and also at ease. This is a way of initially collecting your attention. You might take a nice full deep in breath. And then a slow out breath slow enough so you can feel the sensations leaving the nostrils. And then another nice long deep in breath. Slow out breath, letting go. Letting go. One more time, deep full in breath. And slow out, breath. Relaxing outward. Letting the breath resume, and it's natural rhythm. Noticing the quality of presence. It's right here. From that space of presence sensing your most sincere intention. For this practice. As a way of creating a receptivity and openness in the body, I'd like to do a classical pre meta practice in a way it's a body meta practice of the smile down. Begin by a great smile spreading through the sky. Just vast that great sky that's out there just spreading through it. The uplift of a smile. You can imagine the mind and the sky emerging so that the mind is filled with that uplift curve, openness of a smile. Letting the smile spread through the eyes, lifting the outer corners of the eyes. Softening the eyes. Letting the brow be smooth. Sensing the mouth, slight smile. Just directly helps to quiet the

Rumi
A highlight from Train Yourself to Take Action

THE BRENDON SHOW

04:54 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Train Yourself to Take Action

"So here's my question. If you could take just small actions every day to improve this month. Could you make a list right now with the small actions could be? Could you make a list of where those things would be? Just some small actions. If it was health, maybe like, okay, I'm going to meditate every day at 2 o'clock. Great. Just to get your mental health back in check. Or it's like, oh, you know what? My finances. I'm going to start saving a dollar a day. Or you're like, oh, I'm going to you know, if it's in your relationships, I'm going to start complimenting my wife more. All those things consistently applied. Shift everything. The small actions compound into big character changes. I and my clients when I think about them, they're a result of a lot of conversations that awareness opened, acceptance happened, accountability was taken place, and then we just moved them forward a little bit. Moved a little forward, small actions, and over a period of weeks and days and months, as we developed them, all of a sudden they were like feeling better. And reporting is astounding results, you know, in our certified high performance coaching program, we have a score, which is basically a client driven score of how they rate each session. And they can score on a zero to ten basis. The industry average is somewhere around a 6.7, maybe to 7.8, depending on the certification or the school. Ours is a 9.7 out of ten. Why? Because we focus on habits. We focus on high performance habits, and they're action oriented. If you're ever at high performance habits, the research behind that is pretty clear. These are action ordered. High performers seek clarity. They generate energy. They raise necessity. They develop influence. They demonstrate courage. Each of those first words, do you ever hear that? They were verbs. Their action words seek. Generate raise develop, demonstrate. Got it? It's like, as we do those things, oh. Okay, what happens? It feels like all of a sudden life transforms over 12 weeks and survivors coaching. We coach people for 12 weeks, 12 week sessions. And sometimes it's 12 weeks, and we keep going. Sometimes, 12 weeks and we're done, just spend on the client. And what happens is it's like dramatic transformations. Because we're putting them back in that action gate. A lot of people, you know, the difference sometimes between their counseling or their therapy or their conversations with their family, their friends, it's very ruminative. It's lots of conversation. Lots of things. We're high performance coaches. We're going to shift people back into that action mindset without asking crazy transformation, but across a series of habits for us, as we help them shift into action in their psychology or their physiology or their productivity or their people skills, what ends up happening is it feels like everything goes up. I really think chefs. Okay, my friend, I hope you enjoyed this episode of the Brennan show. Tell some people about this episode. It's on each of us to spread positivity and empowerment during these times of chaos and negativity, right? So I'm asking you to be the dealer of hope and personal growth and education in your tribe. So take a screenshot right now and share the screenshot and this link to this episode with three of your Friends today. Post it on social media, use the hashtag growth day that's hashtag growth day because that's the name of my company. And we're always giving away prizes to our community. If you'd like to help me personally, then please rate and review the podcast on Apple podcasts. Give us some stars, cheer us on, leave a review because believe it or not, that stuff actually really does help. And I read all of them. So my last thought for today, please remember, you are stronger than you think. And the future holds good things for you. Tomorrow can be an inspired today. Every new morning is a second chance. Every day is a great day to grow. We're thankful to have you here and the growth day community. So be sure to go deeper with us at growth day dot com.

Apple
A highlight from 401: How to Embrace the Anti-Diet | Christy Harrison

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:53 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from 401: How to Embrace the Anti-Diet | Christy Harrison

"This is the 10% happier podcast. I'm Dan Harris. Hey gang, one of the things that happens to a lot of people when they start meditating, and it definitely happened to me. Is that you might become more aware of your thoughts. And as you become more aware of your thoughts, you may notice that many of them are venomously self critical. You might notice this background swirl of judgments and worries and regrets that can make your life a lot more miserable than it has to be. Again, I'm speaking from genuine personal experience here. Oftentimes, some of the most pernicious and most harmful thoughts revolve around our relationship to food and our bodies. Longtime listeners may have heard me say this before and I think this is something more men should say out loud. But I often find myself in spirals of self laceration when I walk past a reflective surface, especially if I'm wearing a bathing suit, for example. The visible abs I prided myself on back in my 30s or not here anymore and the thoughts that follow this observation can be pretty nasty. And my inner weather can have outer consequences. Maybe I start fanatically counting my calories or maybe I'm so caught up in obsessing over food that I'm barely president mealtime or maybe I get so into the habit of beating myself up that I extend that aggression to other people in my orbit. So all that is the bad news. The good news is that there's a way out of this, at least in my experience. Hence the two part series we're doing on the show this week, which we're calling the anti diet series. This is episode two, by the way, if you haven't heard the first episode with the actress Jameela Jamil, I highly recommend you check it out because she's amazing. Today's guest argues that the dysregulation I just described inside my own head isn't just common, it lives in just about all of us. But also that it has a common source, which she calls diet culture. What's more, she says there's another better way to interact with our food. It's called intuitive eating. I should say this is something I've been practicing personally for a couple of years now, and to use and overused phrase, it has genuinely changed my life. My guest today is Christie Harrison. She's an anti diet registered dietitian and nutritionist, a certified intuitive eating counselor and a certified eating disorder specialist who has struggled with disordered eating herself. She's come out the other side of it, and she's written a book called anti diet, and today she's here to talk about how to transform your relationship with food and your body. In this interview, we talk about Christie's personal experience with eating disorders. The problem with diet culture, the deep historical roots of diet culture, the scientific evidence against dieting and then the principles of intuitive eating. Just a few notes before we go for it. This conversation, as you might imagine, touches on some sensitive topics, such as eating disorders, body image. Some of these issues may carry an emotional charge for some listeners, so just a heads up on that. On an audio tip, you may also hear a tiny bit of airplane noise in the distant background at certain moments that's what happens when you record remotely during a pandemic. Also, you may notice that Christie's voice at times is a tiny bit breathy. That's not because she's nervous, it's because she was very pregnant when we recorded this. By the way, if you like what you hear today, I've got another bit of good news. We've tapped Christie to be the instructor in our brand new anti diet challenge over on the 10% happier app. In this 7 day challenge, we're gonna help you build a better relationship with food and your body. The approach is back by science and supercharged with meditation. And the challenge Christina and I are going to talk through the principles of intuitive eating in a series of short videos and then after the video is complete, Christie will lead you in a guided audio meditation to actually kind of pound the lessons of intuitive eating into your neurons.

Dan Harris Jameela Jamil Christie Harrison Christie Christina
A highlight from Daryl Davis - Healing Hate with Friendship

Untangle

07:24 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Daryl Davis - Healing Hate with Friendship

"I have the most amazing guest for you. He is a man that really shows us the possibility of how two disparate sides can come together. His name is Daryl Davis, and he's a black man who is convinced over 200 Ku Klux Klan members to give up their robes by boldly and bravely walking in deep into their lives deep into the heart of the Ku Klux Klan, becoming friends with them and showing them his sheer humanity. Today we're going to hear Daryl's story and learn how it is that he threw his empathy compassion insight and bravery has been able to really embrace a methodology that allows people from opposite sides to come together, learn from one other, become friends heal and grow. Welcome, Daryl. Thank you, Ariel. It's a real pleasure to be here with you. Thank you for having me. It is such a pleasure. You're such an extraordinary human being. Sorry to embarrass you. I am so excited to be able to share your story and your insights today. Oh, it's my pleasure and I hope your listeners will enjoy it. Thank you. Why don't you begin by telling us the backstory to how and why you were able to penetrate the clan? Okay, I'm age 62 currently. And as a child, my parents were in the U.S. foreign service. So I spent a lot of my formative years starting at the age of three, and on through elementary school, traveling abroad, living in various foreign countries. You go to a country for two years, then you come back home here to the states, and then you're reassigned to another country. So back and forth back and forth during my formative years. While overseas, my classes in elementary school and things like that were filled with kids from all over the world. Anybody who had an embassy in those countries out of their children went to the same school. So my classmates were Nigerian Italian Russian Japanese French, you name it if they had an embassy there. I was in school with their kids. And to me, that was the norm. That was my first exposure to school. And so when I would come back home at the end of the two year assignment, I would either be in all black schools or black and white schools, meaning the still segregated schools or the newly integrated ones. What year was this? Well, I left Chicago shortly after I was born. But we would come back and we would be like in Washington, D.C. or we'd be in Massachusetts, different places for a short time before being reassigned. Every other two years. So I was back. I know I was back for part of the second grade. I was back for a fourth grade. I was back in 6th grade, and I was back here in 8th grade. When I would come back to schools were either all black or black and white, meaning still segregated or nearly integrated. And there was not the amount of diversity in my classroom that I had overseas. So in one case, I was in fourth grade, 1968. I was ten years old. And I was one of two black children in the entire school. Myself in fourth grade and a little black girl in second grade. So consequently all of my Friends were white. And many of my male friends were members of the local cub scout group. And they invited me to join, which I did. And during a march we had from Lexington to Concorde to commemorate the riot of Paul Revere. Suddenly I was being pelted with sort of pop bottles and cans and Ross and Joseph debris from the street by just a small group of the white spectators on the sidewalk. Not everybody. Most of those people were cheering us and waving. And all that kind of thing. But there were about maybe 5 people off to my right. I remember there being a couple of kids, perhaps a year or two older than myself and a couple of adults who were throwing things. And when I first began getting hit and looked over and saw this, my first thought was, oh, those people over there don't like the scouts. That's how naive I was. Because I had never been through that kind of thing before. And it wasn't until my scout leaders came rushing over and these were white people, my den mother, my club leader, my troop master, and they huddled over me with their bodies and escorted me out of the danger. And I realized then that I was the only person being targeted because nobody else was getting this special protection. And I asked him, I said, why am I being here? Why are they doing this? I didn't do anything. And all they would do was kind of shush me and rush them along, telling me everything would be okay, just keep moving. And so they never answered the question. At the end of the day, when I returned home, my mother and father who were not at the parade were fixed me up cleaning me up putting band aids on me and asked me, how do I fall down and get all scraped up? I told them I didn't fall down until the what had happened. And this was the first time in my life that I heard the word racism. They explained what racism was to me. And my ten year old brain could not process this definition. It made no sense to me whatsoever. I'd been around white people from all over the world at this point. And none of them, whether they were my fellow Americans, my French friends, my Swedish friends, my Australian friends, none of them treated me like this. So my parents were making this up because people don't do things like that. And the issue that not all white people do this, but there is an element of some they do. And I just could not wrap my head around it. So I didn't believe them. Well, about almost two months later, that same year, 1968, on April the fourth, Martin Luther King was assassinated. And every major city in this country burned to the ground. All in the name of this new word that I had learned called racism. So then I understood that this phenomenon does exist. But I did not understand why. Why are people raise this? What makes them that way? So I formed a question in my mind at that age, which was how can you hate me when you don't even know me? And now, for 52 years since then, I've been looking for the answer to that question. So how better would you get an answer and who better to go to to get it from, then somebody who would go so far as to join an organization whose whole premise has been now for a 155 years practicing hating people who don't look like them or who do not believe as they believe. So I began to question Klan members and clan leaders to get the answer to this question. And as a result, not only did I get some answers, but I also changed some minds along the way. Now, I don't like to say that I converted them what I want to say is that I was the impetus for them to rethink their ideology. And then they would make the change or make the conversion themselves. I planted the seed. It's amazing. Can you tell us some of the stories? I know I've heard some of them before and they're extraordinary. Top clan members that became like family to you. Sure, absolutely. The first leader that I interviewed was a grand dragon, which means a state leader. What you and I would call a governor, and he would later the one to become an imperial wizard, which means national leader.

Daryl Davis Daryl U.S. Foreign Service Washington, D.C. Ariel Paul Revere Massachusetts Lexington Chicago Ross Joseph Aids Martin Luther King
A highlight from It's Not Me, It's You: Two Types of Desire

The Angry Therapist Podcast

01:16 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from It's Not Me, It's You: Two Types of Desire

"Hi, my name is John Kim. I'm a therapist who went through his own rebirth many years ago, and I've been documenting my journey ever since sharing my life lessons and revelations. I believe in casual over Pinnacle with you instead of at you. I come unrehearsed on purpose because self help doesn't have to be so complicated. Hey, I want to tell you about the lab. If you haven't heard, it is wellness. Anywhere you go, you can listen to it like a podcast. They're basically live zoom classes, but you could listen to them on a run, or you could turn the camera on and engage with them. We have a thriving community of like minded people trying to live better lives and it's been amazing. Not only do we have the foundational classes like codependency and trauma and relationships and all that. But we also have a lot of fun classes because it's so hard to make friends as adults, right? So we have Terry card readings, we have so shower. We have astrology readings. We're turning wellness into a lifestyle. We're also going to run a retreat soon. So come and hang out with us, come ride with us. Go to the website to get into the lab and then go download the app. We have a brand new app out with tons of audio.

John Kim Terry