African American

Listen to the latest audio content in African American culture, identity, politics and history. This playlist features African American individuals having great conversations on relevant topics through a cultural lens. Broadcast from premium podcasts.

Why The KKK Was Sick of this Black Doctor

Black History Year

03:05 min | 9 hrs ago

Why The KKK Was Sick of this Black Doctor

"Officially one hour until your favorite show premieres. Time to get some snacks delivered through Instacart. Okay, let's get some popcorn seltzer, chocolate covered almonds, and wait, did they release the whole season? Better cards of ice cream for the two part finale. When your day should be ending, but a new season is starting, the world is your cart. Visit Instacart dot com or download the app and get free delivery on your first order. Offer valid for a limited time minimum order $10. Additional terms apply. One of the most famous doctors of his time could not step foot in a hospital to treat his own patients. Even if they were about to die. What did he do to deserve such treatment from the medical community? This is too many black history. What you didn't learn in school. If you got sick before the 1950s, chances were, you would either die for lack of care or be carelessly treated by a white doctor. If they would even see you. Why? In the Jim Crow era, endless limitations prevented black doctors from properly treating their patients. While some black hospitals existed, racially biased white doctors and nurses often ran and staffed these spaces. If black doctors had patience that needed to be hospitalized, by law, they had to turn over those patients to white doctors. That is, until this man came along. Doctor John a Kinney was born to enslaved parents in Virginia in 1875. After successfully completing college and medical school, he worked with Booker T. Washington and eventually became his personal physician. He also became an activist in fault against laws that kept black doctors out of hospitals, but then horror struck. When he tried to integrate hospitals with black and white doctors and nurses, the Ku Klux Klan burned down his house and tried to kill him. Still, he persisted and raised enough money to open the Kenny memorial hospital, named after his parents. His legacy wasn't finished, however. His children all became doctors and led hospitals across the nation. Isn't it amazing what we can achieve, even in the face of hatred and adversity? In order to move towards the future, you've got to look to the past. This has been two minute black history. A podcast by push black. Show your support by sharing this episode on your social media, and join us in amplifying black history stories. We all deserve to know.

Jim Crow Kinney Booker T. Washington Kenny Memorial Hospital Virginia John
A highlight from Ep. 718 - The #1 reason Republicans refuse to denounce Donald Trump for dining with a Neo-Nazi bigot

The Breakdown with Shaun King

00:46 sec | 20 hrs ago

A highlight from Ep. 718 - The #1 reason Republicans refuse to denounce Donald Trump for dining with a Neo-Nazi bigot

"Last week, Donald Trump had a dinner. With an open bigot with an avowed neo Nazi white supremacist named Nick Fuentes. And Republicans just can't denounce it. One is it's obvious they are deep into Trump and they don't want to cross him. But there's a much bigger reason. Why they can't denounce something that should be so easy to speak out on. Just say you wouldn't do it yourself. Just say you don't approve of it. But they can't. For one primary reason, and I want to unpack and explain that today, this is Sean king, and you are listening

Nick Fuentes Donald Trump Sean King
A highlight from Healing Generational Trauma in Your Own Backyard with Yonnette Fleming

Black History Year

08:15 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Healing Generational Trauma in Your Own Backyard with Yonnette Fleming

"As inheritors of centuries long oppression, black folks have a lot to heal from. Caring for our bodies our minds and our emotions is imperative. But look into a racist food and medical systems for help has proven fruitless time and time again. But land is loyal to no man or systems. Only to mother nature. And in the soil, might lie the ancestral wisdom we need to heal collective wounds and strengthen the black community. I'm Jay from push black. And you're listening to black history year. To help us identify where to begin Tapping back into the lens regenerative power, we're sitting down with your net Fleming. Also known as farmer yawn. Farmer Yan is a Guyana born and Brooklyn based healer, urban food justice farmer and educator. She's authored the book titled a time for healing. Recipes for health and reconnection to mother earth. And she's the VP of the hattie carthan community garden. She's on a mission to bridge the gap between generations to unite and exchanging historical knowledge for sustainable living and health. All right, so stay tuned for a great conversation on how to restore our relationship with the earth's natural resources. First up is a story about a freedom fighter who refused to let racism run her or her community off the land. Racist poisoned their black farm, but her comeback made them sick. Fannie Lou hamer's family worked hard to go from sharecropping to owning a farm, but one day, they returned home to find that their cows had been executed. Who would do such a thing? It turned out a jealous white neighbor had snuck onto their property and poisoned their livestock. Ruining their years of hard work and forcing them back into sharecropping. Hamer remained haunted by the destruction for decades. However, she was determined to fight for civil rights and dedicated her life to speaking out against racism and injustice. In 1967, hamer secured a grant and purchased 40 acres in the Mississippi Delta to launch the freedom, farm, cooperative, and opportunity for black people to be self reliant and build something together. It was a sprawling oasis of fresh foods where folks lived and worked grew their own food and protected each other from white terrorism. Hammer knew firsthand there was freedom and farming. She wanted us to Stewart our own land and the freedom farm eventually spanned more than 700 acres. Her legacy continues to be a call to action for us globally. Today, only 1.4% of U.S. farmers are black. As South Africa, black people are still fighting to take back their land from white colonizers. Like hamer, we must commit to self determination and the power of black community to truly be free. Officially one hour until your favorite show premieres. Time to get some snacks delivered through Instacart. Okay, let's get some popcorn seltzer, chocolate covered almonds, and wait, did they release the whole season? Better cards of ice cream for the two part finale. When your day should be ending but a new season is starting, the world is your cart. Visit Instacart dot com or download the app and get free delivery on your first order. Offer valid for a limited time minimum order $10. Additional term supply. Tell me, what does black liberation look like to you? Liberation is such an interest in word. Because you could be liberated from one oppressor and find yourself smack dab in the middle of another oppressor. But liberation. In its highest form when I think of it, some people think that it means like freedom, but it's really an interesting word. Liberation to me means healing. And it means healing from self betrayal. They are levels at which we liberate ourselves from betrayal. And so it's ongoing. The process of liberation, this ongoing, for all of us. What does it look like for you and the work that you do? It means taking off levels of programming, false programs, and oppression, it means repair heal and repair for the most part in my work. Yeah, so when we talk about healing repair and the broken systems, I'd like to get a real solid understanding of what it looks like when it comes to the work you do with the food system and so our work is on the intersections. There is no single issue, it's all connected and interconnected. So our work finds itself at an interconnected place, we as a total group, meaning all of us on the planet are facing like a collective extinction and collapsed. That's where we are now. And so the work now as a maroon is to reconnect and to repair and to make sure that the consciousness of our people is intact for the next iteration of this game. yourself as maroon, dig more into that for me please. Well, I find myself as a maroon, that is my identity. I've always understood myself on Zoom or on someone who remembers the ways that we have managed to survive. I was born in South America, so where I am from, and my people are the duke of people, the people of the guyanas and the Dutch Guiana British Guiana where the Dutch the British and the French are explored and broke up those territories. The morons of always been a people, you've lived in mountainous regions. We've lived outside, mostly hidden for a very long time. And so that hidden feature has given us some resilience and some other things that we might be aware of that can help our communities to thrive what's up everybody. I'm hosting a new podcast, no mercy with Stephen a Smith. That's no spell K and OW mercy. Listen, as I pull back the curtain on all things beyond the world of sports. My no mercy podcast will be three new episodes every week, making this podcast a great one to add to your weekly routine. On no mercy, I'll be interviewing influential guests outspoken celebrities and thought leaders across the political financial and social spectrum. I'll be sharing my thoughts on social issues, politics, and beyond the goal is to keep an open dialog, of course. I want to spark your curiosity and give you answers. From a different perspective, you know me, I'll give you my unbiased opinion on breaking news and entertainment stories that'll leave you motivated and informed. Don't worry. I'll always offer my comments about what's going on in the sports world too. A new mercy episode drops every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. No mercy with Stephen a Smith. A presentation of K to 13 and Odyssey studio available on an Odyssey app or wherever you listen to

Farmer Yan Hattie Carthan Community Garde Hamer Fannie Lou Hamer Guyana Fleming Mississippi Delta JAY Brooklyn Hammer U.S. Stewart Dutch Guiana South Africa Guiana
A highlight from Ep. 717 - Donald Trump just dined with a literal Neo-Nazi and white supremacist. It's a dangerous normalization and escalation of bigotry in America.

The Breakdown with Shaun King

01:07 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Ep. 717 - Donald Trump just dined with a literal Neo-Nazi and white supremacist. It's a dangerous normalization and escalation of bigotry in America.

"A huge percentage of my life has been spent tracking down and holding bigots, racist, white supremacist, neo Nazis and others like them accountable. And just this week Donald Trump had at Mar-a-Lago, Nick Fuentes. And expressed clear explicit neo Nazi. A Holocaust denier, a white supremacist, someone who is actually behind violence and attacks in Charlottesville and other places has been banned from all social media because of how dangerous this man is. He is meeting with an ex-president who is running for president. It is the normalization of hate in a way that we have not seen before. That this man is meeting with Donald Trump while he's running for president, is extremely dangerous, and I need to unpack and explain it. All right? This is Sean king, and you are listening to. The

Neo Nazis Nick Fuentes Donald Trump Charlottesville Sean King
A Brutal and Bloody Battle Of The Soul We Should All Know About

Black History Year

03:24 min | 4 d ago

A Brutal and Bloody Battle Of The Soul We Should All Know About

"With unlimited access to 10,000 plus workouts from world class studios and trainers. Lululemon studio is everything you need to be your best. Take a class in cardio, strength, yoga, dance, boxing, stretch, or any of our 60 plus class types, or visit any of our U.S. participating partner studio locations, including pure bar, rumble, and Y 7 studio, and save 20% on any in person class. The mirror is the center of your Lululemon studio membership. See your reflection alongside your trainer in a full HD display and track your metrics. All in an elegant design that fits any space in your home. For a limited time, you can bring Lululemon studio into your home for just $745. Visit Lululemon studio dot com and use code cadence to take advantage of our best deal of the year. Full price last offered ten four 22, Lululemon studio content features and member benefits subject to change. We will fight till the last of us falls in the battlefields. Bellowed these words, a charge to her people. They wouldn't bow out from this fight. They couldn't. The liberation of their very souls depended on it. This is two minute black history, what you didn't learn in school. As slavery ended, Britain was determined to continue colonizing Ghana, beginning with the ashanti people. They went after the ashanti's most sacred symbol. The golden stool. The golden stool possesses and protects the literal soul of the asante people. You can imagine the ashanti's disgust and rage when Britain demanded, they surrender the stool. Collectively, ashanti chiefs gathered to prepare for war. But some lost faith, knowing it was likely they would lose. They are standing tall and proud amongst these crestfallen men was the one and only. Yah asantewa. Yaa asantewa bellowed is it true that the bravery of the ashanti is no more? If you men of ashanti will not go forward, we the women will. I shall haul upon my fellow women. We will fight the white men. We will fight till the last of us falls in the battlefields. Inspired, the chiefs vowed to fight for ashanti liberation until their dying breath. Led by asante, the asante resisted Britain for months before yaw asantewa and other chiefs were captured and exiled. White supremacy wants to own our bodies and our souls. Knew its only when they own our souls that we're due. With white supremacy constantly coming for us, what are we doing to ensure we're ready for the fight? Physically, and spiritually. In order to move towards the future, you've got to look to the past. This has been two minute black history, a podcast by push black.

Lululemon Britain Ashanti Chiefs Boxing Yah Asantewa Yaa Asantewa U.S. Ghana Yaw Asantewa Ashanti Chiefs
A highlight from Ep. 716 - The one solution for sports teams owned by open bigots

The Breakdown with Shaun King

01:01 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Ep. 716 - The one solution for sports teams owned by open bigots

"For my entire life. Anytime I see photos from the 50s and 60s of young white students, sometimes in elementary school, middle school, high school, college. Blocking black students from entering elementary schools, middle schools, high schools, colleges all over the Deep South and sometimes even beyond the Deep South. I always wonder. Where are these people? Who are these people? What have they gone on to do? And it just so turns out that in 1957, as white students in Little Rock Arkansas gathered together to block black students from entering. There was one Jerry Jones, the owner of the Dallas Cowboys. And there's no better day than Thanksgiving a day in which the cowboys always play. To unpack and explain it, let's talk about it. I have a problem, but there is a solution. This is Sean king, and you're listening to, the breakdown.

Little Rock Jerry Jones Arkansas Dallas Cowboys Cowboys Sean King
A highlight from The Sour, True History Behind The Baby Formula Shortage

Black History Year

01:32 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from The Sour, True History Behind The Baby Formula Shortage

"Quadruplets in the world. And though they were perfectly healthy, what ultimately happened to them is downright sicknick. The white Doctor Who delivered them lied to their father and took advantage of their mothers and ability to hear or speak. He named the girls after his own family members and injected them with dangerously high levels of vitamin C then, he did something that still traumatizes black mothers today. Acting as the girl's legal representative, the doctor cut deals with baby formula companies thirsty to reach black women. Only a few generations removed from serving as wet nurses for white women while their own children suffered. Black women were taught to believe they were bad mothers if they didn't use baby formula. Once black women became major consumers of formula, the company's flipped the script. They used aggressive marketing, depicting black women who used baby formula as lazy or unnatural mothers. Today, black women face criticism no matter what they do. But formula shortages affect black parents the hardest. In order to move towards the future, you've got to look to the past. This has been two minute

A highlight from Ep. 715 - HOLD UP! Herschel Walker just admitted on his taxes that his primary residence is in Texas.

The Breakdown with Shaun King

00:58 sec | 6 d ago

A highlight from Ep. 715 - HOLD UP! Herschel Walker just admitted on his taxes that his primary residence is in Texas.

"Did you know that Herschel Walker doesn't even live in Georgia? Why is there a neck to neck Senate race? With a man that was born and raised and does live in Georgia. Rafael Warnock why is it even close? When his opponent has filed with Texas as his primary state of residence, including in this year's taxes, it's ridiculous. They are many reasons. To not be a fan of Herschel Walker, but it's incredibly frustrating with me. We saw Doctor Oz try to do the same thing and he lost. Now we're seeing Herschel Walker trying to do the same thing and hopefully he loses. But listen. Don't vote someone in office that doesn't really live in your state. They're not going to represent you well. Let me unpack and explain it. We got to talk about this. This is Sean king, and you are listening

Herschel Walker Rafael Warnock Georgia Doctor Oz Senate Texas Sean King
Harry Belafonte Tricked A Racist Landlord In The Most Genius Way

Black History Year

02:56 min | 6 d ago

Harry Belafonte Tricked A Racist Landlord In The Most Genius Way

"Officially one hour until your favorite show premieres. Time to get some snacks delivered through Instacart. Okay, let's get some popcorn seltzer, chocolate covered almonds, and wait, did they release the whole season? Better cards of ice cream for the two part finale. When your day should be ending, but a new season is starting, the world is your cart. Visit Instacart dot com or download the app and get free delivery on your first order. Offer valid for a limited time minimum order $10. Additional terms apply. Harry Belafonte tricked their racist landlord in the most genius way. This is two minute black history. What you didn't learn in school. When yet another landlord denied his rental application, he knew it could only be because of race. So he got an idea and they were not ready for the trick that he had up his sleeve. He was furious. How could they deny him again? Harry Belafonte had sold millions of records and had the bank account to prove it. But still, Manhattan landlords kept refusing him. Despite his fame, white supremacy was relentless. In 1958, housing was rife with racist landlords who refused to rent to black people. But mister belafonte not only had money, he had an extremely clever trick up his sleeve. First, he sent his white publicist to get the rental paperwork in his place. But someone told the building manager that a black tenant had moved in and with an hour's, they forced him to leave. So he went bigger. He set up a fake real estate company and bought the entire building. Belafonte moved right in and some of his friends did so too. Like Lena Horne, who was struggling to rent a place. Although the fair housing act exists today, this still happens. We experience housing discrimination when renting and especially when investing in a home. I've been a Horton experienced this firsthand when an appraiser low balled her family's Florida home. The value shot up on the reappraisal after she removed family portraits in black books, from their house. Racism remains ingrained in every part of our society and housing inequality is still happening. Like belafonte, sometimes we may have to get creative to beat this system. In order to move towards the future, you've got to look to the past. This has been two minute black history, a podcast by push black, show your support by sharing this episode on your social media and join us in amplifying black history stories we all deserve to know.

Harry Belafonte Mister Belafonte Manhattan Belafonte Lena Horne Horton Florida
A highlight from Ep. 714 - Kyrie Irving NEVER needs to apologize again for sharing a link on Twitter. He has apologized more than enough.

The Breakdown with Shaun King

08:29 min | Last week

A highlight from Ep. 714 - Kyrie Irving NEVER needs to apologize again for sharing a link on Twitter. He has apologized more than enough.

"Print. He's apologized in social media. He's apologized in person. He's apologized privately behind the scenes. He's apologized at press conferences. Do not ask this man to apologize again for the link that he posted on social media. Don't do it. What we're seeing now in so many ways is what happens when almost every member of the sports press and sports media is white and almost every athlete in the NBA is black. Yesterday, at a press conference for the Brooklyn Nets over and over and over again. White member of the media after white member of the media after white member of the media continued to press Kyrie Irving to either get caught up in his words to apologize again for something that he's already apologized for to address something that he's already addressed to address new issues around anti semitism and no matter what he said. The next member of the media and the next member and the next member continued to press him on it. And at this point, he has done and said more than enough. He has apologized more than I can recall any white man ever apologizing for anything. It's crossed a ridiculous line. I want to play this clip from his press conference. And we'll also have a quick word from one of our sponsors. But let me play this clip from the press conference, and then I'll be right back. Breakdown. Outside, hundred possibly more they were wearing a called Israel united in Christ. There are a group of people who think there's a conversation for another day. I'm just here to focus on the game. Carrie, but you've said this whole time that you didn't know what kind of like what basically what kind of voice you had. And but if these are the people that are out here in your name, do you feel like you have a consequence that we've done? Again, I'm just here to focus on the game. Kyrie forgive me if you've been asked this already, but when you were suspended, there were a lot of players around the league, you know, Jalen Brown is one specifically that didn't like the way your suspension was handled. I'm just curious if you ever thought about filing a grievance or exploring those avenues at all. I got a lead out to my legal team. And leave it to the warriors I have around me. I have some strong people men and women around me that are going to do everything possible to make sure that I'm protected and my family's protected and we protect one another. So, you know, I'm sure some things will be done in the future. There's no timetable on that right now. Hank, Harry. I know you said you just want to talk about the game, but this morning you talked about using a recognizing the platform you have, why not unify you're being asked about things that are being said in your name and reaction to the movie promoted. I'm curious, I guess how you go about deciding when's the time to use a platform and when it's not and what you decide to react when you say it's one here to talk about basketball? I would like to be on a platform where I could openly share how I feel without being harshly criticized or being labeled or dealing with outside perceptions I have nothing to do with me. So I want you to hear what Kyrie Irving is dealing with at the press conference. It actually went on for one whoever recorded it at sped it up a little bit and it wasn't going that quickly. But it went on and on and on. Nobody asking anything about basketball and continuing to ask him in essence. If he disavows anti semitism, if he disavows white supremacy, some protesters were outside of Barclays center, they were actually, it appeared to be they were black Hebrew Israelites who were just outside showing solidarity with Kyrie, Kyrie didn't organize it didn't make it happen. He wasn't affiliated with it. He's not affiliated with the black Hebrew Israelites. And everybody continued to press him over and over. If he knew them, what did he think about them? And it was clear that they weren't trying to get good information. They were just trying to get him caught up. And no matter what Kyrie said and said, listen, I'm just here to talk about basketball. I'm not going to address this. It's clear that they didn't want to talk about basketball. And it wasn't that they were trying to get new information. They just wanted to get the man caught up again. And, you know, he's going to have to. It's the NBA rule. You have to go out and do your press conferences. I damn near would prefer to just pull him from the press conferences. If this is all we're going to see, like just take the fine, remove him. Like, he is not an expert, nor am I on anti semitism. Stop trying to get him to talk about it, stop trying to get his opinion on it. The man has already said, he disavows all anti Jewish sentiments. He disavows anti semitism, he does not support anybody else who was anti semitic. He has apologized, profusely. It's too much. And he never needs to apologize for this again. Period. If he chooses to ask his business, to quit pressing this man to apologize, yesterday a clip went super viral of what looked like a few hundred black men standing outside of the Barclays center as a show of support for Kyrie Irving. And a lot of people retweeted it and shared it across social media, I couldn't hear anything they were saying, it just seemed like a good thing that these black men had showed up to support Kyrie. Kyrie had nothing to do with organizing it or anything else. The men were somehow affiliated either with black Hebrew Israelites or another group. I am not a 100% sure because I only hear other people talking about them. Jaylen Brown of the Boston Celtics retweeted the video and just said, this is the kind of energy we need, where black men are supporting black men. Well, then the media started calling for him to apologize because they said those black men were not the kind of black men that you can support. They are not on the list of available black men for athletes to support in essence. And started calling on jaylen Brown to apologize to disavow himself with those black men. And Jalen Brown said, listen, I don't know who those black men are. I just saw a lot of young, strong brothers out there supporting Kyrie and was glad to see it. Then he said, hell, I thought they were members of omega sci-fi, the black fraternity. It kind of looked like that. They were wearing the omega colors, whether that was on purpose or not. I have no idea. But here's the thing. The over policing of black speech has crossed a ridiculous line at this point. Where everything that every black athlete and every black entertainer says is being basically scrutinized to the highest degree. As if black people are the primary or a primary threat to Jewish people in America, it's not true. And yet, this hyper focus on the tweets and words and actions and thoughts of black people is too much. It's outrageous. And it's crossed a line where I'm incredibly frustrated. And it's frustrating a lot of people. This is not helping. At all. Not even a little bit. And while the overpolicing of black speech is not new, it's, I don't remember it in modern history. Being this fierce.

Kyrie Irving Kyrie Brooklyn Nets Jalen Brown Basketball Barclays Center NBA Carrie Hank Warriors Israel White Harry Jaylen Brown Boston Celtics America
A highlight from The Spiritual Significance Behind This Color Was Important To Enslaved Africans

Black History Year

01:58 min | Last week

A highlight from The Spiritual Significance Behind This Color Was Important To Enslaved Africans

"Exodus 39 one. Tells us for the priests who served in the holy place. They decorated finely woven garments with blue, purple, and scarlet thread donated by the people. Blue was special to priest, but our people have a spiritual connection to this color. What is it? Traveling through the south, you might notice a pattern. Many homes proudly showcase porch ceilings, doors, and window treatments, painted a specific color blue. The selection, many are surprised to learn, goes way deeper than a design preference. The color symbolism honors many rich African spiritual traditions. Including honoring one Europa deity, I am meatball. Many black families believe this color blue protects their families against evil spirits, known as hints. Conjuring up the illusion of uncrossable water, or of the expanse of the sky. But that's not all the appropriately named heat blue signifies. In the 18th century, indigo plants produced coveted blue dye. Its production drove the economy of colonial era South Carolina with a value that far exceeded cotton. Its rich tone served as a reminder of the atrocities committed against enslaved laborers on indigo plantations. In spite of the historic wrongs, perpetuated against their ancestors behind this rare die. A reclamation movement is rising. Blue has a history of suffering within our bloodlines. But it also signifies the ability of our people to survive boundless racism and oppression. Find something blue

South Carolina
A highlight from Ep. 713 - The Internet has made too many of us mean as hell

The Breakdown with Shaun King

04:56 min | Last week

A highlight from Ep. 713 - The Internet has made too many of us mean as hell

"Listen, the Internet can be a very ugly, very intolerant, very bigoted, very mean spirited place. And that doesn't come as a shock to you. We all know this. And at any given moment, that means spirited, ugliness can come out into the real world offline in ways that are deadly, I am thinking in particular of a brutal mass shooting at a gay club in Colorado Springs, Colorado. And at least 5 people were killed. Nearly 20 more shot and shot obviously with some of the most horrific weapons on earth, and so when you're shot with these weapons, it changes your life forever. And this attack, we don't know all of the details yet about who the shooter is and want the shooter was motivated by, but we do know. Every single day, people are saying and doing ugly things to the LGBTQ community. We see it often. People now politicizing drag shows and making it as if, you know, people are trying to harm your children, what drag shows. All types of foolishness. And what I know and whether this bears itself out with this particular shooting or not, what I know is if you demean a person or group enough, it can motivate people to do ugly things to them. Obviously, I've experienced this in my own life. When you demean a person so much, even when that person suffers harm, people stop caring, because that person has already been demonized and belittled and made small, and made into an enemy. And so when harm comes their way, people just keep on moving. I see right now. I'm just going to own it, it's hard for me to change this reality. And I'm not, I'm not even frustrated that it exists. I bring a lot of different people together. And so if you are a part of the community that I've built on my Instagram page, on there is every race every ethnicity, every nationality, every faith and religion, every orientation, it's all there. And they are virtually no rules on how people interact online in these comments sections. And I see sometimes in the comments, it can get very ugly. And most often I see people say something offensive. And it's clear to me that they frequently weren't aware that it was offensive. So they genuinely offended somebody. We didn't know they did it. They didn't say it to offend somebody. They thought they were being insightful or they thought they would just participate in the conversation. And it might creep into what I would call casual bigotry. Where they just very casually very comfortably walked right into a created a bigoted moment for the rest of the people. And then everybody will pile up on that person and say, you can't say this or that's racist or anti semitic or whatever it may be. And the person just is like, hold on, hold on, hold on. Why am I being attacked? And there's rarely. Much understanding or forgiveness or education going on in the comments section. People try all of those things. But people tense up and don't receive it. And it's to the point where I'm seeing a lot of good people. Say things that are harmful, frustrating, irritating, about entire ethnic groups and nationalities, et cetera. And I have one lesson. One key idea that I want to share with you is something that I try my best to practice every day and have done so for years. I'm going to tell you what it is right after the break. We have a quick word from one of our sponsors that I'll be right back. The breakdown.

Colorado Springs Colorado
A highlight from The Fight for Food Justice with Cheryl Whilby

Black History Year

02:12 min | Last week

A highlight from The Fight for Food Justice with Cheryl Whilby

"So we've all heard the saying that goes you are what she, but when you don't know what's on the plate, what are you? I'm Jay from push black and you're listening to black history year. Like all imperialist institutions. America's food system is killing us. By controlling who can and can not access food by determining what we can and can not eat. White supremacy has starved millions of black folks while demanding we pay for a commodified natural resources like water and food. But black people come from a long line of survivalists and self sufficient farmers. We are the descendants of enslaved and free black people who independently form the land to feed themselves, their families, and their communities. Today, black activist farmers are tracing their ancestors footsteps and the fight for food justice. That includes our guests today. Sarah will be is the communications and development director and soul fire farm. And Afro indigenous centered community farm committed to uprooting racism and seeding sovereignty in the food system. She's coordinated the recovery of fresh fruits and vegetables from local farmers and other community partners and has served as the market manager of the synecdoche green market. She's also one of the 12 black food system leaders who developed the antiracist farmers market toolkit in collaboration with the farmers market coalition. Get ready for an insightful and important interview that would change your idea of what it means to have a good meal. Before we jump into it though, we need to talk about a Jim Crow farming system that still affecting black folks today.

JAY America Sarah Jim Crow
A highlight from Ep. 712 - Democrats are going to have to quickly make some hard decisions about who all runs for President

The Breakdown with Shaun King

01:06 min | Last week

A highlight from Ep. 712 - Democrats are going to have to quickly make some hard decisions about who all runs for President

"Now that Donald Trump has announced that he's running for president, it really does shape the race. It shapes the Republican primaries in so many ways. And in my opinion, it really also shapes how the Democrats are going to need to run against him. Will it be Joe Biden against him? But what if Ron DeSantis runs, if Ron DeSantis beats Donald Trump can Joe Biden beat Ron DeSantis? Should Joe Biden run? I've even changed my opinion a little bit on that and want to tell you what I'm thinking. The Democrats have some real decisions to make. And none of them are easy. Because they've lost control of the House, they have the Senate majority by one vote. And if they lose the presidency, the Democrats for all intents and purposes were really be out of power. And the race is already underway and a lot of stuff is going on behind the scenes. And so I want to just game plan a couple scenarios with you and talk you through it and unpack and explain what I think is going to happen next. This is Sean king and you're listening

Ron Desantis Joe Biden Donald Trump Senate House Sean King
The Little-Known Civil Rights Leader Who Paved The Way For Rosa Parks

Black History Year

02:41 min | Last week

The Little-Known Civil Rights Leader Who Paved The Way For Rosa Parks

"Sweat, drip down her back as the bus driver told her to move for a white lady. She said, absolutely not. We're not talking about Rosa Parks. We're talking about someone, they never wanted us to know. This is two minute black history, what you didn't learn in school. In 1955, 15 year old claudette colvin stood up for her right to sit where she pleased on a segregated bus. As police forcibly removed her from the bus, she kept yelling. It's my constitutional right. So why was her story cast aside? The NAACP considered using her case to advance their cause. But galvin was a poor and pregnant teenager. Unfortunately, the NAACP didn't think her story would be appealing. So they tapped NAACP secretary Rosa Parks to try the same action. According to colvin, quote, parks was an adult. They didn't think teenagers would be reliable. Kevin also reported that parks skin color and hair texture made her a better representation for the NAACP. Quote, her skin texture was the kind that people associate with the middle class. She fits that profile. Parks went on to become a civil rights icon. But colvin's story didn't become well known until decades later. Both women were crucial to the movement, but unfortunately, respectability politics dictated cold and story was not good enough for white approval. We must know that respectability politics won't save us. It only serves to hide the richness of our community and our humanity. Like colvin, we must know our worth and always stand up for our rights. In order to move towards the future, you've got to look to the past. This has been two minute black history, a podcast by push black.

Naacp Rosa Parks Claudette Colvin Colvin Galvin Kevin Parks
A highlight from Ep. 711 - EMERGENCY. Conservatives in Pennsylvania just voted to impeach Philadelphia DA Larry Krasner

The Breakdown with Shaun King

01:21 min | Last week

A highlight from Ep. 711 - EMERGENCY. Conservatives in Pennsylvania just voted to impeach Philadelphia DA Larry Krasner

"Yesterday and the Pennsylvania state House, Republicans voted on a party line vote to impeach Philadelphia district attorney Larry krasner. Larry, of course, committed no crimes violated no laws. He did nothing to deserve impeachment, but they went ahead and did this in a political stunt anyway. Although it's a political stunt, they actually did vote to impeach him. And it will now go to Republicans in the Pennsylvania state Senate, where they have control. And may actually vote at a quote unquote trial to remove Philadelphia's district attorney Larry krasner. It's a catastrophic development that will overturn the will of voters in Philadelphia. It's a major major setback, for those of us that are fighting for criminal justice reform and deep systemic change. And it not only matters to the people in Philadelphia, it matters to all of you who help Larry get elected, and you need to understand that this is coming to a city and a state near you. What they're doing now to Larry, they're going to cut and paste that and try to do it in your state as well. I need us to talk about it. Let me unpack and explain it. This is Sean king, and you are listening to the breakdown.

Larry Krasner Pennsylvania State House Philadelphia Larry Pennsylvania Senate Sean King
The Man Who Made Malcolm X The Hero He Became

Black History Year

02:51 min | Last week

The Man Who Made Malcolm X The Hero He Became

"Officially one hour until your favorite show premieres. Time to get some snacks delivered through Instacart. Okay, let's get some popcorn seltzer, chocolate covered almonds, and wait, did they release the whole season? Better cards of ice cream for the two part finale. When your day should be ending, but a new season is starting, the world is your cart. Visit Instacart dot com or download the app and get free delivery on your first order. Offer valid for a limited time minimum order $10. Additional terms apply. The man who made Malcolm X the revolutionary hero he became. This is two minute black history. What you didn't learn in school. The story of the man who helped Malcolm X become Malcolm X Malcolm X might have stayed as Detroit red. If it wasn't for a chance meeting in prison with Elton bembry, better known as bindi. Who showed him the power of education. But who was bendy? Malcolm X wrote that bimby was the first man I had ever seen command total respect with his words. Other inmates and even prison guards would sit around and listen to him. Bim B's inspiration motivated X to become the legendary figure we all know today. But who was he? John Elton benbury grew up during The Great Depression in North Carolina and was orphaned young. Despite his brilliance, work was scarce. He tried to survive, however he could, and ended up spending time in jail. During one of those stints, his passion for education would change the world. In the Malcolm X film, bimbi is called baines, and not only encourages X to read, but introduces him to Islam. But that part wasn't true. Ben B and Malcolm did develop a friendship and envy's intellect and power inspired X two develop his own. The push towards self enlightenment put him on a path to become one of the greatest black leaders of all time. Education and self improvement are powerful forces that can enlighten us in the worst circumstances. Even incarceration. But they can also empower others. For what might have become of Malcolm X, if he had never met and been inspired by bin B and how radically different, might our lives have become. In order to move towards the future, you've got to learn from the past. This has been two minute black history, a podcast from push black.

Malcolm Malcolm X Malcolm Elton Bembry Bimby John Elton Benbury Bindi Bimbi Malcolm X Ben B Detroit Baines North Carolina Depression Bin B
A highlight from Ep. 710 - Lets talk about Donald Trump running for Presidentagain.

The Breakdown with Shaun King

01:10 min | Last week

A highlight from Ep. 710 - Lets talk about Donald Trump running for Presidentagain.

"Well, here we are. Again, Donald Trump is running for president again. I think this is the third election in a row, right? He won the first one, lost the next one. And here he is again. He'll be in his 80s. And yet it is what it is. He's running and we need to talk about it. And for anybody saying we don't need to talk about it. I agree that we don't need to obsess over it. But we have to talk about it. He is a serious challenger. He is still the number one most popular Republican. Although Ron DeSantis is coming up quick. And I need to talk about what I think is going to happen. I think there's some Democrats that Trump could defeat if he won the nomination. But I think Trump will struggle more than he expects to get this nomination. There are some other things at play as well. I just want us to talk about it. Let me unpack and explain it. This is Sean king. You are

Donald Trump Ron Desantis Sean King
A highlight from Session 284: ICYMI, Understanding Seasonal Affective Disorder

Therapy for Black Girls

07:45 min | Last week

A highlight from Session 284: ICYMI, Understanding Seasonal Affective Disorder

"My archive that not only matches the literal season we're in, but also reflects the world we're still trying to figure out how to navigate. Growing up, you might have heard that people's moods change with the season. But did you know that there's actually some science behind that? Despite fall and winter being a time for family traditions and celebrations, it's also a time when more people may experience feelings of sadness, irritability, and fatigue. In this conversation with doctor Ellison Powell hicks, we talked about seasonal affective disorder or sad tips for managing depressive symptoms. How we can tell if symptoms are something we should be concerned about. How to support ourselves in this reimagined holiday season. And some of the relationship challenges that arose during the pandemic and how to manage them. If something resonates with you while enjoying our conversation, please share with us on social media using the hashtag TPG in session or join us over in the sister circle to talk more in depth about the episode. You can join us at community and therapy for black girls dot com. Here's our conversation. Thank you so much for joining us today, doctor alley. Well, thank you for having me. Yes, it feels like we are overdue for a conversation. So I'm very glad we were able to get you on the schedule. So you may have seen this meme floating around social media with all the Spider-Man's pointing at one another, right? With seasonal affective depression meets COVID depression means normal depression, right? And it kind of feels like that is where many of us are, right? Like it just feels like there's been so much going on this year. And now we are hitting peak winter season. Let's start off by defining what seasonal affective disorder is. Well, what it is is it's an increase in depressive symptoms around specific seasons. Most commonly those seasons would be the beginning of fall through winter. Some people do experience some seasonal effective disorder in spring. That is very rare. The average person experiences this decrease in affect, this increase in sadness, maybe even some thoughts of suicide, low volition, low desire to do things that they used to live to do sleep, alterations, changes in diet, and maybe even some level of irritability. The experience some of those symptoms normally starting in fall or winter. There really isn't any difference in what those symptoms look like versus you just had depressive disorder, not otherwise specified or something like that. So can you talk about what people might be expecting or experiencing this year given what 2020 has been like? I think you said it perfectly. It's the too many Spider-Man like model. We have too many overlaying issues. There's a lot of issues happening right now because I mean we also have Black Lives Matter. We also have people concerned about their health insurance. We have people worried about their jobs. We have people worried about their rights on multiple different groups that are doing the threats from DACA people to people dealing with LGBT issues. There's so many co occurring stressors right now. It's something that I think we haven't seen in a hundred years. And so most of us were not alive and those of us who are a hundred weren't alive enough to have done anything a hundred years ago. And so what people can expect and what is a really typical is maybe some increased sadness, right? A level of sadness may be some slight changes in rhythm, like for example, people really haven't been getting out of bed at the same time that they used to when they used to have a job that they had to go to every day, so they had to be up at 5 30 in the morning to get ready. Maybe you're waking up at 7 30 instead or 8 o'clock or 9 o'clock. And some of those things are kind of expected, when you want to begin to get concerned is when these alterations begin to damage or alter the function of your life. So if now your diet and your appetite has changed so much that you're either gaining weight without trying to or losing weight without trying to. That's something to be concerned about if you notice that your sleep is changing so much that now you're sleeping throughout the whole day or you're not sleeping at night at all when you used to. These are the types of changes that you want to keep an eye out for. And how would we know though doctor Ellie, I mean, because so much of that already changed because of the pandemic, right? And so how would I know whether my functioning looks different now than it might have? Would I be comparing it to last year this time? What marker should I be looking for? I say we might need to narrow the comparison window now compare it to two months ago. It's a three months ago because we do have a baseline COVID function. And I think that we've kind of reached a point, at least here in California, I can only speak to. We've been in a level of quarantine since March 19th. And so we've all had a number of different experiences, like for me, the first two weeks I was petrified. Utterly petrified, I didn't sleep. I was in bed all day though. I was sad. I was anxious. I had so many emotions. It was really difficult for me to function. And then I started to kind of lift and everything started to kind of smooth out. Am I the same way I was last year at this time? I don't think so. But I think we begin to identify a rhythm that we have for COVID. So if you, let's say, I don't know who's doing this, but if you like showered every day during COVID, I don't know who's doing that. Maybe I'm telling them myself. I did shower today. But if you showered every day and now you notice you're showing once a week. Or you're showing every third day or you're showing every other day. That's something you can notice. So comparing your current functioning to where it was a few months ago. I think is the way we have to treat it now. That's a good idea. And let's back up a little bit. So what is it about the change in season that causes this difference in functioning? Yeah, it is all about sunshine. It is all about sunshine is that humans need sunshine in order to create vitamin D it's one of the best ways we create vitamin D obviously now we have vitamins and things that we can take supplements. But vitamin D from the sun is so important it helps to elevate mood. It helps to regulate circadian rhythms as well. So we also have melatonin that's impacted by our access to the sun and as well as serotonin and serotonin is something we're all very familiar with when it comes to people with depression, one of the first medications they take is an SSRI, which is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. So serotonin is really important in the way that we process emotions. And so when we have these two chemicals and one vitamin or mineral that are off, it can really change our behavior, the way that we feel in our own skin and the way that we relate to others. And so it is key to try to get as much sunlight as possible if you're in a state that has any California has some right now. But other states are under cloud cover. And so a lot of people have been getting those lights. Those are some nights, and it's really important because as we have more nighttime, we just have less hours in the day. One of my best friends with the Sweden, and I think they're getting like 5 hours of sunshine a day now. And winter hasn't even fully hit. Right, right. So can you talk more about the lights I know a lot of people do like the light boxes, right? And I love that they have become so much more accessible because ten years ago, I remember we would rip them out to students in the counseling center, right? Because it wasn't something that you could individually afford. But it feels like now there are lots of affordable versions. Can you talk a little bit about how the light boxes work? Yes. I release the same type of wavelength that the sun would. And so you can sit near these lights sitting upon what kind of light you have. You can turn it up as high as you can. You can get some of the benefits that you would have had from sunshine from these lights. And it's particularly important for people of color because melanin helps to protect us from the light from UV rays by reflecting more of the UV rays back. And so what it does is it

Depressive Symptoms Depression Ellison Powell Hicks Daca Depressive Disorder Ellie California Sweden
A highlight from Ep. 709 - The one MAJOR reason ALL of us need to help Raphael Warnock get elected in Georgia

The Breakdown with Shaun King

01:14 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Ep. 709 - The one MAJOR reason ALL of us need to help Raphael Warnock get elected in Georgia

"As you may know, the Senate as it stands right at this very moment is 50 to 49 in favor of the Democrats. And there's one election left that's gone to a runoff that is Rafael Warnock versus Herschel Walker. And it is now I'm looking at my calendar. It's now about three weeks away. It's on December the 6th. It's going to be here before you know it. And I understand how easy it could be. If you live in California, or if you live in New York, or if you live anywhere outside of Georgia to think, well, like what does this have to do with me? It has everything to do with you. Getting him elected, not just him, but getting the 51st vote for Democrats. Matters to get all kinds of things passed. But there's one thing that I have in mind, and I just need to impress upon you, it matters no matter where you are, no matter where you live, and no matter what you think about this race, it matters to you. Let me unpack and explain it. This is Sean king, and you are listening

Rafael Warnock Herschel Walker Senate Georgia California New York Sean King
Balenciaga’s $1,200 Sagging Pants Are Being Decried as Racist

The Breakfast Club

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

Balenciaga’s $1,200 Sagging Pants Are Being Decried as Racist

"Is being criticized over these. I'm sure you guys have seen. These sweats have boxes attached to them before. Yeah and women. They've had that for women like all different brands like the underwear shows above the longtime ago. Right so they're saying it's a boxer detailed designed to be visible above the waistline of the sweats so people and these by the way it costs eleven hundred ninety dollars but people are saying that gentrified sagging now and that's what people are upset about. He's saying that if we slash black kids were are this. We were going to be statistics and not do anything with our lives. Just for some years to pass him balenciaga to sell it for twelve hundred dollars. I don't care if they balenciaga's or you know just some regular levi's what you boxer briefs showing why you want you boxes showing. Why why are you want you draw. Sean there's been literally laws that make it illegal to have sagging pants at fashion designers are profiting off of the same thing. Black people were criminalised for

Balenciaga Levi Sean
Influential Educators: Fanny Jackson Coppin

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Influential Educators: Fanny Jackson Coppin

"Jackson coppin was born in eighteen. Thirty seven in washington. Dc she was born into an enslaved household fannies grandfather had managed to save up and by the freedom of four out of his six children. Fanny's mother was not among them as fanny recalls. in her autobiography. It was on account of her birth that her grandfather refused to buy her mother's freedom. So fanny remained enslaved until the age of twelve when her aunt bought her freedom for one hundred. Twenty five dollars after that fanny was sent off to new bedford. Massachusetts to live with the different ant by the age of fourteen fanny was fully supporting herself. As a paid servant in rhode island. She worked for author. George henry calvert household for six years during her time. They're fading used the money she earned to pay for tutoring and leader public schooling. It was at the rhode island state. Normal school where fanny. I realized her love for teaching and for making education accessible for all black people in eighteen. Sixty fanny enrolled in oberlin. College in ohio oberlin's courses were rigorous and it was the first college that accepted both black and women students while studying at oberlin. Fanny broke several glass ceilings. She was selected to join the highly coveted. Young ladies literary society. Fanny was the first black person chosen as a student teacher. She used this role to organize evening. Classes for newly freed people in her last year of college. Fanny was scouted by the institute for colored youth and philadelphia. The school was run by quakers who were in search of an african american woman who could teach greek latin and arithmetic officials at oberlin. Immediately new fanny would be perfect for the role. Fanny was an excellent teacher within a year. She was promoted to principal of the women's part of the school. Four years after that van became principal of the entire institute her position as such was extremely radical for the

Fanny Jackson Coppin Oberlin George Henry Calvert New Bedford Young Ladies Literary Society Washington Rhode Island Massachusetts Institute For Colored Youth Ohio Philadelphia VAN
The Life and Work of Mamie Phipps Clark

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:12 min | 1 year ago

The Life and Work of Mamie Phipps Clark

"Me was born on april eighteenth. Nineteen seventeen in hot springs arkansas. Her father was a well to do physician. His position gave the family comfort. Rarely afforded to black people at the time especially in the jim crow south while mamie attributed her later career successes to growing up the she did. She was not shielded from the stark racial realities outside her home. When she was six years old she witnessed a lynching in an interview in nineteen seventy six. She described knowing she was black at a young age. She said i became acutely aware of that in childhood. Because you had to have a certain kind of protective armor about you all the time. After graduating from high school. Mimi received a scholarship to attend howard university. A historically black college in washington. Dc she intended to study math which she loved but the professors proved uninspiring. Then she met a student. Named kenneth clarke who encouraged her to try out psychology. Kenneth suggestion led to me means lifelong career and to their forty six year. Long marriage the summer after mamie graduated. She worked in the law office of the prominent. Acp lawyer charles hamilton. Houston it was there that she witnessed preparation for racial segregation cases. When she went back to howard in the fall for her master's degree in psychology she planned to address racial disparities in her work. Mimi's thesis surveyed one hundred fifty black preschool age children and set out to understand at which age black children became aware that they were black for the study. She and kenneth presented the children with different photographs including of white boys black boys and images of animals and other objects. They asked the boys to pick which picture looked like them and then asked the girls to pick which picture look like their brother or other male relative mamie and kenneth concluded that the boys showed a racial awareness at three or four years old which kenneth described as disturbing mamie and kenneth were on the forefront of a shift in the field

Mamie Jim Crow Mimi Arkansas Kenneth Clarke Howard University Charles Hamilton Kenneth Washington Houston Howard
interview with Comics Creator Tyler Martin

Black Girl Nerds

02:09 min | 1 year ago

interview with Comics Creator Tyler Martin

"Give you a little food for thought here to kinda start us off. Bush your definition of evil. You know like a little devil like sitting on your shoulder like who will. What if i tried this. What if i did this are how about this quote. This is my favorite from the comic series. We're going to talk about today. The road to hail is paved with good intentions It got me thinking. I'm talking about the antagonists comic book series. I'm here with comic book. Creator writer tyler martin. He's also a publisher editor antiquated creative director. How you doing tyler. I am doing amazing ryan. Thank you so much for having me here. I'm so excited about today. Yeah i. I've been so excited talk to you about this. This is so cool before we dive into the tag and his family and these characters who are so cool. I got to start from the beginning. Because i know you're a self-proclaimed blurred a lover comic so we gotta start there and so my question is is there a character or just what about comics in general kind of captured. Your attention early on so. I was Raised by a single mom and just remember As early as five or six Mom and dad was calling. It was just tons of arguments tons of chaos. Sometimes and i remember that comic books and cartoon just that star wars and just that whole Nerd geek thing. At the time was my escape. It was a way to another reality and fell in love with it from then on. Yes you can tell like. I always love talking to the craters. The writers of these serious because you could tell us like that it kind of gives you that release a little bit that we're all like ooh. I wish i can just make that character. That's you know kind of taking me away from life a little bit and kinda right through. That character is pretty cool. Yeah i think you're absolutely right. I think all of us I always say that creative writing saves lives. I think all of us need some kind of outlet The world is too dark. Especially right now. Dr. too stressful if you don't have some type of outlived so hard out here for you so for me writing in comic books that was my way to say you know what forget what's going on. I got my own world to figure out

Tyler Martin Bush Tyler Ryan
Back to School With the President of the NEA

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

02:25 min | 1 year ago

Back to School With the President of the NEA

"When we talk about how you having an up close and personal view you really did with your family leading the nea. And i really appreciate you hitting on the point. That teachers are also parents. Because i think so. Many people forgot that they're just not here. You know schooling your kids. They also have to do the same for years. So when the pandemic hit. Let's go back to the beginning. What were you immediately thinking when you knew that. The majority of teachers and students couldn't be in physical classrooms in. How was that going. To impact education system in our i immediately started thinking about the disparate impact and that showed up right away but used the irony of the timing for me is that The nea had just convened over sixty groups education group civil rights groups at the end of february february twenty twenty. We combine them in a coalition that we called the homework gap coalition because we had so many students and families who did not have access to the internet who did not have technology tools that they had at home and we already knew that they were going home and coming back to school with a gab of opportunity because so much of the homework now required that they had that connectivity and are black and brown indigenous students did not have that mpm lease did not have that accident so we have put together this coalition to to address that and to demand from the federal government that they allocate funds to close that gap within a month. It was no longer about the homework out. It was about the learning and access to the classroom. Gap that again. Disparately impacted are black and brown digital students are students. Living in poverty are students with disabilities in our marginalized communities that had always all ready and always been impacted by these inequities. Now all of a sudden they're very access to learning had been cut off from them their access to meals. You saw that you saw that on full

NEA Federal Government