African American

Listen to the latest audio content in African American culture, identity, politics and history. This playlist features African American individuals having great conversations on relevant topics through a cultural lens. Broadcast from premium podcasts.

A highlight from Session 236: Healing Through Sound Meditation & Breathwork

Therapy for Black Girls

06:53 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Session 236: Healing Through Sound Meditation & Breathwork

"We had new routines, our gyms closed, our stress increased, and sadly, many people who are struggling with weight gain and weight regain are afraid to talk with their physicians in fear of being humiliated or talk down to. Despite what you might hear, weight itself is actually about so much more than diet and exercise. There's also science behind weight loss that may be making weight maintenance a challenge. So if you're struggling right now, we encourage you to work with the healthcare provider who can help develop a weight management plan that works for you. Watch HBO Max's new comedy series, the sex lives of college girls, now streaming. Get ready for another comedy series from Mindy Kaling, full of books, butts, boys, and four females who are a bundle of contradictions and hormones. These hilarious women stumble toward adulthood as they dive into new experiences, neck and parties, air rushed abs and caution tape dresses, refusing to be shamed for any of it. No rules, no regrets. Watch the sex lives of college girls now streaming only on HBO Max. It's important to note that healing looks different for all of us, and that each of us might find different things helpful. Joining us to chat about how he link can happen through sound meditation and breath work is linnaeus Smith Crawford. Linnea is a licensed marriage and family therapist. Holistic healer, wellness expert and entrepreneur. She earned her bachelor's degree in psychology from spelman college and her masters in marriage and family therapy with a certification in trauma therapy. In addition to her degrees, she's an advanced certified yoga breathwork and meditation guide, sound healer. International teacher and speaker. She specializes in holistic mental health and healing, which she defies as the return to wholeness through the blending of practices of the mind, body and spirit. Linnea and I chatted about the definition of holistic healing, how things like sound meditation and breath work and support healing, how to find someone appropriately trained to offer these services and she shares a special sound bath just for our community. If there is something that resonates with you while enjoying our conversation, please share it with us on social media using the hashtag TB G in session. Here's our conversation. What are we talking about when we talk about holistic healing, especially when it comes to mental health? Yes, so I have started to use holistic healing and holistic mental health interchangeably, but essentially what it means is that we are tuning into all aspects of ourselves. We are honoring that we are multifaceted and that in order for us to truly heal, we have to be able to integrate all layers of self. So our physical, our emotional, our energetic, our thoughts and our spiritual aspects to create this safe container for healing. Got it. And so some of the things that you use as a part of your practice are both breath work and sound healing. Can you tell us a little bit about how you have developed these wellness practices as a part of your life and how they've been beneficial to you? Yeah, absolutely. So I have always loved things like meditation and yoga and breath work. And I've always understood how necessary they were for healing and for our mental health. So much so that I completed my yoga and meditation teacher certification while I was finishing up my masters. While I was in grad school, I think, you know, you can also maybe relate to this, graduate school is probably one of the most stressful times in a professional's life. And so I really was able to lean into the power of breath work and yoga and meditation and ultimately sound feeling while I was going through that really stressful period. And I started to notice my colleagues and my peers were on the verge of straight burnout, right? And I had a sense of calmness about me. And it was at that point I really realized that things like breath work and yoga and sound feeling are really necessary for us, particularly in the most stressful times. And so with that realization from my personal practice, I wanted to integrate it with my work as a therapist. And so I definitely try to do it on my own or I tried to ask my supervisors for guidance as far as integration goes. And back then, it really wasn't like it was forever ago. It was almost 5 years ago, right? But we've seen how much this whole concept of holistic mental health and holistic healing has really taken off in the last I would say 5 years. My supervisors looked at me like huh, like girl just refer them out to a meditation teacher, just refer them out. We don't do that as therapists. And so that was ultimately the beginning of my journey of integrating these practices into the therapy room and in the mental health space. You know, I really appreciate you sharing that because I do feel like the people who are training now and in the future will have a very different experience of gray school than it sounds like we both had because it feels like we have learned so much more about how all of these things are integrated, but our training isn't typically integrated in that way, right? And so a lot of people have the same kind of story like you around like going back to get certified in yoga and meditation to supplement or compliment what they do in the therapy room. And so can you talk about how you have brought both of those things together and how things like breathwork and sound healing can actually complement traditional therapy. Yes, this is one of my favorite things to talk about. And to your point, we don't get this training in our master's program and still now it's not really a part of the curriculum. And so that's one of the reasons I created the holistic therapist academy, which is essentially to teach therapists and mental health professionals how to ethically integrate and confidently facilitate trauma and from yoga, breathwork and sound healing to help clients heal from anxiety depression and trauma. And so when you think about the major diagnoses, anxiety depression and trauma are really the top three that many of our clients face and a lot of society goes through. And so breathwork and sound healing is so beneficial for those diagnoses and just like stress overall. And so when we talk about this feeling of stress, when we talk about being in our fight, flight or freeze, right? Breathwork and sound meditation and sound healing ultimately help us to calm our nervous system. So in our nervous system, we have our parasympathetic and our sympathetic our sympathetic and I know you know this, but for the audience, the sympathetic nervous system is our seat of fight flight freeze and there's many other responses, but that's essentially our bodies knowing that we're in danger. That is when the bear comes out in the forest and we have to freeze or we're in danger. We're experiencing

Linnea Smith Crawford HBO Mindy Kaling Spelman College MAX Anxiety Depression Trauma
A highlight from Express Yourself: How do you support your child in making progress in speech?

The Parenting Cipher

08:28 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Express Yourself: How do you support your child in making progress in speech?

"To have a big impact or we can help set up a more structured practice schedule with specific activities, but help walk through how to make those as supportive as possible. And when you're looking at that, you're just looking at an exponential number of time. 60 minutes a week that they might spend with us or might get in the school versus hours and hours and hours a week that they're working with you talking with you and getting that really good good input. How to intertwine it into our daily lives. Absolutely, yes. That is key. It's key. Right, as well as helping us to be able to talk to other family members about how to support them in their daily lives. Because sometimes, you know, because we're not talking to speech therapists, so we don't know how to actually tell someone what's going on. So that, you know, you have family members and they're like, boy, you talk too fast. I don't understand what you're saying. And it's like, you know, to have actually engaged with your family members and friends and family who are dealing with your child. And apparently, not buying the more I know the more I'm able to explain it to people. Yeah. To be an advocate for them in any situation, that's a fantastic point that yeah, I haven't considered that too much, I think in other conversations with other podcast hosts and that's a really excellent point that you can also not just work with them, but advocate for them with family. It's an important aspect just because what happens is you get a diagnosis someone tells you a child has articulation or that you have dyslexia or an array of diagnosis, but you're kind of disconnected from it because it's on a piece of paper and no one's actually telling you what that looks like in real life. You may know that you can't understand your child. You may know they talk too fast. But you don't know actually how to tell someone else, this is why they talk so fast. This is why you can't understand them. So if you can't understand them, ask them to slow down, and I have to actually start coaching my family on that because my son is like really talkative. But he had rapid speech. Okay. So for anyone who's listening who doesn't know what this speech is because trusting believe that you have experienced it is when a child talks so fast that the words and the pronunciation are running together. So it's kind of like you may catch a word here or there. And my son was very gay and he's happy and it's like, we're looking at him like, I don't know what you're talking about. And my brother would always get him. My brother would be like, I know you're excited, but I don't know what you're talking about. Yeah, it's hard. It's hard. There's an inherent question that we asked back and most, you know, a lot of people are inherently pretty good at saying the right thing, but sometimes we yeah, others who maybe don't have that kiddo or aren't as close to the problem or the concern might not always say this spot on best thing to support that child. So yeah, you may have fantastic point Jeannie that be in there advocating and not just at home, but also at school as well. That's something like you said talking to your private speech therapist about what goals they would recommend. You probably carried that back to the school and took a lot of that education from that SLP with you and were able to really advocate for the care that you felt he should receive in the schools. Yes, and just for everyone to know, at one point, the school actually wanted to take my son off of and that leads to one of the reasons Leanne is joining us today is for Q&A. So I have some questions from the community. About what would you ask a speech therapist if you had the opportunity? And leading to that one of my questions was how do you know as a parent if the school is basically advocating to remove your child from speech therapy, but the diagnosis really is based upon articulation only. That's a good question and that does come up. The way to frame services at school is to know that they're always going to be evaluating and assessing based on academic need. And so that means they're comparing what the kid is able to do to how successful they're able to be in their general education setting, are they able to function in a general education classroom, meet appropriate grades, make age level progress. And so sometimes there are pockets of other disabilities as well, but when it comes to speech and language, there are pockets of communication where the kid who might very well have a concern like articulation or another one that comes up is sometimes stuttering or social skills. They might have an issue have a concern, but if it's not impacting them academically, they won't qualify for services at school because they're always working off of limited resources. And so in a way that's kind of how they keep it to the kiddos that would quote unquote needed to succeed in their classroom setting. So if someone has maybe a list on some of their sounds, if they have rapid speech and sometimes are tricky to understand, if they stutter, but they're still reading at their grade level. They're still making friends. They're still participating in class. This school might come back and say we don't see evidence of it impacting them, negatively and therefore we won't provide services for them here while they're at school. That doesn't mean that there's not a concern. In our setting with expressible in outpatient settings, if you're going through insurance, those evaluations are going to be done more on a functional and medically based need. So, you know, there is the opportunity to seek that outside care if the school is not dividing it while they're at school. Okay, so you said that if they see that it is interferon with their academics. So if the school is saying articulation, like they're only seeing articulation for a parent. Sometimes they do not actually understand that academics and speech common side. And for instance, for me, I realized that my son had articulation. But he also had dyslexia. So, you know, in my studies, I realized that a lot of children who are receiving speech therapy at some point, especially like early on, it can be an indicator that they may have another learning disability. Yeah, that is true. And when it comes to articulation and phenology, that might very often tie in with reading language, delays and disorders can also impact reading progress. So that is what they'd be evaluating for. So when they set out to do their assessments, they'll gather, even if it's a speech only assessment because in the schools you might be referred for just speech and language evaluation, you might be referred for a full disability evaluation. Even if it's just speech and language only that we're recommending will still look at their reading progress or reading levels. They'll talk to their classroom teacher. They come out to do specific assessment tests, but they'll also observe them in the classroom and talk with their classroom teacher and really try to get the fullest picture they can of how that speech and language might be impacting academics or could potentially play a future role in impacting academics. But I say that and I know full well that it might not always be done the best that it can be, it might not always be the decision that winds up being the best and parents have rights when it comes to schools. There's a ton of information online. I would dot com myself an expert in that kind of arbitration and everything like that. But parents and families have rights because of the individuals with disabilities education act. If they don't feel that their child is getting the most appropriate education for them, they have rights to request outside evaluations at the school would need to cover

Dyslexia Jeannie Leanne
A highlight from I'm A Boss: 3 Terrific Ways To Identify Burnout And Steps To Heal

The Parenting Cipher

04:42 min | Last week

A highlight from I'm A Boss: 3 Terrific Ways To Identify Burnout And Steps To Heal

"Hello everybody and welcome to the parents I've heard. So today we have miss Cassandra. From bee wealth is on our show. And just to tell you briefly about her, she's a woman of mini hats, a mother of two young boys, a medical doctor, wife, educator, wellness blogger, and she's a host of the award winning B well since podcast. And she's incredibly passionate about the wellness and self care practices of black millennial women and I just want to say thank you so much for being on the show. Thank you for having me. I'm excited. For the very first episode, guys, I talked about self advocating for yourself in your health. And then Cassandra blessed the show with her presence, and I was like, I don't know. Because this machine does, and I've been following her forever because I just love her self help tips. So it is national caregivers month. So this show is dedicated to the caregivers. I wanted to talk about identifying overcoming burnout because it is difficult caregivers in the streets to recognize that they are burnt out. Yeah, burnout is so real. I think it's become so common in our culture that we think, well, this is what adulting years adulting sucks. No dude. You're just burnt out, you know? And we just keep going, keep judged along and spirals into depression and anxiety and all of those other things. So. And then how do you identify burnout? Because like you said, in our community, is to grind. It's the grit. So it's like it's part of our black experience. And my mom did it and her mama did it. And I gotta be strong. Yep. I'm not weak. Yep. Yeah. So I wouldn't say the first thing is recognizing that you're human. And this is something that I'm actively working on. I'm in therapy and I'm not ashamed of it and I'll probably be in therapy for a very long time. Maybe for the rest of my life because I need that outlet. I need the mirror to be put to my face. But anyway, one thing that I've been realizing working on is that I try to push through things and my therapist is like, you're a whole human. You're not a machine, and I think a lot of us grew up seeing these examples around us like our mothers, our grandmothers, our aunties, just pushing through and really moving mountains and making it seem like it's just a mole hill. So we think well, that's what we should be doing. That makes us a woman. It makes us a strong what makes us a good one makes us, hey, a black woman. And I think we need to take a step back and realize that we're human and you're gonna need breast. We're going to take a step back. You're going to have feelings that don't feel good. And it's okay to be sad sometimes. It's okay to be tired. It's okay to experience all the range of emotion that come with being a human. It's okay. But what I would say in identifying burnout is when for me, I suffered from burnout. And that's why I actually started a podcast. But my burnout for me was that I had a lot of great things going on. My child, my youngest, he had an unexpected birth. My pregnancy was completely, nothing to talk about. But during labor and delivery, everything I could have went wrong went wrong. And his first few months of life were really scary, but at the same time he was doing better because we weren't sure we'd bring him home from the hospital. It's that bad. And so my child was getting better. My older child was okay. I have a supportive husband and my mother's huge support in our lives too. But I would go to bed every night thinking God from my blessings and then praying at the same time that I didn't wake up the next day. Right. And in speaking to my doula, my daughter would check in with me. And she was like, something's not the same. And she knew that I was seeing a therapist before in the earlier part of my pregnancy. He said, have you seen your therapist? I'm like, nah, she's like, do me a favor and go back and see her. And I went back to go see my therapist, and was she asked me and was like, okay, so run me through your day. I ran through my day from before set up to send down I'm like doing things for other people. And she's just like, okay, so I haven't heard you mention yourself in any of this. I just sat there looking dumb because she was right. And she was like, you sound like you're suffering from burnout which is rolled into depression. She's like, you know, for the next four weeks, let's see if you can carve in like an hour a day of doing something just for yourself not for your kids, not for your employer, not for your husband after your parent, just for yourself and see how you feel.

Cassandra Depression Anxiety
Balenciaga’s $1,200 Sagging Pants Are Being Decried as Racist

The Breakfast Club

00:58 sec | 3 months ago

Balenciaga’s $1,200 Sagging Pants Are Being Decried as Racist

"Is being criticized over these. I'm sure you guys have seen. These sweats have boxes attached to them before. Yeah and women. They've had that for women like all different brands like the underwear shows above the longtime ago. Right so they're saying it's a boxer detailed designed to be visible above the waistline of the sweats so people and these by the way it costs eleven hundred ninety dollars but people are saying that gentrified sagging now and that's what people are upset about. He's saying that if we slash black kids were are this. We were going to be statistics and not do anything with our lives. Just for some years to pass him balenciaga to sell it for twelve hundred dollars. I don't care if they balenciaga's or you know just some regular levi's what you boxer briefs showing why you want you boxes showing. Why why are you want you draw. Sean there's been literally laws that make it illegal to have sagging pants at fashion designers are profiting off of the same thing. Black people were criminalised for

Balenciaga Levi Sean
Influential Educators: Fanny Jackson Coppin

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:06 min | 3 months ago

Influential Educators: Fanny Jackson Coppin

"Jackson coppin was born in eighteen. Thirty seven in washington. Dc she was born into an enslaved household fannies grandfather had managed to save up and by the freedom of four out of his six children. Fanny's mother was not among them as fanny recalls. in her autobiography. It was on account of her birth that her grandfather refused to buy her mother's freedom. So fanny remained enslaved until the age of twelve when her aunt bought her freedom for one hundred. Twenty five dollars after that fanny was sent off to new bedford. Massachusetts to live with the different ant by the age of fourteen fanny was fully supporting herself. As a paid servant in rhode island. She worked for author. George henry calvert household for six years during her time. They're fading used the money she earned to pay for tutoring and leader public schooling. It was at the rhode island state. Normal school where fanny. I realized her love for teaching and for making education accessible for all black people in eighteen. Sixty fanny enrolled in oberlin. College in ohio oberlin's courses were rigorous and it was the first college that accepted both black and women students while studying at oberlin. Fanny broke several glass ceilings. She was selected to join the highly coveted. Young ladies literary society. Fanny was the first black person chosen as a student teacher. She used this role to organize evening. Classes for newly freed people in her last year of college. Fanny was scouted by the institute for colored youth and philadelphia. The school was run by quakers who were in search of an african american woman who could teach greek latin and arithmetic officials at oberlin. Immediately new fanny would be perfect for the role. Fanny was an excellent teacher within a year. She was promoted to principal of the women's part of the school. Four years after that van became principal of the entire institute her position as such was extremely radical for the

Fanny Jackson Coppin Oberlin George Henry Calvert New Bedford Young Ladies Literary Society Washington Rhode Island Massachusetts Institute For Colored Youth Ohio Philadelphia VAN
The Life and Work of Mamie Phipps Clark

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:12 min | 3 months ago

The Life and Work of Mamie Phipps Clark

"Me was born on april eighteenth. Nineteen seventeen in hot springs arkansas. Her father was a well to do physician. His position gave the family comfort. Rarely afforded to black people at the time especially in the jim crow south while mamie attributed her later career successes to growing up the she did. She was not shielded from the stark racial realities outside her home. When she was six years old she witnessed a lynching in an interview in nineteen seventy six. She described knowing she was black at a young age. She said i became acutely aware of that in childhood. Because you had to have a certain kind of protective armor about you all the time. After graduating from high school. Mimi received a scholarship to attend howard university. A historically black college in washington. Dc she intended to study math which she loved but the professors proved uninspiring. Then she met a student. Named kenneth clarke who encouraged her to try out psychology. Kenneth suggestion led to me means lifelong career and to their forty six year. Long marriage the summer after mamie graduated. She worked in the law office of the prominent. Acp lawyer charles hamilton. Houston it was there that she witnessed preparation for racial segregation cases. When she went back to howard in the fall for her master's degree in psychology she planned to address racial disparities in her work. Mimi's thesis surveyed one hundred fifty black preschool age children and set out to understand at which age black children became aware that they were black for the study. She and kenneth presented the children with different photographs including of white boys black boys and images of animals and other objects. They asked the boys to pick which picture looked like them and then asked the girls to pick which picture look like their brother or other male relative mamie and kenneth concluded that the boys showed a racial awareness at three or four years old which kenneth described as disturbing mamie and kenneth were on the forefront of a shift in the field

Mamie Jim Crow Mimi Arkansas Kenneth Clarke Howard University Charles Hamilton Kenneth Washington Houston Howard
interview with Comics Creator Tyler Martin

Black Girl Nerds

02:09 min | 4 months ago

interview with Comics Creator Tyler Martin

"Give you a little food for thought here to kinda start us off. Bush your definition of evil. You know like a little devil like sitting on your shoulder like who will. What if i tried this. What if i did this are how about this quote. This is my favorite from the comic series. We're going to talk about today. The road to hail is paved with good intentions It got me thinking. I'm talking about the antagonists comic book series. I'm here with comic book. Creator writer tyler martin. He's also a publisher editor antiquated creative director. How you doing tyler. I am doing amazing ryan. Thank you so much for having me here. I'm so excited about today. Yeah i. I've been so excited talk to you about this. This is so cool before we dive into the tag and his family and these characters who are so cool. I got to start from the beginning. Because i know you're a self-proclaimed blurred a lover comic so we gotta start there and so my question is is there a character or just what about comics in general kind of captured. Your attention early on so. I was Raised by a single mom and just remember As early as five or six Mom and dad was calling. It was just tons of arguments tons of chaos. Sometimes and i remember that comic books and cartoon just that star wars and just that whole Nerd geek thing. At the time was my escape. It was a way to another reality and fell in love with it from then on. Yes you can tell like. I always love talking to the craters. The writers of these serious because you could tell us like that it kind of gives you that release a little bit that we're all like ooh. I wish i can just make that character. That's you know kind of taking me away from life a little bit and kinda right through. That character is pretty cool. Yeah i think you're absolutely right. I think all of us I always say that creative writing saves lives. I think all of us need some kind of outlet The world is too dark. Especially right now. Dr. too stressful if you don't have some type of outlived so hard out here for you so for me writing in comic books that was my way to say you know what forget what's going on. I got my own world to figure out

Tyler Martin Bush Tyler Ryan
Back to School With the President of the NEA

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

02:25 min | 4 months ago

Back to School With the President of the NEA

"When we talk about how you having an up close and personal view you really did with your family leading the nea. And i really appreciate you hitting on the point. That teachers are also parents. Because i think so. Many people forgot that they're just not here. You know schooling your kids. They also have to do the same for years. So when the pandemic hit. Let's go back to the beginning. What were you immediately thinking when you knew that. The majority of teachers and students couldn't be in physical classrooms in. How was that going. To impact education system in our i immediately started thinking about the disparate impact and that showed up right away but used the irony of the timing for me is that The nea had just convened over sixty groups education group civil rights groups at the end of february february twenty twenty. We combine them in a coalition that we called the homework gap coalition because we had so many students and families who did not have access to the internet who did not have technology tools that they had at home and we already knew that they were going home and coming back to school with a gab of opportunity because so much of the homework now required that they had that connectivity and are black and brown indigenous students did not have that mpm lease did not have that accident so we have put together this coalition to to address that and to demand from the federal government that they allocate funds to close that gap within a month. It was no longer about the homework out. It was about the learning and access to the classroom. Gap that again. Disparately impacted are black and brown digital students are students. Living in poverty are students with disabilities in our marginalized communities that had always all ready and always been impacted by these inequities. Now all of a sudden they're very access to learning had been cut off from them their access to meals. You saw that you saw that on full

NEA Federal Government
Interview With Joanna of Joanna E.

Black Women Travel Podcast

01:46 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Joanna of Joanna E.

"Thanks so much for joining us today. Can you please tell us your name where you're from your current location and the name of your business. Hello my name. is joanna from joanna eve Business i am from new york city in currently live in new york city. Beautiful so joanna. Please tell us about how you grew up so you were born and raised in new york. Your family is from trinidad and tobago to pick So talk to us about what it was like growing up. First generation trinidadian beggaring american. So i pretty much grew up in queens raised and which is a very diverse Borrow but for the most part. I grew up in lake southeast. Clean so There's more like black. American on some lessening americans in that area but Some of my older brothers and sisters. They live from brooklyn In mike flatbush Areas too so. We grew up pretty american like eating on foods. I for the most part mate myself and my older brother like the three young. Have six brothers and sisters. So i'm the thanks Of seven so Older brother anger sister will like the baby so we pretty much grew american but very much caribbean on around the holidays. We always ate Caribbean foods Listen to korea music.

Joanna New York City Lake Southeast Tobago Mike Flatbush Trinidad Queens New York Brooklyn Caribbean Korea
The First Lady of the Black Press: Ethel Payne

Encyclopedia Womannica

01:44 min | 4 months ago

The First Lady of the Black Press: Ethel Payne

"Hello and welcome back from wonder media network. I'm jenny kaplan and this is encyclopedia manica. Today we're talking about a fearless journalist and civil rights activists witnessed and reported moved the most monumental moments in american history known as the first lady of the black press. Meet our pioneer of the day. Ethel l payne born in chicago in nineteen eleven to the children of slaves at those one of six siblings. She was raised by her single mother after her father's early passing in nineteen forty eight. Ethel was working as a senior library assistant at the chicago public library. She decided to move across the world to work for the army special services club in tokyo. When the korean war broke out in nineteen fifty ethel wrote extensively in her journal about the discrimination. She saw against african american troops stationed in japan. Even though the military had been ordered to integrate she noticed that soldiers were still segregated. She also noted the racial slurs commonly used against african american soldiers and the regular abandonment of babies born to japanese mothers and fathers. Ethel eventually showed her journal to a korean war reporter and he sent her observations to the chicago defender a newspaper that served african american communities. Breeders were

Jenny Kaplan Ethel L Payne Army Special Services Club Ethel Chicago Public Library Chicago Tokyo Japan
Black Women Athletes Reimagining Sports

Therapy for Black Girls

01:33 min | 4 months ago

Black Women Athletes Reimagining Sports

"Just so excited to have this opportunity with you. Because i feel like in like an academic in a psychologist life. There are few times when like the work that you do kind of comes to life right in a big big way on such global scale so i know that you have been incredibly busy in the past couple of weeks and we're love for you to just start by like sharing. You know your thoughts about all of the things that have unfolded as it relates to black women specifically in the olympics guy. I mean this is one of those moments right where you like ten years of your research and you're like i've been hell y'all until y'all y'all ain't nobody been listening now you listening. That's the feeling that honestly with feeling where you're like. It's definitely a fool. Socal moment not just myself but for other researchers and practitioners whose work is deeply at this intersection of the ways in which these kind of racist and sexist stereotypes and trope clay out in performance based made and seeing the way. It's kind of live. It's kind of been demonstrated. It's like this is what we've been seeing all along and this is how it impacts wellness. This is how impacts women's wallin's. It's right you're right in front of a

Olympics Wallin
InterPop Comics With Brian David-Marshall and Rachel Gluckstern

Black Girl Nerds

02:11 min | 4 months ago

InterPop Comics With Brian David-Marshall and Rachel Gluckstern

"And you know if there's one thing i like more than talking about comics is talk about the future of comics and how advanced the technology is getting if i can get it out. Sound way to talk back on and just where it's going just in general when you talk about digital comics. And how do you get the ownership when it comes to the riders to the creators. And so i have inner pop comics joining me today. And i have brian david marshall. He is the president and publisher of inner pop. And i have racer concern. She is the group editor of the emergence universe. Brian racial thank you so much for joining me today. Oh thank you so much for having us. It's really exciting to talk about all this. Yeah thank you very much ryan. I'm and i have to thank you for joining me. I have to admit off the top here that i had to have guys on because i need to make sure i'm invited to ever enter every inter pop block party ever assign invited. 'cause that was way cool for you guys do that. I couldn't believe it was like a comic convention all my computer screen right. I was so impressed that the technology because we do the zoom things. But it's still not. It still doesn't have that person to person contact and the topiary platform that we did for internet block party amazing. I threw my hands up in amazement and realize nobody can see that in mind. It was great. Because you know like like rachel said you. Zoom is very efficient. And obviously you know for podcasting in for meeting and producing all sorts of stuff. But but it's not great on serendipity and you know it was. It was first of all. I just being in that call. I ran into people lying new from all over the world. And i haven't seen obviously in close to two years so that was that was pretty amazing but then also i think the most satisfying moment of the of the convention in this was event. We put on for the launch of our comic line. Gave away free. Comic was having a panel and having somebody come running across across this virtual space last minute to join the panel because they got lost in one of the side halls. Oh yeah this now. This is a convention

Brian David Marshall Brian Ryan Rachel
To MY BLACK SISTERS, It Aint Over

Trill MBA Show - For Black Women Surviving Corporate America

02:06 min | 4 months ago

To MY BLACK SISTERS, It Aint Over

"The struggle is real right now. Trying to stay in a game and implement the strategies that felicia is giving you to get promoted while also try to die from the stress that we are often subjected to because of discrimination in a workplace that stress is a ravishing our bodies and yet because we have a corporate warriors that we are the you are especially as black women. You keep checking keep going you keep fighting so i'm here to help. You equip yourselves to fight smarter not necessarily harder. You see the problem at least the problem that we think is the problem is us when drama pops off in a workplace are very first stop is to wonder what we did wrong how we could have done. Xyz better. but like a prophetess naomi. osaka in apostle simone biles. You're not going to stress us out. And more and more we as black women are getting to that point where we are no longer going to accept simply being beat up in a workplace even as we are climbing the so called Ladder which you know. What a corporate lavender. Even the corporation itself is actually not a problem. The real problem is emotions emotions on both sides. You see. Discrimination is an emotional transaction because discrimination is an extreme dislike or hatred for a group or type of people as emotional as a motion

Felicia Simone Biles Osaka Naomi
INTERVIEW With Christina of Melanin Travels Magic

Black Women Travel Podcast

01:45 min | 4 months ago

INTERVIEW With Christina of Melanin Travels Magic

"Thanks so much for joining us today. Can you please tell us your name where you're from your current location in the name of your business crew. Hi everyone manages christina I'm originally french guy. Benza was born in pirates. My burned cell phone From looping second generation I'm currently in london. I've been here for seven years in a row. Now and the name of my businesses millennium travel magic It's a group tool company focused on black re-teach alasia tools So you grew up in france. Tell us what that experience was like. So you're first generation than your parents came from waterloo to france correct. Yes yes so. Guadeloupe is a french of Abutment so technically we are fringed but we leave eight thousand kilometers away and so That yet my. I was specialty vision. Guadalupe mike burns. Send me to my grandmother. So that's why. I'm a bit more connected than most people. I guess also I was raised by a lot of people in my family. Which makes me someone very social sociable. Because i had lots of nineties my mom had me young twenty one and the brothers and sister the youngest twelve and thirteen so for example On wednesday every wednesday take me to cinema to mcdonnell. So i used to have little of have from both sides because my mom gets me again. That was the first girl in the family.

Benza Guadalupe Mike Burns France Christina Guadeloupe Waterloo London Mcdonnell
Making the Most of College, and Books That Educate and Empower

Our Body Politic

02:16 min | 4 months ago

Making the Most of College, and Books That Educate and Empower

"Back to our body politic angel. Good to see you again. How do you view the return on investment of higher education today. I'm asking because you wrote in the atlantic it's harder than ever for lower income students to afford college. What's the state of play for college. Accessibility and affordability. So i think the first thing to acknowledge is that college is certainly expensive in actually the the rate of college tuition keeps going up at a much faster rate than inflation but the reality of the matter is college. Education is still one of the best investments that any student can make in their lifetime. All of the data shows to the point that if you get a college education you have much higher possibility of getting more employment over time you will make more money over a lifetime. So wallet is expensive. It certainly is still a very good investment. So what are the best solutions. Is it about making college. Less expensive about increasing scholarships and financial aid about some people not going to college. We're at the solutions. Coming from the solutions are gonna come from a lot of different places. One college administrators need to start thinking about how to cut costs so that students can actually afford their education a little bit more but the other pieces. We have a real serious reckoning due in this country around how higher education is funded in most other countries. Higher education is much more affordable sometimes free and so changing our model thinking about the way that our government invest in higher education is actually really important but also we have to invest in more financial aid for students actually might association the national association for college. Admission counseling just put out in partnership with a bunch of other organizations a campaign for the biden administration to double the pell grant for the lowest income students in the united states. And so it's initiatives like that that are going to help move the needle. But i do want to say because i think it's really important. It is very dangerous. The city young people today do not go to college because if you look at the predictions about all of the future of work the majority of jobs are actually going to require a college education and no one wants to be left behind.

Atlantic National Association For Colle Biden Administration United States
Dream Big Quilt-a-Long With Mary Davis and Shereece Spain

Stitch Please

02:13 min | 4 months ago

Dream Big Quilt-a-Long With Mary Davis and Shereece Spain

"Week we are talking with two wonderful quilters who are not only amazing creatives in their own right. They have come together to put on a spectacular quilt along for a really wonderful piece of fabric or series of fabrics. And i am speaking of course of. Mary davis with go round quilts and cherie spain of so cooked on treasures. Welcome to the program. Thank you so much and welcome. Thank you hear those of you. Who are patriot on subscribers. In if you are not a pastry on a subscriber why are you not. I mean for as little as two dollars a month. You can support amazing programming like this in honestly like catch cushion money and i know damn well. I'm worth more than cash. Cushion money. okay but anyway. You'll get to see these amazing panels in. I am actually wearing a dress that i made from one of the panels. That's going to be part of the challenge that you could see me in my this. Lovely lovely okay. fine. I'll stand up this lovely lovely amazingly rich and textured fabrics. So thank you so much. Y'all for a hitter day. I'm so grateful. Thank you and welcome. Thank you excited. Whose idea was this to get started. Did it wisco- who's to blame. Give credit to i. I'm a nation deal. Actually automation deal. Cherise was talking. About how many screen big panel. She had that she's never quilted in how someday she's gonna get you. And i. maybe. I can get a dream big paneling kind of cheer each other honest. We do the panel and then thought. Oh gosh but it'd be really great if we could do like a quilt awhile. Which i've never done before. And so cherise and i talked about it and she was all in birth of a quilt along

Cherie Spain Mary Davis Cherise
Romance Novels for Black Women

Therapy for Black Girls

01:58 min | 4 months ago

Romance Novels for Black Women

"You so much for joining these day. I really appreciate you hanging out and talking about romance novels with me this afternoon. I'm so excited. It's my favorite thing to talk about likewise so to you i would love for you to just kind of get us started by talking about what actually makes a romance novel a romance novel. Like how is their genre classified. Well there are some actual hard and fast rules that you have to follow. Were to be considered a romance. Like a romance isn't just fiction with a love story in it. The love story has to be prominent. So it can't be like a thriller where they're solving a murder or something and they accidentally way in the background fall. But that's not point at all so the love has to be or front and there has to be a happy ending if there is an. Yeah if there is no happy ending. It's not a romance in. Who says these rules. Where do these rules confirm. Maybe the romance writer association Their long-held hardened basked rules. Okay and the phantoms. Get into battles over at honey yes it. Yeah this doesn't classify you know so like we were speaking in technical terms. That's what that is. But like i grew up on romancing the stone and things like They're like on adventures in cartagena colombia. Like solving insane mysteries following romance to me that might not technically classify. No yeah interesting. So very i saw you shaking your head when she said the phantoms. Kinda get into a would have been some of your favorites. And how did you get into this genre. I would say like. I've always been a reader. I don't know how to explain that. The people but i've always been a deep reader and one of the children were meet other women. They're like yeah. I was picking books that people's houses and disarray minimum. That was me picking people's houses.

Cartagena Colombia
Interview With Carlacia Grant of 'Outer Banks'

Black Girl Nerds

02:21 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Carlacia Grant of 'Outer Banks'

"It is so great to meet you. My name is stacey and i write for black girl nerds and i have watched a feel episodes of outer banks and then kind of pulled away for a while and so my nieces and nephews are huge huge fans and so they're always talking about it and so i was like i know a little bit about it so this opportunity came up. I was like okay. Well let's let's see what this is about Especially knowing that season two is going to take place in the bahamas. We found in barbados but nj heated to look like bahamas. Well yeah what can first of all tell us a little bit about you and kind of how you got into acting and then how you stumbled upon this role. I started acting Will i knew. I wanted to actor when i was thirteen. Did a play. And i don't know. I just fell in love with the whole process of this is what i wanna do for the rest of my life. Just you know just kept pursuing it through the years in with getting outer banks I just got. I got edition. And i didn't wash yet like i remember seeing the show that my cuba never got around to watching it. But it said films in barbados. Looks like i'm emily an island girl at heart man. I never been to barbados yet. So i was like. Oh my gosh. I have to get this like i really wanna go to barbados And then i tape the audition. I sent the tape in. I didn't hear anything back. And i just kept seeing like re releasing the role like now to say day. I didn't i didn't even get a callback. Nothing and then like my manager call. And she's like. I'm still looking for that girl like they're still casting that that cleo role in like that show. He talked about the barbados shop. And i was like Shall i love the show like at this point. I already finished it in house Wanna be in the show She was like are listed. Send it again. Let's just on the tape again in literally just sent the exact same tape again Chemistry and russell and history.

Barbados Bahamas Stacey NJ Cuba Russell
Interview With Ashleigh Chanl of Make Your Mark Consulting

Black Women Travel Podcast

01:36 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Ashleigh Chanl of Make Your Mark Consulting

"Thanks so much for joining us today. Can you please tell us your name where you're from current location and the name of your business. How yes my name is ashish. Now i actually like to say. I am from the world or of the world because i have moved around so much But i'm from la. And i currently live in houston texas and the name of my business is make your market digital marketing consulting. So tell us how you grew up your from. La what was it like being low black girl. Because you've five one so you were even smaller than that Tell us about your upbringing. And what your influences is worried. Tell us about your mommy. A grandma if she was around So yeah i honestly feel like. I have been this high for most of my life. I don't know like everybody else. You can have a grossberg but me but my mom is my biggest influence. I love her so much. Sees like the best person that i know and my she influenced me a lot because she always told me that. I could do and be anything that i wanted to do. And be and one of the things that i will say that i feel like really influenced the way that i showed up and walked into a room was that she never told me that my skin color was a hindrance. She never told me that. I couldn't do something or i couldn't act a certain way because i was black.

Ashish Grossberg Houston LA Texas
Mary Fields' Rocky Journey to Her Perfect Job

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:38 min | 4 months ago

Mary Fields' Rocky Journey to Her Perfect Job

"It's unclear why. Mary settled on the convent to work as a groundskeeper. Some say she traveled there with a family friend or the daughter of her former enslavers. Whatever her reason. Mary didn't quite fit in among the disciplined nuns. She had quite the temper and a habit for cursing and drinking. She argued with the nuns for a higher salary and yelled at anyone who stepped on her freshly trimmed grass. Mary eventually left toledo and headed west. Most likely to care for the sacred heart. Convents mother superior. Mother amadeus done. Mother done had moved to montana for missionary work and they're fell ill. When mary caught wind that mother done was sick. Mary traveled to cascade montana to nurse her back to health and to work for a new convent nearby though. Mary was fiercely loyal. She wasn't suited for convent life. She raucously drank in bars with men and women's clothing at one point. She and one of the convents meal. Janitors got in an argument that escalated until both at them drew their guns though. No guns were fired. The conference bishop had had enough and kicked mary out out of work. Mary did odd jobs to get buy some say. She tried opening a restaurant which failed when she gave away too. Many free meals others say she opened up a laundry shop. Her love of hard liquor and gunfights quickly earned a reputation in her new home. Town in nineteen eighty-five. Mary got a job with the postal service protecting mail along. Its delivery route in the harsh conditions of northern montana. She was the second woman and first black woman to hold this position known as a star route carrier. Though mary was already in her sixties this turned out to be the perfect job for her. Mary grew famous for her fearlessness against all threats on the montana trail legends. Say she fought back a whole pack of wolves with her rifle. Bandits didn't stand a chance against her. She was a beloved figure in cascade known for her generosity and kindness towards children the locals called her stagecoach mary and honor of the vehicle she used to deliver mail. Even after mary retired from the position she maintained her legendary reputation restaurants and bars gave her free food and drinks and she even became the mascot for the town baseball

Mary Cascade Montana Montana Toledo Northern Montana Cascade Baseball
Interview With Kristin Dodson of Flatbush Misdemeanors

Black Girl Nerds

01:58 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Kristin Dodson of Flatbush Misdemeanors

"Welcome to the black gunners podcast. I'm your host rain and are you mismatch comedy in your life basically showed us gonna keep it real. Tell you the struggles of the city life. And y'all it's just sometimes struggle issues. Through i mean that's all i can say when you follow into characters of this. Show dan and kevin. I'm talking about flatbush. Misdemeanors own showtime. And you know my thing about dan and kevin on this show is i feel like they're not making the right connections because they're officials out of water and flatbush brooklyn you know. They're not talking to the right. People don't have key players as xactly. When i'm saying is they don't know kristen dotson they might you know masters i'm telling measures where now i exactly but you know you hear over there. Beautiful laugh over the hagedorn. Kristen thank you for joining me. bob away. I'm so glad that you has invited me to come on here. I'm like super excited. I've actually been a huge fan of you guys. So we'll look. I appreciate it and don't let this be a your first and only time of course not please invite me back anytime but look speaking of the truth though before we get into flatbush Misdemeanors let me talk about some other projects. Gary you keep moving you got things going you did cartoon network's the shivering truth. Tell me about being in the animator. World always like that comparison. They're like when you go on a series and how that is an animation. I mean well for one animation you literally just roll out of bed so up in a you know. Just do your thing. I think now. I inside from that like the other difference especially doing animation like a cartoon if they allow you to can totally change your voice based off with the character there's just a little bit more Freedom in not having to worry about how you look your makeup or anything it's just lifting those words off the page

Kristen Dotson Kevin DAN Brooklyn Kristen BOB Gary
Protecting Workers Rights During the Pandemic

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

01:25 min | 4 months ago

Protecting Workers Rights During the Pandemic

"Hello everyone. I am so excited today. Y'all know always excited me are talking to is you and who who has been one of the leaders at the forefront for workers rights and during the pandemic is in thank you so much for taking lieutenant minus how you i'm well and i'm so excited to be talking to you. I am excited to talk to you first. Why don't you tell us a little bit more about the national domestic workers and the organization and the wonderful in very important. Were they do sure. While we represent the two and a half million women mostly women of color who work inside of our homes providing caregiving and cleaning services so all the nannies house cleaners and the homecare workers and this work is essential. We call the work that makes everything else possible because it is this care that makes it possible for all of us to do what we do. Every day and yet it's some of the most undervalued and invisible work in our economy and our mission is to change that to really lift up. This workforce build the power that we need to make sure that these jobs are good jobs that are truly valued as essential

National Domestic Workers
Interview With Walton of Black Woman Owned

Black Women Travel Podcast

01:32 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Walton of Black Woman Owned

"Thanks so much for joining today. Can you please tell us your name where you're from your current location and the name of your business. Yes my name is walton. I was born in delaware. A raise between pg county maryland in an fat ville north carolina. In my business is black. Women owned so talk to me about growing up in several paces down to us. Break down for us where exactly you grew up. Yes so i. Until i was ten so from mike a couple of weeks until ten lived in ville which is really like slow I didn't it at the time. But like i went to basically in all white school it was very i. It was very slow. But i loved it. I was like obsessed with living in north carolina so it was so funny i I moved in maryland virginia. In like by fifth grade year that was just four year. Then finally settled in brandy wine maryland and that's pg county maryland for alma dnv. People out there. It's been like total opposite of country. Living it's bay. When i first moved here i was like it's so fast and but it's it's really nice. I love it here. i'm my son here for the moment and i love it. I love all those places though. So like i still like country living. I would like to settle down.

Pg County Ville North Carolina Maryland Walton Delaware Ville Mike North Carolina Virginia
The Complex Task of Public Safety Reform

Our Body Politic

01:11 min | 4 months ago

The Complex Task of Public Safety Reform

"Jones is the mayor of saint louis missouri before that she served as the city's treasurer in the missouri house of representatives. When she was sworn in this spring she became the city's first black female mayor. I'm pleased to have her on the show to talk to us about her approach to politics and what it means to her to be progressive and pragmatic. Welcome mayor jones. Thank you for having me. So in your inauguration speech you said. I am not naive in my of progressive public policy. What does that mean. That means that. I know that sometimes as i pursue progressive policies that i will be met with resistance so i am expanding what public safety means in my city and really transforming the meaning of public safety In public safety is everything that keeps you safe in your neighborhoods and in your homes and some of the things that i have proposed to do the we're working on right now. are adding more social workers to the police department and using coal responder model where officers an licensed clinical social workers go out on certain calls. The

Missouri House Of Representati Mayor Jones Saint Louis Missouri Jones Police Department
What Influences How We See Ourselves & Others?

Therapy for Black Girls

01:32 min | 4 months ago

What Influences How We See Ourselves & Others?

"What do you think we can do. Donna as a community to begin or continue to change the conversation around like light skin and pretty hair so to speak being the only things that are deemed attractive. What you said is so true. We definitely started so isa raise. Insecure shows us different spectrum of beauty. The black panther of course showed a completely different spectrum of beauty. But some of that is what we are going to do for ourselves as individuals as well as how we're gonna relate to one another so number one you know like the judgment of someone's character based on their hair got the stop because was often is happening is someone is saying someone with light skin. And there's no the silkier hair and they're saying their stuff up from like well. You don't know that you haven't had a conversation with them already. Assuming a character trait based on what you see just like. There's an assumption that if you are dark skin with kinky hair that somehow you are lazy and not willing to take pride in your appearance so that judgment of character based on the hair and our skin tone. That's part of what needs to sort of stop. We need to take stock of why we are feeling and thinking this way and figure out whether or not this thought even originated with us. Because what i'm finding is that for most people is not what they think i. It's what someone else thought that. They have adapted as their own

Donna
Interview With LaToya of Black Girl Digital

Black Women Travel Podcast

02:23 min | 5 months ago

Interview With LaToya of Black Girl Digital

"So much for joining us today. Can you please tell us your name where you're from your current location and the name of your business. Yes thank you so much for having me on. We'll play shambo. I am the founder and ceo of blackout digital and. I am based in queens new york. I was actually born here as well. But i was raised in houston. Texas are misled. Soya we gonna take you back to the year. The early two thousand was not really really. But i'm twenty fifteen and in two thousand fifteen. You had this post on instagram. And it says focused on the things you love. And you'll always be happy. And i wanna know if missile toya who was born in houston and grew up in queens new york. If that is something that had always been inside you because it seems like you have always known yourself just based off of like the little information. I was looking around on the internet. Seemed like you've always had yourself so yes came. Please share that. Yeah absolutely so. I was actually born in brooklyn raised in houston and then came back Came back up. When i graduated high school literally the day i graduated i was like goodbye but i was always very Aware i wouldn't say that. I knew my purpose Earls too early on. But i was always aware of myself i was always knew that there was something there and i just i always felt like i was on a a road of discovery so for me. Discovery was trying different things and in trying. Different things cereal entrepreneurship at a time. Where people. Your your friends like. Aw you're doing another thing. You're doing something and i'm like so i i want. I want to do this. Mlm program. i wanted to sell lay strangling.

Blackout Digital Houston Queens New York Toya Instagram Texas Brooklyn Earls
Practicing African Traditional Religions

Therapy for Black Girls

01:45 min | 5 months ago

Practicing African Traditional Religions

"Thank you so much for joining us today. he may. Of course you so much. For having me i really appreciate a huge fan. Thank you likewise. I wonder if you can start by just telling us a little bit more about who you are and how you got started in your practice so my name is a he. May aura also known as iae our nation would assume until adiel long name right. I even priests initiated into the sightings of ethos. Sean go greenlee. i am nigerian. I was born in nigeria in biden city. I immigrated to small town in florida. When i was around four years old even though i was disconnected from like my roots and my traditions my mother was really the one responsible for keeping things live. She would be the one telling me stories of our ancestors shoot. You always the one telling me about songa before why the new shovel was. I wasn't even really to that like the school nights. She would always tell amazing stories. They know nigerian moms dramatics. She would always be a movement in the in the voice raise about this only homaizi so through her and threw her being very deliberate and connecting me with our ancestors as we are kind of forced to assimilate as immigrants. I've been able to keep that connection. As i grew into my spirituality amicably as i found my elders as i was able to reach back it was really through the help of my mother. Doing what she could. You know so. That's definitely the foundation. Apart from you my

Adiel Biden City Songa Greenlee Nigeria Sean Florida
Zaila Avant-Garde Becomes First African American to Win Scripps Spelling Bee

Tim Conway Jr.

00:21 sec | 5 months ago

Zaila Avant-Garde Becomes First African American to Win Scripps Spelling Bee

"Has won the Scripps National Spelling Bee Zella avant garde is the first black champion of the competition in the first winner from Louisiana. The word that won her the title was Mariah. Not what you're thinking. In addition to being a spelling whiz, Zale is also a basketball players holds three Guinness world records for dribbling multiple balls at the same time. There is a talented to wish I

Zale Mariah Louisiana Basketball
How Octavia Butler Used Science Fiction to Address Social Injustice

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:18 min | 5 months ago

How Octavia Butler Used Science Fiction to Address Social Injustice

"For some science. Fiction is way to escape problems. In the real world for octavia via science. Fiction was away to shine a light on those problems. She used other worlds to examine real human experiences and address issues facing humanity. Her works touch on the environment race. Theory black feminism queer theory and disability studies. She was a pioneer in the development of africa. Future azam octavia had a powerful certainty and drive in her writing career evidenced in the archives of her work at the huntington library she wrote. I shall be bestselling writer. And i will find the way to do this. So be it. See to it. She was right octavia won many awards including the nineteen eighty four hugo award for best short story and hugo award for best novel. Let in nineteen ninety-five. She received a genius grant from the macarthur foundation. Becoming the first science fiction writer to do so with this grant. She was able to buy a house for her mother and herself. In two thousand five octavia was awarded a place in chicago state. University's international black writers hall of fame by that point. Her books had been translated into at least ten languages selling more than one million copies a year later. In two thousand six octavia died after taking a fall in her washington home. She was fifty eight years old. Since her death octavia butler's writing has become even more popular. Her work is featured on college campuses and there are plans for some of her stories to be adapted for film and television one of her books parable of the sower feels particularly prescient. Set in the twenty twenties. Parable of the sower is based in a world that's largely collapsed due to climate change class inequality in corporate greed. In her work octavia exposed flaws of this world by creating others her uncanny ability to see understand and reveal deep-seated problems continues to inspire and provoke readers today

Octavia Azam Octavia Huntington Library Hugo Award Macarthur Foundation Octavia Butler Africa Chicago Washington
First Date With Tyson Brown and Shelby Duclos

Black Girl Nerds

01:43 min | 5 months ago

First Date With Tyson Brown and Shelby Duclos

"Welcome to the bloggers podcast. I'm your host ryan in. This segment is dedicated to all the people that think. There's a problem with virtual dating but if you insist on doing the traditional dating i have two guests on me today. There are the stars of the first day and if they can get you the first day i don't know who can. I'm talking about actors. Tyson brown is shelby. Do clo- how are you guys doing tyson. Show you how you doing good this. This is the craziest first day. Like i feel like nobody story unravel. This is the craziest thing i've ever seen it. It's a well think of that. take place. yes but tyson. I'm gonna start with you because i think it's actually both interesting with you guys backgrounds that you kept it very local as far as getting your start in and starting to act and everything within Sacramento can talk a little bit about your starred and just Why you thought it was important to start with the indie project. That was just something that kind of came your way tyson. I'll go with you. I something a definitely came away. I was really lucky. For a manual darren. Dahbi onto of additives project consists adventure journey Other than that. I really do like independent films. That kinda center focus way more than story than just like the gifts and stuff so. That's something i'm definitely looking forward to do or keep doing my career shelby. How about you. How did that how to start. How did this come about for you. Kind of like tasted just kind of came about for me too. I was doing some student projects before this film. But this one was definitely different than the others. And i just i felt like it was really special and i loved the script so i still super lucky but yeah just kinda came out for me to

Tyson Tyson Brown Shelby Ryan Sacramento Darren
The Short and Difficult Life of Billie Holiday

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:41 min | 5 months ago

The Short and Difficult Life of Billie Holiday

"About one of the most iconic jazz singers in history. She let us short and difficult life filled with trial and tragedy though. She had no formal musical training. She had a natural gift for jazz musically and emotionally connecting with audiences. Let's talk about billie holiday. Ellinora fagin was born in nineteen fifteen in philadelphia to teenage parents clarence holiday and sadie fagan soon. After eleanor's birth clarence left the family. He would go on to become a successful guitar and banjo player. But would be largely absent. In eleanor's life cd and ellinora moved to baltimore to live with savings older half sister. Eva miller and eve as mother-in-law martha eleanor would often be left with martha as her mother. An aunt worked jobs that took them out of the house for weeks at a time ellinora. Meanwhile began skipping school at just nine years old ellinora was brought to court on truancy charges and was sent to the house of the good shepherd. A reform school after nine months. Ellinora was paroled. But her homecoming was far from idyllic. Shortly after she returned home she was sexually assaulted by a neighborhood. Man ellinora was taken back into state custody this time for nearly two months upon her release. She dropped out of school at barely. Twelve years old. It was at this time that ellinora still a child store covering from trauma and working as a house cleaner. I heard records by the likes of louis armstrong and bessie smith in nineteen twenty eight. Sadie eleanor's mother moved from baltimore to harlem. The next year ellinora joined her sadie began working as a prostitute for their landlady out of a brothel on one hundred and fortieth street. I some accounts. Elenora ran errands for the brothel by others. Ellinora herself was a sex worker at barely. Fourteen years old over the subsequent three years ellinora began developing her singing. Act eventually landing a performance slot at a harlem nightclub though. She had no formal music training. Ellinora hadn't a neat sense of musical structure and theory jazz and blues genres. Who song rely on a singers. Well of pain and sadness or a natural fit for ellinora though just seventeen. She had already lived and survived a difficult life. She adopted the stage name. Billy after billie dove a favourite actress and started

Ellinora Ellinora Fagin Clarence Holiday Sadie Fagan Eleanor Eva Miller Martha Eleanor House Of The Good Shepherd Billie Holiday Baltimore Clarence Sadie Eleanor Philadelphia Martha Elenora Bessie Smith Louis Armstrong Harlem Billie Dove
Briana of Black Queer Travel Guide, Fringe of Colour Films

Black Women Travel Podcast

01:54 min | 5 months ago

Briana of Black Queer Travel Guide, Fringe of Colour Films

"Thanks so much for joining us today. Can you please tell us your name or your from your current location and the name of your business i wanted. My name's brianna forgot her from washington. Dc currently based in edinburgh risk auckland's or the united kingdom depending on who you're asking and i am the grand development manager for the black rear travel guide am also the creative director of festival fringe of color films which is an alternative arts festival for black people and people of color internationally. Sometimes i'm not always also. Sometimes i should say most also the co director of an organization called. We are here. Scotland is a community interest company that supports black people people of color indigenous folk in the arts and creative industries across scotland. So many hats talk to me please. About growing up in the united states of america. I believe you in the dc area. I'm not sure if you had an awareness of age of seven that you had anxiety but like talk about all of that also don't know when you started to experience chronic pain like tell us your story gave us the tea please. Yeah so. I grew up in washington d. c. born to an african american family that basically migrated up north During the great migration of a lot of black families from the south and basically that side of the family was based in and around the washington. Dc area the Metropolitan area the dmv. I still family in north carolina and on my dad's side of the family. I m first generation begajah which is my last name or in the united states. My dad was from angola which is two countries of south africa on the western coast.

Brianna Washington Auckland Edinburgh United Kingdom Scotland United States DC North Carolina Angola South Africa Western Coast
Our Voting Rights Are Under Attack

Our Body Politic

01:44 min | 5 months ago

Our Voting Rights Are Under Attack

"The house of representatives has voted to set up a select committee to investigate the insurrection of january sixth despite efforts to invite republicans to participate in an investigation. Gop leaders are still calling it. A partisan effort and most voted against it. My next guest has spent the last few months exploring this and the issue of voting rights have become so politicized judd leg is the author of the daily newsletter popular information in the last few weeks. He's done some impressive. Investigative work digging into the companies that donate to legislators who didn't vote to certify president. Biden's win back. in january. Judd has years of experience observing politics. He was a research director. For hillary clinton's presidential campaign and worked at the center for american progress where he founded the news site think progress. Welcome to our body politic judd. Thanks for having me. So we're coming up on six months anniversary of the insurrection at the capitol. How do you feel the media is doing in terms of framing. What needs to be talked about. I don't think were doing that. Well i would say none of the members of congress or members of the senate who voted to overture. The election day have really expressed any remorse. And i don't think that there's been any real consequences yet so it in my view we are letting it slip into the rear view mirror without appreciating how close the country tape that day to completely falling apart.

Judd House Of Representatives GOP Biden Center For American Progress Hillary Clinton Congress Senate
African Fashion and Fabric With Jacqueline Shaw

Stitch Please

02:27 min | 5 months ago

African Fashion and Fabric With Jacqueline Shaw

"So jacqueline i am so glad that you are here. Welcome to the stitch please. Podcast thank you lisa. I two weeks i eight. And it's an honor to be has effectively for whites and thank you so much for navigating the time change to speak with me from london. This is very generous. And i never forget. This is an absolute time difference. And you have to be five hours at a different time than i am. So thank you very much. How did you get started. Do you have a sewing story. Did you start with sewing and design. When did you get the message. That i loved to create and this is something i would like to do. Rows la. I can put me guy from eddie memories. I never remember how old i was by do. Remember maybe i was around simple something like that and i received as a gift for my mother. The fashion world so this was a toy that in spun the wheel and the with helping to draw and designs to gang up on portfolio designs again. And i remember having that toy and also is so in claims for my teddy banks and people with love to talk about it. We didn't have done latvian. Ms phosa teddy level so to say things by hand as a child and ways creating things. I talk about how i created pingpong gains. We've lay a pink from gay with an old cereal box. I can cool flakes or something i. He's my elastic band. Mabul was my main octane. Gave therapy. how did these thing so always creating ways. Neither i'm not to the idea of putting something for nothing and from the with the fashion wheel and just a love for textiles with right. Context textiles franson kinds of things. Like that as a child amused to a new area which we knew school my mate my first time the mostly being around carribean which is where my family from in era was festive than meet. Erin it was like the asian community. Miss asian mean not pakistani indian bangaladeshi that community. And we also have my my jared and ganay inference and i saw to become friends with these different groups of people and go to some weddings. Bents might love coach. And i would learn much Tomorrow we'll textiles and then fed up with african takes more and that was part of my journey

Ms Phosa Jacqueline Lisa Eddie Franson London LA Erin Jared Bents