Asian American

Listen to the latest audio content in Asian American culture, identity, politics and history. This playlist features Asian American individuals having great conversations on relevant topics through a cultural lens. Broadcast from premium podcasts.

Food Activism with Jenny Dorsey

Model Majority Podcast

05:50 min | Last week

Food Activism with Jenny Dorsey

"Jimmy dorsey welcome to the model majority. Podcast today thank you for being one of our very first episodes to record in the year. Twenty twenty one which is a very exciting for so many people that we are here at this point but before we get into all that one actually start from the very beginning to get to know your personal story a little bit. i love to hear about. Where did you grow up. how did you grow up. And if anything during that time leads you become who. You are today as a chef but also has an activists usc for sure so i was born in shanghai china and my parents moved to the us when i was around to pursue their both of them are scientists and so they moved to new york. They went to a school in the bronx. And so i followed them when i was up three and a half with grandparents so i was really raised by my grandparents growing up And lived in new york until about eight. Yeah that's i think that's right. I moved to seattle so i. I set my larger chunk of my childhood in seattle washington and ended up going to school College in seattle as well so like good decade plus in seattle cut the no it and during that time also like learned. I think that seattle is not the place for me. I really really wanted to go back to new york so right after college and making that switch back to new york i i. started in management consulting after college. I was a finance major in school. Originally marketing major switched over to finance was not doing so great. Marketing and very quickly knew that finance. It's fine but it was something that is not naturally good at it. You know. I think everyone kind of has their own talents and you can tell you a talented something when it's really yes you're still gonna have to work hard and there's times where you're not doing great job or what. Not but for the most part. Like in makes just intuitively makes sense to you and tell. The numbers intuitively. Don't make sense to me the way that they did to other people And i hate like the serota asian being good at math and talk about that maybe later on but at least it was like a way to get my foot in the door ever since i was young. Who was always a big part of my life. But i didn't even think about it in college or honestly dion for a while because it was never really encouraged by my family. My family going up with more traditional than they are now I'm chinese american and like and we kind of because they were scientists. They were very wary of Career or they felt that. I cannot get ahead because they were you know they were in our lab. They were always the ones that were doing all the work. If you've just look at lab dynamic it's always usually by hawk. Individuals a lot of them. Asian east asian or south asian. Doing all the research all the were all the writing but who is the main like name on the paper that you see who's getting nobel peace prize for their work in science. It's usually white men and that dynamic played out throughout my childhood. I never really consciously understood it but now looking back it was. You know my parents had these bosses. And i'd be like but you do everything and they get all the credit. I'll get it. You know so anyway. I think my parents really wanted me to find a career where i could succeed and not have to be under someone's thumb so to speak and they really wanted you know they've really encouraged less ultra prenatal careers for more careers where you can make money and you can be independent so business. Definitely they definitely encouraged. I was an undergrad business school and they were like yeah. You can now go out as a console. You do make a lot more money like you know so. They just wanted that stability they wanted to non you know. Be a lab technician salary for me Even if they really loved the sciences sciences so anyway with that kind of mind food never really felt like a real clear path. Never really thought about. I never really even explored at. I had no idea what to do right. I think a lot of people who are interested in food don't really know how many years pm and starting my career absolutely hated it. I was in the fashion and luxury division. So i usually work with clients in your fashion and luxury so i spent a lot of time By clothes being obsessed with clothes and shoes and being skinny and it was like a really tough period of time because everyone around me really encourage that behavior as well. It was always about how you lose more way out of your book. Nice you know there was a lot of judgement and it. I think it really came to a head. there was one time at At work where our partner came in and she was very fashionable. Amazing like wealthy Woman and she had brought in a bunch of clothes she had purchased at a sample sale. We We work in chelsea in new york city and chelsea market. Has this like if you've been. There was kind of large area in the center of the market. That always has sampled feels. And i guess she had gone to hurry and she just said that she would just buy everything that basically that was in her size and just figure it out later and it was. I mean there was a lot of things but let's about. But i just remember thinking of this woman coming ahead at all. You know she was. She was such a bath right and the fact that she would come in with a garbage bag full of new clothes designer clothes. It's like it's never ending hole in your heart that you're just trying to fill with dot and you can't ever fill it like spoil alert for anyone who's over there you can't feel it it's impossible it doesn't matter how much money you out you can't feel it because that's not something that can be so thing

Seattle New York Jimmy Dorsey USC Bronx Shanghai Dion China Washington United States Chelsea New York City
China's Starring Role in Hollywood

Why It Matters

04:41 min | 2 weeks ago

China's Starring Role in Hollywood

"So what does china have to do with hollywood. So this is a particularly important year for the china. Hollywood relationship because this is the year that the chinese box office is expected to surpass the american box office as the most important box office in the world. This is james taker. He's the deputy director for free expression research and policy pen america and the author of the pen. America report made in hollywood censored by beijing now to get access to that box office. Any movie studio in this includes hollywood has go through. A regulatory process set up by beijing. Set up by the chinese government. The is that this regulatory process includes censorship that compliance with china censorship model is a prerequisite to entering the chinese market. So what we've seen. Increasingly is hollywood studios firstly complying with the censorship and editing or altering or removing content that chinese central subject to but increasingly. We're seeing more proactive. Compliance anticipatory compliance. And a self censorship basically removing things that studios even suspect will upset the chinese sensor and beyond that sort of working more actively with chinese censors and chinese government officials to include portrayals of china or to include portrayals at the chinese government particularly likes within their movies in many cases altered content only affects the versions that are sent to theaters in china but in other cases these changes are included in the global release to meaning that american audiences and audiences all over. The world are sometimes watching propaganda without even knowing it it shocking when you think about it for a second and seems to undermine a lot of what hollywood stands for. So why are they doing it. Hollywood studios like any other foreign studios in this situation really have significant economic imperatives to cooperate with this chinese model censorship in order to get into the country and this is perhaps most pronounced when we look at hollywood's. Biggest movies the blockbusters the movies that everyone sees you know movies like iron man. Three where china's sensors were actually invited to the set to kind of see what was going on every city further released way back in two thousand thirteen ironman three grossed one point two billion worldwide of that it made four hundred and nine million domestically and one hundred and twenty one million in china. That's a huge chunk of change and the proportion of prophets coming from china continues to grow. There is a quota system. That is in place where the chinese government will allow up to thirty four movies from outside the country. Technically they can bend the rules on this little bit but usually the numbers thirty four. Many of these spots are obtained by hollywood studios. With their biggest blockbusters and access or lack thereof to the chinese market for these big big movies can literally make or break the profitability of certain. Hollywood movie in two thousand nine hundred nine before the pandemic caused chaos in the film industry global box office sales were worth roughly forty two point. Five billion dollars of this the. Us box office accounted for eleven point. Four billion and china's accounted for nine billion while the us was still slightly ahead it's take had fallen from twenty thousand eighteen whereas china's had continued a long trend of growth the pandemic has made it difficult to measure things accurately but many think that china's market either already has or will very soon surpass that of the us and that the trend will only become more pronounced with time and regardless china has already become essential to hollywood's bottom line especially when it comes to domestic flops. Consider the twenty sixteen film warcraft based on the video game or so it was reported just to break. Even the film needed to gross four hundred million worldwide but in the us it got panned and only brought in forty six point seven million not to fear china to the rescue because of the popularity of the video game there had the widest release of any film up to that point and pushed prophets into the green with a final total of four hundred twenty two million

China Hollywood Chinese Government American Box Office James Taker Free Expression Research And P Beijing America United States
Interview With Dr Bradley Onishi

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

05:43 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview With Dr Bradley Onishi

"I listen to several podcasts. Every week and it is especially a thrill. When i can bring onto host of one of the podcasts that i listen to on a regular basis because i feel like i know this person already but we've never had a conversation in this case. It's actor bradley. She he's the associate professor of religion at skidmore college. Which i look where that was bred as like you must be snowed in spirit man. I'm here in southern california for california boy whose deaths from maui. This is not my native environment so well a little bit of your background. You actually went to zoos. The pacific university. Which is right down the road from where i live where you got your be in philosophy and always wonder you know when a undergraduate majors flossy where they planning to end up. You ended up getting a master's in philosophical theology at oxford. And then you did. Some time in france doing postgraduate work in philosophy. And then finally you finish up at the university of california. Santa barbara doing your piece de and religious studies. I just want. It's tell my listeners. If you ever enjoy some of the conversations i get into on this podcast. With my guest that crosses over into this post evangelical political sort of realm. The person feeding me. Most of my information is now my guest on the show. That's kind now thank you. That's flattering thank you can. Let's start with your story. Because i think what set you up. Not just as an academic to have such a substantive take on what's been going on during the trump years before trump years where we're going to go after the trump years is also not just rooted in your research but it's it's based in your own life so tell us a little bit about that. Yeah i let me just say thank you for that flattering introduction and just. It's it's an honor to be here. So i've been looking forward to this for a long time and i'm really grateful so you know for me i. I grew up in north orange county. My father's japanese-american my mother's white woman from tennessee. And they met in the middle He's from hawaii and we grew up. Your belinda placentia fullerton area. I did not grow up religious. My dad was was culturally. Buddhist is what i would say he. He mowed the lawn. At the buddhist temple on maui in inkatha louis he. He went to japanese school there. But when i was thirteen and ask them about what it meant to be a buddhist to give me a book and i read it and i thought after i read it he would discuss it and i realized later. He gave it to me because he didn't know anything that was in it. He just didn't want to have me ask questions about what it meant to be a buddhist at fourteen. I had a very extreme conversion at a evangelical mega church and a conversion meant that i went from the kid who was hanging out with other teenagers behind the movie theater. Smoking and drinking and doing that kind of stuff to within months standing in front of the movie theater asking people if they knew my savior the lord. Jesus christ and if they knew where their so would be return ity. Tell us a little bit about how that dramatic conversion took place. I was invited to wednesday night. Bible study at rose drive friends church. rose drive is part of that network of quaker churches that richard nixon grew up in so i i was invited to that church by a girlfriend and i thought you know i'm fourteen. There's not a lot of ways to see your girlfriend on a with night off to pragmatist and there's no way mom can say no to this. If i want to go to church she's gonna say yes. So let's do it. This is a great plan She dumped me very quickly but that youth group became my second home. I found there what you would find in the ninety s at youth groups all over the place. Young cool hip leaders. They had tattoos. They played the guitar. We have a lot of fun games. The bible messages weren't boring and all of a sudden the existential angst. I had about the meaning of life and the depression that i faced throughout my entire childhood. I found answers found solutions to my condition. In jesus in god and so a very quickly i went from a kid probably hanging around folks who are going down the wrong direction drugs and alcohol and other stuff too when my mom asked me what i wanted for christmas on my When i was sixteen. I asked her how much she was gonna spend. She told me i said mom. I want you to give me that money. And i'm going to buy as many pamphlets and tracts and bibles as i can for people in nepal and i'm going to send them there because that's what's important and that's why how we should be using our money. Now i gotta ask you bread. Did your parents on the one hand. I'm sure they're going well. This is nice. He's not hanging around with those bad people anymore. The water bozos right. Okay right these these these yoga right but but at the same time is dislike. Did our son just joined a cult. So it's exactly what you said. For mom. there was times. I think she was relieved. But you know when your son is saying. Hey i don't buy me letterman's jacket for the basketball team. Send the money to nepal for bibles. I think she kinda wish. I was back to the guy getting caught with the kid. Smoking pot again. I mean she was kind of like. This is a little extreme. It was a lot harder for my dad. My dad's japanese-american guy. He grew up in the cradle of asian american. You know Communities on maui. His life was in the buddhist temple even though he he really didn't wasn't a practicing buddhist so for me to join a mega church especially church. That was ninety percent. White was really hard for him and it took a lot of convincing to let me go to the wednesday night. Bible study or the retreat or the youth group party or whatever.

North Orange County Belinda Placentia Fullerton Skidmore College Inkatha Louis Pacific University Rose Drive Friends Church Maui Bradley Southern California Santa Barbara University Of California Oxford France California Tennessee Hawaii Richard Nixon Nepal Depression Basketball
All The Things: A 2020 Debrief with Sean Miura

First of All

05:01 min | 3 weeks ago

All The Things: A 2020 Debrief with Sean Miura

"Living cooney In in many ways that is the most that we can ask ourselves right. Now i was gonna say what qualifies as living now is simply a pulse because sure i got that notes a into bleak time but i think I'm leaving this year with capacity to be grateful for stuff. That's that's kind of something that i'm i'm happy about and i feel very privileged good. I'm very happy to hear that. That's an esa. Just sean way to start this off. isn't it also need. I'm still like writing this high of realizing that. This is the first time that you're on my first of all podcasts. 'cause i was like i've podcast with sean before. This is not the first but if the verse but this one. So i've done. I've been on collab- cast multiple times. I think the last time was when we recorded with david joy okay and then the recording. They didn't like that so that but it was fine. I think laden wanna had just come out and that was all we were talking about or something so it was kind of saying that in intro as well it was a whole thing it was a it was beautiful thing. That is so solicit. Start with that. That my memory is non-existent This i mean the whole purpose of this conversation. Is i just wanna talk with you. But it's really we're at the very very end of twenty twenty which will go down in infamies. Two days left two days left as probably gonna go up the last day. So we're just like you know settling and coming to terms with all that was this year. So yeah we're just if anyway i mean i said this in the intro. We good but just or eight. We're debriefing. I calling this. Like a twenty twenty debrief a good a good debrief. Yeah thank thank you for having me. This is actually the. I've i've said no to pretty much every like podcast or video or or writing. Ask that. I've had This year really. Yeah just because i had. I didn't it was it was like either at. It didn't feel like i was the right person to talk about the subject. Or i just wasn't really feeling like i. I wanted to be putting anything. That i was saying at the time on tape because my brain was all over the place but I'm i'm happy to be here just to to look back because i think that that's that's an important thing for everyone to be doing right now. I'm slow. I am just so beyond honor. Now this is so meaningful that it's the first time you're on first of all and also that it's a rarity because i one hundred thousand percent support that i think i did ask you earlier this year and you did say no. I really admired and respected you for that. I think that an imprint. On my heart of like i need to be more on i. Yeah i mean. It's i think you're asking me to talk about the The uprisings after the murder. Of george. Floyd and taylor and And the The central park on incident. And i think that for for for many from for many of us who were applying. That was an interesting moment because that sort of like amplifying and supporting movement work has been is just kind of part of what we do and then in that moment. Suddenly i found myself being pegged as like a like a weird spokesperson. For that. i wasn't. I wasn't a leader. Hin or was an expert in nor nor should i really be the person to go to and i think that i i think for many of us. Were just trying to figure out who who who could have. The conversation. And i got asked quite a few times actually In the weeks following that to not surprised podcasts. Or or Write a thing or do a photo shoot or et cetera et cetera. Simply off the fact that i was reposting things on on instagram stories and I think what. I what what i've taken away from. That is just this reminder that you know we we need to be more clear on who within our community is doing this work and who were in the scene to and who were uplifting and And so and so in that moment would it's some. This is something that i've always tried to practice I thought it was really important. Just to pass the mic. Which i did a few times and referred people to other folks but Yeah i mean i. I'm i'm glad that was. That was a good thing. I'm always a little a little bit unsure. When i say no to stuff but yeah trying to try and do more of that.

David Joy Sean Cooney Central Park Floyd Taylor George
MUJI has Japanese Funeral Vibes (w/ Sable Yong)

Asian, Not Asian

00:59 sec | 21 hrs ago

MUJI has Japanese Funeral Vibes (w/ Sable Yong)

"So so so so far. There's five asian guys together. Got stealing place. Maybe you can look me up. I don't care and we'll come back to another episode of asian asian podcast. The podcast were agent guys now from asia. Talk about american issues. No american cares about. I'm your host fumi ave and mike. Today is saturday january sixteenth. Coming at you live from brooklyn new york. If you're listening to this on your phones right now please take screenshot. Posted on your stories and tags at asian. The asian pod. That's how we get new fans and if your listeners please. If you're tunes listener please leave a review five view i tell you i don't wanna see anything else. Okay that's the suspect. And if you want to see more content for me and mike like aka nudes a patriotic patriots dot com as asian pod for news and bonus episodes but mainly for the nudes. And we've got

Asia Mike Brooklyn New York
Riya Goel

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

08:46 min | 16 hrs ago

Riya Goel

"Our guest. this episode is reig oil. Ria is a student at west orange high school in new jersey. And she is an amazing human being You'll find out as you listen to our conversation after this introduction that she is definitely a bright reason for hope for the future of our country she is a leader a grassroots organizer and activist and also a writer in fact She has just started taking orders for her. First book called the gen z book. Which is a great resource for those of us who have gen z children or grandchildren and it's written by and from the perspective of ria who herself is agenda here. She is Passionate for gender equality and the environment. I wouldn't be surprised if maybe a decade from now we would be hearing reas name as she runs for and wins various political offices This was recorded back in late. September of twenty twenty so it was a couple months before the presidential election. You'll hear some of our comments that reflect that particular timing but I just think it's especially pertinent to have a guest on. Who's a south asian american. Now that we have our first ever vice president who is a woman and an african american and also a south asian american. So you'll definitely want to look forward to hearing the impact of Vice president khama harasses a victory on this young up and coming person. One encourage you if you have yet to go to patriotic count on ww patriots dot com to consider signing up and supporting us. We now have four monthly patrons and it's amazing. Just how much has been pledged ingest less than a month with these first four patrons so thank you very much to our first four and we look forward to seeing if there are others out there. Who enjoy this podcast. And who want to partner with us in that way. Back when i was in. I think it was first or second grade at riverside elementary school in sacramento california. I had a thing for this. Little red haired girl. Sounds like charlie brown comic strip. Her name was patty mckinney and she had freckles. Even though we never explicitly stated it to one another It was clear that we had a thing for each other. We just loved hanging out. We love teasing each other. Every recess would find us hanging out and chasing each other and kind of ignoring the other kids. I was just in seventh heaven. I think at that time. I knew i was chinese but because i was third generation and i really only spoke english. I think i thought of myself more as american. I now understand that. Of the four kids in my grownup family. Three of us were boys. My mom made it very clear to all of us. That one of the reasons why she was really trying to emphasize are being as american as possible and hence not having to go to chinese school on. Saturdays was because she wanted us to have the option of running for president of the united states. Now my older sister melinda was not included in my mom's aspirational hopes and You know in fairness my mom. I don't think anybody back then. I was thinking that one day we would have a female president. I mean we still don't have one. Well that's your main. Because as patty mckinney and i were just enjoying our young love one day she comes to school with a very seriously interface which was not typical for her and she says you know what we can't get married one day. Now mind you. I had never proposed. That was not the first or second or ten thing in my mind but obviously she was very serious about how we're feeling about each other. But she said we can't get married in. And i said oh really not and she said because you're chinese now. I don't at all believe that. Patty was being racist. I don't know who that idea remind. I know wall. I'm guessing that she had been doing some sorting out. And i clearly don't have red hair and freckles. But you know again. This is back in the sixties early sixties. So anyway as much as my. My heart was broken in that moment. Even though i wasn't planning on marriage the more immediate thought i had. Was you know what. In spite of my mom's efforts in spite of how americanized i am in my lifetime. There will never be someone who looks like me. Who is president of the united states. And if i'm honest. I feel like something died that day. This idea that. I'm just as american as anybody else. And that the fact that i'm ethnically chinese should not hinder me in any way shape or form in pursuing the goals and the dreams that i have in this country but just for patty do come out with that declaration about our nonce future as as a married couple it just kind of shook me to my core if that was possible Being that young realizing that you know there are a lot more opportunities for white people especially white boys in white men then. There are for people who aren't that fast forward many many many years and we see barack obama elected twice to be the president of the united states amazing and then just recently to see comma harris become the first female black and south asian american vice president of the united states and to be having this conversation with a young south asian american. Who's already showing so much. Not even potential so much real ability to lead to organize to make a difference to turn her passions into practices. I couldn't help thinking as i was having this conversation at this time with this young non white person and female just how different her aspirations her dreams are now because it's not a pipe dream there actually isn't example of someone who looks very much like her and comes from a similar cultural background. So i'm happy. I'm happy that people of color women of color little girls of color even with all of the ongoing fishers and problems that we still have in. This country can still dream more robustly than i was able to dream at a young age. I think that's amazing. I think there are only going to be more people of color men and women who just don't see the barriers that i grew up seeing a footnote i ran into patty mckinney years. Later when i was visiting my family in sacramento. She still lives. There turns out that one of my nieces was really into horseback riding and jumping and all that stuff and patty starter was as well and so when she found out that her daughter and my knees were friends. She filled in my then sister-in-law a little bit on our back story and i. Yeah i actually got to meet her one time and you know she's doing well is very wealthy and she looked wonderful. I don't know if she remembers telling me that we can never get married but clearly we went on very different paths in in a lotta ways. I'm actually grateful to patty in her own. Innocent little way of kind of waking me up to realities that were true for

Patty Mckinney Reig West Orange High School Reas Khama Harasses Riverside Elementary School RIA United States Charlie Brown New Jersey Patriots Sacramento Melinda Comma Harris Patty California Barack Obama
#126 - January 2021 Book News

Books and Boba

07:50 min | 3 d ago

#126 - January 2021 Book News

"Mervin. And i'm rewrite you and welcome to our first books in boba bid month news review For the year. Twenty twenty one rira. How's your new year been It's been going okay. I've been avoiding social media which has been reporting a lot of garbage. That's been happening as of late to this country so it's been pretty mellow on my side. How about you. That's probably a good call. I've been am. I a on social media. I noticed you know how on instagram people do your top nine for the year. Your top narayan images In twenty twenty. I only had nine xers total. Yeah i'm not. I'm not a big instagram user. Either which is probably why books boba. Our instagram is. Pretty bare and i apologize for that. We do have content. It's just we upload as my thoughts who i've been. I've been being a little lax in creating audio grams of our episodes but I'm working on those where we're going to have some highlights from someone are best author interviews over the last year up soon. I promise But just this whole lockdown quarantine pandemic situation. I think i mentioned this on the podcast before. But i feel like i'm becoming more and more with sudden like i know i'm being forced to be a shut in but finding that actually like it. It's gonna it's not. It's not a bad life being a being a shot in well. We're here today to talk about the latest book news in asian american literature We always start with the latest publishing deals And it's a pretty light month. January is typically just not a big month for deals said it's a it's a debt month mainly because the holiday season has passed but there are a saw. Let's get to them. What's i deal. I deal is amulet acquired. My sister's big fat indian wedding by patel. The why romcom follows an aspiring violinist. Who must secretly juggle the obligations of her sisters extravagant wedding week with auditions for a prominent music contest. On top of all this. She must dodge her nosy families matchmaking. Schemes publication is scheduled for spring. Twenty twenty two awesome title. The way i feel like we've been seeing more and more of these asian wedding stories. You know what bring it. I love wedding stories. I love movies. That take place during weddings. And it's just. I don't know i just like big party. Seems yeah annoy mentioned that. I've never been to indian wedding. But i hear they're per t nuts Chinese weddings would just eat a lot. korean wedding. I don't think i've twinned with those neither well. Korean weddings have definitely transformed a lot from the traditional crean weddings Sort of like for the korean traditional weddings like you wear like humble and there's like specific rituals you drink alcohol and you catch dates with your skirt and whatnot and a lot of a lot of couples. Don't do that anymore. It's become very streamlined and westernized so Actually have a pretty funny story about about korean wedding so last time i went to korea I went for my cousin's wedding and it was my first korean wedding that it was going to and it took place at a wedding hall. There's there's a bunch of wedding halls in this district and seoul and pretty much like what they do is like the bride usually doesn't buy address. They can rent it from the wedding hall. And they have like makeup artists and hairstylists. It's all part of the package. So it's much cheaper and the bride usually sits like in a sitting room where people come up and say congratulations and then they take pictures. So it's literally a place for people to just take pictures with the bride and once the wedding starts for my cousin's wedding. There was like a runway like it wasn't like an eye on it was like a platform runway show. Yeah it's kind of like a modeling runway and every everything in the wedding hall was like super. It seemed more kind of like Like a press conference in way. It didn't it was definitely like not like the romantic decorations that you see in american weddings. But they don't have bridesmaids they don't have groomsmen but what they do have our wedding singers. So what happens during the wedding is that they have like a performer. Sometimes it's a friend who can sing really well or professional wedding singer and they serenade the couple but the thing is it's very awkward because the couple is just standing there watching the wedding singer like saturday to them. And it's like it's just like okay. Well like no one is. Dancing is just like them standing there and watching the strangers sing to them and you have an option of having like a dinner and show pretty much so people will be like eating while they watched the wedding hap. It happened sometimes. it's a buffet style so for the buffet style. Which was what happened with my cousin's wedding. Everyone who is invited to wedding. They have to like pay because that is like the wedding tradition. You pay money to help. Cover the cost of housing for them. Or whatever. if you go to like an asian wedding attorneys wedding everyone brings. There's no wedding gifts. Everyone just brings down belowps. Yeah bring envelopes. And there's like a set amount depending on how close you are to the bride and groom so. If you're just like a coworker it might just be like like twenty five dollars or whatever and the closer you are you pay more and they give you a ticket after you give like the money and that ticket is your ticket in to the buffet. So it's like very it's very commercialized. Very streamlined and. It was very strange. Because i was overdressed for the wedding. Overdressed like possibly. But i. I was just like oh like like there are people who are just wearing button ups and slacks. A there are women who are just dressed in business casual clothes and and whereas like. I'm wearing a cocktail dress. It was it was very very weird but like the the wedding ceremony was very quick. It was like fifteen minutes tops and then people went to to the buffet and then people will yes so literally like the whole wedding lasted maybe like an hour and a half including the food there is no reception. There is no dance floor. It's just people get married in the morning or early afternoon. They go take pictures and then they eat and then they leave and sometimes they go back to work. Wow that's

Romcom Mervin Patel Korea
No AAPI Cabinet Secretary!? (With Madalene Mielke)

Model Majority Podcast

04:54 min | 6 d ago

No AAPI Cabinet Secretary!? (With Madalene Mielke)

"Madly milk. Welcome back to the motto. Majority podcast today. Thanks so much. Appreciate having a having having you have me. Yeah absolutely well. We love our previous conversation back in episode. One one to talking about your career your life story from the very beginning you know your political career dating back to al gore's presidential campaign. I believe so. I encourage everybody to listen to episode one until after this episode to get to know your personal story a little bit better but today we are going to focus on. You know some current topics. Niger say before we get into that. You are the president and ceo of the organization. Asian pacific american institute for congressional studies or apec. Could you give us a quick overview of the mission and the goal of this organization. You're leading which. I think actually is a good background and foundation for other stuff. We're gonna talk about later on in this interview. Well absolutely so apex down at twenty. Six years ago by former secretary norm annetta when he was a member of congress. He founded it alongside on the congressional asian pacific american caucus k. pack which comprise of the api members of the us house and senate and so apex mission is to increase a representation at all levels of government From community service to elected office and have them participate at all levels of the electoral process. Gotcha so it's interesting that you mention norman. Mineta who i think is one of the first cabinet secretaries of asia-american designed in our country. I don't know the first night check on that. The first right okay. So yeah. I think he was transportation secretary. He was actually commerce. Secretary and president clinton's administration got it and then went to transportation under the bush administration. Gotcha gotcha he has this. Unique history of serving the first cabinet secretary serving both administrations both parties administrations. And really i think started in important. I guess trend of representation that is about to end with the incoming biden administration. And we're talking about as we are a few days before job and becomes president to be inaugurated. This will be the first time in close more than twenty years that they will not be in asia. American or pacific islander as a cabinet secretary in an administration whether it's democrat or republican for the first time. And you as the leader of a pack which is a nonprofit has spoken out quite a bit about a lack of representation. Could you share with us. What is your view of what is about to happen with this. Lack of representation in the incoming administration sure dodge. Obviously we have an incoming vice president. Who is a pi asian american. She south asian descent black vice president-elect kamla harris and also to cabinet level positions. They don't head up an executive department of which there are fifteen. And that's catherine tie. Vr and near attendant. You know the to cabinet. Level positions obviously have a lot of influence and i will just use the word sides the congressional hispanic caucus and the congressional black caucus as well as k. Pack when they sent a joint letter over a hundred and fifteen members of congress to the by the administration saying close to equal equal. And so that is that those were their words and so And so you know. I cabinet secretary heads of an executive department. And there's only fifteen of them and so when you think about that fifteen how's that diversity including asian americans. It doesn't because there isn't one of the fifteen a. I applaud the administration for their work in trying to expand diversity in having openly. Lgbtq individual leading agency And native american woman of half of the cabinet will be women so all those great things. So if you wanted to find diversity and not include asians in the fifteen than i need to ask you. What is your definition of diversity. Because we seem we've seen this play out and other places where the state of washington. I think they're department of education. Basically categorized asian americans as white so obviously a different definition of diversity.

Cabinet Asian Pacific American Institu Norm Annetta Biden Administration Apec Al Gore Niger Mineta Us House Asia Elect Kamla Harris Congress President Clinton Norman Senate Bush Administration Dodge Department Of Education Washington
Interview With Dr. Laura Huang

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

04:54 min | Last week

Interview With Dr. Laura Huang

"My wife is retired banker and She reads different things than i do. I'm going to pastor seminary professor and we tend to have this morning routine where we get our coffee and we go to respective wings of the house and we just start going through the news. One day in january. My wife comes to me which he never does and she shoves this article in front of me from the harvard business school. That's hard work isn't enough how to find your edge. And she says you need to get lower wong edged turning adversity into need to get on your podcast and this is coming from a spouse who never to my podcast. And so i go. This is unusual. And i read the article and let me tell you i was fascinated. My guest today is dr laura wong. She is an associate professor at the harvard. Business school before that she was assistant professor at University of pennsylvania's wharton business school. I am so delighted that we're actually having this conversation. I scored major points with my wife. Will i have your wife to think. Then here i was thinking that you wanted me on your podcast but thank you tour. Well i didn't know about you. let your book. But i teach leadership i'm entrepreneurial we're recording this in september while this ongoing pandemic and shutdown is going on and my wife and i one of the conversations we do have is. We're trying to kind of understand how different groups and individuals can thrive going forward. And i think that's what really caught her attention in this. That's one of the lessons. We've been married almost forty years. And i learned that listen very early. So who did you write this book for and why did you. Yeah i actually. I actually didn't intend to write this book. I mean it wasn't one of the things i mean in the back of my mind i was like. Oh maybe someday. I'll write a book but it wasn't actually something that i consciously thought about intil. Because i had been doing research for a really long time unsettling studying like disadvantage inequality and people who are underestimated. And i had been presenting a lot of this research. And i'm kept coming up to people coming up to me and saying you know like this is sort of. What can we do about this right because a lot of my research is is a little bit depressed right. He's like talk about disparity disadvantages. And how people have an how there's all this inequality bias in the workplace and entrepreneurship and just sort of been lies and so people would say like. Hey will this is depressing. What do we do about this and you know. How do we sort of level the playing deals and the thing is all the solutions that i that that that were out there that that i knew about from from research were all these sort of structural solution the system level solutions things. What i what. I mean by that is like you know. Let's have more nerdy critic. Hiring practice or west diversified the top management teams or have more diversity in terms of who gets to be mentors and and so it was like all these solutions where we had this sort of wait around for things to change right for the for the for the structures insistence more meritocratic so it was found that it like leaving people frustrated still because there were these outside in solutions of there were a lot of things that individuals could do as they were waiting around for for things to get better as they were waiting around for things to get more meritocratic and so the last couple of years of my research has been has has all been around like what can individuals do to sort of slip things for themselves to to empower themselves so that they can turn the perceptions stereotypes and the bias that have about them how they could flip them in their favor and create their own edge. And so that's really ridley. The thought behind this book came from and then as writing it was really very much more. I mean i kept thinking about you know people who do people who have sort of gotten to shutdown over and over and over again and people who just keep putting in the hard work by me because we've been taught from a young age like we're work hard work hard moving working hard but yet for whatever reason they're frustrated because they're hard work isn't leading them to the success in outcome that they were promised that they thought that they would achieve. And so how do we actually make our hardware requirements for us. Recognizing that accepts outcomes aren't really about hard work level there about the perceptions in signals in stereotypes of others. While

Dr Laura Wong University Of Pennsylvania's W Harvard Business School Wong Harvard Ridley
193: Food Activism with Jenny Dorsey

Model Majority Podcast

01:44 min | Last week

193: Food Activism with Jenny Dorsey

"I am your co host. Kevin shoe on today's pod. I am excited to share an interview. I did jenny. Dorsey who is a chef ended activist. She founded and runs nonprofit cost studio taus about. At oh which is a nonprofit that creates immersive experiences at the center of food art and social impact. Jenny is a first generation chinese american. Who has worked in michigan star restaurants and is now using her superpower cooking delicious food to combine that with technology and art to make social impact so very excited to share this conversation with you but before we get into that i want to tell you about our sponsor are sponsored. This episode and this month is the all of us. Research program managed by the national institutes of health or in h all of us is the largest and most adverse health resource ever working specifically to better represent groups who have been left out of medical research in the past like people of color seniors rural residents and the lgbtq community as the kobe. Nineteen pandemic has exposed racial disparities that real severe and sadly not new in our country while almost forty percent of the us made up of people color. Medical research is eighty to ninety percent white and this medical research gap is affecting many asian-americans in fact nineteen point four percent of asian adults compared to twelve point nine percent of white adults report being with out a usual source of healthcare like personal doctor so increasing diversity is very important for building healthier more equitable country so to support the great work that all of us the research program is doing. We encourage

Kevin Shoe Center Of Food Art And Social Dorsey Jenny National Institutes Of Health Michigan United States
They Call Us Bugs Bunny

They Call Us Bruce

04:42 min | Last month

They Call Us Bugs Bunny

"Low end. Welcome to another edition of they. Call us bruce. An unfiltered conversation about what's happening in asia america which now includes bugs. Bunny what's up. Asian americans you and i'm jeff yang and i'm just going to be cracking up the whole time but here it is here we are. We have with us a very special guest. The man the voice the magic eric. Abou- za the new voice of bugs. Bunny has it going guys. Well this is my real voice. This is my asian canadian plane. Pundit salt voices pianos it just regular filipino bread voice. This is the one. That i think iraq customize wanna hear you know for repeat business in all i mean it's amazing how you can slip in and out of it. I mean that's what strikes me like as we were getting ready to record. I'm like oh my god and made me wonder like. Are you like this all the time. Like are people just cracking up around you time. I'm the fattest of my friends. Because i'm the one that makes all the jokes. No one makes me laugh. So i haven't had an an ab workout in like years. Everyone everyone benefits around me but me But that's that's my lot in life you know like i don't mind and i love i love making people laugh And you know thank you for first of all thank you for inviting me on your podcast and and your show and You know the last two weeks have been Insane as far as just wanting to talk you know suddenly paying attention. This show that. I've been on looney tunes cartoons. Has it premiered in march And only now it's like. I'm getting the attention but you know what else premiered march is covid. So that's exactly. Why only now. After a whole year of chasing covert stories. You know so tragic all like so much so much sadness so much like the news has been so heavy. And there's been very light hopeful inspiring moments with vis this pandemic You know just supporting our frontline workers in the current social climate that we're living in you know black lives matter and there's so much see i mean biden. Hello you know like and then all of a sudden this filipino kid from candidates. The voice of bugs bunny like what a way to end the year. Right like what a strange who held out on their bingo card. Nobody has no one. You know the scratch tickets like cherry cherry filipino. Voices bugs bunny damn but so as we're talking on the run up to this. I actually feel like it's remarkable that just in the last couple of years it it feels like we are finally starting to integrate childhood right. That is the voices not just adding diverse programming in the form of look. Let's put an asian kid in the back row you know. Let's let's add franklin to peanuts back when it was probably as that that attempted bussing in ended up being. We're actually starting to see these. Hallowed these hallowed i don't like institutions finally populated by by people who can bring a very different context but the same context to them. I mean obviously bugs. Bunny is a big one of them. I i would also point to blues clues right and yeah your your fellow filipino. north american stepped into that that arena as well I mean like let's let's Let's go back to our youths right. I'm i'm forty one now. And the first real exposure to seeing a face that was like mine and represented in mind. Film in movies was Short round and data from goonies. Jonathan kwan- it's crazy. I met him in toronto. And i was just like you don't understand man like you're you're my hero like you were and i think that goes for a lot of young asian boys and girls just to see like there's the there's the kid that's like me and the group of friends and that they bothered to include him in in you know even something like goonies. I know it was one movie but it was the best movie. It was like the only movie you really needed to see

Jeff Yang Bruce Asia Eric Iraq America Biden Jonathan Kwan Franklin Toronto
They Call Us Asian in New Zealand

They Call Us Bruce

03:51 min | 2 months ago

They Call Us Asian in New Zealand

"A low unwelcome. Today calls bruce unfiltered conversation about what's going on in asia america and other parts of the world bank less affected by covid. I feel you have yang. And as phil has served telegraphed we are connecting with another part of the asian diaspora in the form of very special guests old friend. Who is actually a dialing us in from new zealand from the code. Free paradise of the medicaid seeming mark. And thank you so much for joining us. I killed a koto carta. Yeah all the way from my little island safe-haven aspirational destination of all of us. Who are currently huddled. Sorry we both a wall. You don't want people from shithole countries like america company. How does it feel well. I mean okay. So let's begin where we begin and obviously you are there You actually have been in your from new zealand out born in new zealand. Yeah there are chinese new zealanders again part of the espera that we don't really kind of talk about enough here in in our american centric place now of america and one of the things which has actually been a delight Over the years we've known each other has actually been hearing from a different perspective. What if what. Asian america looks like from people who are asian but not american and i. I am kind of curious what america especially looks like from the perspective of somebody in new zealand at this point. What looks like. Oh you want me to say i don't wanna like i'm you walked. It looks like i. I honestly i wanted to press you. We just sitting here going. Holy shit you know holy shit. We knew it was gonna be bad with the guy you know for four years. It's basically as bad as if anyone could have imagined that could get so we. We have elected him out. The only person who can not really acknowledge that is donald trump out Hopefully means things will get better but he really did kind of dig a fricken marianas trench for us and through us in there and he still to acknowledge again that the rule of democracy is is is operated. And it's like guys yeah you know. He lost the election but he won. really damaging the democratic process. And a still doing so as a as a kind of like a political scientist you guys are in like a bad situation with regards to keeping democracy functioning and not becoming like a regime that really recon uphold its democratic institutions. And something that you know compared with new zealand I just like you sit around on my god. I'm so lucky that i have a functioning government that has a loyal opposition by the concept of an opposition that supports the democratic process that supports like peaceful transition of power. A wicked human rights longtime right. So using tim's that we use you know amnesty international About how this is not a peaceful transition of power. Will people really excited. Because maybe you're going to have a peaceful transfer of power. It's like you shouldn't be getting excited about a peaceful transfer of power. You develop develop democracy

New Zealand America Yang Bruce Phil Asia Donald Trump TIM
Dr. Leana Wen (with Rock the Boat)

Model Majority Podcast

06:02 min | 2 months ago

Dr. Leana Wen (with Rock the Boat)

"I'm happy to join you today. I am dr lena. I'm emergency physician and public health professor george washington university. I also previously served as the health commissioner for the city of baltimore into it wouldn't be a complete introduction here without mentioning that i am a chinese american immigrant. My parents and i came to the us. Just before. i turned eight. And i'm also the you mother of two. I have a son who just turned three and a baby daughter who is five months old. My gosh congratulations. I also noticed that you are from shanghai. As am i so. I don't know if that you still speak shanghainese at all at home. I actually never did. Because i was raised primarily with my grandparents on my father's side whom did not come from shanghai and so i understand shanghainese but actually never spoke. We will not do a practice here. team that don't come late rayo he say you're gonna understand it and kerley speak it. It's always great to connect with somebody from my hometown. We always love to start with an origin story. Lena and you just have such an incredible ordinance story. And you've talked about it in your ted talks and everything but i'm kind of curious like what little was like thinking about this because i look at my son and someone told me prior to you having kids and i didn't really understand this. They said your son or your your children will have all of your best characteristics but also all of your worst characteristics whereas you as parents or adults are able to filter out to end can elise temper your worst. Tendencies your wounded just wash. Show you on your worst using so. I'm thinking about that as i'm answer your question because when i see my son i think is a lot of the same of the worst tendencies up. I think i was very opinionated. Child if you who's who as adults don't find surprising at all. I don't know if i threw a lot of tantrums by son deafening does so i. I'm not sure if it from me or my husband but you know because my parents and i came. When i was pretty young and i think like many immigrant families. We went through a lot of hardships. When we first came to the us we came to utah. Which is another kind of a strange story. Because what shanghai china has in common with. Logan utah is really not very much. Yeah but my mother had actually spoken to a professor of hers back in shanghai and she had gotten into to university so we came because like might. My mother was a graduate student. Here and got into universities one was utah state university in logan utah and the other was university of illinois in chicago and her professor said to her. Oh utah that is. The place to be your. In retrospect your leg. Chicago's way more like shanghai than utah. I think it's just a reminder of how much of our lives are determined by circumstances like that and so we ended up in utah and then we were in la and you know. My parents always worked for jobs just to make ends meet. And so i think so much of what shapes be early on. Were the struggles. Have my parents went through. I mean these things that people referred to as entitlements me. My mother depend on wake when she was pregnant with my sister here in the us we depend on food stamps stamp in. We depend on a medicaid in children's health insurance program and i went to public school all the way throughout including college. Those were not entitlements for us. Those were our lifeline. I can really relate to that so my parents moved to toledo ohio after shanghai as well and when we first arrived in ohio rolling. There's nobody here and just like snow on the ground. There's like nothing around. And i think just the impression of what america is back then is is is just so different and dissimilar to to your family. My mom worked many different jobs like she's worked as a grocer. She's worked at a karaoke bar at some point and so i can totally relate. And it's such a quintessential immigrant story for so many of us. Did your parents ever want you to be anything as you were growing up. It's a good question. It's hard to separate it at this point. Because i am one of those knowing people who always knew that i wanted to be a doctor and so i don't know whether it was something that could be influenced by my parents impossibly but they also knew that it was something that had wanted to do and so encouraged it and so it's kind of hard to tell i will say that i think a lot of immigrants may be able to relate to this too in the us we didn't have any connections. It's not as if we knew doctors right. And so i knew my pediatrician. But i wasn't exactly someone that you could just go to become a doctor in so it was actually really challenged him even in college. I didn't know how to be a doctor. I mean i just didn't have the networks of people who could tell me you need to be taking this m cap prep cores and you need to be volunteering at hospitals in how here's how you get a shadowing experience and These are the types of activities that you should be involved in an and i think that's what's made me want to be in medical education also because i think there are so many people who have that passion for medicine or for whatever other fueled before just never given the opportunity and it's one thing for us to talk about we should have programs to recruit underrepresented minorities and to encourage people who otherwise didn't know about different fields before but for so many people that there's just so much in that experience that's not at all we could imagine including the levels of loans that you have to go through in order to get educated so i think all that is an important component to.

Shanghai Utah Dr Lena Rayo University Of Illinois Kerley George Washington United States Lena Baltimore Utah State University Ohio Logan China Toledo Chicago LA
They Call Us Election 2020

They Call Us Bruce

04:14 min | 2 months ago

They Call Us Election 2020

"Low end. Welcome to another edition of us bruce. None kilter conversation about what's happening in asia america which includes the white house. I'm bill you. And i'm jeff yang and yes. The white house got a little bit less white over the last couple of days. We are exhausted. We are mentally physically may even spiritually very very tired. All of us as americans i think. But we're also tonight kind of exultant and sitting the essentially the stoop of history. So we thought it'd be a fantastic opportunity for us to just get our thoughts out there with some are are close closest friends in just smartest hot takers. That could actually reach out to We want to welcome to the podcast to talk about the election election. Twenty twenty gen fang Friend of ours. Friend of the show blogger behind the appropriate and aisha sultan who is a syndicated columnist based at the st louis post dispatch and just as personal round many many different hyphen. Tash her. i walked thank you so much. Thanks for having me on for the very first time now. Welcome and thank you much for having me two guys. Welcome back your back boy. So okay so this one this episode together pretty quickly because you know. We woke up this morning to some major news and after the shock of that and are quick twitter takes. I texted jaffna like yo. I think we got record episode tonight. So let's get some smart people on and let's let's do this so smart people welcome. What were your respective first thoughts when you heard the news and let's be honest here we've been we've been all just far too far out on that limb of wondering whether or not the future of our republic was strong aisha I mean how did it feel. What did you feel so I'm a public writer In writing in a red state. I'm in missouri and i write too frequently Ideas and things that challenge a lot of my readers here Humanely disagreed little Some of the things. I have to say and ever since the last election cycle the response to a lot of where i wrote got much more personal much more bigoted. Much more violent nasty. I think you know all all of us probably experienced that to some extent but And you know we're used to as journalists public writers. We're used to harsh criticism but it felt very different and I feel like i did take an emotional toll on me. And i felt like for the i. Guess almost five years because it started before the last election I feel like. I was really questioning whether the work i did even mattered. I was wondering if truth even mattered in this country. I wondered if people even had enough empathy to care about the stories. I was telling and honestly jeff i was ready to Look for different job or do something different. If this election it turned out differently. I had thought this all through. Because i didn't see any meaning in it and so there is so much and beyond being a muslim woman. A brown woman a south asian woman and mother I just felt like there was so much personally writing on his election for me. And so when i heard that it was official they called it. i don't know that i could even intellectually process that moment because there was such a physiological flood of emotion in my body.

Jeff Yang Aisha Sultan St Louis Post Tash White House Bruce Asia America Twitter Missouri Jeff
An Election 2020 Conversation

They Call Us Bruce

04:14 min | 2 months ago

An Election 2020 Conversation

"Low end. Welcome to another edition of us bruce. None kilter conversation about what's happening in asia america which includes the white house. I'm bill you. And i'm jeff yang and yes. The white house got a little bit less white over the last couple of days. We are exhausted. We are mentally physically may even spiritually very very tired. All of us as americans i think. But we're also tonight kind of exultant and sitting the essentially the stoop of history. So we thought it'd be a fantastic opportunity for us to just get our thoughts out there with some are are close closest friends in just smartest hot takers. That could actually reach out to We want to welcome to the podcast to talk about the election election. Twenty twenty gen fang Friend of ours. Friend of the show blogger behind the appropriate and aisha sultan who is a syndicated columnist based at the st louis post dispatch and just as personal round many many different hyphen. Tash her. i walked thank you so much. Thanks for having me on for the very first time now. Welcome and thank you much for having me two guys. Welcome back your back boy. So okay so this one this episode together pretty quickly because you know. We woke up this morning to some major news and after the shock of that and are quick twitter takes. I texted jaffna like yo. I think we got record episode tonight. So let's get some smart people on and let's let's do this so smart people welcome. What were your respective first thoughts when you heard the news and let's be honest here we've been we've been all just far too far out on that limb of wondering whether or not the future of our republic was strong aisha I mean how did it feel. What did you feel so I'm a public writer In writing in a red state. I'm in missouri and i write too frequently Ideas and things that challenge a lot of my readers here Humanely disagreed little Some of the things. I have to say and ever since the last election cycle the response to a lot of where i wrote got much more personal much more bigoted. Much more violent nasty. I think you know all all of us probably experienced that to some extent but And you know we're used to as journalists public writers. We're used to harsh criticism but it felt very different and I feel like i did take an emotional toll on me. And i felt like for the i. Guess almost five years because it started before the last election I feel like. I was really questioning whether the work i did even mattered. I was wondering if truth even mattered in this country. I wondered if people even had enough empathy to care about the stories. I was telling and honestly jeff i was ready to Look for different job or do something different. If this election it turned out differently. I had thought this all through. Because i didn't see any meaning in it and so there is so much and beyond being a muslim woman. A brown woman a south asian woman and mother I just felt like there was so much personally writing on his election for me. And so when i heard that it was official they called it. i don't know that i could even intellectually process that moment because there was such a physiological flood of emotion in my body.

Jeff Yang Aisha Sultan St Louis Post Tash White House Bruce Asia America Twitter Missouri Jeff
They Call Us The Donut King

They Call Us Bruce

04:43 min | 2 months ago

They Call Us The Donut King

"Low end welcome to another edition. They call us bruce and unfiltered conversation about what's happening in asia america. I feel you sorry. I'm jacky my mouth is full right now. Because i'm i'm eating doughnut. Which should give you a little bit of a clue as to this special episode or doing just swallow. I really do but is not fair. This is not fair at all. I know this is. This is intent intended to be a little bit of a Torture for you guys. i'm eating actually decay. Donuts doughnut and was it's fantastic and is a fortune for us that we actually have a two guests with us Who will share quite a lot about the business and a documentary. that's specifically about it. The documentary called donut king. The donut king and the director of that documentary is with us. All's goo else welcome to the show welcome and we also have listen one of the stars of the documentary. Put it that way right l. Be donut. Princess may lead tau of decays donuts gone. Hey guys what i'm doing. My princess wave. Meles is actually coming from the future as she is in another time zone. She's you are in cambodia. Right yes i am in kampot which is about three hours south penn in. It's a living in the future. Some fifteen hours ahead of you can i. Can i just say your internet is spectacular sounding like better than it is here in los angeles. Oh you don't even want to know what i did to get this wifi here. I have a a friend to an uncle. We call them boo in cambodian sephardic respect. So we actually also tonight. We did a cuban a little bit earlier on today. And then you know we have this podcast scheduled and i. I told my uncle where is the best wi fi here in kampot. And you know there's a lot of you know cafes. And i did a little test in one i was like. This isn't going to do so what he did was. He gave me his wifi at home. And i'm sitting in my hotel room with. His wifi plugged in amazing amazing. Thank you so we should mention that. you guys did a. I guess you guys did acuna earlier and during this now because the movie is the donut. King is Hit theaters out is out. Virtually eaters This weekend as a record this correct. Correct me opened friday october thirty and i just actually went to an in person screaming anna the only playing the film in california in person and it was being sold out screening. What is sold out mean. These days sold out at like twenty five percent capacity every other seat every other row. Now we were in With a two hundred and forty five person capacity theaters so the game is really big theater. Packet out as much as you could. During ninety five percent of the people were actual like extended family members of mealy gotta show strong so this is actually the core of the documentary. It's not just about donuts. It's actually about a community and i. It's fantastic by the way Literally it was. It was such a engrossing Story to watch. That not only did make me incredibly hungry but it may be hungry for knowledge. It's inspiring it's inspiring had inspiring about the story and inspiring our hunger for donuts so it basically tells the story about how it is that cambodian americans ended up essentially dominating the donut trade in southern california. Is that right else. Yeah it's some people make casually now. Asian people work at my local donut shop. When you know in doing this film. I've talked to people. And when i told them working on newly i thought it was just to own mind donut shop when i go to michael time. I didn't realize it's like all of them.

Kampot Acuna Meles Donuts Bruce Asia Cambodia Princess America Los Angeles Anna King California Southern California Michael Time
Confesions by Kanae Minato

Books and Boba

04:51 min | 2 months ago

Confesions by Kanae Minato

"You're listening to books and bobo. Oppo club podcasts. Between books by easing american doctors are marvin gaye and angrier. And we're here today to talk about our october. Twenty twenty book club. Pick confessions by name and knoxville translated by steven snyder. Who re-re you picked. You picked a doozy for spooky twenty twenty. It really was the perfect read for for spooky month. In my opinion yeah. This episode should be released on election. Day twenty twenty. How are you feeling as we enter this potentially new era. I've just been trying not to think about it. I submitted my ballot a couple of days ago. And i'm like well. It's i don't know it feels kind of hopeless but you know you're i don't now i don't know i feel i don't wanna i don't wanna think about it. I like when the results come out. I'm still skeptical on. How much can change. How much damage control do yeah. Oh at least we can still escape to our books as a resident alien from canada. I'm counting on all you people to To us that's right. You can't vote. I voted for the first time when a moved to california. Because i didn't become naturalized until i was like twenty one twenty. Which very like my this is only like my second election because because the last election the first very first one i voted for was trump versus clinton and wow. I was appointed by the results of it my first election. I vote and i was like. Wow i feel like my vote. Didn't cout of but that's democracy for you right. I mean did count. it just didn't count enough. Yeah i know because of the electoral college or some bullshit like our international listeners are going to just be so continue. No i think they understand. Also what's at stake here. I mean everyone knows the situation that our country is an and yeah so Those of us in the future. How's it over there. I hope i hope it's I hope it's not as bleak but yeah Quick reminder that we're gonna be talking about the whole of confessions by claiming not so so that includes spoilers and since this book is kind of like a crime thriller. You definitely don't want to get spoiled before you get into it so make sure you read the book before coming back listening to our discussion. Yeah i would put this in the same category as never let me go. I'll just go into it as cold as possible and then come back and listen to us and it's a pretty quick read only about two hundred and thirty five pages for a novel. It's relatively short so you can probably knock it out in a day or two and back. Okay so we're we're gonna move on tear discussion. Yeah marvin what have you heard about this book before. Because it you know it was an international bestseller. It was extremely popular in japan. It sold millions of copies. And there's a movie based on this book as well. So have you heard about this book before. Going in actually haven't so this is my first time exposed to this I guess you can call source material. actually didn't know there was a film Yeah it's directed by tetsuya kashima. Who is a pretty well known director and it debuted at the toronto international film festival back in twenty ten and it got a lot of critical acclaim so i have not watched a movie and interested in how they adapted it. Yeah i mean it is a form of story that is somewhat familiar in asian media tropes which is like the revenge story right like we've seen this before in like the korean cinema. A lot of japanese films anime manga light novels also feature stories that like kind of focused on revenge right like the wrong party. Getting their justice is probably one of the darker ones of these that i've read

Steven Snyder Marvin Gaye Knoxville Electoral College Clinton Canada California Tetsuya Kashima Marvin Japan
They Call Us Chinatown Pretty

They Call Us Bruce

05:02 min | 3 months ago

They Call Us Chinatown Pretty

"Hello and welcome to another edition of they call Bruce Non filtered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and Jeff Yang, and this week we have a very special set of guests who are the authors, the creators of a very, very special book when his right in. The heart bone. Shall we say? It is a book called Chinatown Pretty. It is a book of incredible photographs and some just lovely words celebrating the elders who Don't just make up a the generation, the greatest generation of our community but who? Make. It beautiful with their very presence? So. We left a welcome to they cost Bruce. Valerie Lou in. Andrea Lo. Thank you guys so much for joining us. Thanks for having US have come. You guys have put together a really great project. Know it started off as kind of a Website Project And then is now an a full-fledged published book. It's Chinatown Pretty. Is Just A. Really. Great tribute to Chinatown Elders grandmas and GRANDPAS, but it hits on a very specific. Aesthetic. A fashion aesthetic. I think what's really great about is that you've taken sort of the The the style photography mold and apply to kind of the more most unlikely subjects I think. People who are very special in our community so Maybe, you guys could describe actually what is Chinatown Pretty Yeah. This is Valerie Chinatown pretty as a style that's common and chinatowns across North America It's really a patchwork of different. Eras right close from Hong Kong? They've had for thirty years mixed with like say supreme hat that they got from who knows where? A lot of colors. A lot of patterns sometimes I, four shades of pink or four different floral patterns in one outfit. And that's about keeping warm mostly So you could have a big puffy jacket but also keeping the sun out at the same time. So really white built a hats. I love that description just viscerally but I think for people who have not seen your blog and the book itself. Just a little bit more kind of literal color around that. So. When we talk about transparency pretty we're talking about people who are usually immigrants for immigrants who but who have lived here a while and who have. Synthesized a look and the fascinating thing is the look is different from person to person but somehow it all still fits this mold of Chinatown pretty it blends Western clothing it blends. Traditional clothing from. Historical closets as it were. Sometimes across gender lines. It's often incredibly colorful like you said, is layered it's branded, but it's also unique like there's a signature to how people. In that generation dress that feels so much more vibrant than you know those of us, who are I mean in in quarantine were like the sweatpants anyway. But I guess, what was it? That first struck you about the look of Of these elders and kind of lead you to coin the term and decided to actually explore it photographic in words. Yeah. This is Andrea I'm I'm the photographer behind the project and I think we would. have. Known each other for. Several years now, and we would hang out in Chinatown get dim sum and just people watch in the park. And that press was really fascinating Chinatown I feel like has some of the best people watching and I think what we? Both intuited without really realizing why is that? A lot of the outfits we would see on the senior so people sixty five and plus. They there's all this history woven into their outfits I think. For us we might think, oh, it's like this vintage jacket from the seventies but you know for them it's like close. It had ended preserved for decades. Mixed with with newer Chinatown fines and let the handmade clothing as well. So there's so much. Shown in one outfit it's like there's a lot you can extract from it, and so we were really curious about you know. Not only like where did you get these cool shoes but also yeah, how did this? Is just such A. Look in. So we're really curious. About the stories and the people behind it and so that's that was sort of the seed of. What led us to investigate. So

Bruce Non Jeff Yang Valerie Lou Andrea Lo Valerie Chinatown Asia Bruce America North America Hong Kong Andrea
They Call Us Chinatown Pretty

They Call Us Bruce

05:02 min | 3 months ago

They Call Us Chinatown Pretty

"Hello and welcome to another edition of they call Bruce Non filtered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and Jeff Yang, and this week we have a very special set of guests who are the authors, the creators of a very, very special book when his right in. The heart bone. Shall we say? It is a book called Chinatown Pretty. It is a book of incredible photographs and some just lovely words celebrating the elders who Don't just make up a the generation, the greatest generation of our community but who? Make. It beautiful with their very presence? So. We left a welcome to they cost Bruce. Valerie Lou in. Andrea Lo. Thank you guys so much for joining us. Thanks for having US have come. You guys have put together a really great project. Know it started off as kind of a Website Project And then is now an a full-fledged published book. It's Chinatown Pretty. Is Just A. Really. Great tribute to Chinatown Elders grandmas and GRANDPAS, but it hits on a very specific. Aesthetic. A fashion aesthetic. I think what's really great about is that you've taken sort of the The the style photography mold and apply to kind of the more most unlikely subjects I think. People who are very special in our community so Maybe, you guys could describe actually what is Chinatown Pretty Yeah. This is Valerie Chinatown pretty as a style that's common and chinatowns across North America It's really a patchwork of different. Eras right close from Hong Kong? They've had for thirty years mixed with like say supreme hat that they got from who knows where? A lot of colors. A lot of patterns sometimes I, four shades of pink or four different floral patterns in one outfit. And that's about keeping warm mostly So you could have a big puffy jacket but also keeping the sun out at the same time. So really white built a hats. I love that description just viscerally but I think for people who have not seen your blog and the book itself. Just a little bit more kind of literal color around that. So. When we talk about transparency pretty we're talking about people who are usually immigrants for immigrants who but who have lived here a while and who have. Synthesized a look and the fascinating thing is the look is different from person to person but somehow it all still fits this mold of Chinatown pretty it blends Western clothing it blends. Traditional clothing from. Historical closets as it were. Sometimes across gender lines. It's often incredibly colorful like you said, is layered it's branded, but it's also unique like there's a signature to how people. In that generation dress that feels so much more vibrant than you know those of us, who are I mean in in quarantine were like the sweatpants anyway. But I guess, what was it? That first struck you about the look of Of these elders and kind of lead you to coin the term and decided to actually explore it photographic in words. Yeah. This is Andrea I'm I'm the photographer behind the project and I think we would. have. Known each other for. Several years now, and we would hang out in Chinatown get dim sum and just people watch in the park. And that press was really fascinating Chinatown I feel like has some of the best people watching and I think what we? Both intuited without really realizing why is that? A lot of the outfits we would see on the senior so people sixty five and plus. They there's all this history woven into their outfits I think. For us we might think, oh, it's like this vintage jacket from the seventies but you know for them it's like close. It had ended preserved for decades. Mixed with with newer Chinatown fines and let the handmade clothing as well. So there's so much. Shown in one outfit it's like there's a lot you can extract from it, and so we were really curious about you know. Not only like where did you get these cool shoes but also yeah, how did this? Is just such A. Look in. So we're really curious. About the stories and the people behind it and so that's that was sort of the seed of. What led us to investigate.

Bruce Non Jeff Yang Valerie Lou Andrea Lo Valerie Chinatown Asia Bruce America North America Hong Kong Andrea
Assemblymember Yuh-Line Niou (with Rock the Boat)

Model Majority Podcast

05:50 min | 3 months ago

Assemblymember Yuh-Line Niou (with Rock the Boat)

"My name is Yulia new. I'm actually the Assembly member representing Lower Manhattan, which actually encompasses some very thing statue of Liberty Wall Street financial, district Battery Park City salary seep, or and of course, my favorite, which is like the lower east side Chinatown area, which I think everybody thinks. As new. York. So yeah. Proud of my district. Yeah. Well, I'm very proud of your district too because I live their. So you know, we always like to start off the podcast with going back in time and understanding who our guests are when they're little. So what was little you lean like parents brought me to the states when only six months old mom and dad were actually really amazing and brave and they were in their late twenties and they decided to immigrate to the United States with a thousand dollars in their pockets and sixty cases the baby can have to you know. On my dad decided that he was going to go to Moscow Idaho. Doing school at the University of Hide Ho in Moscow was willing to actually give my data package that would be able to bring over his young family. So yeah was able to get a dormitory for families that would allow him to be able to keep our family together, and so that's the decision that he made and I'm really glad that I wasn't just like left behind somewhere but I would only six months old when we came and then we moved around a lot to agent immigrant family was really in pursuit of my fathers education, my nurse, and so she was amazing and just kind of picked up and started up wherever my dad needed her to and yeah, that's like the strength of. This amazing woman that I call mom yeah I see. So many parallels between might Ernie in your journey my dad is the same. He got a scholarship at the University of Toledo Ohio similar to you my family and I have moved around to seven different states, and so I was looking at your bio and I notice that you lived in Idaho and Texas and. All these different states where there are very few Asians in those states. Like for you when we moved to Oregon I still remember just. Having, a small Asian American community around us because we were in a small town called Beaverton Oregon and there's a lot of actually Asian Americans there what you know like within the school I was obviously Asian kid and I just was. Very, lonely I got bullied a lot in school and when I was in. Elementary School on Texas I. still remember she used to bully me a lot like she pulled me into the CO closet and have all of my other classmates take turns spitting on me. There was a time when she likes to remind lunchbox bathroom and I was too afraid to. There, but she set the trash can on fire, lock me in, and then the sprinklers went off and John My. Gosh appeal right. That was whole thing. I didn't catch on fire but she ran out. Locked the door and I was so afraid that I actually paid by solve in a bathroom. Into things that were going on in Texas all the time and totally acceptable and I still remember how it was totally okay for somebody to just WANNA be up because. I actually read home to my mom and I was crying and telling her I had no friends and the she was so sad for me and I remember little calmer face because I kept saying like why I was blaming her I was like, why did you have to make me Chinese like why? Make Asian, and mom. So remember that day distinctly 'cause I was so angry at her way that. Now I can talk about a lot easier, but I just don't remember like her shock her her and like her inability to do anything to protect me right and. There was nothing that of course you could do and I. Still Remember her was to study harder because you know everybody likes people with good grades. The most Asian answer. I guess at what point were you able to sort of embrace Eurasian identity when I can't I didn't understand a lot of my parents are doing it like I understand why my dad you know put a break in the toilet or like. It was like, wow, people must. Like do weird things. But actually when was like an Enviro and he was making a low flow toilet, you know he was doing all kinds of stuff that was interesting like garden and I was like Oh. My Gosh like please stop gardening. Poor. Poor but I don't look like that. I remember being like very scared in a shame ole time and then when I started to see how that was so wrong and where my Internalizing all this stuff. Was it really kind of broke one of the things I remember the most was watching my mom study. And I remember crying a little bit because she studied and worked so hard all the time. She. Was a nurse for most of my life. She was just. Nurse. All the time and. She worked night shifts and she was also studying because I like all of her certificates and everything had to be redone he was very experienced in very qualified nursing. Taiwan. To recertify everything and. She start working towards for Masters to be able to do administration and things like that and so as I still remember she was pregnant with my brother and she was studying an issue going to work and doing all these things I just remember thinking like, wow like. I'm home is amazing.

District Battery Park University Of Hide Ho Moscow Yulia Idaho Texas Oregon University Of Toledo Assembly Ernie Beaverton York United States Elementary School Ohio John Taiwan
What the Kids in Subtle Asian Traits Know

The Slowdown

03:33 min | 3 months ago

What the Kids in Subtle Asian Traits Know

"For the last two years has been my ritual to write these daily episodes entering into dialogue with poets I admire and delving into my own trove of memories, feelings, associations, and convictions all with the intention of sharing these things with you. It's hard work. The has deepened my understanding of why poetry is important. And you're listening along with your occasional emails has reminded me that those of us who ponder and revel in all the many facets of life make up a very special form of community. Today's poem fills my heart with immense feelings of gratitude devotion. Thanks, and love. And I'm sharing it with you as a way of saying thank you for the tremendous offering of your presence, your attention and your belief in the significance of small things. This is Jennifer G. lies what the kids in subtle. Asian. Traits. No. Is that cut up fruit is the ultimate Asian parent gesture of love. There are posts like. That, feel when your mom cuts fruit when you're up late at night and you see her eating, the leftover bits around the core before putting the nicely cut apple slices and a bowl to bring to you. And if your mom doesn't randomly bring you cut up fruit is she even your mom? And one me into frames in the first, a man reads a book and you can see only the cover Asian parents guide to apologizing. In the second, the inside of the book the response. Come eat. Now that I'm older I need to get the translation, right? No, there were never any saris just cold plates of nectarines Bright Camello, ice Ross, star fruit fragrant lead G. Suite ya-li pairs without their papery brown skins glistening. At Jing. Vong at Sam Woo at May some at garden? The restaurants do this to tonight the apron splattered man with grandfather hair carries a chipped plate to the register. The server counts the other tables change but jokes with me crowded enough for you annoy. Novoye could mean girl or woman, but it also means daughter. I have spent years making sure. He places the oranges on my table. They do this for all the customers but oh, what a glitch in the matrix tonight. My mother saw me alone with my bowl and splintered face on a Wednesday and she is here. I know there is a math that measures time. But what about a math that accounts for logic? How should I explain the strangers? Who bring me fruit after she has gone?

Jennifer G. Apple Ross Novoye Sam Woo Vong
Author Chat With Katie Zhao

Books and Boba

06:01 min | 3 months ago

Author Chat With Katie Zhao

"Katie. PODCASTS, we're happy that you can join us. Congratulations on the release of your second book, the Fallen Hero is the second book of Your Series started with the Dragon Warrior. That came out last month So yeah, congratulations on that. Thank you so much. So just to start off I, know you're from Michigan but did you grow up there your whole life? Yes I grew up in Michigan so I was born and blend and Then I moved to another area in the Metro Detroit area and I grew up in Michigan I went to school at the University of Michigan Ann Arbor. So then spent another four years of my life in Michigan. and. Then in nineteen, I actually moved to New York City for. A little bit over a year, and then like back in Dundas may early June ish like when I realized this pandemic isn't GonNa be over anytime soon, I moved back to Michigan. So I am back home with my family. I don't really know much about like the Asian American community in Michigan I know that there's a pretty good like Korean adoptee. Population there. But like I'm not so sure about like the. Asian. American community there. So did you grow up around a lot of Asian Americans so I think Southeast Michigan which is where I live has one of the bigger populations but like it's still absolutely nothing compared to east coast or west coast like my school was probably five to ten percent Asian but I did grow up going to Chinese school. So that was nice. And I don't know about Korean adoptees let the area where I grew up actually has a big Japanese American population Oh yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Because I mean it's like Detroit promoter city right so like I think a lot of them would like their families will come from Japan to work at You know un-american Automotive Company for like maybe one to three years or something, and then it was really sad for me because I would make friends with them and then they would move back But yeah, that's like probably like the extent of the Asian. American community around here it's. it was a real shock for me moving to New York and just being so overwhelmed by all the Asians everywhere and like Asians, who are like like really Americanized Asians who are also like kind of fresh off the boat. Yeah I mean if you head to Chinatown, it's you know a totally different world. Yeah. Yeah. So I heard through the grapevine that you're pretty well known what? Pad Author. So I'm guessing that you have been writing since at least highschool I'm probably younger, right Yeah. We're civil. What Grapevine was there? It was just it was just like floating around. Okay. Interesting I have talked about it. I've talked a little bit too much about it I like. I like a joke that like I want to like block out that part of my memory but no walked had was like like I might thoughts on that website but. It was a good starting block for me to like really get used to like getting like writing a novel length story and also because it's so interactive I could get like reader comments on every chapter uploaded. So that was like really encouraging and for me when I started writing novels on what Pat I was in high school. So you know I was still dislike learning how to write a novel. So like honestly other writers and readers encouragement meant the world to me back then But yeah, I have been writing for a very long time I started out writing short stories when I was like seven or eight years old, I remember. my teacher gave all of us an. To write a short story and Lake. I. Still Remember that moment very vividly I like was running the story and I was like this is so much fine. I don't think you know had so much fun doing anything yet before I always was still very young. So I didn't know this is what I would want to do for the rest of my life. But then my teacher also praised me and was like Oh, this is like such a great short story, which is probably what she said to everybody back then but. I thought I was like the greatest writer ever so. In this industry, it really is everything but not like being overly competent just like. You know just having enough confidence to continue like pushing through rejections and putting yourself out there I think is definitely key but yeah, and after a very long writing journey I'm publishing novels now. Yeah. Do you remember what story got you that that key praise? I remember we were doing a on legends and myths I don't remember what like I think it was just like a different American legends like like big foot or. I'm blanking now but you know like the kind of and talking about and I wrote about a river but I don't remember like what river now but. Yeah. I just like surprised that I still remember that moment. So vividly because it's been like many many years. But Yeah I i. think that was a key moment for me is a writer.

Michigan University Of Michigan Ann Arb Asian American Community American Automotive Company Detroit Dundas Southeast Michigan Katie New York City East Coast West Coast UN Japan New York PAT Lake
Learning How To Like Myself with Melly Lee

First of All

06:47 min | 3 months ago

Learning How To Like Myself with Melly Lee

"Readings Melis. Welcome to welcome to percival Meli and her news. If you love. I love that you welcome me and my nerves where here waiting yeah. You can dig into anything. Go ahead. Yeah. We we are your safe-space went. Do you remember when we recorded the other episode introvert went over a year ago right I think like it least I want to say like twenty eighteen because that's when it got came back to the states that is a long ago. How Does twenty eighteen. Yeah because I left I left, I left la in two thousand, seventeen ellen debris lived abroad for about a year came back, and then we started talking about traveling I and then I kept setting you introverted means you WANNA. Talk about the introverted yeah because I was so. The brilliance of the memes you send me are. So again, it's so sustained. It says everything in like an image, which is why I think like brilliant memes are so valuable they they convey everything but you intrigued me for sure it was like I never looked at the world this way. Thank you. But this this is a we're also investigating the compatibility of our personality types. For Yeah, we're very compatible compatible and I love it and basically, I, would just to bring everybody on the same page what I was realizing because I go I fluctuate between an NF and the NFL. But we're both like between me me we're both Weirdos but we love each other's weirdness that's the basic summary. It's grilled think I don't think we're weird I think everyone else get on our level. Thank you actually said thank you. So I agree So yeah, I have to up in my intro because door you and basically what prompted this whole thing can get everyone on the same page was even writing this dope blog that I've been consuming and you and I been working out so we can catch everybody up on all of that but it's kind of this general premise of the the journey we've been going on in Covid of like. Accepting ourselves and like being our best selves. Having this unique experience of actually like really thriving in the middle of complete utter chaos like not being blind to the chaos but. Yeah and that's why I've been bonding with you all year long and it's been really really great even though the world has been a dumpster fire. We've actually hung out more this year than ever before. Yeah. When people have been asking me how I'm doing like I mentioned you I mentioned our group workout. been a very significant part of my of my. Pandemic. So thank you for that. Oh likewise, likewise, you've been a great friend, a great sounding board and it's a pleasure being stuck inside a different place. All my God, it's the. Dream let us unite separately in different houses. Yes. Yes and consciously connect when it's could meet like it makes sense and it's comfortable. Am I? Yes say otherwise no. I. Love It. It's good boundaries and good. Emotional exploration and one of the themes like one of the entries from your blog that is super like I got very move just by the title was when you're talking about learning to like yourself. So I thought that could be a good jumping off point to kind of just dive into all the thoughts and feelings because there have been a lot. And I wanted to like lazy like can we just talk about the instagram because let's go back to the beginning shall we or like? Yes to contextualize who you are because we don't know if people have listened to our first episode together how how did you? What is your elevator pitch for me? Well now I'm a I'm supposed to be a photographer, but I'm stuck in quarantine shoe facetime and I work out a lot and retouched photos. That's. Like that's pretty much will pages right now. My background is in portrait photography in commercial photography, alive entertainment. My spare time was was spent doing nature photography and a lot of legs just outdoor exploration but you'll everything's kind of off the table now in can't do any of that. Like I'm a photographer. Photographer when the world says, I can be a photographer. Just, kind of retouching photos on a large scale and. I've been writing a lot dislike bogging more. So I things like this time has been given. The has a lot to be introspective and just. I had a previous blog that was more for my photography and I had a hard time writing on the blog released continuing to write on there just because I, started that blog in. Reich right. When I'm out of college my early twenties and it was more just trying to me setting myself up to. Seem like I was like, Hey, I'm of Darfur look at my work I. Know My Shit Yeah and. What I look back on it now I read it I'm like Oh. Yeah I'm I'm a coffee little twenty year old. which which makes sense it makes sense. Yeah So just out of this of quarantine, I started a new blog called now starving artists that it was a euro, I sat on for a while because I liked the name which came from this. There was a joke back in the day in right out of college where up to my close friends they would disappear months at a time and then they would never hear from me because I was probably like somewhere in La trying to do some sort of Hustler on a project that I would just ignore my phone's like Oh. Yeah. Milly died but then she'll come back and resume. A few months later so I I bought this year L. because it was a toddler blog at first I like kind of right. I would of write letters to my friends essentially like no I'm not dead. Yeah. I am not a starving artist. This is what I've been doing this to working on but then I eventually scrapped it he he became better staying connected to friends inside and With quarantine and everything I kinda resurrected that you're al again just so that I could reflect and be more introspective on things that I wish. I could I told myself back Beckenham starting and also It's been a good place for me costs like. What I feel what I went through and kind of finding just acceptance with the with the process and the journey and also like Morsel recognizing that things are not necessarily good or bad. They just are led. We project what we want them to be an they say hindsight is twenty twenty but really it's hindsight's twenty twenty because we choose the connect the events of the reasons and make it fit current. Yeah and I think just kind of being okay with the. See the world and not be so judgmental on our souls is a better state of mind via. A read. So it's just it's just kind of been my sounding board.

LA Percival Meli NFL Instagram Pandemic Covid Darfur Beckenham Milly Reich
To D.B.

The Slowdown

03:53 min | 3 months ago

To D.B.

"For no reason, memories of the summer of Nineteen, ninety-four surface in my mind. I had just graduated from. and was living out the last month of my off-campus lease the idol sunny days getting everywhere by foot. The sense of freedom mingled with fear because the only thing I knew about what awaited me was that I hadn't planned enough. Didn't know enough. It's strange to admit but sometimes I miss that summer terribly. I miss the innocence, even the haplessness of myself at that age. Twenty two. Still a child but believing myself to be something more. I miss the ways my then best friend and I played at adulthood. One Weekday afternoon we took a long train ride out to the beach. When we arrived it was lunchtime. So he sat down at a boardwalk restaurant for French fries and glasses of cold white wine. Then we took turns visiting the restroom to change into our bathing suits. I must've gone I emerging wrapped in a bright sarong nodded behind my neck. I remember the exact feeling of pride of youth of the pride of youth and the satisfaction of is upon me as I strode back to our table. A few minutes later, I heard the slapping of sandals as my friend made her way back from the restroom in a lavender one piece with high cut legs and a scooped open back. The sundress she'd been wearing was draped over her finger it waived behind her like a flag. I watched her as it for the first time realizing that her body had somehow raced ahead out of girlhood and into something else she seemed to feel it too and gloated in it on her slow strut back to the table. An. Older woman followed her admiringly with her gaze. And I felt something like fear. Fear rooted not so much in the fact that something was ending though it was. But rather that something real an. Was Beginning. Today's poem is two D be by Edward Hirsch. I Miss Your apartment on West Eleventh Street where I slept off the front hall and a bedroom that would have been a closet in another city. The plants breathe easily in their heavy pots, but the radiators knocked all night like ghosts trying to reach us from the other side. The traffic on sixth avenue was a slow buzz someone rattled a dog chain in the moonlight that bathed the school yard across the street. Lights seeped in through the barred windows. I get here faith rustling around downstairs getting ready for work. Unwilling to. Die. If there is a West village and the other world, we will someday meet there. I'll reach over and hug you will make you uneasy. Let's go for a bottle of wine at the tavern near the branch library, and then stroll over to Cinderella for Prosciutto and melon. You can buy a pack of cigarettes at the corner and explain the architecture to me. Maybe, I can stay at your place until I get settled.

Edward Hirsch
Book News For October 2020

Books and Boba

04:32 min | 3 months ago

Book News For October 2020

"All right. Our first book deal is scholastic press acquired to change a planet by Christina Sinturin Vat. Illustrated by Rally Jim Poor Bell. The nonfiction picture book explains Climate Change, with honesty and hope for very young readers. Publication is scheduled for twenty twenty two is awesome. Crisanto avant is known for writing novels. So it's kind of cool to see her writing. A book for younger readers as well. Yes. So Christina soon, turned that we've had her on our show for We talked about a wish in the dark, which is middle grade tie inspired fantasy, and she recently came out with all thirteen, the incredible cave rescue of the Thai boys soccer team. So this would be her second nonfiction book, but this is a picture book so I like. I'm sure it's going to be just as great as her other books. Yeah. Our next book deal barefoot books but road rights to dumpling day by MIRA, serum illustrated in this day onto neon. No. In this multi-cultural counting book ten contemporary families, Cook Different types of dumplings for neighborhood potluck featuring food from their culture's. Publication is planned for fall twenty. Twenty. One Speaking of dumplings. So I had Ravioli, last night for dinner. And you know like random conversations, top Dan and I are talking and Dan was saying is really considered a dumpling. Probably Right. It's like pasta stuff with something. Our next book deal is Harpercollins Balza and Bray acquired. This place is still beautiful by debut author. She she ten the why a novel is about to estranged Sisters Margaret on early whose family becomes the victim of an anti Asian hate crime during a summer that includes surprising romances for both sisters they clashed with one another as they navigate the ripple effects that the hate crime has had in their community and uncovered the truth behind the perpetrators identity publication is set for spring twenty, twenty two. It sounds interesting because You know like we talked about this in our episode with minor feelings, but a lot of like Asian Americans are. Considered to be. Next in next in line to be White and people forget that model minority is a myth and it is a way to create a wedge between. The different minority groups. So I, think it is a very interesting Subject, to explore for WII novel. So yeah. congrats to she she for getting the story out there. our next Greystone kids acquired world rights to bioluminescence by Julia club a picture book that explores bioluminescence in nature under the seat in the woods and in the air publication scheduled for Spring Twenty, twenty, two bioluminescence. That sounds like something Like I'm just picturing a light, the illustrations for it and I'm pretty sure it's GonNa look beautiful because bioluminescence in nature is just gorgeous. If you look at photographs, have you seen in person I've seen the type of happens in the ocean when I was in San Diego when I think I, don't know if this jellyfish or it's like a glowing in the ocean. That's really beautiful. no, I have never come across bioluminescence in person the closest would be the James Cameron Movie Avatar. which is not real but Yeah I'm guessing that the illustrations will be a very beautiful. Our next book deal. Our next book deal is critical world rights to the snail by emily, H- hugues. The picture book is an exploration of Japanese American artists, Osamu Noguchi who found acceptance through the act of creation in the face of rejection from both of his homeland's publication is planned for Spring Twenty twenty two. So is this like a BIOGRAPHY PICTURE book. Yeah. It would be a biography picture look from what the description is saying your interested in why it's called the snail mail. It's a very unique title.

Harpercollins Balza Christina Sinturin Spring Twenty Jim Poor Bell DAN Crisanto Avant Osamu Noguchi James Cameron Greystone Emily San Diego Bray Julia Club