Arts

Listen to the latest news, interviews and analysis from the world of visual and performing arts. Sourced from leading podcasts and talk radio shows.

A highlight from 558: City That Does Not Sleep

The Slowdown

05:23 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from 558: City That Does Not Sleep

"I've spoken before about the surreal quality of everyday life. The haunted parts, the bright Technicolor glow of elation. Maybe it's that surrendering to the weirdness of life that makes me feel connected to the surrealists and their dream like images. Everything is strange. They're just pointing it out. In today's poem, by one of my poetic fathers, Federico Garcia lorca. We watch as the speaker looks out over New York City. Sees the chaos fueled by capitalism and begs us all to pay attention. City that does not sleep by Federico, Garcia, lorca. Translated from the Spanish by Robert bly. In the sky, there is nobody asleep. Nobody, nobody, nobody is asleep. The creatures of the moon sniff and prowl about their cabins, the living iguanas will come and bite the men who do not dream. And the man who rushes out with his spirit broken will meet on the street corner, the unbelievable alligator, quiet, beneath the tender protest of the stars. Nobody is asleep on earth, nobody, nobody, nobody is asleep. In a graveyard far off there is a corpse who has moaned for three years because of a dry countryside on his knee. And that boy they buried this morning, cried so much. It was necessary to call out the dogs to keep him quiet. Life is not a dream. Careful, careful, careful. We fall down the stairs in order to eat the moist earth, or we climb to the knife, edge of the snow, with the voices of the dead dahlias. But forgetfulness does not exist. Dreams do not exist. Flesh exists. Kisses tie our mouths in a thicket of new veins, and whoever his pain pains will feel that pain forever, and whoever is afraid of death will carry it on his shoulders. One day, the horses will live in the saloons and the enraged ants will throw themselves on the yellow skies that take refuge in the eyes of cows. Another day, we will watch the preserved butterflies rise from the dead. And still walking through a country of gray, sponges, and silent boats, we will watch our ring flash and roses spring from our tongue, careful, be careful, be careful, the men who still have marks of the claw, and the thunderstorm, and that boy who cries, because he has never heard of the invention of the bridge, or that dead man who possesses now only his head and shoe. We must carry them to the wool, where the iguanas and the snakes are waiting, where the bears, teeth, are waiting. Where the mummified hand of the boy is waiting. And the hair of the camel stands on end with a violent blue shudder. Nobody is sleeping in the sky. Nobody, nobody. Nobody is sleeping. If someone does close his eyes, a whip boys, a whip. Let there be a landscape of open eyes, and bit her wounds on fire. No one is sleeping in this world. No one. No one. I have said it before. No one is sleeping. But if someone grows too much moss on his temples during the night, open the stage trapdoors, so he can see the moonlight, the lying goblets, and the poison, and the skull of the theaters. The slowdown is a production of American public media in partnership with the poetry foundation. To get a poem, delivered to daily, go to slowdown show dot org and sign up for our newsletter. Follow the slowdown on Instagram and Twitter at slow, down, show. The slowdown is a nonprofit program, and we rely on gifts from you, our listeners. Please send us into the new year strong. Give $5 a month to support these 5 minutes every weekday. Go to slowdown show dot org slash donate

Federico Garcia Lorca Robert Bly Lorca Federico Garcia New York City Poetry Foundation Instagram Twitter
A highlight from 557: from A Year

The Slowdown

03:54 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from 557: from A Year

"I remember the first year after my stepmother's death. I saw her in everything. It wasn't on purpose. I wasn't looking for her. She just showed up. Unexpected and alive and also not alive in my life. I remember walking in Brooklyn and there was a woman, who looked just like her, ducking into the blue stove bakery, and I thought very simply, of course, she loves good food. And then, of course, I knew it wasn't her. It was only the back of someone's head, really. And then it turned out to be a woman who didn't look like her at all. That's how it happens, right? All of you who have lost someone, you know it. You've seen it. The visitation seems like a gift, and also a hard memory of grief. I would see her in everything that first year, and then slowly it would shift until it only happened, fewer, and farther between. But just a few days ago, the flight attendant, checking our test results and vaccine cards for our flight, looked so much like her, even behind her mask that it took me aback. When she also turned up at the gate to check our passports, I said, hello again. And she smiled, and her eyes looked even more like Cynthia's eyes, Cynthia, who has been gone for 11 years now. I bordered the plain with the words, hello again. Branded on my brain. It doesn't always feel easy for them to return to us. Our ghosts. But it always seems to happen at the right time. A reminder that someone I loved and who loved me shows up sometimes saying, hello again. I remember before she died the Internet at the house was always going out in the storms and dad was always trying to get a stronger signal. Emails would never go through. Once she looked up from the bed that she was not yet imprisoned by and joked, well, if I ever want to send you a message from the great beyond, I guess I won't send an email. And she hasn't. But messages still arrive. In today's poem, by the wonderful poet Josh Charles, we see a lost one, return in images. This is from the November section of Josh Charles poem a year. I press each leaf. The unfaithful to, in your leaves, pigment presses out, you in you, Laurel, not yet in the wind. All Saturday, a fire, household down in bustling, cease fireless, leaf approaches, leaf, I built exits, canopies to come back to world, wilted, Eileen in the air, winter, color, national, and its mass, like wool, and there are those who sort wool and it is work to bow to fold a hand upon a hand, election day, interred, sheltered the wood us. Water floods beneath us, chambers of water beneath, visible, even the unseen, overcast, and fielding our street, you were no new word, having fed every word being

Cynthia Brooklyn Josh Charles Josh Charles Poem Eileen
A highlight from (Episode 266) "What Happened, Brittany Murphy?" Film Composer: Genevieve Vincent.

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

02:22 min | Last week

A highlight from (Episode 266) "What Happened, Brittany Murphy?" Film Composer: Genevieve Vincent.

"Critic podcast. Here is Derek Thomas. Murphy has died. Media justice is surrounded by home that she shared with her husband Simon mon Jack. Simon took her away. He made sure no one could get to her. Hi, her name is Brittany Murphy and I go to the river middle school. Brittany was so wonderful. There was nobody else like her. There was kind of a sweet childish lost quality that she had that just breaks your heart. She was successful immediately. You can not be a teen girl and not love Britney in 8 mile clueless. These are movies that will stand the test of time. Pretty Murphy was super cute, but in Hollywood, you have to be Gwyneth Paltrow. She was not a typical pretty girl. And so many young women in Hollywood are pressured enormously. She had lost an enormous amount of weight, and she was dressing totally differently. She said, that's what I've been told. If I wanted to be considered as a leading lady during a little dip she was having, he came along. And I think that's where her judgment was muddled, and she became pray. Simon said that he was the largest collector of Vermeer, dated Elle McPherson and Madonna. He said that he had been dying from terminal brain cancer and that he had bought an experimental treatment derived from the fins of sharks. Every single word out of his mouth was a lie. We all were scared and freaked out. Like, who? Was this guy? Once they got married, they were holed up in that house. 24 7. Nobody got close to her. We start to think, well, okay. Who gained from her dying. There were more unanswered questions after the autopsy came out than there were answered questions. People start thinking, there's more behind this. There's something else. Simon had all these secrets. He actually said, people in the government were watching them. Britney's dad was sure someone had done it. You visibly see mold. Is the house first? Something made her sick. A

Derek Thomas Simon Mon Jack River Middle School Murphy Simon Brittany Murphy Hollywood Elle Mcpherson Brittany Terminal Brain Cancer Gwyneth Paltrow Britney Madonna
A highlight from 555: Private Property

The Slowdown

04:59 min | Last week

A highlight from 555: Private Property

"I don't think we write about our Friends enough. Or talk about them enough. They're so much art made for family members and art made for and about lovers. Lovers who don't deserve poems are getting poems. Bad lovers are getting good essays. Barely their lovers are getting songs and stories written about them. But friends, not so much. So much of our life depends on our friendships, those people you call after the frustrating conversation with the lover, or the hard conversation with a parent. There needs to be more written in praise of friendships. If we've met, you know that I think my Friends are the balm. I have an exceptional bevy of compatriots. They are a smarter, hotter, funnier, and way more talented than me. And many of them are also artists. Having someone to talk to about the elation and subsequent plummet of art making his helpful. We can start out having a cocktail and casually catching up when suddenly the conversation turns toward the emotionally intense memoir or poem or writing. Or the play or TV pilot we're working on. And before you know it, more knee deep in the big ticket topics that fuel our lives at every turn were hilarious and tragic, all at once. I think of that Joni Mitchell lyric from her song people's parties. Laughing and crying. You know it's the same release. I've always valued friendships that go deep below the surface. I'm bad at small talk. I want the good shit. The bury the body in the backyard shit. I want the Friends that know even when you're dancing, letting it all hang out in the heat of the moment that you're still raw to the realities of the world. If ever I slink back into my cave of quiet and worthiness, I know one of those friends is coming to get me. Today's delightful poem pays homage to those authentic and artistic friendships that find a little grace in the good times despite the hurt we all carry. Private property, by an Alicia, sotelo. In this minor emergency of the self we drink to become confused to swim in the dark like idiot fish. This is a Lake at night in a forest. This is where we look up at the stains in the sky and someone says it's purpling out here. And someone else says someone write that down. We're all performing our bruises. Chloe smiles like a specialty knife. B tells stories like a bubbly divorcee. Clara smokes like a sage in her quaffed towel, expertly naked, third eye shining. I hang back on the shore with Kyle. We talk about this man in New York while our skinny dipping sirens sing show tunes in the violet dark. Later, we're all in a clinic at three a.m., handling Kyle's broken ankle. It's so embarrassing he keeps saying. And it is earlier doing the sprinkler in a dorm room to please don't stop the music. He kept yelling, stop the music. Stop the music until we understood. He wasn't actually joking. And sometimes the poems were like that. When we wrote knife, bubbly, naked, we were really getting down. Dancing hard, on the injury. The slowdown is a production of American public media in partnership with the poetry foundation. The slowdown is written by me, 8 a limo. It is produced by Jennifer lie. Our music is by hannis Brown. Engineering by Cameron Wiley and Alex Simpson. Production help by susannah sharpless Ryan lore and James Napoli. Our executive producer and editor is best Perlman. Our executives in charge of APM studios are lily Kim,

Sotelo Joni Mitchell Kyle Alicia Chloe Clara Poetry Foundation New York Hannis Brown Cameron Wiley Alex Simpson Susannah Sharpless Ryan Lore James Napoli Jennifer Perlman Apm Studios Lily Kim
A highlight from 37. Tommy Beardmore & Adam DeCarlo "Imposter Syndrome"

Before the Break

03:40 min | Last week

A highlight from 37. Tommy Beardmore & Adam DeCarlo "Imposter Syndrome"

"All righty. Here we are, back for another episode of before the break this week. It's just gonna be Tommy and I Tom how are you doing? I'm well. I'm well. You look tan. Are you pregnant? I am with child. It's a food baby. It's back from vacation in much needed vacation. It was fantastic. And you know, right back to that New York grind. Landed. That's true. Landed and had 6 fucking auditions and work and all that good stuff last week. It's busy busy busy. Welcome back. Oh yeah. Nothing lasts pal. Welcome back to the real world. Leaving vacation, you're just like, you get used to the relaxation and now you're like, fuck, I have to leave. You know, I just found out what scary Sundays. Sunday scary, scary Sundays? Yeah. Sunday scaries. Sunday skirt. And I didn't know that I was on I think I was on a date with someone. And I was like, what is that? And she was like, you know, like, a 9 to 5 corporate, whatever. What do you mean you just found out? I guess. Well, that's true. I'll say the phrase has been going on for many, many years and only in the last say two years that I actually ask what the hell does this mean? And it is Sunday before the work week where you have this horizon of death and darkness of the work. Halloumi, it's the looming time ahead. It's the yeah. Well, we don't really have that though, because every day is dark, isn't it? As an actor that's trying to make it in this industry. It's today scary. That's all it's called. Yeah, just the day. So what are we chatting about today? Well, you know what? I was thinking about, you know, this week we do not have a guess sometimes it'll just be Adam and I every maybe I don't know 8 or so guests. It'll just be he and I to kind of come back together and chat a bit about something and we have launched this really cool mentorship thing, this program and working at your prone. We've got to talk to a lot of students in some of these q-and-as and meetings and something that comes up a lot, man is this impostor syndrome and the struggle to believe that we deserve to be happy and working and and all those things that we wanted in life to come to fruition. It seems that we obviously are drawn to this business and we work really hard at it. But occasionally, there comes this voice into our heads that says, you really think you're going to do this or do you really believe that you're you deserve to be here or people are going to find out that you're just acting on intuition and you're a total fraud and all these other people who have done so much in training and performance, they're better equipped for this business than I am. It's just this doubt. It's doubt. And everybody has doubt no matter what business you're in. You have doubt about your capabilities, your competency, just you as a person. And I think that's very human, but I think it's also something that keeps actors from really walking into the room owning this idea that I deserve to be here. I've cast enough projects where people come in and it's just like, hi, yeah, I'm sorry. Thank you. I'm sorry. You know, and they're desperate to. Prove to themselves that

Tommy TOM New York Adam
A highlight from 554: Sonoran Desert Poem

The Slowdown

04:57 min | Last week

A highlight from 554: Sonoran Desert Poem

"I almost moved to a desert once, or rather I did. But not for as long as I intended. I moved to the chihuahuan desert in New Mexico, and for a good month or so. I thought I might call it home. There was something about those dramatic skies that could change in an instant with a coming storm. Those otherworldly pinks of the sandia mountains, and the thick sage smell of the bosque along the Rio Grande, that made me fall in love with the raw beauty of North American deserts. As a rule, I tend to distrust forced wisdom from others. I even distress myself if I suddenly find myself opining in the middle of a conversation about something I've figured out. I don't think I'll ever figure out much. Or maybe I'll have a little respite here and there. A moment of equilibrium. The only time I do trust wisdom, it's the wordless knowledge that comes from the land itself. The mountains. The river beds. I'm always putting the O and ocean when I see it. A hand going over my mouth. I may not know much, but I know enough to understand that the land knows more than us. I remember once going for groceries just outside of Albuquerque and the light hitting the sandia mountains above the grocery store, and being struck by how small I was, how small everything was. I was loading the groceries into the car, and had this overwhelming feeling that nothing truly mattered. Not in a way that meant I didn't love the world, but in another way. Everything I was worried about was some minuscule, grain of sand in the otherwise endless mass that made up the world. It knocked me out of myself, or rather, it brought me back to myself. In today's tremendous poem, we see the power of the desert and how the wisdom of those mountains can teach us something about release about surrender about what we can not know. Sonoran desert poem, by Jake keats. The ones who live in the desert, if you knew them, you would understand everything. Lucille Clifton. One. Coming to the desert, for the first time, and the night turns over a millennia before you. Just say the name mountain of mountains. Make more out of bird formations or drainage pipes, deserts, build water, so drink the lightning. Two, so you have been here for some time. Velvet ants, and paper wasps, testify. Sandstone bones are left long, under sage, bones, sculpted by sand. Sand that collects its legs in the atmospheric heat to storm and swallow an entire city. A city that two builds its water from fly ash, drink from that now the cactus wren finished the lightning. There are those who come to the desert because they have always been here. Wind coyotes grow thorns in the inches of light, sunsets have. Of mountains, do not make a mountain. Reach for one. And let it turn away from you. The slowdown is a production of American public media in partnership with the poetry foundation. The slowdown is written by me, ate a limo. It is produced by Jennifer lye. Our music is by Hannah's Brown. Engineering by Cameron Wiley and Alex Simpson. Production help by susannah sharpless, Ryan lore and James Napoli. Our executive producer and editor is Beth Perlman. Our executives in charge of APM studios are lily Kim, aleck schaffer and Joanne Griffith.

Sandia Mountains Chihuahuan Desert Rio Grande Jake Keats Lucille Clifton New Mexico Albuquerque Poetry Foundation Jennifer Lye Cameron Wiley Alex Simpson Susannah Sharpless Ryan Lore James Napoli Hannah Beth Perlman Brown Apm Studios Lily Kim Aleck Schaffer
A highlight from Fraud: how corrupt is the art world? Plus, Warhols Catholicism and Moscows new museums

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:07 min | Last week

A highlight from Fraud: how corrupt is the art world? Plus, Warhols Catholicism and Moscows new museums

"Featuring in depth conversations with artists about the art, music literature and film that's inspired them and the cultural experiences that have shaped their lives and work. The first two interviews in this series are with distinctive South African artists, Belize and Candice brights. Do subscribe to a brush with and this podcast wherever you're listening now. And if you like what we do, please give us a rating or review on Apple podcasts. It helps others to find us. Now, inigo philbrick, the art dealer who lived a lavish lifestyle yet allegedly fleeced collectors investors and lenders out of millions of dollars before fleeing to a tropical island last week pleaded guilty to fraud charges in a New York criminal court. He faces a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison, though his attorneys brokered a deal with the prosecution that would likely keep his sentence down to between ten and 12 years. After the hearing phobics attorney, Jeffrey lichtman, said that the art industry is corrupt from top to bottom that philbrick was not the cause, but the symptom, and that he suspected many more cases like this would appear if the art world were investigated thoroughly. So is he right? I spoke to Georgian Adam, one of the art newspapers editors at large, about field brick, and just how widespread this kind of behavior is in the industry. Georgina, perhaps we can begin with talking about inigo philbrick, who is he? So inigo philbrick has just pleaded guilty in a Manhattan court to basically scamming his clients out of $86 million in the art world. And he has very colorful history because while he legged it basically. He left he hadn't gallery in mayfair. He had a gallery in Miami, and then under trail as it turned out of infuriated creditors who were after him, and so he went to its tiny little speck in the Pacific, Vanuatu, I think it's called. Where I think he thought he couldn't be picked up, but he was. He was actually in flip flops when FBI agents. That's a lovely detail. He was in his flip flops, and he was apparently walking along a road when he was grabbed by FBI agents, and he was flown back to America, where he has now appeared in court, and he has pled guilty. So we know he admits it. Right. You say he was a dealer in London. Were you aware of him, as, you know, as an art market reporter, did you know of him was he somebody you came across? I did. I was aware of him because he came up sorted through the ranks he went to white cube, and then he set up his own gallery, and the rumors were, and I think they were true, that J Joplin actually financed what was ultimately a secondary market business. So he was reselling works of art for white cube, but probably also, but as it turns out for himself as well. Right. And so it sounds like he was a genuine enthusiast. He knew his stuff, and he was particularly dealing in certain artists. Is that right? Yes, absolutely. He definitely had huge knowledge of a few markets he particularly knew the Christopher wool market, and he knew the Rudolph steel market absolutely through and through. I think there's no doubt about that. He came from a cultivated background his father is a museum director, and he worked for white cube, but he'd come up, as I said, through the ranks of a gallery. So I think he was knowledgeable. What happened? Did he start off intending to swindle people? Personally, I don't know, but I doubt it, I think he probably started off. As an art dealer, genuinely, and then he got in over his head. And I think one of the things that struck me reading Kenny schachter's very colorful story in vulture about his dealings with indigo philbrick and he was obviously very close to him, literally traveling around the world with him going to parties with him, drinking a lot, bowl accounts. But one of the things that you can see in that tale is the lavish life that feel it was living and how that was all part of it and of course it's a part of so many people's perception of the art world and indeed, enjoyment of the art world. Yes, I think it's a bit unfortunate because this alcohol and other substances fueled lifestyle the private plains is what a lot of people think the art world is like. And it's true that there is a little section of that at the top end where it's a very moneyed lifestyle, but it's not the whole art world, and I do think that it's important to emphasize that there is another art business as another art world as well as this particular, almost caricature. And there are certain practices that philbrick used that are not in themselves illegal, but are all part of the kind of opaqueness of how works are bought and sold, right? Can you explain briefly some of the kinds of ways in which, for instance, multiple owners have works, and that kind of thing? Yes, I mean, this does reveal quite a lot about that end of the art business, because it still is a very personal business. It's done on a handshake contracts don't exist, now you wouldn't buy a house without having a surveyor crawl

Inigo Philbrick Candice Brights Jeffrey Lichtman Manhattan Court Philbrick FBI J Joplin Belize Georgina Mayfair Vanuatu Kenny Schachter Apple Indigo Philbrick Miami New York Pacific London America
A highlight from 553: Daylight Saving, Age 5

The Slowdown

03:37 min | Last week

A highlight from 553: Daylight Saving, Age 5

"Each fall, I start to worry about winter. Which I know is not how we should think of the seasons. But winter is my worrisome season the darkness, the cold. Even so I love sweaters and scarves and watching practical magic with friends every season. I love fire pits and hot cider and good red wine and slippers. Many years ago, when I worked for Martha Stewart, I love how the whole office would immediately become transformed into a decorative gourd bonanza. And though I promised I'd never be the type of person who dressed up my dog. I also love dressing up my dog on Halloween. But there is one thing that I don't like about fall. And that's daylight savings time. I don't like falling back. Sure, I like the extra hour of sleep. But then it feels like what comes next is darkness. I know that sounds dramatic. Still, winter is a time where we work in the dark to quote Henry James. We work in the dark. We do what we can. We give what we have. And so maybe I need to reframe the coming winter as the time to create to make things to work on the projects I love as the hours dwindle. Ironically, when I was a kid, in California, I'd actually get tired of this son. I hated a sunny winter. I wanted it to be dark. I wanted winter to be the winter on TV. The winter of rain and storms and even snow. The snow of movies soft and piling up. But what I got were crisp gorgeous, sunny days, and like a fool, I spoiled them all complaining about the gift of sunlight. In today's wonder of a poem, we see the poet as a child, not quite understanding the meaning of the phrase, daylight savings. I love how this poem takes that innocent misunderstanding and turns it into something magical. What would it be like to be able to save daylight? And what would you do with it? Daylight saving, age 5, by James Cruz. The night my mother turned back the clocks, I thought that while we slept, the hour stolen from everyone on earth would collect like coins in a bank fault. So we'd wake up rich at last. Even as my mother explained that it meant only extra dreams in winter only late return to us with daffodils and rain in spring. I was cupping my hands under every lamp, keeping the fridge open, so the cold brightness would pool at my feet. Honey, she said it doesn't work like that. But I didn't listen. I was seeing daylight leaking slowly from the dripping comb of the sun and into bowls, jars and bottles, anything with a lid I placed on the window sills to gather the

Martha Stewart Henry James James Cruz California
A highlight from 552: Hammond B3 Organ Cistern

The Slowdown

03:43 min | Last week

A highlight from 552: Hammond B3 Organ Cistern

"Ordinary living. Sure, we may gather for the holidays or celebrate weddings or significant moments of real joy, the big wins, the markers of time. But what about the day today living? I think we need more awards for that. More awards for putting on our shoes and going to the office or brushing our teeth in the morning, doing the dishes. I was once on the subway in New York City at some ungodly hour. It was maybe 6 in the morning, and I had to be in the office to set up something for a sales meeting, meet a caterer. I can't remember. But I was surprised at how busy the subway was that early. Folks had their kids all ready for school, people had lunches packed and coffee in their hands. I remember having the overwhelming feeling of wanting to shout, I am so proud of us at the top of my lungs. And I was proud. Life is like that. You think you're just slogging along and then something reminds you that just getting up in the morning and choosing to live is something miraculous. I try to hold that with me a need to hold that with me. In today's poem, we witnessed the rapture that comes when you've come out the other side of sadness, shaken off the blues and entered the world again. A warning, this poem does mention suicidal ideation, so feel free to skip this episode. But at the core of this poem, is the light that comes after the clouds have cleared. Hammond B three, organ cistern, by Gabriel, kava karesi. The days I don't want to kill myself are extraordinary. Deep bass. All the people in the streets waiting for their high 5s and leaping, I mean leaping when they see me. I am the son filled God of love, or at least an optimistic undersecretary. There should be a word for it. The days you wake up and do not want to slit your throat, money in the bank, enough for an iced green tea every weekday and Saturday and Sunday. It's like being in the armpit of a Hammond B three organ, just reeks of gratitude and funk. The funk of ages. I am not going to ruin my love's life today. It's like the time I said, yes, to gray sneakers, but then the salesman said, wait. And there out of the back room like the bakeries first biscuits, bright, blue, kicks, iridescent, like a scarab. Oh, who am I kidding? It was nothing like a scarab. It was like bright, blue, fucking sneakers. I did not want to die that day. Oh, my God. Why don't we talk about it? How good it feels? And if you don't know, then you're lucky, but also you poor thing. Bring the band out on the stoop. Let the whole neighborhood hear. Come on, everybody. Say it with me nice and slow. No pills, no cliff, no brains on the floor. Bring

Kava Karesi New York City Hammond Gabriel
A highlight from 551: Tangerine Peel

The Slowdown

04:05 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from 551: Tangerine Peel

"The other night I couldn't stop thinking about all the people I love. It wasn't worry necessarily, but it wasn't not worry. Maybe this was a result of not having seen some family members due to the pandemic. I don't know. At one point, I drifted off and dreamt about my maternal grandfather, and my paternal grandmother, and I woke up thinking I needed to rush to them to see them to tell them how much I loved them. But of course, after waking up a bit more, I remember they were no longer living. I was worrying about people that didn't need to be worried about anymore. Then I decided to reframe my thoughts as not worry, but love. I was loving everyone so much that I couldn't sleep. Recently, I was thinking about how I hadn't seen my father's siblings in so long. They, too, showed up in my dreams. Always wondering where I had been, why I was so busy. In my dream, I was the one who had been absent. It's not hard to be overwhelmed by your own attachments. To want to reach out and talk to everyone. To want to make sure everyone is safe and good and healthy and well. Back in 2007, when I was first learning meditation, I started to practice loving kindness meditation that I learned from Sharon Salzburg at the Tibet house. It's a way of offering love to loved ones to strangers to difficult people in your life and to yourself. I repeated the phrases may you live free of danger. May you have mental happiness, may you have physical happiness, may you have ease of well-being. I loved this meditation. Still do. But early on, my problem was this. I couldn't stop, off her hand. It started to feel like a job, like a necessity, like an obsession. I often couldn't sleep because I was trying to repeat the phrases and offer them to everyone I could think of. Everyone who had ever crossed my path. This was when I realized that attachments were real. And sometimes in need of hallucinating, my fist needed to open. I needed to learn to love people without gripping the wheel so tightly. In today's poem, by the extraordinary Mary rueful. We see how a strong attachment to the world can change the way we perceive everything. Even something as small and seemingly inconsequential as a piece of fruit. Tangerine peel, by Mary rueful. What did the little tangerine do to deserve to die like this? I am a scalp of myself, skinned by my own thoughts. A poetry, God of molting turkeys, save my brother from the truck, save my mother from the fire, save my sisters and fathers from the dust of their own homes, save their children from drowning in love, save my Friends from going through the ice, save all animals from starvation, and those who have gone rogue save them, too. Strangers, everywhere, try to save them. My husband and puppy. Ah. Little tangerine, by all implications of the dictionary. You do not deserve to die. Forgive

Sharon Salzburg Tibet House Mary Rueful
Off the Wall: Van Gogh’s Art Comes to Life in Immersive Exhibit

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

01:47 min | 3 months ago

Off the Wall: Van Gogh’s Art Comes to Life in Immersive Exhibit

"Immersive art shows aren't displaying the real thing but our review of a new van gogh show suggests. That's not the point. These exhibits can still be authentically. Inspiring the immersive exhibit of vincent van. Gogh's paintings playing on sunset. Boulevard in los angeles is part of a hugely popular global trend in projected art produced by mostly non museum for profit companies in the los angeles production. The main event is a florida ceiling wall to wall surround showing van gogh images. These are produced from sixty. Four projectors that run on a continuous loop visitors themselves splashed with the images. Sit on socially distanced cubes from there. They watch a mash up of masterpieces. Morphing for one to the next in which crows fly win meals turn clouds shift and iris's grow the soundtrack ranging from edith piaf to mode dust. Muzar sqi is integral to the production. At the show's end. Visitors applauded with enthusiasm and even whooped one visitor browsing in the gift shop afterward said he loved the show. I felt put into the art. He added the monitor's francine keefer had wondered how giant video projections could possibly compare with a face to face encounter with authentic works of art but after she watched the show and talk with visitors. She realized she was asking the wrong question. This isn't about a comparison with the real thing she writes is a variation on a theme a building on what's come before

Vincent Van Van Gogh Los Angeles Gogh Edith Piaf Francine Keefer Florida
Interview With Pianist, Melody Quah

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

01:56 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Pianist, Melody Quah

"Curious how this job works with your performance side and Do you still perform. Obviously that's may be a different story with the pandemic as well but Have you kind of crossed the performance and the teaching pieces. And how do you see them benefiting each other. Yeah so you know. Part of many university positions. Include this expectation that you're going to maintain A performing A platform and so. That's part of my position as well as that. I've got this teaching portion of it. My creative activities you know what they consider the performance element as well but that could be researched. That could be presentations. That could be other things as well. I'm an in service to the university So it's it's sort of a given that you know you're not just teaching every week by your Also playing using those opportunities also to get to know the community. Get to know the students recruit in all of those things so well. Yeah this past. Year is has been unusual in that sense that i'm in a new place you know i'm still getting to know who are the folks around the area. Who are my colleagues. Actually we've got a department and most people were still teaching online. So i haven't met actually a lot of the of the faculty and staff In person yet but We have been able to perform on recital space and have that being livestream so we definitely have had opportunities to connect in that way.

A Conversation With Art Historian, Curator Plus Writer, Stephanie Von Spreter

The Wise Fool

01:39 min | 4 months ago

A Conversation With Art Historian, Curator Plus Writer, Stephanie Von Spreter

"Now going back at you talked about working at some by any os and such so. The fascinates me is what is it. That differentiates a so. You did it as a curator correct. Now i didn't. I was the curator thoughts in the case of documenta levin hundred curatorial assistant but i worked really closely with a curator's which obviously influenced my curatorial work later on. But when i worked for documenta and the biennial i was not a curator. Or in the case of documented eleven as a curatorial assistant whereas at the berlin biennial. I had different roles kind of like moved up the ladder from the third to the fourth to the fifth biennial so i ended up project manager in the fifth one but in all cases my positions where an kit in what was called the autistic office so it was working closely with the curator on the one side with the artists on the other sides. And so one would be also a care in that sense in the curatorial sense in carrying lots about the artists actually Being a mediator. Being a friend as well being in a sense trustworthy person you could share your thoughts with but also somebody who would be higher to make things possible. Basically so tat's several sites to disposition

Documenta Levin Berlin
Why Fame and Success Won't Heal Your Wounds

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

02:19 min | 4 months ago

Why Fame and Success Won't Heal Your Wounds

"I found out about your story because you wrote in About your film the golden age and. I think that the thing that really struck me was that you wrote about this idea of this obsession that we have is a culture with fame which i thought this is kind of a no brainer to me because it's so important because i think that often we've prioritized fame over mastery and craft but before we get into all of that I want to start asking you. What is one of the most important things that you learn from one or both of your parents that influenced and shaped who become in what you ended up doing with your life while it's a great question Well i think you know. It's the parents came from a generation where they did what. They felt that they had to do but didn't necessarily want to do you. Know of course have a traditional family. My father was an attorney. My mom was like come dance teacher. And but secretly. My mom always wanted to be a singer. My dad was this really great saxophonist and they both loved jazz. And the irony. And i talked about it a little bit in this book. That accompanies the film released later. This fall as the irony is. I became like the hybrid of what they really wanted to do at an a generation where they couldn't my dad to be a musician. My mom wanted to be a singer. And it's like i became a high bit of what they wanted to do. Was kinda strange but i. I've learned so much from them especially like my love of music like my dad was incredibly large beach. Roy beach boys fan and as a kid. I just couldn't stand. Listen to that music but i realize you know i didn't realize brian wilson's genius as a child and and now i realize how much brian wilson's affected my life and how important they are in my life and it was almost like i had to go through all this crazy tutelage with my father. He was an alcoholic and abusive a gun into it into the film a little bit but it was like he was training me. You know with all these jazz records than the beatles and you all these different bands but especially the beach boys. And it's like i get so obsessive recording with all the production stuff and i can't just make regular album it's like oh here's me on piano singing. It's like i have to do my brian wilson and i i realized that was kind of the badness of being raised by my father's like he was training me for something that i didn't even

Brian Wilson Roy Beach Beatles
RODNEY CROWELL Launches Vincent Neil Emerson

Launch Left

02:15 min | 4 months ago

RODNEY CROWELL Launches Vincent Neil Emerson

"Hi rodney crowd. Welcome to the show. Welcome to launch left are our you. I'm good what an honor to be speaking to you. my god. you're just an incredible career and more than that like you. As an artist have been such an incredible influence on so many other artists and Helped pave the way in a left of center way In country and and pop and and production all of that. I could sing your praises and speak about your accolades for a while. But the question burning question i have is about the intersection between What every artist wants to have your music be heard by white audience and not compromise your creativity in to do so I feel like you could speak to that. And i'm just curious where your journey is. Ben if you feel like sharing a sure happy to share. I'm here to protect and serve Well you know funny. You should ask of actually given that some thought. I was speaking to my co producer slash son-in-law Just a little earlier today. We were talking about that very thing. I said you know During the most commercial part of my career. When when i was you know top the charts and stuff. I was not comfortable in my body at the time and Maybe psychologically i i sort of started trying to wiggle out of it in a way because it felt like there is a trap that i had allowed Laid for myself. Which is that thing you know when you when people are when you're on the top of the radio charts. You know in this some time ago so you walk into a room. People look at you know certain way

Rodney BEN
Philip McKernan on Finding the Courage to Speak Your Truth

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

02:03 min | 4 months ago

Philip McKernan on Finding the Courage to Speak Your Truth

"Philip. Welcome back to the mystical creative for the fourth time. Yeah thank you. it's i can honestly say it's an absolute utter privilege. I've talked to you. It's been what it's been like for the audience. But i can tell you. It's been immensely rewarding for mesa. Thank you well. Before we hit record. I don't think anybody in our audience is gonna be complaining that you are back for a fourth time. You have a new book out which we will talk about quite a bit of detail. But for that i wanna ask you something that. I don't believe that i've asked you before. And that is what did your parents do for a living. And what impact did that end up having on the choices that you've made throughout your life in your career. My mother was a stay at home. Mom and i think that she in later life had some regrets and has some regrets around that she is a massive animal lover. And i don't think she ever fully embraced and stepped into that so when i was growing up so kid or maybe when i was even before i was born my mother would have home students. My parents chose to put a true private school. Even though argue they couldn't really afford it as put them under pressure so my mother did that for for income but for the most part she was a stay at home mom and my dad was in sales and he ended up becoming the sales director of a very large distribution drinks company beverages soft drinks pop alcohol etc etc which were eventually acquired by guinness. He contemplated becoming an entrepreneur And as most of us do when we think about studying business we often think sometimes from a very limited standpoint. sometimes we think about it through the lens of who we are and what we've done as opposed to possible excited out in the peripheral and a member him looking at buying a pub at just outside of the city of dublin. And i'll always remember going to see the pob and it would have been a huge outlay in order open. A big change lives and i'm so glad he never takes. I think it would have been his grave now if he if he did both in terms of the work ethic the smoking in the pubs at the time and just the general lifestyle so my dad was in sales and my mom was A stay at home mum

Philip Mesa Guinness Dublin
Shame and Guilt in the Artist

Strength To Be Human --Literary Podcast, Hosted by Mark Antony Rossi

01:59 min | 4 months ago

Shame and Guilt in the Artist

"Now. I know this might sound a little interesting Shame and guilt in the oddest because there is such a wide array of opinion about these subjects in in the arts. You have a group of people that literally believe that because we are human and because we are communicating to humans through arts that we should try to use whenever possible. Shame and guilt and in all the other things that are inside us. But we're just talking about shame and guilt and this show and use it on a regular basis and in fact Use it all the time practically and then of course you have another group that say You know issue used sparingly or. Should this be used strategically. You know where we're has them real relevancy so that you can still remain an artist or you can still have something that's artistic and not just a rant or rave or you know a complaint or something like that and then of course you still have another group top of that that believe that somehow in some way we should try to put together things arts whether it's nonfiction frictional. Whatever doubt don't really have a lotta bearing in our lives or maybe even a lot of bearing in people's lives in general they just stories period. You know or like a science fiction writer. I know tells me all the time mark now this is real so i mean i don't need to be gene roddenberry and try to lose every single thing that's happening on earth in order to make my science fiction relevant. He makes he makes fun of the word relevant a lot. I mean he has a point. i don't wanna go as far as he he's gone to where You know he can't do anything. It is writing ille- resembles anything that happens on. Earth happens with human beings because everybody any anyway marked. So what's the big deal

Gene Roddenberry
Part 2  Being a Witness, Storytelling, Play, and Art With Ella Reilly

Creative Therapy Umbrella

02:15 min | 4 months ago

Part 2 Being a Witness, Storytelling, Play, and Art With Ella Reilly

"Then I have another lovely example of, you know, a child very much taking what they need and knowing what they need. And, and I had this little guy in Iraq and this was ages ago, but he, you know, he had come in and was it was pretty obvious that it was kind of an insecure attachment. So a lot of distress with new people and unable to leave home side. You know, very much stuck to her. Glue, you know, wouldn't move with it were moving and so we, we did a lot of work around that move. Eventually got into sections that are owned and in one of our sessions, he walked over to to my books cuz they helped him quite load off the kitty ones. And he picked up the one. What is it called? A little babies? You come across that one. I haven't. I'm writing it down though. I will babies and I will, I hope you ma'am. Let me grab the the order so it's a really beautiful and yeah, it's called our babies and it's by Martin waddle. And it's illustrated by Patrick Ben Branson. Now it's a relatively old book. I got a second-hand version on Amazon but he picked this up off and the story is is basically about one night. These three baby owls. Wake up and Mom has gone. Okay. And they're, they're in the dark and they're they're in a forest and it's nighttime and and the three babies react very differently. But the youngest is is distraught and very worried and very much just cries out for Mom throughout the book. And and then, of course, mom eventually comes back after they try to comfort each other and, and do all sorts of things. Mom comes back. And I just love her reaction cuz she comes back. And she says, what's all the fuss? You know, she could come back and I remember, he picked up this book, and I read it to him. And he kind of looked at me, when I finished, she looked up at me and looked at the back of the little baby. And put his hand over the smallest owl and then just closed the book and put it back on the Shelf. But that will him, you know, he's, he's not baby owl, you know, as soon as this goes upstairs in high circles, the bathroom work goes to work. He's worried the whole time, you know, where's mom wears?

Patrick Ben Branson Iraq Amazon Martin Waddle Three Babies Three Baby Owls One Night ONE Ages Ago
Interview With Curator, Silja Leifsdottir, Norwegian Sculptors Society

The Wise Fool

01:17 min | 5 months ago

Interview With Curator, Silja Leifsdottir, Norwegian Sculptors Society

"Could you please pronounce your name correctly for me. My name is celia life stupid and you do many things you are both an artist and curator and then even within those. It seems like you're very many different things. Gimme a lay of the land. What are all the different roles. You have in the arts industry right now jeff. I have many hats. And i do enjoy that. Although we can be a bit confusing for myself and others at sometimes my main job my hundred percent main job is to be a curator at what in the region is called nashville running which translates to the region sculptor society. So that is one thing that i spend mondays to fridays on. But then i'm also the chair in the region curtis association and then. I started eleven years ago when i moved back to norway in oslo ice started what is now known as the snow art guides which is a free guide to the contemporary art scene in oslo and along with that we also arrange the also art weekend in september each year

Celia Region Sculptor Society Curtis Association Jeff Nashville Oslo Norway
Aubrey Marcus on Owning Your Day, Owning Your Life

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

02:05 min | 5 months ago

Aubrey Marcus on Owning Your Day, Owning Your Life

"Doing creative work can be kind of lonely. And that's why we built the unmistakable listener tribe. The tribe is community for professionals to connect and support each other. Everything is designed to help you. Grow your business and share. What's working and what isn't and that's true whether you're a business owner or an artist could access to feedback live conversations with guests and so much more by joining the tribe you become part of a community of creators who all support each other and completely free hopefully see their visit. A mystic will creative dot com slash tribe to join again. That's a single creative dot com slash tribe. Be welcome to the mystical critic. Thanks so much for taking the time to join us. Yeah happy to be here so it is really great to have you here. I was actually introduced to you by way of your book marketing team. Who sent me a copy of your new book. Own your day on your life which It was mind blowing and filled with all sorts of insight which we will get into integrate bit of detail. But before we get there. I want to start asking you. What did your parents do for a living. And what impact did what they did for a living. End up having on the choices that you've made with your life. Yeah it's an interesting question. Because i had no my parents split when i was two years old so i ended up having four parents and all of them brought a great diversity of career but the one common factor was that they were all great at what they did so. My mother was a professional tennis player and got as high as number. Six in the world to billie jean king in the semifinals. A women so she was an athlete and that was her career path for she met. My father and my father was a commodity trader. In one of the pioneers in futures trading commodities in the us and written about in a book called market wizard excellent in his craft there and then my stepfather was a swat team squad leader and former collegiate wrestler and my stepmother was the nutraceutical doctor for all of pat. Riley's teams so the lakers in eighties. Nixon the nineties heat in the two thousands in a bunch of other kind of peak performers.

Billie Jean King Tennis United States Riley PAT Lakers Nixon
Black Women Photographers Are "Intentional With This Community"

B&H Photography Podcast

02:05 min | 5 months ago

Black Women Photographers Are "Intentional With This Community"

"Today. We're going to be talking about building community and finding jobs in the world's photography and media and to do that we welcome journalist editor and photographer. Poly ringo poly works is in editor for wnyc. Here in town and a photograph published in buzzfeed bbc news. Cnn refinery twenty nine and okay player but polly is here with us. As the founder of black women photographers which is a global community and online database of black women and nonbinary photography's we also welcome photographer join banji. Dawn is a portrait. Photography art is based in virginia and through black women photography. She was hired for an assignment by the new york times. We're going to be speaking with doing about a photography and how be. Wpa has helped her find work and community. Welcome polly welcome dawn. And congratulations. Paulie up black in the photography's celebrating. Its first year anniversary this month. Thank you so much for that interim. Oh hey that's why they pay the big bucks. Okay thank you anyway. Let's it's been years. Let's talk about that Truly been a year it has been how have your thoughts and perceptions concerning a black photographers shifted costs over the past year of. Because this hasn't exactly been just another year right Now that's a great question. I mean for me. I really didn't know what to expect. You know everything that's happening. It's not what i had in mind like it's just been amazing to watch it unfold In it's happening like you said in the midst of this pandemic amidst of just crazy year I don't have to unpack for everyone listening and so it really has been able to. You know want for me at least personally. Just give me some sense of joy. Because i think it's so hard to find that join these times in Ah load is work to keep running. I mean it has been Really just joyous experience for me.

Poly Ringo Poly Polly Wnyc CNN BBC WPA Paulie Dawn The New York Times Virginia
The Power of Giving Yourself Permission to Do What You Love

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

01:58 min | 5 months ago

The Power of Giving Yourself Permission to Do What You Love

"And robin. Welcome to the creative. Thanks for taking the time to join us. Absolutely so i found out about you guys and your company bright blue gorilla when you guys wrote in and when i saw what you did i thought. Wow this is weird and it's cool. Which meant a kind of a no brainer for me has having you as But before we get into your work. I wanted to ask you. What did your parents do for work. And how did that end up. Shaping influencing the choices that you both made threat your lives and careers Interesting question. my dad was a salesman and His grandfather who came over from europe in the twenty s. He started business in new york and it was like stainless steel giant. Kettles that you cook bagels in or certain kinds of metal that they used on ships so my dad came out to california with my mom in the fifties and it was it was great because they were the first of the family to travel and get out of new york and leave tradition so my dad and mom really had a a pioneer spirit upcoming to a new place and setting up their lives here in los angeles. And i think that really influenced me that it's okay to go to new places and reinvent yourself and plus my dad. Being a salesman was a real people person. He's always been really good with people very friendly. Not afraid to talk to someone who doesn't know and That came in handy when i started booking our concert and film tours because you have to talk to a lot of people and you have to be persistent because you get a lot of knows along the way so i think i picked that up from my dad and my mom Mostly a homemaker but she was also into market research for a little while and she actually pretty good painter. So i think that influenced me plus. She always liked to wear bright colors.

Robin New York Europe California Los Angeles
In Your Shoes With Tim Brown

In Your Shoes With Mauro Porcini

02:08 min | 5 months ago

In Your Shoes With Tim Brown

"So the first question i wanna ask you to the straight to the point is out. Do become team brown. I mean you are a night club in the design war than there are many young designers. Probably right now listening to us and thinking out can i. He became somebody that team. That is not just a great design but he's also taught neither in our industry. You brought an amazing bull that iran right away as soon as he was out you really. You have the design war in so many ways. Whoever see the table in the business community and the business work. How do you get where you are today. you know. i wish. I had a very deep and sophisticated answer to that question but a lot of it i like so many i think of Things in life was was was a healthy dose of of good fortune and a little bit of a little bit of determination and perhaps a little bit of talent. But i think not so much talent along the other things but i was i. I was just very. I was very fortunate. I've always been very fortunate to to work with people who have inspired me and caused me to think about about design about About my role in designing and help point pointed direction. And the you know. I i whether it's people like bill mortgage david kelly who founded idaho and the many people that i've worked with an idea in the many great clients i work with. It's just been a continual sort of Kind of wonderful experience of working with smart people and and really just you know i i. I've spent my whole career really asking one question Which is this is. This is question of what's next. The design and the and that has kept me kinda focused on trying to understand the role of designed in the world and try and trying to help him promote the role of design the

Brown Iran David Kelly Idaho
Tamsen Webster on How to Make Your Big Ideas Irresistible

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

01:57 min | 5 months ago

Tamsen Webster on How to Make Your Big Ideas Irresistible

"Tamsin. Welcome to the unmistakable creative. Thanks for taking the time to join us. I am delighted to be back. Thank you so much for having me. Yeah absolutely you know. As i always say anytime we have somebody back a second time to me. That just says a whole lot. About what an amazing guests. They were the first time you have a new book out finding your red bed which we will get into but as you know from previous conversations. That's definitely not where. We're going to start so i thought we'd start by asking you. What is one of the most important things that you learned from one or both of your parents that have influenced shaped who you've become in what you ended up doing with your life All right so. I saved from my mother who is an anthropologist to observe what people do and to be curious about why they do it. I would say that's definitely from my mother for my father. Who definitely who's a system sneakers. He's a submariner. He was spent twenty years in the navy He he's very focused on on a two things. I think that i've picked up from him. One is have a way to do it and be clear about it And the second would be. Father is alone. Introver- assisi the loan extrovert and our family And so i think that from him. I have learned to appreciate the a joy in the unexpected serendipity that can come from being just talking to people being curious about them so my mother's very much of a quiet observer and my father is a as an engaged interviewer of fee by is probably a good way to think about it and i think there is value in both and so I i can see the lines of both of those influences in in everything that i do

Tamsin Navy
Great Women in Art History Make a Comeback

The Art Newspaper Weekly

02:09 min | 5 months ago

Great Women in Art History Make a Comeback

"The exhibition charts. How the concept of the new woman or the modern girl too call in the one thousand nine hundred twenty s and. I think it was more or less typified by this. Stylish image of a woman with bobbed hair Striding confidently out into the world to revolutionize photography. How did the idea for this exhibition. Take root seats of the exhibition. Really lie in my interest in the photographer. Elsa bang When i started working at the national gallery of art back in twenty ten I became very interested in things. Work the national gallery has over ninety photographs by bing and many of those were given by the photographer and her state in the early nineteen nineties. And you know being someone who really made an important contribution to the field of photography she worked almost exclusively with a thirty five millimeter hand held camera and she was one of the few women photographers that the national gallery had collected in depth. So i was interested in in her work. I was interested in exploring. You know how her life story really exemplified. What one thinks about as into war new woman photographer. She was brought up in an a fluent jewish household in frankfurt germany. She went to college but she ends up abandoning promising academic career for photography. She moved to paris in nineteen thirty. Paris was this vital center for artistic experimentation and you know she really develops and builds this promising career. I mean she's being published regularly during the nineteen thirty. She's participating in photography exhibitions. But of course. This success was cut short when the nazis took paris. Nineteen forty she and her husband were actually sent to a concentration camp in southern france. They're able to find their way their passage to the united states. But after you know this exile to the united states she really was never able to gain a comparable professional foothold

Elsa Bang National Gallery National Gallery Of Art Bing Frankfurt Paris Germany France United States