Arts

Listen to the latest news, interviews and analysis from the world of visual and performing arts. Sourced from leading podcasts and talk radio shows.

A Conversation With Tricia Caiati And Kate Shannon

Creative Therapy Umbrella

05:57 min | 4 d ago

A Conversation With Tricia Caiati And Kate Shannon

"And so i thinking about it. Reached out to some other after's and like high pastor communities are absolutely amazing and i'm so thankful for the music therapy podcast community. They're awesome there is a facebook group called music therapy podcasts community. Podcasters music podcasters. Yeah if you go there you learn about like everyone has like updated podcasts. That are happening in everything too. So it's definitely a good group to join on. But so tricia and i were like okay. Let's see if we can make us idea happen. Let's see if we can figure out a way that people can earn c. n. t. Ease for listening to podcasts. And we figured it out which feels crazy it's happening and it's real it's real life so That's how mvp seeing this kind of born has a yeah true. Do you feel ready to diamond. Tristesse nagel into Yeah i think so. Go ahead start skill. I mean as good as we're gonna get we'll see we'll see how things happen. We'll see how the cookie crumbles. I like her like to improv. So the first thing we want to talk about is really just the basics of music. Therapy podcasts collective is Tricia and i both being podcasters not only wanted to find a way for listeners. To be able to earn credits by listening to podcasts. But we also wanted to find a way for podcasters to feel more supported. Have some sustainability with podcasting If you're a podcast or you know that it takes a lot of time effort money. It takes a lot to keep it going every week. But i think that's part of what we love about. It is that we're putting out free educational content for people and it's it should be free. We want people to access all of this stuff and we wanna be able to continue doing that. And not burn out Find a way to make it sustainable. So we really had this to kind of two different pronged approach to the music therapy. Podcast collective which you'll hear us refer to as mt p. c. Which i just think it's hilarious but so are focused. I was really like okay. Let's figure out how we can make this happen. How do we put together. bundles of podcasts. And all these different things so that it's accessible so that it's sustainable and so that it's quality which those are big parts of our mission and we'll talk a little bit more about those so But our biggest thing was just trying to figure out. What does this look like. There's not many other people that have done this in even other areas other therapies and stuff so we had to kind of create a model and go with it but art of all of. This is the super open feedback. We want us to be what the community wants it to be So if newer if he listened to this if you get ideas if you like it if you don't like your feedback let us know all about it and we really wanna make it something that is accessible to everybody in. That really works for working therapists. So that's really kind of music. Therapy podcast collective in a nutshell But tristesse going to go a little bit more into those three kind of core parts of our mission. The accessibility sustainability and quality so tricia. You can take it away. actually. I want to add to your last point. I so as far as we know there aren't a ton of people doing this continuing ed thing through podcasts. In like many fields. So kate nyah. Figured out like we said we have. We have approved credits. Ready but we're not. We don't have all the answers. Were only two people and again. We want your feedback because as a as a community we can make it so much better like so much more. They're still many different ways. We could make this happen Thanks haley 'cause like podcasting is just so versatile. And i think that having like been having a podcast for a couple years and like seeing other people's podcasts pop up it's amazing inspiring to see everyone's different take on podcasting in the music therapy community Yeah and i just love that. So silicate said Accessibility is a big factor for us. you can listen to podcasts in the car if we ever get to a place where you're commuting again or if you're one of those people who has been commuting throughout this whole year thank you for your service so you can listen to podcast. Anyone has access to them. They're out there for free. Were putting out this content all the time so yes the core part of the credits of the opportunity. Cmt opportunities is out there. It's accessible you. Get it the other thing about accessibility and a big part of why we're doing this. Is we want to make the music therapy. Profession a more accessible profession and so that's going into our mission to funds donate and create scholarships for music therapy students and interns. Were really excited about that. and yeah i that was one of those things when we first talked about this idea. I think that's just something i've always wanted to do. I wasn't sure how to make it happen. How can i set up a scholarship. How can i. Donate to existing scholarships. And i'm really grateful that and the other people we talked to were like that's awesome. Let's do it. Here's an avenue to get there

Tristesse Nagel Tricia Kate Nyah Facebook Haley
The New York Actors Experience With Caitlyn Piccirillo

"Diary of an Unemployed Actor"

05:39 min | 6 d ago

The New York Actors Experience With Caitlyn Piccirillo

"Is there much. Are the theaters. Closed down there as well. Oh yeah they've been They shut down broadway on march thirteenth. I believe End there hasn't been any live theater in new york city as far as i know There's been some like socially distanced park performances What small theatre companies. Just trying to keep busy but for the most part Most of the theater being done in in new york city right now seems to be a via zoom or now that filming is happening against tv productions coming back the show that i'm we just started rehearsing for the dining room where rehearsing over zoom and then we'll be Recording it over like the course of three days and someone's apartment interesting help. How do you find that then. Immigrants regards to rehearsing over zoom versus in person. Because you're not getting as much instant feedback in that experience. Just being right next to the person. Yeah it's a little weird just because Everyone has technical issues. might internet sometimes is a bit a sporadic and this production My friends directing it but he casts instead of doing the way traditionally would do the dining room which was six people. every character is played by different persons. Losing fifty something people in this cast. So it's really hard to just have that one on one moment with with your scene partner but when i've done zoom Readings and stuff. It's not that bad. A as long as people are really trying to stay in the moment and kind of committing to what they're doing. There's been some beautiful theater being done over zoom Yeah i know a lot. Some as being in it's same here. Some theaters are broadcasting over zoom. I haven't really watched anything. Maybe i should give it a try though because people that are doing it and in theaters need to stay. Afloat is the thing like our they. I mean they're not earning any money right now and so you know. What else are they supposed to do. They had a a scheme here. That's i don't remember. One of the politicians proposed was basically just like a well. You know if all the actors and stuff are complaining about not having work right now they should just go back and retrain and do something else was. I saw that Jesus seriously how much. Money is generated for the city of london from the theaters on first of all and then like just ridiculous thing to say exactly so much and i don't. that's something i've found even talking within Like with my family who who are not art people their science people and they really don't get it they really do think that Performing as like a glorified hobby rather than something that you really work in train for. However many years you know. I not only have like my bachelor's in acting but i also have my masters in theatre i've spent. I couldn't even tell you how much time and money on a acting classes voice lessons. Dance lessons and To to Like out of nowhere. Have your entire industry disappear. It would be like out of nowhere having the entire publishing industry disappear like sure. Books are like a commercial item. But you would very much notice if out of nowhere known was writing publishing reading books anymore. That's good point. It's i wanted to ask you about that too because you have a ton of training which is amazing. So what is kinda value. Get out of doing so much training. Because i know a lot of hollywood actors. You could look into it in say well. They didn't have any actual acting training them. But i think there's a value in love to hear kind of your take on it because like you said you got your bachelor's you got a master's in theater will. My masters was primarily in theatre history. Because i have a real interested in drama turkey and in london they actually really have an appreciation for drama turci which i approach which i love but in the us it's not it's kind of a dying art. But i think it's super important for performers to have at least some idea of of that of doing that kind of research. Because i find that i can always tell a performer has done their homework in. That's homework on the character homework on character. But it's not just like what are my motivations. Who am i talking to. What is background. But it's the show of it things like okay well. What is my socioeconomic background What does that mean for. How i was raised end Because someone who was raised in like a upper middle class lifestyle versus someone who is poverty stricken as a child is going to have different reactions to different Situations in a show or talking. About what what era was it and what was going on in that timeframe you know A story about you know a two women in love is totally going to have a different feeling context. If the story set in the nineteen sixties the eighteen sixties

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Conversion Killers for Photography Sites with Jan Koch

The WordPress Photography Podcast

04:47 min | Last week

Conversion Killers for Photography Sites with Jan Koch

"My name is scott wine wits. And today i'm joined by my guest. Johncock host the wbz agency summit and consults businesses on hosting their own virtual events. His agency power community driven businesses that serve digital agencies to host virtual event so they can grow their loyal audience and establish thought leadership. When he's not working on the business he loves spending time with his wife and daughter were chasing his silver lab through his backyard. So welcome yon finally. We're connecting And i'm glad to have you in. This is going to be a really good a really good educational discussion for a lot of photographers around the world. Thank you so much. I haven't meets code. It's so everybody where you're from because obviously you've got a different accent than i do. So allow share a little bit. A little bit about your backstory absolutely so. I am from germany so english is not my native language bandwidth we if i mess up. Sometimes i do my best. I started using what press in. Twenty twelve's Originally where. I got in touch with his online marketing digital space and in thousand thirteen. I decided to become seven employed. And i haven't looked back since so it's the best thing ever for me. And as you mentioned we have a small family here that is supported by lend business and virtual events and stuff like that recently acquired vitual summit mastery dot com. which is the leading course for running ritual events. It's actually the cause. I took to run. Majority wants to learn how to do the the right process out to make sure that the events are successful and stuff like that. So excited about this. But i'm also very much looking forward to talk about all the good stuff. We have coming up today for sure. So you started using president who doesn't twelve. I just did a quick. Google search that means you started using wordpress inversion around three point four. Yep that's really interesting. I love hearing that. I love hearing because like every stage of wordpress has a different look in a different function that didn't exist in the past and it's always fun to see a just a date myself a bit. When i first started using wordpress was still version one and there is no gallery system so i started using extra gallery. Whatever your it was version one. that's yeah so so what. What is your your favorite thing about. Wordpress that As helped you stick with it and You know that helps keep you. You intrigued and interested in wanting to recommend it to others. Yeah that's a really good question. And they are two aspects. One is how flexible the system. It's like you can do almost everything with repes- if you know your way around. Php and my sequel pretty much. A lot of things with were president than I'm not a developer by trade. I've learned a business consultant. Study for business consultant so What i needed to rely on especially in the beginning is the community and education from the community and by diving into the community mercy myself into that and sharing what. I'm learning learning from others. That is what really made me. Stick with what press because there are so many tutorials out there. There are so many helpful people that you can just approach on twitter or stack overflow or whatever in any facebook group that you might find your own wordpress people want to help you if you post is somewhat relevant enough on your homework before that so That's the best thing ever now with the virtual events that i'm hosting i'm seeing this to speak from all across the globe just willing to volunteer to speak and to help me get the word out of what i'm doing. I think that is the best thing about many other. Cms can out from for sure. Yeah the community is definitely one of the best aspects of wordpress. The is great. But you don't get the same experience community wise that you do with software In the websites based like yes sure. There's facebook for squarespace or or wicks one up but the interactions are not nearly as as depth as you get in the wordpress based plus these dedicated events. Both what used to be in person basically barely virtual these days I can't wait to get back to the in person stuff. how many can you have any work camps. have you been to. i'm just one. I have to admit workum europan twenty eighteen in berlin. Did you speak at it or

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Upcycling: What kind of upcycler are you?

Maya 's Upcycling as both Art and Function

02:30 min | Last week

Upcycling: What kind of upcycler are you?

"Up cycling. What kind of upcycle are you. The other day. I was thinking about cycling and the very different things And ways that people are probably up cycling. As i see it. We all have a method to how we upcycle. I believe that we all fall into some kind of category in style. I would describe the kind of obstacle i am. I tend to be the individual upcycle to save materials for various projects that i will engage in for myself and not necessarily as part of a group but interestingly enough there are people who actually collect items in order to engage in an op cycling project as part of a group. One of these activists i believe would be creating a quilt which are basically pieces of fabric sewn together many times by a group of people But i'm sure there are other group projects that are not necessarily commercial level projects. They are the are upcycle. People whose reuse repurposing materials is strictly reserved for the use of our and although they may repurpose other items. They are not primarily using In their art there is the upside of this specifically only certain types of materials for example someone who designs clothing a work with may only reuse materials that are suitable for designing clothes. Some obstacles will only collect materials that deal with the up cycling of furniture. This is another example of someone that will only reuse materials that can be re purposed in the kind of items of the obstacle. I tend to repurpose materials. That are good for arts arts and crafts as well as everyday practical uses. I don't consider myself a designer. I have limited so in skills. And therefore i don't really look for materials to upcycle for clothing. I also don't look To repurpose materials. I believe will be useful for furniture Impart living apartment. This can be difficult with the amount of space This would require but as you go through this upside Journey you find that. Each of us has an innocent of the kinds of materials. We like to upcycle as whether we work to upcycle Some of the projects as part of a group or as individuals. Well for now remember. The life is about personalities not impossibilities to next time stay well.

It's Never Too Late To Start Doing What You Love With Paul E. Kandarian

"Diary of an Unemployed Actor"

07:00 min | Last week

It's Never Too Late To Start Doing What You Love With Paul E. Kandarian

"What's interesting about you. Is you start got into acting a bit later than most which is an interesting story so You went down. And we're doing something with the play then decided audition. Is that what it was. Yeah i was doing a story on This he was the then new artistic director. Trinity rep company in providence. Which is one of the few if not the only rep company left in the country but he came from steppenwolf in chicago and i always wanted to be an actor in so i started hanging around with him going to shows and just watching people. Just the mac nations of theater and i. so what am i waiting for. What the hell am i waiting for. This never had the courage to try it. And that debt gave me the courage to try it in in the bug. Bit hard and i've been just been ever since. What was that night. The play. I saw their addition for sorry took. That was later life. So you didn't audition for that play. You were interviewing him. And then that motivated addition for another play for another play calendar life in the then i want to see like the cherry orchard at trinity rep in one of the actors the came in from the sides on the the the lobby area one of the actors were standing right next to me and i could see like the hair on his arms his nahshon flaring and i swear almost cried because it was so electric and so immediate a what. What power this. This medium has to on people to vote that kind of response and offices. I've got to try this. I've just got to do it. I don't know why. I denied myself all those years. I think i just feared failure. And i don't like doing things unless i'm good at it. You know a a so. I just tried it in a fairly good at it and it's been a great ride ever since. I'm curious what that first audition was like. When you just kind of went down there no having no experience in then handing me a script and basically he. Oh hey read this. Yeah and i never forget it. Because i was sitting in a group of other people including a couple of guys it was competing with and it just felt real in in good in normal. It just reading somebody else's words pretending to be this character. The characters name was austin in the play austin from boston. Oddly enough and it's just reading it and it just felt if folic completion of some sort pretend to be somebody else my whole life of always pretended to be other people's joking around making people laugh. Or whatever just being a class clown sort of thing and then when i was reading this it the legitimacy to to acting out i mean all those years is a goofball it just gave that sense of like you said legitimacy said so this is this is what it feels like to be someone else in in a setting where you have permission to be someone someone else and i loved it so it absolutely loved it and they gave me the part the lead and it was phenomenal. I got on stage and it was like i think lewd to an in the email The lady who was going out ahead of me said my heart's in my throat is at normal. Because i don't think so. And she smiled and went out and i laughed and it just got out there. All nerves went away. It just felt like this is the place. I've been my whole life but you know you come to things when you come to them so i've been making. Yeah that's beautiful because it's true too because you you might be off stage in your heart's racing but as soon as you're out there in that zone how yet none of that matters. You're just you're so focused on what you're doing it's exactly yeah off. If you're an actor too right yeah yeah. Yeah yeah so you know let me. Just what a feeling he asked in. It's an honor privilege to do that. To take some take people somewhere else just to get them out of their own world for a little while and take them into yours it is. It's a privilege that we don't take lightly. Was it stressful being. That's your first play in your in a major role in your first play and you don't have the experience so i'm just thinking even stage directions right. So if the directors like okay. I needed to go stage left. And you're like okay. Is that way exactly because we started rehearsing. And they said we're going to go of blocking like tomorrow and what's blocking this where they tell you where to stand said. Oh that'd be helpful because if you're not used at the film even and you just see people walking and now i really obnoxious points. My girlfriend us to see that guy walking. He's just wasn't walking randomly. They told them where to go. And the so many moving parts to play in film yet and it was all new to me and it still feels new in so many ways. Even though i've done till dozens of films and bunches of place this just a newness to it and there's an earnest embrace of the entire process. I love reader player hill. Says i don't like film rehearsal so much i think it kinda rob's spot and eighty but you know just referrals to play rehill so i like to go to rehearsal sometimes. I'm not even needed off just to watch other people do it so hopefully hopefully at newness and a new hobby you just want to devour. Everything still feels that way. That's been twelve years now so it's great yeah Just from my experience as well like it doesn't go away because you've got a new production and cast that you're working with and in a lot of ways it's new even though you might be doing the same show night after night for a while. It's still that you ever hersal process. And in that excitement of that opening night and in i've always said this i mean an audience is a living breathing organism in it changes when you change. Do it's different every night. You know this. I mean some nights she deliver line and raucous laughter in the next night since crickets. How does that happen. It's the same joke. It's the same way just two different different organisms out there taking it all in you ever had a situation where you like blanked online or tripped over a stage prop or something like that during a show. Oh yeah it's balked on the few lines here and there and i think one time you know. He skipped an entire page in it. You just kinda pick up the pieces and go on but as you know this. The they'll say latest the audience know unless they know the place specifically the scene by scene or whatever they don't know and i and i've been to place of dead i didn't know and i could tell i think is an actor. You just kinda know. I know something screwed up there. No they did something but the covering so you know you. Just pull inform form at that point. Sure yeah think we've all gone up One of the funniest things. I've seen was at trinity rep in angeles korea. Thicker name is just a legendary axe actress. In the new england area. She stopped and she was like kind of looking around and then she gave the line as she just looked. The crisis thought forgotten. She's totally brooke character. Brook in fourth wall. But she's a riot so she got away. Everybody laughs hilarious.

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Interview With Ben Seidman

The Insider

04:37 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview With Ben Seidman

"And welcome to episode. See how smooth welcome to before. Yeah welcome to episode four of the insider vanishing and on the line. Today i am lucky enough to have been seidman. Ben how are you today. Hello everyone hello damien. i'm wonderful thanks for asking you. I'm currently i was in. I was on a private island in miami. A couple days ago and then las vegas at the palazzo doing a show with derek hughes. And now i'm in the upper peninsula of michigan population. I think it's three now that i'm here. So you know things. Things change quickly guys. Don't get cocky okay. we're gonna kick off with this because some people we have listens around the world And you mobile night in the states than you are here so with no disrespect intended. Who are you and what do you do no no not at all. I'm very very famous. And the stance. But let's just let's touch without room misspent seidman who are you what do you do. You have forty three seconds. Okay i first of all used the first half of that to clarify that. No one knows who i am. And then i'll use the second half to say i do. Magic tricks mostly primarily on stage. You do stand up comedy in magic together. That's most of my work but my background is close up magic which i still do occasionally and still love so. There is something else that you might become more known for which is a new show on netflix. Tell us about that. Yeah yeah that's a fun thing. Yeah i'm very. I'm very honored to appear on a netflix original. That just dropped about a week ago. Called the brainchild and the show is a science show for kids produced by pharrell and also atomic entertainment. Who are the guys who did Brain games that apollo robbins and other great magicians also appeared on so they kind of they teamed up with ferrall design. This concept end. It's a kid show version of of brain games in a way where they want to teach kids about science. Which i think especially right now. I don't know how things are over in the uk but especially right now in the united states. I think teaching young people about science is more important than it ever has been and it was a lot of people who denying science in general so getting kids into it is great and yeah i did segments doing magic on that show and i think they translated it into all the languages so wherever you are listening from. Yeah if you haven't net flex go on there and you might you know if you're in korea. There might be korean person who has overdubbed my voice and And i think wherever you are if you get netflix. You can search for brainchild and see my segments. The ones that. I'm most proud of are on the episodes space and social media. So it's episode one and episode five and Yeah they're they're pieces. That i designed specifically for the show for the theme and i'm really really proud of that material. I've just seen them. And i've just watched them and i am. You see this is an interesting thing. Whenever things on television youtube comments always default to although they may not know the particular inaccurate they will say pre show or setup all stooges and i watched the first one. And i was like okay. There's something that that's crazy and the second one is a beautiful sleight of hand. So do you want to talk about either of them all sure. Yeah this is. This is the first interview that i'm actually talking about. So yeah i'm very. I'm incredibly happy with how they turned out. Obviously hindsight you always want to change things. But there's two interesting things. I think that are worth mentioning number. One is the social media. Piece was I'm i'm concerned one big concern with it and that's that people are just going to go with. Oh they're stooges and because it really looks clean it really looks good But i'm incredibly proud of the method that i developed. They are not stooges at all. I promise from the bottom of my heart. They are completely completely fooled. I didn't have them write down information before the show or anything like that. This really hit them like a ton of bricks and even though it looks completely impossible. It's a mellow. It's a method that i had developed several years ago and then continued to tweak and finally solved all the problems in time to make it work for this show so that is my promise. People will say. Oh it's completely sat up it. Is i promise you from the bottom of my heart genuinely fooled. It is really really impactful for the spectators live. Let's

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What will Biden-Harris do for the visual arts?

The Art Newspaper Weekly

08:10 min | 3 d ago

What will Biden-Harris do for the visual arts?

"The promo code is wax one to one. That's w. x one to one now. Last year we looked at the effect of president trump on the art world but now that joe biden and kamala harris been sworn in as us president vice president. We thought we'd look at the future with ravages of the coronavirus pandemic and a divided nation. What role coach a play as the us heels and rebuilds after donald trump all seeks harm to none and harmony. For all as amanda. Go put it in her. Stunning poem at the inauguration. I asked jury finco a contributor to the art newspaper based in los angeles how central she thinks the arts will be in the biden era jewelry before we start talking about sort of possible policies. Should we talk a little bit about the personalities. What we know about joe biden and come a harris's personal taste and commitment to the president biden has had such a long history is serving this country that we know just about everything there is to know about him. We know which. Bruce springsteen songs he likes for example he likes james joyce and yates. He reads poetry. He's read poetry He said it helped him with his stutter as a kid so so he has some connection to literature. We haven't seen him involved in a director personal way with that many museums or arts organizations in the us. He's been busy vice president harris and it is fun to say those words Has been involved with the arts in her life in particular with music. She's very musical. She grew up playing. I i think the flu and then the french horn and the kettle drums as well and by the time she was in high school she was really involved in a couple of dance troupes. That used to go out and dance at local community. Centers and senior centers was called midnight. Magic we we know that they are arts involved at least within the field of the arts. But let's let's begin talking now about what we think. Particularly the visual arts need from from from this administration because we're in a situation of unprecedented crisis. There was this committee right. On the arts and humanities resigned on mass under trump so basically after charlottesville the terrible events in charlottesville with the white supremacist rally. This committee resigned right. Can you do you know much about that committee and what role it plays. So that's the president's committee on the arts and humanities and it's really an advisory committee is so it's played different roles in different administrations. But this is the first time that it's fallen apart almost completely where it became dysfunctional. Because of trump's actions as president in fact a number of people resigned before his inauguration so it was already hobbled by that just by his coming into onto the scene and then the remaining private sector members chuck close was one of them resigned after charlottesville charlottesville being the site of that white supremacist rally. Where president trump said there are quote unquote good people on both sides And so they the remaining members Who were in the private sector resigned at that after that event and then and then trump said no i'm dismantling it and one of the members had to tweet something like very funny. You can't break up with me. We already broke up with you. Okay so i mean it would seem certain therefore that might be reinstated. That committee right. That would be very easy and natural decision to make just to show support of the arts and to have some formal mechanism for bringing some advisers into the white house. Roy so one of the intriguing things for me is that i hadn't really got my head around before now is that of course in europe. Their culture ministry's they were department of culture right across governments. But in the us there is no culture department. Is that right correct correct. We don't have a cabinet level position. We don't have a culture. Czar so to speak and there have been some cause for recently among art. Critics here Which i think you can understand. During a pandemic during economic crisis you would like some formal way to make sure the arts don't get shortchanged and don't fall through the cracks completely on the other hand that's not how funding in america works so if we did have an art sorry they won't have a lot of money to fund anything so it doesn't it doesn't quite make sense. I mean the most powerful organization at the federal level is probably the national endowment for arts and the national endowment for the humanities and those are organizations that trump kept on threatening to dismantle to de-fund every year he would say we're gonna de-fund the nea Like we were back in the nineteen eighties. But instead bipartisan support in congress kept the any funding alive and so they just got one hundred sixty seven million dollar budget and that's all money that gets redistributed right to smaller arts organizations right so i mean i suppose also if you were to create a ministry coacher to have a cabinet level position. That's that's a costly endeavor. You'd have to create you have to find a building for one sense is that it will also be very expensive to create that right. Yeah very expensive. And what's the goal. What's more exciting to me as to hear a lot of talk these days about Creating possible wpa style program putting artists to work you know Famously it was. It was fdr who did it as part of his new deal in the nineteen thirties It was one of the later parts of the new deal that he put the artists to work. We all know the stories about jackson. Pollock painting murals. Post office murals and school murals. Jim murals lots of murals other other works projects as well. But i'm seeing a lot of talk about that and that is something that makes sense to me that you know. Should we be asking right now. What the biden harris administration can do for the arts or should we be asking how can arts be used to advance the agendas and priorities that. He's already stated our our top his list. We saw an inauguration what he named as top of his list. It's the public health crisis. Four hundred thousand americans dead from covid. The economic fallout from that the environmental catastrophe of our own making and also the racial justice crisis in america. The convulsions we've been going through and that's to me. I don't know if anyone else has talked about this. But i feel like that may have the most potential are. Is there a way for artists to get involved to help on issues of racial justice. These are the issues that artists care about so much. Can they be hired in some ways you know when we think about racial justice initiatives. It might be a structural changes in their curse. Rations stop it. Might be structural changes in the police departments. But is there a way for artists to get involved in those kinds of big projects. That would be absolutely fascinating. I think and of course you in doing that. You are able to give artists work when we are facing this terrible crisis among artists at the moment where we hear that self-employed workers in the states are suffering more than they are in other parts of the world for instance. They don't seem to be as many safety nets for self employed people of course. The overwhelming majority of evolved are employed. You are absolutely right. It is the lack of safety nets. So artists here are struggling. We have all different kinds of figures but there are some reports that in certain fields performing arts for example that over fifty percent unemployment

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The white supremacist art in the US Capitol

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:49 min | Last week

The white supremacist art in the US Capitol

"Now on the sixth of january we saw terrifying scenes in washington dc as right wing rioters and conspiracy theorists incited by the president. Donald trump and other republican politicians invaded the capitol building one of the emblematic images of that day. Taken by mike tyler for reuters featured one of the reuters walking across the second floor of the capitol holding a confederate flag with chilling irony behind him on. The wall is a portrait of charles. Sumner a nineteenth century massachusetts senator. Who was an abolitionist. But it didn't need the riotous to bring white. Supremacist imagery into the capital. Eight statues of confederate leaders. Still stand in the building. So we're going to begin this episode with a special version of our regular feature work of the week and focus on confederate statues and the capital. Sarah beetham is the chair of liberal arts and assistant professor of history at the pennsylvania academy of the fine arts. she's chosen to focus on a sculpture. that was in the capital until recently but is no longer there. It would valentine's nine hundred ninety nine statue of the confederate general robert e lee which was removed from the capitol's national statuary hall on the twenty first of december twenty twenty. So just over two weeks before the riot sarah the images from the capital last week of confederate imagery inside the capitol were so deeply disturbing but that building actually has white. Supremacist imagery in it already. Doesn't it yes absolutely does You know as i was watching the all of those images going by on my on my phone on my on my computer screen You know i. I was just so upset as an american To be watching and worrying about You know our members of congress their staff in that building Seeing that symbolic space be breach on. I was thinking so much about the officers who put themselves on the line to try to take care of. And and Protect our members of congress. My heart really goes out to all officers who were injured in the two who lost their lives on. But of course i was also thinking about The capital and the spaces as an art historian as a scholar of merck and art on and one of the things that i kept coming back to you over and over again was thinking about the significance of all of the art in that collection You have In the capital you have in the rotunda. You have those enormous paintings of All of these scenes from from american history You have the Rotunda with the Freeze going around. It's that is showing all these different scenes of american history as well But then one of the major parts. That i've been thinking about for a long time as the national statuary hall collection on which is a collection of one hundred statues Two of which come from each state on that Began in eighteen. Sixty four And each state has had the ability over time to donate their own two statues to it. n's There are a couple of different criteria for getting into the statuary hall on the statues has to be either marble or bronze. So kind of the highest level of of preserved stature on the subject must be deceased. Must have been associated with that state on and must be historically noteworthy in some way on and subjects are decided on by the states and then donated to the capitol collection with very little oversight by by the capitol collection on end. What i think that maybe maybe more people know now. But i didn't know until a few years ago. Was that a number of the statues. In the capital. Statuary hall collection are actually confederates Either confederate generals The confederate president. Jefferson davis was there on the confederate vice president alexander stevens on with the one that as i was watching those images over and over and over again the kept coming into my head was the statue of robert e lee Which was donated by the state of virginia in nineteen o nine It was by edward. Valentine who was a well-known converts with a sculptor on and it actually wasn't there to be present for the riots because just been removed in december on december. Twenty first of twenty twenty on. And so you know. A lot of people talk about those images of people going by with confederate flags. But i kept thinking you know. This kind of imagery has been there. has been supporting The the capitol for very long time. We talk a bit about valentine before we go onto the specific scope to that. We're talking about because it seems to me to be really amazing. There is this sculptor who long after the deaths of these people was effectively making statues repeatedly of confederate generals. Can you explain that histories y y walls. Valentine's his creating the statues. Sure so. Valentine was a southerner on his entire family was established in richmond. Virginia on there's a museum there today. The valentine museum that includes collections related. To the whole family he came for a very wealthy family. He wasn't actually a confederate soldier because he was studying overseas to become an artist while the war was over but when he came back He saw real opportunity to get involved in confederate commemoration on and he actually produced a number of major statues That's have been in news in the past couple of months One of them is the g. Sant- of robert e lee Lying dead in state on that is at washington and lee university on in the chapel. That's kind of above where his to miss on. It's very striking sculpture for anybody. Who has even before. I recommend looking

Mike Tyler Sarah Beetham Reuters Capitol's National Statuary Ha Robert E Lee Pennsylvania Academy Of The Fi National Statuary Hall Donald Trump Sumner Congress Valentine Statuary Hall DC Massachusetts Alexander Stevens Charles Washington Merck Sarah
WandaVision: Season 1 Episode 3 Recap | Everything is Super

Post Show Recaps

04:22 min | 12 hrs ago

WandaVision: Season 1 Episode 3 Recap | Everything is Super

"Go any further. This is wanda vision. That's right the world outside. Your window may not be able hear butchery cubs. Everything is wonderful to another episode of everything is super recapping. Wanda vision episode three. I'm josh witter joined here by The stork of podcasting. Kevin mateo dork. Yeah you're you're the stork. I do have a very long neck and a very long sharp beak and i do tend to just get babies and give them to other people. I was going to say you were you bring the miracle of life teen every time is is what you do kevin and it's just an absolute delight Just as it's an absolute delight to have our next guest here who may or may not be an agent of sword. We just don't know yet. We can only suspect we can only guess. Latonya starks is in the house. I'm here if i was an asian of sword. What i tell you. I don't know what. I just let it reveal itself through my choice of accessories. Yeah it's hard to say. I'm not very observant when it comes to this stuff so you could be wearing a tee shirt. Latonya that is. I'm an agent of sort and bill. So where do you work what he do. I wouldn't really know that's such a good question point to is just like why. Why are you wearing that like going undercover and just being like this is the organization. I work by the way. I had this little necklace. Or you know. Like a t shirt like. Why are you wearing that here. What are you what are you doing. Yeah i hopefully got converted from some other like Thing that monica rambo honor and then all of a sudden it was just a really beautiful kitschy necklace. Yeah i think yeah. I think it's another testament to like. Probably there are aspects of this world. Wanda is whether it is like warning for other people or just warping for herself and then like something that she sees. That's triggering responsive. Like a an agent of sword. I think like like parts of earthquake resistant to the reality. That at least is supposed to exist. That seems to be breaking through. But i mean like burying the lead kind of yes. We're getting you know much more. Monica rambo in this episode and much clearer sense that like there is some action with sword potentially but also wanda was not only pregnant as of the end of the first two episodes but now she has given birth. It happened very quickly. Fastest pregnancy of all time from wednesday to friday. And here we are. We got wins. Tommy and billy. Which i know are very buzzy. Names that kevin will be like. Oh let me tell you about tommy and billy as comic book nerd. I'm gonna tell you all about that. So we got twins we and and so we've got winds in the mix. We've got a little bit more of a sense. That a agnes at least feels like she's got her fingers on the pulse of the situation to some extent but doesn't want to review it to the rest of us. We've got a chainsaw. Buried in the side of offense from our neighbor vision seems to suspect that some stuff is going on but then he doesn't seem to suspect anything because wanda's warping reality even as it impacts vision very eventful episode here in week three of wand vision. We've got feedback to sort through and then tons of stuff to discuss so we'll start with the discussion portion before we go into the feedback. What tanya overall thoughts on week. Three of the wanda visual. This is my favorite episode. So far so. I'm hoping that they only get at her from here. This one was just creepy in a lot of really cool. Way is that. I enjoy being creeped out. Wanda's terrifying in case you hadn't noticed she's powerful and terrifying. And i believe that she is completely in control of whatever it is. That's going on in west view. Which is the place a apparently have taken over for this pocket reality that she's created There are just some really

Josh Witter Kevin Mateo Wanda Latonya Starks Latonya Monica Rambo Kevin Cubs Billy Earthquake Tommy Tanya
Final Fantasy VII, Recap Part 3 | From Gold Saucer Through Cosmo Canyon

Post Show Recaps

04:21 min | 1 d ago

Final Fantasy VII, Recap Part 3 | From Gold Saucer Through Cosmo Canyon

"Oh my god. We're here it's the golden saucer where everyone's a winner unless you don't have the gold pieces to back it up. It's brooklyn's ed's favorite place to be at thirteen. We're backfired on fantasy golden sauce time. Ding ding ding ding. Everyone's a winner except winter. Remember last week. When i said that they say on the air or did i say offline. Or it's like oh well next week's podcast is going to have a little something to do with the warriors. Cassia yeah i think you said that At the end. Before we stuff. According thank you i felt like i gotta warns that. We're getting into casino territory here on part three of the final fantasy seven podcast. We are making our way through the original final fantasy seven first time my four hundred and fifty five thousand. I happen replaying it. It's been very fun. You got through much faster than any of us. Anticipated said the portion. That i told you to play before. This week's podcast was like all the barrett stuff goes through some things in this episode that we're going to talk through and i figured like that's enough a lot of stuff that's going on with barrett. That should keep said busy for a week and then and then went out. Yeah your internet. Went out. Gave the assignment on a saturday or a friday. I think and then like on sunday night. Alright oh god rockdale. The funny thing happens in the twenty first century when you have no internet because now you can't watch tv in can't really hang out with your friends. And i had done much reading as by brain was capable of doing so unfortunately the playstation two doesn't connect the. Yeah and in one city when you come out looking like a genius ed. This is smart staff. Man you gotta go old old school. Stay off the grid. True avalanche styles as she runs the internet very on brand for me. So you told me that art. Why guests this episode will then also encompass what i told you to do for the fourth episode so we we have adjusted the plan. And if you're playing alongside the podcast for the first time or for a repeat time. We are now going from costa del sole all the way through cosmo canyon that is what's gonna be covered today on the podcast so a bit of barrett some barrett tori as we said that's a pun. I came up with that. i couldn't That's the one. And then some some red thirteen from zad thirteen is where we will go for the second portion of the podcast this week and then next week. I'm gonna give you some sizable homework. Because i figure you can do it now. Said yeah. we'll we'll see. We'll see i don't know you know you've you've demonstrated that you can. You can play a lot of f seven in just a few short days so this may have been the wrong flex. I'm getting better at navigating and i think Speeding up yeah. So i actually was going to ask. This is a good segue is just like sort of like getting into the rhythm of the gameplay like last week we were in over world like over like world map mode for the first time. How are you doing this week. You get a car. You got to go through the mountains a couple of times. Are you feeling like you're getting more. The hang of like sort of like the rhythm of the world in terms of gameplay yeah. I think i'm starting to understand better where being sent when i'm moving from one place to another and what general direction. I should be going to look for that place Like i mentioned last week. When i got to the choke. Abo- farming their lack. You'll need one of these to cross the marshes sure. What marches But now they mentioned the mountain. Pass that you have to go through.

Ding Ding Ding Ding Barrett Costa Del Cosmo Canyon Barrett Tori Brooklyn Rockdale Warriors ED
How Tragedy & Resilience Made Joe Biden

Fresh Air

07:37 min | 3 d ago

How Tragedy & Resilience Made Joe Biden

"From whyy in philadelphia. This is fresh air. I'm david being cooley. In for terry. Gross joe biden is the oldest person ever elected president when he was first elected to the senate in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy two. He was so young. Lady wasn't eligible to serve in the senate until later that november when he turned thirty today. We talk about biden's life and long political career. With evan osnos the staff writer for the new yorker and author of a new book about biden. Also we remember musician. Howard johnson who made a place for tuba in contemporary jazz working with charles. Mingas mccoy tyner gil evans and others. He expanded into rock and roll playing with taj mahal and the band later. He helped assemble in played in the original saturday night. Live housemate and justin. Chang reviews the new netflix film. The white type on the week. The joe biden was inaugurated as our new president of the united states. Our first guest. Today is evan osnos. His recent bestselling biography of biden written and published before the twenty. Twenty presidential election is called joe biden. The life the run and what matters now osnos is a staff writer at the new yorker who covers politics and foreign affairs he was the new yorkers china correspondent from two thousand eight to two thousand thirteen his book age of ambition chasing fortune. Truth and faith in the new. China won a national book award. Terry gross spoke with evan osnos last october. Shortly before the twenty twenty election. Evan osnos welcome. Back to fresh air biden a elected in october seventy-two to the senate and in december just a few weeks before he was supposed to be sworn in his wife was driving her station wagon with their two sons and bb daughter in the car when they were hit by a tractor trailer and as most people know his wife and baby daughter were killed. His two sons were badly injured. It's a famous life-changing story in joe biden's biography. What did you learn that you didn't already know. And you think the public might not know about the impact of that tragedy on his life his political career. Well wh when it happened The reality is that joe biden did not expect to take his seat in the senate. He thought that period of his life was over. He didn't see practically. You're spiritually how he could go on. I mean the reality was he considered suicide and some older members of the senate said to him. You need to do this. Not only because it's the right thing to do for your voters but it's also the right thing to do for you personally because if you don't do something you will you will cave in and his sister valerie told me that one of the ways that they were able to get him off the floor in effect was by telling him you have two boys at home now who have no mother and if you collapse then they have. Nobody and biden struggled in that period. With what it meant to become this kind of public symbol of grieving. And what surprised me. Was he really bridled against it. He didn't like that. That was the public image. That people were imagining for him that they were thrusting upon him through grieving widower and father and it was only later in his life really. It was after the death of his son. Bo in twenty fifteen when biden kind of came to accept more fully that that's something that people wanted from him as a political person they wanted actually somebody in politics to talk to them about something like suffering and like vulnerability and and he. He kind of embraced it but he didn't come to. It quickly took a long time for him to acknowledge that what you stand for in his early years as a senator. Interestingly in his very early years as a senator he was kind of a moving target politically. I mean to be blunt about it. He was sort of. He was more concerned about about being reelected than he was about. Specific policy items. And there's a the most acute example of that is that he had run for office as a progressive candidate on the side of civil rights and he had played a a bit part in some desegregation efforts in wilmington delaware and he got to the senate and he was occupying district. He was representing a district. That was that had a large white suburban contingent who were very wary of court ordered busing and and they and they told him so and he was a famous meeting that he went to in which a parents in the suburbs most of them white of course attacked him for being For being in favor of integration and civil rights efforts and he turned on that issue and became the senate's most forceful democrat in against a court ordered busing and for a long time. I think that made other members of the senate say well. What is this guy. Believe in is he a best in. What is he really care about. And i think it's useful these days. I if you speak to people who have really studied wilmington delaware politics. Which after all is the district that he represented they will say you have to remember. The delaware was very much suspended between north and south. It was a in some ways it had elements of jim. Crow were still segregationist. Policies in places African diplomats for instance who drove between washington and new york when they pass through delaware would find themselves unable to get served at rest stops and yet at the same time it was closer to new york city than to raleigh north carolina. So it had this very strange composite identity and ask joe biden. This first term senator was trying to represent and was trying to figure out a way how to inhabit that role and so he sort of became a little bit of something for everyone. You know in talking about his early years. You're right that the americans for democratic action which was a liberal progressive group gave biden a high rating and he was very concerned about that. He thought that be a political negative for him. So what did he do in response to that. Did he do anything. Yeah he had a funny reaction to that rating. It was after all supposed to be a great compliment to him. He had run against the war in vietnam. He'd been active on civil rights. And so we'd received this high mark from From a progressive organization and then he said this is a problem for me. It makes it hard for me to operate politically. It's hard for me to get elected. He said in interviews at the time and so that's one of the reasons why you began to see him. Try to announce his conservative credentials. He started telling people look one of the more socially conservative people. I know my wife always used to tell me. So and so he he was trying to on legislative matters be progressive in some respects but at the same time now lose the constituency that he needed which was in many ways still a conservative democratic working

Evan Osnos Joe Biden Biden Senate Mingas Mccoy Osnos Gil Evans Cooley Howard Johnson Terry Gross Delaware National Book Award Taj Mahal Chang Netflix Terry Philadelphia Justin Charles Wilmington
Star Wars: The Phantom Menace Analysis | A Long Time to Go

Post Show Recaps

07:24 min | 3 d ago

Star Wars: The Phantom Menace Analysis | A Long Time to Go

"Right. We got a long time to go here in this galaxy. Far far away it star wars podcasting and post show. Recaps your second round of phantom menace. Because that's exactly what you want more than two men is. This doesn't even the end of it. So much phantom menace is a phantom menu that we are serving up here course number two. I'm joined here by to folks who are not thrilled with that phantom menu line that i just tested out it came up. I served it up. Kevin deo deeply disappointed. I'm popping a lifesaver viewers care. See it right now. But if i was there by be careful semantics or a reversal is having a lightsaber. Sorry we re not doing phrasing anymore. We're not. I just wish be telling me. Don't feel about that tanya starks here as well we'll tiny you wanna say something to offset kevin just did and what i did. I i have to have some kind of cool breeze load down. Yeah i'll just say the truth. Which company is there's one major takeaway from the phantom menace pimp unease the third certainty of life taxes. Pin pin penny is. Well it's interesting. It's interesting that you bring up death and taxes because these are all mark qualities higher. The phantom menace episode one. So of course we've already done our recap if you have not listened to that yet. He should it's myself and rob sister nino going through the entire movie of the phantom menace about two and a half hours long a long way to go through that first longtime to go recap and here. We're doing what i told. Kevin latonya in advance the other week when we were recording or before we started recording. Juan division Because we're recapping wanda vision. If you didn't know that you'd now do we record wanda vision. Podcasts new episode. Coming out here real soon. We'll be back on mondays every monday. With some wanda vision coverage check that on the everything's super podcast. Feed here on post show recap so i was telling kevin china's like all right. Here's what i wanna do dual of debates dual of debates as you know man. I can't resist. It's there and see it. It's like the big glowing blue dirk letters that pops onto the screen for me dual debates and. I'm like that's what we'll do for the podcast and so what we're going to do here today. Is i've already talked a lot about my takes on. The phantom menace kevin latonya stalwart co hosts of the mandalorian podcast. You're going to be here throughout the longtime to go journey given your takes on the projects that were stopping and talking about along the way and perhaps we shall get into some dual of debates over the course of the podcast. As you'll present your takes from the movie. We'll talk them through. It may happen tiny that the negotiations will be short. Maybe we'll all just agree on everything that we have to say here. I can't imagine a time when we have not all just agreed on everything. Yeah one time. It's never had. I assume is going to happen. Is if we say something that josh's disagreed with he will just funnel in some very visible gas into the room. That will all be able to see an escape rather quickly rather than wait to see if it takes effect reasonable amount of time. He'll just like just open the doors. I'm dead five. Not unless it's tenant style in which case there yet watch tenant for the first time. How was that for the first time. I am one of five people in the united states of america. That loves that movie. Aren't that say who has seen that movie. That's also like yes. I wanna five people that enjoyed that movie the other not even people in the past and i think the people who work for the ranger. I feel like i watch it. I think i'm gonna and probably being on your side of the timing because like interstellar. I actually really like a lot of people didn't like that one. Yeah last night. Not last night i think. A few nights ago we re watched to prestige frapp. That might be my. I think that might be hard. So i take is that the prestige is the best. Christopher nolan movie star sake second and we're getting somewhere we're doing great by talking about anything that's game in washington and so so i guess like before so i know so so you've both prepared like three takes about the menace to lead us through the conversation and i guess before we do that i would like to just like get like sort of like the over arching take not necessarily even of the movie itself but if that's where you want to go with it that's great but i would be more inclined to like know about like your experience with the movie for example latonya i'll i'll start with you is that i knew you just watched the band of minutes for the first time for this. They did have that guy and did i enjoy it. Actually i enjoy quite a bit of it. I think there are a lot of in this movie that been emails. Yeah there were things that i enjoy it. I actually enjoyed the racing. Which i know not a lot of people do because you know the whole point of it is that. If you're a spectator can't see most of it. But i enjoy the pirates seen. I thought that was really who i love. Oj louis and his. I thought it was really cute and endearing. I am all here for like all in for either neither version. The version was a little wooden. And i definitely tell when the job but the fact that they digitally lowered now important voice so that she would sound more like and they really are dead ringers from one another. And then s seen at the near the end. Or the big climactic battle where natalie portman comes forward and reveals herself to be the actual wayne amidala and then you know not only humbles herself to the people of new right to get their assistance but also very much fighting it. It was just really cool to see reds of princess later in the natalie before even if she was more open trade concentrating on graduate. Yeah

Wanda Kevin Deo Tanya Starks Rob Sister Nino Kevin Latonya Juan Division Kevin China Dirk Kevin Latonya Josh United States Of America Christopher Nolan Oj Louis Washington Wayne Amidala Natalie Portman Natalie
Lauren Oyler

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

00:49 sec | 3 d ago

Lauren Oyler

"The online lies that have concerned us. Most in recent years have been those politicians and their operatives. This is understandable the stakes of the falsehoods high. Their impact is broadly. Felt mendacity is often glaring but be on the political stage. The internet is implicated in every layer of our private lives and deceit. All the way down this territory explored in fake accounts debut novel by the american writer lauren. Oil the story begins with its unnamed narrator. Finding out her boyfriend is a popular. Internet conspiracy theorist follow her attempts in the wake of this discovery to navigate the fruit obstacle. Course where an offline life meet it sets in new york berlin and against the political backdrop of the trump presidency. Laura noah really sat down with monaco's

Lauren Berlin Laura Noah New York Monaco
Down the Hatch | Missing Pieces, Part 2

Post Show Recaps

00:53 sec | 3 d ago

Down the Hatch | Missing Pieces, Part 2

"Can't believe i'm actually going to have my baby in a hostile. We get rescued. And i go back in touch. Rubik rescuing carry search primary. And what is whatever they came forward is not every single. Living person on this island will be killed. I was thinking. I was going to get a good night's sleep there wondering why we're here. I'll tell you why would you really don't spend a ten minute by minute a much time. If you wanna live you need to come with me. What are you

Busting Myths About Exercise

Fresh Air

08:06 min | 4 d ago

Busting Myths About Exercise

"Walking running carrying and sitting and how their health and longevity compares without of american lieberman has written a new book called exercise later jazz. Pretty kevin whitehead reviews the new album by soprano saxophonist. Jane ira bloom and basis. Marc elias support for this. Podcast comes from the neubauer. Family foundation supporting. Whyy's fresh air. And its commitment to sharing ideas and encouraging meaningful conversation. The restrictions caused by the pandemic have changed the amount of time. Any of us spend moving walking standing if you're used to going to work but have spent the better part of the year at home and you can't go to the gym because it's closed or you just don't feel safe doing it. You don't even have time to take a walk because you're working and have children at home all day because their schools are closed. Well how's that affecting your body and your general health and mental outlook. My guest daniel lieberman writes about the importance of exercise and the myth surrounding it in his new book exercised. Why something we never evolved to do is healthy and rewarding. Some of the questions. He addresses include is sitting. The new. smoking is bad to slouch. Do you really need eight. Hours of sleep is walking. Effective for losing weight. Does running ruin your knees. He writes from his perspective as a paleo anthropologist. He is a professor in the department of human evolutionary biology at harvard in his lab at harvard he and his students conduct experiments to study the anatomy bio mechanics and physiology that underlie various exercises and activities. His research has led to remote villages in africa and america. That have not been industrialized. He studied how much time indigenous people there sit. Sleep walk forage dance and run. He's compared their activities. Their bodies their health and longevity to that of americans daniel lieberman welcome back to fresh air. Thank you for joining us. So during cove it. I feel like everybody's lives has changed in one way or another. So i'm going to mention a couple of things about my life. I typically for many years have worked at the radio station during covert. I've been working from home. Simple things that are causing me to take fewer steps in my working life. The bathroom was further away in the office than it is in my small home. I walk a few blocks to get lunch and then walk a few blocks back to get it home that now. I'm just making something really quickly for myself. However i'm still taking walks. And i'm spending more time making meals. 'cause i can't eat out and we're spending more time therefore washing dishes since i eat three meals at home no instead of none or two. Since i'm not in the officer eating out so my first question is can. I count standing and cooking and washing dishes and cleaning as exercise. That's a great question. The first of all. I should mention that my step count has gone down by about fifty percent for all the same reasons. Well i think it's important to make a distinction between physical activity which was just moving right including making breakfast and lunch and going to the bathroom and all those sorts of things and exercise which is physical activity that sort of discretionary involuntary for the sake of health and fitness and and so What the pandemic has done for a lot of almost all of us to decrease physical activity right. I'm not going to work either around working from home. I'm you know not making as many trips to you know to do errands all those kinds of things really cutting down on how much i'm i'm sort of walking about but i'm trying to compensate with exercise but that's also been challenging and so the is that My my overall physical activity levels have definitely decreased regardless of my attempts to compensate with exercise. So not all. Physical activity is exercise exercises especially physical activity. Okay so you're saying that. I can't count washing dishes and washing the floors and Standing up preparing food instead of sitting eating at a restaurant that i can't count that as exercise. But i can count that as some form of physical activity room for those of us in that position where we're doing more housework and we're doing more cooking and washing dishes that's still physically better than just sitting. And absolutely yeah. No it's what matters is physical activity. It's just that we've we've created a world in which we don't have to do much work anymore right. We don't have to be physically active and so today do something very strange. which is they. They go on a treadmill or they go for a five mile run in the morning for the sake of just the five mile run or they or they lift weights who so purposes to be lifted. That that's that's exercise and and that's a very modern behavior. People never did that before because until recently people had to be much more physically active every day in order to get food or or sometimes being somebody else's food there's a great story you tell in your book you just mentioned treadmills In the story has to do with a treadmill like. I said you go done a lot of studying. In remote villages where pupils are still basically foraging and hunting for food. And you're comparing their physical activity with ours and their bodies with ours so in a remote village in kenya you manage to transport their a treadmill. What was your point in bringing a treadmill to this. Well so yeah we've been. We've been working in a community up in the in the up at the top of the western rift valley in kenya for almost twelve years now and the community has no paved roads. There's no electricity. There's no running water and people do everything by hand everything and One of the things that people do is they carry everything they carry a especially women. Women carry a lot of firewood. Women carry huge jerry cans of water often long distances. Uphills and We're interested in how people carry. Because there's we have some evidence that people can carry. Women can carry huge weights like twenty percent of their body mass on their heads with no essentially no extra cost and we were curious how they did that so we we have some fancy machines that measure oxygen so we can measure how much energy they're spending and we thought the best way to this would be on a treadmill so we we bought a treadmill and slept it these horrible roads to get it to this area and we found the closest place where we could plug it in and then we drove are. Are we got our you know the jeep. We got our participants to the treadmill and there was a total disaster. Because if you've never been on a if and if you're forty fifty prison and you've never been on a treadmill your entire life. It's a very strange and awkward experience and and the women they got a kick out of it. They sort of enjoyed the treadmill but they weren't walking normally the way they normally walk. Because it's such a strange bizarre flemington contraption and so we actually had to after all that time and energy and effort to get the treadmill up there we had to abandon using the treadmill instead. Did the experiment outside over overground. Where's your conclusion that we walked differently on a treadmill than we do for walking on a floor or the st. Well yes i mean. Everybody does walk slightly differently on a treadmill and also we run slightly differently but but but more importantly is just that we wanted to make sure people were walking the same way. They normally walk when they're carrying things. And you change how you walk and and if you're not used to it treadmill No it's you walk awkwardly. It's kind of a bizarre experience to kind of walk and and not get anywhere. I've always wondered like. Is there more tension in your body when walking on a treadmill because because it's slightly unnatural an off because your brain always knows that you have to walk in place at the speed of the treadmill and

Daniel Lieberman Kevin Whitehead Soprano Saxophonist Jane Ira Marc Elias Department Of Human Evolutiona Harvard Neubauer Whyy Lieberman Western Rift Valley Kenya Africa America Jerry
Malike Sidibe: Protest Photography and Zoom Portraiture

B&H Photography Podcast

03:28 min | 4 d ago

Malike Sidibe: Protest Photography and Zoom Portraiture

"Way. It's a real treat to have you here. Welcome to the show. I allan thank you so much for having me so anyway. Let me start off here. you've been primarily doing fashion and portrait work as photo journalism. Some of you portrait. Where can pass for that. Become some twenty twenty suddenly. You're out there. Cameron hand in the thick of the most passionate of protest marches. This country has seen in over fifty years. And how did you approach this new thing. How did you get your head wrapped around it It's pretty interesting. 'cause where i grew up When i was born. I was wondering ivory coast There was like a civil war happening in the country and We had to migrate foot of for few days and gets nearby cd and then get on the bus and go from ivory coast guinea on so pretty much like off Seen this before When i was younger and moving here and seeing this happening it was just auto know like ages. it made me realize a lot about the world and Just kinda like take everything in and I think were like bob brand just might just was just like okay cool. What are you gonna get up and do about it. You know And that's when. I decided i want to be out there undocumented. Because photography is what i'm good at doing and i'm gonna use it to Get point across you right in the middle of things. I mean you not just an observer a lot of the photographs. I was looking at your right in the middle of everything that's going on. You might not have had a choice but you also had your mind about you. Because you're you're. I remain very very short through all of that and a lot of amazing moments. Were really really quickly. We'll be talking about some of those photographs from sure during the course of the show John current esteem there. That's kind of where. I want to jump into because you know as we were saying you of your your first. We work before. This year is fashion and his portrait. But you went to. The eddie adams workshop was renowned for photojournalism and and some of the work. You produce there You know it's it's report but it's also portraiture do separate these types of photography in your brain. I mean or you just kind of bringing your eye to it. Is you decide to photo I think i just bring my eyes to whatever it is that i decided to photograph is one of those things just like. I just loved the idea of photography hasn't whole it doesn't matter if it's being fashion or protests are wedding of event as long as a habit assigned to me. I think that's what. I focused mostly on charter. Find the best way to that Yeah and the stuff you were doing in brooklyn were were those assignments at first or did you just get out there. Right yet wade. The journalism actually came about for me. besides Getting us at eddie atom of i went there even though when i was there. They assignment that gave me. It was documentary but to me outlook that as a fashion. You know like it was cool. Like they're pretty much was like go out there photograph. What you see in the fashion says of the people like Took a little bit of tests from the journalism Photographers have romney and then just went out and practiced that so when the Protests happened on the way.

Bob Brand Allan Ivory Coast Cameron Guinea Eddie Adams John Brooklyn Wade Eddie Romney
AANG IN THERE: Book 2 Episode 2 The Cave of Two Lovers

Post Show Recaps

04:42 min | 5 d ago

AANG IN THERE: Book 2 Episode 2 The Cave of Two Lovers

"Where nothing seems to be going right in there. Because we are back with your favorite avatar. The last air bender rewatch podcast. I'm one of your host zack. Muhammad and as always. I'm joined my mind. Good friend than saddened saints. Fan jacob redmond jacob. How you doing. I'm doing okay. Zach took a tough loss but okay. I'm someone who usually suffers from destination fever. So i think there's episodes helpful you know. It helps me a little more perspective on my life yet. I didn't have the best week ever though. Admittedly my favorite sports team did not lose a playoff games. I don't know of my weeks better worse than yours. Probably a little bit better but yeah this episode. It was good. It was night. This is a nice chill of avatar. Nothing too crazy happens but it was still a solid code overall on my you jacob. Do you have any initial about this episode. Yeah yeah so. This is a throwaway episode. Like you know nothing that happens here is like gonna change the course of avatar. That doesn't mean we can't be having fun. I mean this episode has some of the more memorable characters that come in from one episode. We this band of hippies which like really just have all kinds of misadventures in songs and silly stuff like that. And i think that this is fun you know in a week. That may feel stressful or anything. We have a. We have an episode of avatar. You get to sit back. And i think that's nice. No you're right and that is a pretty app description honestly. This is a very fun. Little episode almost economy does have some parallels to the great divide for me. I don't know if you felt that in a way because they're traveling through this past path trying to get to this destination and they have these whacky side characters Said of the two tribes. We have this like band of hippies with their guitars and for salk episode. Getting you have. We'll get to good everyone's on just ham stranded with the hippies. And in that moment i really was borough soccer. Yeah he really low rolled on that one you know he could have gotten like a good group of people instead he gets the just the hippies isn that's gotta be rough for him but here i think like yeah this is. It's a good episode. It's better than the great divide for sure in that like this episode is lots of fun. Do other cool stuff with the animation which we saw in the great divide episode. Yeah i think coming away from this episode. i'm just like yeah. That was a good time. it also has one of the most notable pop culture moments from avatar like. I know the like everything changed from the fire nation attacked as a second life but i also think the secret tunnel song is something that even people who don't know the avatar like universe may also be aware of inter interesting. I don't know too much. So is the secret tunnel song like this popular idea. I didn't know that. Actually i've seen this on tiktok all the time and it's unlike some tiktok that are not even like avatar base deserves linter random other things. I think this pops up. It'll pop up. You know every now and again. I there's tiktok so they can link you to zach. No it's fine. This is funny because it's the first mention of avatar we've had in a while but the fact that it's in tiktok unrrelated habits are no that definitely shows its popularity and yeah i mean. Is there anything you wanted to touch on before. We jump straight into this episode. I mean i was recently on robin. Akiva nita podcast. This week jot to anybody listening. That was a fun time with among us talking about kazam and then we among us mail bag. That was a great time. If anybody has enlisted to that. I'd highly recommend checking that out. Yeah it was a podcast even longer than how we go but it was really great. I love hearing you on robin and cunene. Podcast with my all time favorite podcasts. Or kiva yeah. It was great to see you there because they were actually asking about your stand them. And i thought i back you up. I thought i gave you some support. There there were like oh. This is drip. Stuckey was big as a. Yeah i think so. This is something. I'm happy to get into this at any point. Anyone on me for the crown like let's go. My thought. is that like. I'm not the most vocal person. But i do listen to pretty much everything. He makes As soon as i possibly can. So i think the episode jobs saturday that means you know. That's on my sunday morning to do list as soon i get to it so i'm gonna keep a fan through and through and you know what i'll use my in their platform to on anyone who's willing to fight me for that crowns. There we go and yeah. That was a fun time. And you're right. It was a little too long for my taste about full disclosure. By the

Fan Jacob Redmond Jacob Zach Muhammad Saints Fever Jacob Akiva Nita Soccer Robin Stuckey
The Story Of The Blackwell Sisters, Pioneers Of Women In Medicine

Fresh Air

07:25 min | 6 d ago

The Story Of The Blackwell Sisters, Pioneers Of Women In Medicine

"From whyy in philadelphia. This is fresh air. I'm dave davies in for terry gross. Today the story of a little known but remarkable feminist trailblazer in the eighteen forties. Elizabeth blackwell was the first woman admitted to an american medical school in part because the male students thought it would be an entertaining joke to have her around. Blackwell proved a formidable student and practitioner and became a reluctant celebrity but she was a complicated heroin. She never liked the idea of granting women rights regarding the women of her day as petty. Trifling gossips writer. Janice tells the story of elizabeth blackwell and her sister emily who followed her into the profession in the new book. The doctors blackwell also. Ken tucker reviews folk musician. Peter stamkos new collection of songs one from each year of the twentieth century today. More than half. The students in american medical schools are women but when elizabeth blackwell decided to pursue a medical degree in the eighteen forties. The idea was about as unthinkable in the all male profession as a man getting pregnant but blackwell persisted and got her degree and a few years later her younger sister. Emily joined her as a fellow physician. Their story is told in a new book. By our guest writer. Janice nomura is a tale with plenty of twists. Elizabeth blackwell is fairly regarded as a feminist trailblazer. But she took a dim view of the women's suffrage movement emerging around her after many rejections blackwell's admission to medical school was approved by an all male student body essentially as a practical joke while blackwell was awkward socially her achievement made her a reluctant international celebrity and she had encounters with florence nightingale abraham lincoln and the story of the nine blackwell siblings is fitting material for a nineteenth century period drama janice numerous essays and book reviews have appeared in the new york times the washington post salon and other publications her first book daughters of the samurai was a new york times notable book in two thousand fifteen. Her new book is the doctors. Blackwell how to pioneering sisters brought medicine to women and women to medicine janice nomura joins me from her home in new york janice nomura. Welcome to fresh air. Thanks dave it's an honor to be here before we talk about the blackwell's themselves and elizabeth blackwell. Let's just talk about medicine in the eighteen forties. What was the state of the profession. Then how we're doctors regarded. How effective were they well. It was really a turning point until right about that moment. Medicine looked a lot like the way medicine had looked all the way back to antiquity. People thought about it in terms of the humor's the four humors that governed the body. There was no really good way to look inside the body. All you could do was take a temperature. Feel a pulse. See what came out of very his orifices and the professions such as it was at that moment was not particularly prestigious At least in america and doctors tended to have sort of an arsenal of could do Leeches blood leading. Mercury laudanum difference Rather intense and harsh medications that they tried one time after another until you either got better or died Was was it was a brutal and and sort of blunt art at that point But there were just glimmerings. The new ideas that would come to revolutionize the profession things like Into sepsis things. Like germ theory things like the importance of hygiene in combating epidemic disease. So it's an interesting choice and a peculiar choice. Really that the blackwell's made to pursue this path. Which i guess we'll get into given that it wasn't a particularly exalted path. In fact medicine at that moment was less profession. More of a trade right right so we had doctors where people who didn't even wash their hands between patients gave things like mercury which was frankly poisonous. What was medical education like basic especially again in this country. There were exalted centres of medicine. In europe and edinburgh in vienna and paris but in medical schools were just emerging In the last half century more were popping up all the time and they tend to be loose confederations of doctors. Who came together to teach. Their specialties The basic approach was a student would study for one sixteen week term in the winter. Go away practically instruction and then come back. The following year for the identical sixteen week term that term would consist mostly of lectures listening writing taking notes. If you went to a particular well equipped medical school you might get to watch dissection maybe might get to do a little bit yourself. But after those two consecutive identical terms of medical school you emerged with a medical degree. Probably never having touched a living patient unless you got lucky in between in apprentice yourself somewhere that would give you some practical experience. Well thirty two weeks and structured. I don't think you can get an certification auto mechanic doing that Hardly the blackwell's were a fascinating family. Just tell us a little about them. Sure Eight of the nine siblings were born in their place of origin in bristol england. Where their father was a sugar. Refiner bristol being a center of the british sugar trade. Their father was a paradox. A sugar refiner and an abolitionist. Sort of think of that. Got for a second given that the sugar trade was based on enslaved labor. He was a dissenter and believed in education for boys as girls so all nine blackwell's grew up with the same education being a dreamer about what could be possible within. His industry moved them all the way to america and then all the way out to the frontier town of cincinnati in hopes of finding a way to make sugar from sugar beets which could grow in the north without enslaved labor rather than sugar cane. He got them all the way out to cincinnati in eighteen thirty eight and then he died broke leaving nine children with nothing to support them and that sort of early trauma created in the blackwell's this tribal feeling they really regarded each other more highly than almost anyone else in the world and they formed sort of a clan and pull themselves up from poverty. The girls first because the first three children were girls Immediately going to work as teachers. Because that's what they could do but there was this curious inversion in the family. This orphaned family where the women would lead the way initially and not continued when elizabeth and later emily decided to pursue this very strange and econo- classic career so blackwell kids are independent. Thinking people Cared a lot about each other. And elizabeth blackwell would become the first woman ever to get a medical degree before we get to that. It's fascinating that right around the time and in the area where she went to medical school. The women's suffrage movement was really taking shape. That was the seneca falls convention. She

Elizabeth Blackwell Blackwell Janice Nomura American Medical School Ken Tucker Peter Stamkos Florence Nightingale Abraham L Dave Davies Terry Gross The New York Times Janice Emily Philadelphia Epidemic Disease The Washington Post Refiner Bristol
Michael Stipe x Jem Cohen | Artist Takeover

Launch Left

07:05 min | 6 d ago

Michael Stipe x Jem Cohen | Artist Takeover

"Hello welcome to launch left. This is our inaugural artists takeover show. It's the end of the world as we know it. And i feel fine. Because michael stipe is hosting this show and he's brought his friend gem colin filmmaker incredible human being. They both are. You're gonna love the show. Please welcome to the show. But i don't forget to rate in subscribe follows and also shows at launch left. This is launch left with orders takeover on your host michael stipe tonight speaking to jim cohen. Filmmaker and artist extraordinaire. Hi jim how are you. Hi michael for laura happy new year. All things considered and given the times giving given what we're moving through. I know both of us feel a bit of reticence about having a conversation about art and music and the creative arts at a time like now and yet it does beg. The question of of people like ourselves creators. Say are you okay with that term people. Use it with ill-will. I just i'm allergic to it. Where people who make rings that that i like. Some of them are tangible. Some of them. Some of them are made of light. Some of them were made of sound some of them. You can touch a lot of them you can't but we're we're artists and filmmakers and musicians and all round guys and and yet The times that we're living in times we're living through the moment that we are right. The second as we record this the moment that we are anticipating. We have no idea what's going to happen. Things have been very very very strange. We're out of two thousand twenty. Thank god we're in twenty twenty one. I feel optimistic in as much as one can. I feel like what we've been through might put us in a better place with with a lot of With with a lot of difficulty. But the question that i think launch left really interested in is how does making music the creative arts art what what role we have in politics and activism. How how do these two somewhat dispirit things or seemingly disparate things merge and come together. What's your take them. Well my take on it is that the merger is is necessary. And it's also inherent. And i also i don't i don't claim for myself. The title of activists because A lot of people do it a lot more full-time a lot better than i do. But i also feel that. It's been part of my life since i was a little kid at some of the biggest peace marches that the nation has ever seen You know i was in those making signs. And i'm still at the protests not necessarily with a sign but i'm there and i've been involved in a lot of strange pockets of activism that i never expected to be involved with by there was fighting the nuclear and toxic waste storage depot in the poor neighborhood of williamsburg where i lived thought that with my brothers for seven or eight years. Clearly forget about it. It's like some bizarre artifacts from my past. And then i think one of the most important struggles i was involved in very intimately entwined with with filmmaking and photography which was Fighting for the rights of photographers to to shoot on the street in two thousand seven and that was a a strange moment where almost under the radar they were going to change the regulations. That would have said that. In order to photograph on the street needed Million dollars coverage in a permit and you had a limitation of fifteen minutes in one place and all of these other stringent regulations that. Were just her quietly going to slide into place and it's a long story as to why those rules came up for review but basically a few of us found out about it and Within a few months we had you know. I don't know thirty thousand signatures and people like da a baker adam photo agency. And and so on and so on making a big ruckus and You know then it was a couple of years going to hearings and you know. We had our support from the new york civil liberties union. Which party connected today. Sale you and You know and we turn it around. I mean i just. I still can't believe that that At that point we manage to actually win that one to the degree that it's actually it became very a very good place to shoot the street because the there was a recognition of prioritizing the rights of the artist to do their work as a as a motive freedom of expression as long as they weren't you know actively interfering with with other people. And so you know. That was a really beautiful moment in which you know the tradition that i had been brought up in in my family of street photography because my mom married to a very important Teacher and street photographer and so that was part of my family. History was not only street photography but also this her former husband is name was sid grossman. He was blacklisted. In the mccarthy era and he couldn't he couldn't work and he died after a couple of years from heart attack in. My mother always felt that. The fbi and joe mccarthy killed him which suddenly brings me to a memory. Part of that legacy was one of the students was a great street photographer. Leeann lebanon steam and early in the days. When i met you. I remember taking you to the little storage room. Where mountain of incredible photographs were stored. And leon was largely forgotten. And i knew that you love the graffiti and that was one of the things that you know that i thought would be a special thing for us to do. So that's a that's a. It's a nice memory it certainly. It certainly has. I was going to bring up leon. I i look around. Look behind you and i look behind me. Were both in our studios here and i- siege similar stacks of things to leon's solely. Leon we had you know incredible. Lee friedlander still with us. Robert frank Recently recently left us in the storm but also left us with a lifetime unbelievable material and images and beautiful memories. I raise but also just the work that he did gary winner ground. I don't know if you saw the show. That was on

Michael Stipe Gem Colin Jim Cohen Laura The Times JIM Michael Williamsburg New York Civil Liberties Union Sid Grossman Leon Joe Mccarthy Heart Attack FBI Lebanon Lee Friedlander Robert Frank Gary
The FBI's Effort To Take Down MLK

Fresh Air

02:06 min | Last week

The FBI's Effort To Take Down MLK

"Fbi director geogra- hoover and his second in command. Bill sullivan had for bringing king down. At first they feared he was being influenced by communists. Accidentally through their wiretaps the fbi discovered that king was having extramarital affairs. And so they shifted their focus to cover all evidence of his infidelity by bugging and taping him in his hotel rooms and by paying informers to spy on him eventually the fbi pen and sent an anonymous letter to king along with some of their tapes suggesting that he should kill himself. Sam pollard is an emmy award winner and oscar nominee his first work as a director was for the groundbreaking documentary series about the civil rights. Movement is on the prize. He is also edited several spike lee's movies including jungle fever and more better blues. He has a pretty long list of credits as a producer editor and director but some of his films include mr soul. Sammy davis junior. I've gotta be me and trains running. Let's start with a clip from mlk fbi. We're going to hear some of king's speech from the march on washington interspersed with some of the people pollard. Interviewed for the movie. America's to be a great nation. This must become true. So let freedom ring when you look at the social movements from the point of view of the fbi. It looks very different now. J. edgar hoover is famous for saying that he feared the rise of a black messiah. Free at last king davis famous march on washington speech wednesday august twenty nine hundred sixty three in a memo dated thirty vodkas no later than that the second person in the fbi heaven solvent since the urgent memo which he says after the march on washington. It's clear

FBI Geogra- Hoover Bill Sullivan Sam Pollard Mr Soul Emmy Award Winner King Sammy Davis Oscar LEE Pollard Washington King Davis J. Edgar Hoover America
WandaVision: Season 1 Episode 1 + 2 Recap | Everything is Super

Post Show Recaps

04:52 min | Last week

WandaVision: Season 1 Episode 1 + 2 Recap | Everything is Super

"The more you go any version just as one dog vision all right and we are talking about one division here on pusher recaps. Everything is wonderful. And thank you to the great. Jason curtis rivera for the greatest theme song time that is causing both of my co hosts here on the wanda vision. Podcast swallow laughter. Try not to explode into the microphone here. Kevin mateo shaking his head. Latonya starts hiding from the computer. Welcome to the podcast. My friends round one one and it's happening it is happening. We're here we're there. Where are we big question. We are we are we. Hey where are we what we have been confused as excited about a show since last season one which relax josh but like it has been good weird feeling right like a just like to me like really awesome. Tv right now but also like what's going on. I do hope this ends better than loss. But we'll see. But i'm not read. Yes yeah it's just a weird show to say the least i don't even know i don't even know what we're gonna all right. So we're talking about the first two episodes of juan division. They have arrived. If you missed our preview podcast urine. everything's super. I mean you could go back and listen to it. We basically know as much now as we did. Then i feel like which is to say not much like this is a show that is shrouded in secrecy and two episodes deep. We're still underneath that shrout. This is a show that is very intentionally keeping us away from the truth from the heart of the reality behind this thing. And that's really intriguing and exciting latonya. You and i were texting. And i think that. I had said you might predominant feeling more than i loved it or even i really liked it my predominant feelings like i'm very intrigued right now. I don't know that. I know enough to say whether i love it or like it yet. But i'm so intrigued. I'm really in. Yeah i feel the same way effervescent about my postings on the social needs as we meet those needs yes associates. We definitely need to abbreviate that. So i but i stand by all of that is just a really beautiful shot show in to having some rate special effects in so it's kinda dazzling in that way with any other way. I just want to know what is going on like you know. He joked at the top. Where are we when are we. Why are we what are we. And they sit hami nature of these first two episodes in what will continue to occur in tropes sitcoms for decades to come very much. Have us wondering what's going on Who's causing it to happen. Why it's been caused happen or if it's something that one is doing on her very own so yeah just very intrigued. I want to know who the bad people are in who the people somewhere in between are also just loving the idea that for each episode seems like in addition to the cool theme song that we get for one division. We're going to get actual song. Cues that tell us what decade. We're in the first one. We get being yacky yacky which came out in the nineteen fifties the exact date. I'm kind of in disputes. Somewhere around nineteen fifty three to nineteen fifty eight And it was a coasters so we get that in the very first episode which is more of a much. Dick van dyke. The i love lucy's of it all and then in the second episode which. I'm sure we'll talk about about a lot more indepth later we get help me rhonda With lv one though Helped me wanda exactly. Which is a song that by the beach boys. It came out in nineteen sixty five. So we're early in the sixties even reflecting an wanda's wardrobe. Yeah and i think. I mean to me that just looking at the sitcoms that they were aping sort of like you could see that and i think that sets a precedent that i'm kind of really excited about 'cause like the first episode was very much two very much dick van dyke. I think it's it's it's like and that's that's the thing that impresses me the most and what makes me really sorry for the show.

Jason Curtis Rivera Kevin Mateo Latonya Shrout Josh Dick Van Dyke Wanda Lucy Rhonda
Final Fantasy VII, Recap Part 2 | Keep Kalm and Go To Junon

Post Show Recaps

03:12 min | Last week

Final Fantasy VII, Recap Part 2 | Keep Kalm and Go To Junon

"That's right. Roll out the parade or another episode of the final fantasy seven. Recap podcast here on those show recaps. I'm josh winkler undercover wearing a big sailor costumes so a look like giant marshmallow with somebody's uniform does not look like it fits comfortably. Thirteen brooklyn's ed brooklyn. Said this is not good. The we don't look good in general uniform. Yeah no i'm just waddling around back and forth trying to figure out how to walk on two legs on chip challenge. It's a challenge. It's a challenge all my can you believe it. A week has passed and here. We are already with episode two of our journey through final fantasy. Seven at gone back in time. I've crossed an ocean spin. It's been a busy time it's been going on. We're grateful for really. I've been so happy with the feedback to the first podcast. People seem to enjoy what we're doing. Here's ed yeah. From what i've seen in the discord almost exclusively and a tiny bit on twitter with people who've just had nice things to say and are not spoiling anything. Thank you for. Not spoiling anything The feedback has been really great. And i appreciate that. You are not making fun of me taking as long as it takes me to do these things. You're you're doing. You're doing fantastic. How was this time crunch. Frey was this too much to offer episode two. Oh no not at all other than trying to catch a choke abo- before i had to say. Yeah yeah. I know. I think for the next couple of episodes. I may give you a little bit less to do. And 'cause there's a cup for the next segments that are coming upset. I think we've got an opportunity. Like focus down on specific characters to a certain degree. I think maybe we'll we'll slow down. Because i think that way. We can definitely keep up a little bit of a weekly pace. If that's case you works for me for people who don't know who just joining in the way there's this fancy podcasts push recap so yeah there is you know twenty twenty one and you could not take me further back in time and i need to go as far back as possible. At least to nineteen ninety seven when final fantasy seven came out further playstation from square soon to become square units a classic role playing video game about about a bunch of people who are trying to save the world from an evil corporation. and a psychopath. That's the that's the journey and that is basically the storyline that that we are on. It's my favorite game of all time. It was. They did a remake of it. We are now past the point of what the remake handled because we're out of mid and we're moving forward into the story zad. This first time at them win. Spoilers on the internet because we are keeping things relatively spoil their re where we are only talking about the context through which you have played said we are not going any further than the points at which you have last hit save correct.

Josh Winkler Ed Brooklyn Brooklyn Frey Twitter
Remembering Michael Apted, William Link And Neil Sheehan

Fresh Air

00:57 sec | Last week

Remembering Michael Apted, William Link And Neil Sheehan

"And murder. She wrote and vietnam war correspondent. Neil sheehan i'm dave davies and this is fresh air this message comes from. Npr sponsor. bank of america. You finally decided to learn how to ice skate. So you ordered the essentials. Ice skater needs a pair of blades. A new helmet and a good set of new patents. And you used your bank of america. Cash rewards credit card choosing to earn three percent cashback online shopping rewards that you put towards the cost of an essential piece of po skating recovery. A heating pad visit bank of america dot com slash more awarding to apply now copyright twenty twenty bank of america corporation. This is fresh air. I'm dave davies in for terry gross. Screenwriter william link who co created some classic tv shows including columbo murder. She wrote and mannix died. December twenty seventh in los angeles. He was eighty seven for decades links.

Neil Sheehan Bank Of America Dave Davies NPR Vietnam Twenty Twenty Bank Of America William Link Terry Gross Columbo Mannix Los Angeles
LOST: Down the Hatch | Missing Pieces, Part 1

Post Show Recaps

07:11 min | Last week

LOST: Down the Hatch | Missing Pieces, Part 1

"That's right. Lost is over but we have to go back down the hatch and scoop up just up little missing pieces along the way here. We are in between seasons three and four for a quick little stop over on lost missing pieces. The websites that aired between seasons three and four. Consider this your down the hatch intermission. I'm josh twitter. I'm joined here by mike bloom and mike. There's absolutely zero chance at that. Was actually terry quinn. As john locke no it sounded more honestly. Like nick. Offerman as ron swanson out the character. It's like when homer simpson voiced the genie for the atlanta. They like all right like i. It's fine but the more. I listen to it not only for the second video on tv show but also the second film i could. I could absolutely see that you are not the real mccoy and yeah we're going to get into a lot of it lost via domus but suffice it to say there were many more cast members who did not do voices on this video game than cast members. Who did i believe it so today. We're not just talking about the missing pieces and we're not talking about all the missing pieces. There are thirteen missing pieces. Episodes all told each episode is like anywhere between a minute and four minutes at the most. There's thirteen all told we're going to talk about the first proto Be if you will. We'll talk about the first seven episodes today and mike also as promised you did the deep dive into lost via domus which is the lost video game. And i'm so glad you did it. I did not do it. You'll have to explain it to me as well as the listeners. Yeah i mean that's one of the things. I'm so glad you did it emphasis on gas and very excited about this i think. Is it safe to say to invoke an analogy similar to a character that will be introducing this batch of episodes. Are these installments. Sort of like the mix ins to put into our lost fro gert for us to enjoy you know what i think. I would have thought so before. I sat down and watched them no and i'm glad that they exist and i remembered being happy about them at the time and some are are really fun and some really funny and some feel something resembling additive and then others feel either a just like kind of like weird quality and then still others feel regressive. If not outright bad. I would say there's a big distinction between especially in these i seven between like ones would seen in an episode proper ones. I would consider like a deleted scene for an episode and then once that flat out like should not have been made whatsoever. I consider like a waste of computer space of film etc. Yeah there's a couple in there. But then there's a few that are next level. And i don't know i think that maybe for next time. Maybe we want to rank them. Maybe klay because i was you and i are on the exact same wavelength josh. I was thinking that exact. Same thing. Coming into this. I think we could create a rudimentary consensus reading of the first seven and then after that we can easily spot in the other six next. Yeah i think so because my favorite one. We're not talking about today. Interest came my favorite ones next week. But there's there's one or two in here that i i'm pretty amped up about in the ones that i'm not amped about at least like excited to talk through so i'm glad we're doing this both because as we mentioned last week we won't do the full twenty five minutes starter. Run down again. That we've got a lot going on here in january on post show recap so you are able to support us. We would all my god would appreciate it so much. Patriots dot com slash post. Show recaps nat. There has for your boy. Never been a better time to design your savings. You want to support josh emerging and all the incredible work he does as the captain of this faithful faithful ship. Please please become a patron. It's still halfway through the month. I still think you're sort of getting your bang for your buck there and look if there was ever a place for chicanery in the beginning of twenty twenty one it can certainly be found within the poll recaps discord in particular at the ten dollars. Yeah we're having a really fun time in there. We would like to have you along for the ride on. If we reach a thousand patrons by the end of the month we will recast me with homer simpson for one episode of down. No but typically. No it's dan castellaneta portraying the genie mike. One of the reasons we were doing the missing pieces was like to give us a little bit of a break right. Little bit lighter load. we're okay. This is a shorter podcast this week. Where okay if next week is a shorter podcast with that. Said i don't wanna hop into it if you're cool with it. Yeah let's absolutely do. I don't have a lot of filibustering that i feel like these are the missing pieces. They were directed by jack bender. He directed them all all of them. It seems like there was like jack bender. Sometimes it feels like maybe like three other people were working on it like they do. Xm touch-ups of season one makeup. To give jack the claw marks on his face. From when i pull poor harold perrineau back in like the season to beard and afro unfortunate plaid shirt. Yes they definitely go and try to replicate some earlier stuff from show sometimes more successfully than others. I did one of the The other one of the things that i am most impressed by is the. I don't know if decommissioned certain sets and or if there were certain sets that were not yet decommissioned like the michael episode where he's still tied to the three minutes poll. Yeah that's amazing. So there's these things along the way that i'm pretty impressed by but then there are other things where it's like it's like guerrilla filmmaking. You know it's really. It's like it's jack. Bender with a hand held cameras. What it feels like if that's not what it actually is. If you haven't watched the missing pieces we're going to play them into. Here's the thing we have. I'm so proud of the extremely dedicated community of hatchlings that we have developed over the past year. Plus that being said i would predict at most. Maybe twenty five percent of you all out there. Sought these clips are available on youtube. If you want to view the visual element but like josh said because they are such short what we're usually they're usually the length of our sounds anyway. why not. Just make them to sound before we get into it though. I know we don't wanna preamble too much. But i do want to put in one quick thing because i do wanna talk about. I'm sure we'll talk about this. Throughout like the choice of scenes portrayed but more so this choice of characters. Eric davis time brings this up. That you know. We're going to highlight several different characters. Recurring capacity

Josh Twitter Mike Bloom Terry Quinn Offerman Homer Simpson Mike Ron Swanson Jack Bender John Locke Josh Mccoy Klay Nick Atlanta Dan Castellaneta Harold Perrineau Patriots Jack
Stance Takes: Reframing The Black Image - Pioneers of The Past w/ Alayo Akinkugbe; Renata Cherlise; Theo Imani & Osei Bonsu

Stance

01:41 min | Last week

Stance Takes: Reframing The Black Image - Pioneers of The Past w/ Alayo Akinkugbe; Renata Cherlise; Theo Imani & Osei Bonsu

"Welcome to pioneers of the past. Especial stance takes made in partnership with bakun tech for the no face gucci collaboration tired of a lack of representation of black people in our exhausted by the narrative suffering surrounding are rare appearances in paintings and photography fed up of it being backward when it comes to looking blackwoods. Well you're not alone. Settle down and get comfortable and get ready to be inspired because this program is for you. We'll bring you the new forces that accumulating a making art that challenges the pallet status quo. They're redefining gets to choose view. And critique the black image tearing up the orthodoxy each in their own way is inspiring new ways of seeing they are pioneers in remapping and rethinking the place of the black image and how is presented in art and culture. So let's meet them from cambridge. England is a liar king kobe. Who's challenging the academy her instagram of black history of art. I'm a student art history student at the university of cambridge. But i will. Sir launched the page about history of this year on it. i highlight the overlooked. Black artists think as citizens from history from florida usa renata chilies hawaiian extraordinary archive of black images at black archive dot com. That's redefining who chooses the images preserved and celebrated i wanted to dig deeper into storytelling and just working through images and just fascinated by the ways in which we can stories how to block experiencing and black way applies

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