Advertising

Listen to the latest news, interviews and analysis from the world of advertising. Sourced from leading podcasts and talk radio shows.

Website Conversion Rate Optimization with Chris Dayley

Digital Conversations with Billy Bateman

03:08 min | 3 weeks ago

Website Conversion Rate Optimization with Chris Dayley

"You start working with the company what's your process like if you're gonna come in and you're gonna start running split test where do you look i For things to start working on. Yeah so i've got a three step process the to your quickly. The great thing is the principles that will chat about are equally applicable to e com and beat a and bb or early But because the process of conversion rate optimization is about figuring out what does our audience wants to see on our website so usually in stepped one of my testing process I call it the existence phase. Basically what you wanna do just phase of terry is you wanna figure out. Do we have the right stuff on the website to begin with nothing. Sucks worse than you start doing testing with a bunch of assumptions. In your mind thinking that everything on your website is working well already when in reality most of the stuff that's on there either shouldn't be there or isn't dial didn't so instead of the process what i do. I typically will go through. Intest removing things from the site This usually makes. Seo people dervis because we might just removing content and go. What's going to happen to our seo results if we remove contact and i always respond to that with. Don't worry i'm not saying that we're going to remove this content. What we're trying to figure out step one of the process is what are the things that matter to our audience because there's one of three results that you can get from from split test you either have a winner. Which is great. You'll lose which is also great or you have no impact. No impact means the thing that you tested doesn't matter at all to your audience and so these are the things that we want to figure out early on in the testing process. What does and does not matter tried it. So if we remove a paragraph of contact from the page do conversion rates. Go up down or nothing happens. If conversion rates go up then that means that that content should be there in the first place right so don't should probably just get rid of it and usually if removing content improves conversion rates. It will also improve your organic rankings. So so that's great. If removing content decreases conversion rates than we know that content should be there. And then guess what our next test is going to be refining that concept art we know this content is useful now in step to. Let's make it better. Let's see what happens if we take our turn it into a bowl pointless. Let's see what happens if we take that paragraph and turn it into three paragraphs. Let's see what happens. If instead of focusing on the benefits of our service we focused on The pain points that you're experiencing is a customer right so step one is about figuring out you. We have the right stuff step. Two is about refining stuffs that we have and then step three. We're gonna test adding new stuff to the site is where we might just new features New designs that kind of stuff and so again. I don't come in with any presupposed ideas. i don't come in my clients. Oh we've gotta get that video off the page or hey. We need a video bates were coming in. And we're trying to learn what the audience wants

Dervis Terry SEO Bates
Beautiful Email Design That Make Sales

The Email Marketing Show

03:44 min | 3 weeks ago

Beautiful Email Design That Make Sales

"You've probably heard this phrase I would have written you a shorter message. But i didn't have time. Yes and right. Most people don't take the time to refine their message. And that includes branding so the stuff that shows up the number of emails. I get that have what i like to call like a big. So when you're looking at an email or or any design just look at the different points of things so there's one type of topography another. There's another that's three points. There's a line there's a different kind of line. That's now five points. There's this amount of space between things and now there's this other amount of space between things now the seven points and you're like golf you're trying to get at low as scores possible so unless a line that's different is doing some unique job you're like it has to be that for this specific reason than kill it get rid of it and always trim trim sentence isn't doing specific job get rid of it right get down to your essential message your minimum viable communication. That's when things get really work and so yeah. When i throw up. That's when that's not happening. I've got it figured i out. What we need to do is make the rest of our branding our website and everything else. That really shit. And then we don't have to worry the emails and everything looks aligning. That's all we need. This makes. I think some people have done that. Actually i have seen people who've taken that approach i can see. I can see how this how this works and why this is why. This is really really important. have you seen that. They're suddenly become particular problems. This we stick one image of like a screenshot gif of kennedy or something in an email and some new we got replies from somebody who's using so machete mail client that's emerged from some murray says all well the image didn't lowered when i looked at the email and starts mooning about it. So have you start. Have you found problems as more email clydes taupo where people are still trying to get it to be consistent and work and all these different email clients so good question. If you're template is either well chosen if you ended up using a email template or if you have good designers and developers create it for you. Then this is a non issue you. There's something called graceful degradation so it will gracefully degrade down into a text email in certain that civic clients where you know that's not appropriate it will gracefully degrade down into like if there's no images available all text can be used with as people. What's they're all kinds of ways of removing the obstacles of making it Work well generally speaking though there are best practices about not too many images and not too large File size of images so that things load quickly and that you know you're looking at So many more mobile opens than desktop. That you really need to be paying attention those file sizes so everything snappy but yeah i i think the that is merely over. Now that said if you have a An audience that is primarily out in the australian bush. No this this is not over. You should be sending text emails. And that's it right but if your audience is an audience that is has high speed internet or has good l. t. e. or something like that for their. You know their bandwidth on their phone. Then you're okay providing a reasonable. You know a graphic visual emails and the templates that come with those.

Golf Kennedy Murray Bush
Industry Preview: Axios CEO Jim VandeHei On Media Post-Trump

AdExchanger Talks

03:24 min | 4 hrs ago

Industry Preview: Axios CEO Jim VandeHei On Media Post-Trump

"To who. Hello i'm ad exchange or senior editor. Sarah sluice a lot can happen in four years for years ago. Donald trump was being sworn in as our forty fifth president and also four years ago. Axios was founded and delighted to have jim van high co founder and. Ceo of axios with me here today. Great to be here. So and congratulations on your four year anniversary. Thank you we we started. We actually moved up our launch because we interview with donald trump so our first term matched up with his first term. We can leave it all of you to decide what better i show while. I wanna talk about the future of media in the airhead recording this the day after biden's inauguration actually has grown up under the trump presidency in our in this completely new political moment with the biden administration coming out of the first day of the new regime. What are you paying attention to. Yeah i mean we at axios. We cover a broad range of topics so politics technology media business and in the political sphere. Obviously we're spending a lot of time. Thinking about how joe biden the presidency will unfold but also how it will unfold in this kind of wild and wacky media environment where you've got you know roughly half the country that doesn't trust anything that the mainstream media produces and you have this rise in the number of people who believe things that aren't true and i don't think we've ever been here's a country where we've been the last couple years. We just have so much distrust in so much misinformation and so much propaganda in so much of a taking root with people that you and i would say other serious smart people and yet they don't believe the same things that we believe even if a to us they're fact base and that's a huge problem in that environment is going to be surrounding joe biden. And you can't extract politics or biden from media swish together. I think you make a big mistake if you try to understand politics without having a pretty good appreciation of modern media yeah in trump is leaving this legacy of distrust of the media and hatred of the media which he's kind of been able to spread to a broader set of followers. What do you think the long term effects of that negativity toward media will be. I mean i think it's to be determined. I think it's gonna take a long time to repair what is broken. When you have this many people you have a maybe half the country. It's deeply skeptical of media in general and kind of what we would define this truth. It makes it almost impossible to be a functioning society in that environment and i think for the incumbent brands. It's going to be really hard to win back. The trust the people who distrust or mistrust them now i think it creates new opportunities for companies like axios or companies at mina merge over the next couple of years ought to be able to maybe kindle rekindle a relationship with people who were skeptical of things about around for a long time. But it's a problem that has to be solved if we end up

Sarah Sluice Donald Trump Jim Van High Biden Administration Biden Joe Biden Axios Mina Merge
212 - The Rapid Rise of Veganuary

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

05:18 min | 18 hrs ago

212 - The Rapid Rise of Veganuary

"You're listening to yeah. That's probably an ad the attic podcast but we talk about marketing media technology pop culture because in the end everything is an ad but hopefully a meat free ad and dairy free and egg free. Because this week we're talking to ury And with me is our plant based product expert to talk about this vegan movement and how and why brands have embraced. It and americans have embraced it so quickly and and dramatically and with with me as engineers is our expert on all things plant based t. l. stanley reporter and editor here at ad week Great to have you back. Thank you so much for having me again. I love to chat as you know. I mean we've talked about. We had on november. I think last to talk about some some plant based trends. This is one of those categories like cannabis which you also cover where it just feels like every two weeks. It's in a completely new place. Like i've never in all my years of covering this divide. I can't think of very many categories that have blown up as quickly and as dramatically and often as these two have. It's probably the intersection of a bunch of trends. That were already in the works but have just been completely accelerated by the pandemic. No i think you. And i have talked about this when we have gotten into these topics before But i feel like i should be transparent about my own kind of Approach to vegan I don't eat beef. that's somewhat newish thing like last two years i wanna say Stopped eating beef mostly out of environmental and and a few health reasons that that's that whenever i say health issue i am. I usually quick to admit that. I eat a lot of pork. Living living in alabama. I can't i do a lot of grilling and smoking and And cooking in general. And i think if i gave up pork. I'm just not ready. I'm not quite there yet. that said i'm always looking. I do eat a lot of plant based foods and alternatives a lot of the brands. We've written about. Terry remind me what's your. What's your kind of status southern girl originally and i love my steak and bacon and i really don't think i could ever give them up It is a little bit of a. It's a disconnect. Because i'm such an animal welfare in person. I love animals of all types. But i love my red meat and i don't hide real 'cause it's delicious. Oh i don't eat it that often. But i really crave it every now and again. I eat a lot of chicken. I eat a lot of turkey. Eight fish i mean i will. I will try pretty much anything. And everything that things i make more consistently for myself are Chicken and turkey with lots and lots of vegetables in there and there's plenty of Completely plant based days or completely plant based meals without ever really Consciously saying. I must eat plant based i just like that food as well so i have a pretty broad mix of things that i eat and cooking at all for myself which i did even before lockdown so decent home cook so i can You know i can make something that doesn't have meat in it. And i still think that's delicious but every once in a while just like a b. l. t. or some sausage delicious. Yeah keep waiting for turkey. Bacon actually be good like i. I use it in random stuff but it's hard to hardy a pass legit bacon. I i'm definitely i mean and hopefully maybe in some ways. I'm kind of a typical american part of these trends. It's like i don't necessarily care. Like if i eat a burger and it's really good i don't care like if i can if it's good and it's not meet and i know the environmental impacts of meat and things like that then cool But i did not start doing that. I did not give up beef until there were Replacements for the things. I eat most often and i mean honestly i think the in the end the only thing i really gave up was like steak and brisket think about it Because just about everything else. You can get a substitute for. And i feel like as you and i've talked about that. That's kind of been why some of these brands have been so successful is it's not the americans on mass are giving up all meat. They are just of course. We've made it this far into the show and we haven't said the f. word flex talk about flex -tarian. Yeah well people site they will. They've sort of talk one game but then when it comes to actually buy you know plunkett down there dollars at the grocery store they sort of talk a game because when people if you ask them. Why are you eating less meat. Or why do you want to Adopt a more plant based diet they will say health data almost always i

Stanley Alabama Terry Bacon Turkey Plunkett
This site built a huge audience by mining legal documents from government websites

The Business of Content

04:25 min | 19 hrs ago

This site built a huge audience by mining legal documents from government websites

"Simon owens in newsletter. Okay now onto my interview preston. Hey preston x joining us thanks. I'm into greater beyond so your background isn't in media you. Were i think once a lawyer right and the new got into sales right yeah. I practiced law in house At the university of miami for a couple of years in quickly discovered that The business was much more interesting to me. So when into went into sales and business development in in sas in tech as sort of my exit out of a law. Yeah so you were telling sas type products. Is that where you kind of got the itch to try to do startup. it was. And i actually i right after i left. I tried to star Small business selling building web sites in in logos and things of that nature and Invested probably far too much capital To try to get it off the ground in came out of it saying wow just dumped all this money and i have literally nothing to show for it so if i do this again after. I recruit my losses. Let's make sure that i can build something that That is sustainable long term. Even if i don't have a ton of money to invest in it so that's sort of foreshadowing a bit about what we built the line or but but yeah the the entry into sas into subscription revenue of the obsession for moire in understanding caq churn and everything else came from from being salesperson in in in sas and that was certainly The big educational advantage is we started building. line cider. a great thing about content Even though i am doing some things like businesswise different things. Today that i was eight years. Ago i i still have the content creating eight years old. You go it's no. It's still providing value to me. Because i'm covering kind of the same beat as i was so like people as long as you're still paying your hosting the minimum hosting bills your content can kind of live on forever and like you said it's not like but if you create like some kind of new platforms sas platform it doesn't take off and then you shut it down that it doesn't then you pretty much have nothing to show for it whereas even if you if you create a content type startup it can still continue providing value to you even if you're no longer running in afterwards is kind of south liquor thinking was and it sets. That's such a powerful insight. Simon in i think every time i see in tech crunch or whatever. A legal tech company called atrium. Was you know what sort of shuttered its doors. I think in march of last year. And i remember being like. Oh my gosh like think. Much brand equity in all these things went into that in millions and millions of dollars and now it's just gone and i have nightmares about that. You know personally i. They probably have very good reasons to do that. Turn a lot of investment dollars to To investors etc but idea that you could put forth so much energy into something And then you know just one day turn off. The lights is is frankly terrifying to me personally is not manure so definitely tried to avoid that so you wanna create something. That's you know that that has long term value. What sparked the original idea that would become law. Insider sure so through. My sort of role is a sales person in this sort of adjacent to lille technology. Got exposed to rocket lawyer. Legalzoom started to understand what they were building in saw that a lot of traffic that they were building was from websites that were sort of. Seo kings of contract in in legal information in stumbled upon a couple of these sites deconstructed them and said this is interesting. These these sites very simple ways have have started aggregating publicly available legal information in this. In this sense it was contracts and just start connecting some dots and said if we really went deep on this and and compile Tried lease to compile the world's largest contract database in get smart with the day to how we a really good at search In potentially maybe build something lawyers would use Sort of get ahead of ourselves here.

Simon Owens Hey Preston University Of Miami Preston Legalzoom Simon Seo Kings
The Quest For A Bloomberg Terminal For Digital Advertising

AdExchanger Talks

02:42 min | 3 d ago

The Quest For A Bloomberg Terminal For Digital Advertising

"Is sponsored by suffer. A leading contextual data platform brands agencies later. This episode is because separate host. Ceo retired radin about the company. Human in the loop approach to brand suitability specifically built with video. Everybody welcome back to ad exchange this zach rogers. I'm the executive editor of ad exchanger. So my guest. Today is ravi patel. Ravi is an entrepreneur who has dedicated. the past. Several years of his career to helping brands make better advertising decisions by adding financial style. Intelligence to their programmatic dashboards. He did this. Originally at adven- his previous company where he was the vp of product and that data and then later became the ceo advocates product allow agencies and trading desks to analyze historical pricing information on independently verified information. It was an ambitious model and it didn't work out We'll talk about why more recently ravi works at price waterhouse coopers as the developer of consumer markets in product lead among other things. He's trying to continue the story. He started adven- building a media. Intelligence business unit that marketers and agency buyers can use to continuously improve the efficiency of their programmatic campaigns. Hope i got all that right. Ravi will correct me if i did not. I'm delighted to have him on the show. Robbie welcome thank you. It's great to be here. Zach out now you got a perfectly at just as you said. Oh good good. Good good so good to have you on the show talking about doing this for a while you and i have been you know every now and then we do zoom caller back in the day we would get a coffee or lunch and talk about stuff and glad we're finally able to do a public podcast. Yeah likewise. I think it's been a long time coming Twenty twenty s kind of a wackier for all of us yes. Good riddance So you know. I summarize what ad finn was there but i thought maybe for the beginning part of our interview. We could talk about the advent story. It's an interesting story And you were very. You've been very sort of about sharing what happened. What what the vision was in then. What ultimately went wrong. But maybe you could put it in your own words. What was the founding idea with atf. In what were you trying to do. Definitely so you know. Add fend name.

Zach Rogers Ravi Patel Ravi Price Waterhouse Coopers Radin Robbie Zach Finn ATF
Must CTV - E129

The Big Story

01:30 min | 3 d ago

Must CTV - E129

"One of the biggest transformations. We're gonna see in. Twenty twenty. One is in tv advertising. Well that and the way online identity resolved but let's talk tv because a path forward there i think is a little clearer and a little more optimistic and a week and in a week where we welcome a new presidential administration. I'm all for a clear optimistic path forward so tv. It is and boy. There's a lot to talk about from the growth of address ability address ability which both buy and sell sides have been chattering about the way major. Broadcasters like disney nbc you and warnermedia reordering streaming last year to all of the recent tv. Related emanate over the past two years. I'm ryan joe. Managing editor attic singer. And with me are alison schiff aka shifty. Hello and anthony rueful lotto aka ariffin. That's fair hello on the big story. We also welcome mike baker founder and former. Ceo of data zoo which still to roku in twenty nine thousand. Nine hundred and mike has also been thinking heavily about the future of tv advertising about a week and a half ago. He wrote an ad exchange column. Called y ad dollars aren't following. The viewers flocking to see mike welcome. Hey hey everybody glad to be here. Thanks for having me on so just kind of talking about your column.

Ryan Joe Alison Schiff Anthony Rueful Aka Ariffin NBC Mike Baker Disney Mike Welcome Mike
New Use Cases For AI In 2021, With IBMs Bob Lord

AdExchanger Talks

03:46 min | 5 d ago

New Use Cases For AI In 2021, With IBMs Bob Lord

"Hey this zach. Rogers the executive editor of ad exchanger and my guest today is bob. Lord bob is the senior vice president of cognitive applications. That ibm. I've known bob for cheese a lot of years and had the opportunity to interview him onstage bunch of times and i know him to be among most thoughtful and passionate leaders focused on the intersection of marketing. Technology pleased to have him on to talk about key trends at. Ibm bob welcome. Hi zack how are you. Good to You and see you again. Thank you for having me on. It's great to have you So talk for a minute about what you're up to these days. We haven't spoken in a good year role that ibm and how has it changed. Yeah it's pretty fascinating pretty exciting. I oversee a number of innovations for ibm now including our advertising and weather. business are blockchain business. Which i loved to talk a little bit more about our ecosystem For partners and developers that stan sort of the global re-met and are independent software vendors in strategic alliances so ultimately i'm responsible for infusing emerging technologies into these businesses into. Drive it at scale. Okay terrific and You know speaking more. Broadly about ibm. How has the company transformed in twenty twenty. I mean you had a new. Ceo come in. Krishna could you speak about what's changing in. Ibm in what. What the key. Initiatives are sort of company-wide. Yeah aren't so arvind krishna. took the reins as ceo in early twenty twenty actually justice sort of The pandemic was washing over the business community And he's done a phenomenal job. I would say galvanizing the company Around our focus on something called open hybrid cloud in which we believe are sort of. I would say fundamental Change agents in our clients right now. and one of the things. I'm excited about which i know. We'll talk more and more about is how i believe. Ai should be brought more at scale into the media and marketing landscape. But he's his focus the company very much on this world of hybrid cloud and a And how enterprises get the biggest bang using those technologies to transform their business through For the future okay. Great so let's jump into that question on. Ai do wanna talk about the marketing in the ads. Use cases but i sort of how is ibm watson technology being used today from abroad standpoint. Yeah so it's interesting because a lot of people ask me that question because if you think. About what watson has done is watson is embedded in over sixty thousand applications worldwide The brand watson doesn't necessarily stick out. But i'd probably suggest to you that any sort of call center that you go into or an interact with or any kind of chat function. There's a piece of watson that's behind that Actually helping to route calls or two auto answer calls to make companies more efficient and The the interesting thing for me as i came into. Ibm only five years. Ago was learning the innovations that have happened in the world and how it's been applied to the banking industry. The insurance industry the healthcare industry government industry. You know to help prevent cyber attacks and the interesting thing for me is it really hasn't been applied in the marketing or media landscape at scale and it was a couple of reasons for that but there is an enormous opportunity to transform.

IBM Lord Bob Bob Welcome BOB Arvind Krishna Zach Rogers Watson Stan Krishna Healthcare Industry Government
EP289: Digging Deeper: What You Can Do Right Now to Prepare for iOS 14

Perpetual Traffic by DigitalMarketer

04:01 min | 6 d ago

EP289: Digging Deeper: What You Can Do Right Now to Prepare for iOS 14

"Eighty nine in twenty twenty one excited about this year and all the optimism and great things that we know we're going to happen alongside awesome co host. Amanda who just knows. This is gonna be the year of all years right. Amanda absolutely it's going to be. No i i'm not even gonna say it. That's jinxing at your jinxing it. Now i'm thinking knock on wood. What are you doing to us on the podcast. Well that's all right because we have the savior of twenty twenty one when it comes to tracking and all these issues with facebook here today. Pretty excited to have this guy back on and not. I will be pronounced on this entire show because we got somebody who doesn't even know how to pronounce an are hidden. None other than wicked scott degrassi from wicked reports. Scott great to have you back on perpetual traffic buddy. I'm excited to be anointed the savior. I was meant for great things. I can send this to my mom. She'll be like all that grief you put me through the the save ya save you guys wicked awesome guys. It's completely just degrade speak here so amanda just give us a virtual smack. I'll do what i can to keep up. The only one who talks normal on this show now later just translates boston. Speak but today. We're going to be doing some boston. Speak but we're also going to be picking apart and dissecting like forensic scientists. Is that what they actually do on those shows. Those forensic shows exactly what is happening with this. Ios update its impact on facebook. And not just facebook ladies and gentlemen. It's all networks in all apps that track through and scott's gonna get into the nitty gritty. So i don't say something. That is not true here but keep in mind that today's show as of the date of this recording. We're going to be giving you the goods as we know it because a lot of this is going to evolve over time. And if you don't know what. I'm talking about definitely go back to episode two hundred eighty seven which i believe was the first show of twenty twenty one our most favorite year from here on out and we talk about this a little bit myself angel. Vp of media buying over at eleven. But they were going to get into more detail with wicked scott because wicked scott as he is known is the owner and ceo of wicked reports which might be a potential solution for this whole thing here not to tease out a bit but scott is uniquely qualified to talk through with us all and make it is clear as possible if not as clear as mud as they say and southie. What's just give us a very high level view. Not too technical about what is happening and why this. Ios update is something that our listeners should be aware of and understand it so that they can plan for it in the coming year. Sure i'd love to spend a lot of time calming over hairy facebook developer docs. We're actually facebook marketing partners for conversions. We were the first ones thing conversion data from the crm facebook both four years ago. I want to send sierra de data to google conversions so this is my life so uniquely qualified to hopefully sort this out for you. You absolutely are. You're the guy. I call when i'm absolutely confused about anything tracking related so anyway so a little stressed a couple of weeks ago a bit paranoid here because change is the one constant. I agree i agree. They never let us arrest in this industry. So so apple's decided not just altruistically 'cause they're being benevolent friendly rulers of your iphone but more for all sorts of reasons we'll get into the f.

Scott Degrassi Facebook Amanda Scott Boston Google Apple
Convince the gatekeepers': How The Week Jr. is growing its U.S. subscriber base

The Digiday Podcast

03:43 min | 6 d ago

Convince the gatekeepers': How The Week Jr. is growing its U.S. subscriber base

"Hello everyone and welcome to another episode of the digital podcast. I'm digital senior reporter. Kelly barbara and today. I'm speaking with weekly newsmagazine. The weeks chief. Executive karen o'connor andrea the editor in chief of the week junior. Us the week junior a weekly news magazine aimed at kids. Eight through age fourteen was originally launched in the uk. Five years ago in march came to the us to reach a new set of young readers. Of course it's launched lined up with the start of the pandemic but since then the new arm of the publication has been able to amass over seventy five thousand subscriptions which we will get into the root of how they were able to achieve that. But i welcome karen andrea. Thank you very much. Thank so i guess it would be helpful to maybe explain The week junior The age ranges between eight and fourteen as i mentioned. But it'd be great to kind of get an idea of what the content consist of and What you know the readers get each week so the week is thirty two pages every week created in real time. It's on the news and we cover a major major news stories every week in an age appropriate way for this age group plus other topics we know. Children are intensely interested in such as animals and the environment and science and technology arts and entertainment sports and it is our mission to bring the news of the world to children and help them make sense of it and another huge part of our mission is to help children form opinions about what they read and think critically about what's happening in the world and and be able to say what they can have. Their voice heard as i mentioned the week junior came to the us in march But that was right at the onset of the pandemic Can you talk about how that might have. Impacted the us debut or did that have to adjust it all When you were first launching well the launch of of a magazine as always intense but We did have a few additional challenges. as you mentioned The our first deadline to the printer was march seventeenth so that was precisely when the world was shutting down and we went one hundred percent remote from our office one day before the deadline and we had some plans for both for our content and for the launch itself that had to be scrapped. We had a very celebrator cover planned and we came up with a different cover that would directly address the corona virus three days before the launch and we had to actually tweak our lineup as well as the architecture of the magazine because certain things that we were planning to cover such as sports and movies and museum openings and things like that were no happening And we had big event planned around the line in our uk colleagues were scheduled to come over and be with us for the launch and couldn't travel But we had several things going for us as well One was that dennis publishing our owner had invested in Very cutting edge technology that allowed us to very seamlessly moved to a remote working Environment we had a terrific team of people working on this magazine. Who were just as dedicated. As as i was to to Keeping our promise to america's

Kelly Barbara Executive Karen O'connor Andre Karen Andrea America UK Dennis
Ep. 108: B2B & Trans-national Localism Ft. Praval Singh

Advertising Is Dead

05:51 min | 6 d ago

Ep. 108: B2B & Trans-national Localism Ft. Praval Singh

"I don't the eighty s. We haven't focused enough on. Advertising is dead have been traditionally ordered b. to b. companies this space that has always looked at as a separate street from more consumer facing businesses has a lot closer in approach to consumer brands because of the advent of digital and the larger digital ecosystem. It's also made them look at all aspects of marketing and content from a lens very similar to wear the wider b. two c. market is headed as retaining and enhancing so taken able customer experience practices. That have had them drive. A truly global model broad bit focus localization to enhance the way the function and discuss all of this and so much more have promising the vp marketing and customer experience of zohar on the shoulder. Day ella and back with his. Have shown ma'am molly. Hi am and i'm kinda guy at the house. Economics qualify psychology. Some him. And you bet only on the nankai. Podcast elliott vinci since ibm podcast app. Yup excite john phoebe up near podcast. Until they've come back to designate dead. Bilbao will hey on it to see you. Good good to have you on the show. And then we had a free discussion before we we reschedule this. According i was gonna build a bunch of torture When you gave me a lot more for the for todd. But i really start off with some of the some of the basics of how how do you look at the space in which you operate two different for b. two b. space from a marketing different from. Let's say more consumer side of things when suharto of new view the difference that so this classic b. two b. b. b. two c. Question keeps coming on an different platforms and gunman stations with people like you and even other ways internally as well of no there've been times when we trying to work on a campaign or initiative and somebody would invariably say that you know this might have worked better for me to see which is true and everything that works to see would essentially work for me to be Idea but i mean comforting fate today the way we do business right you and i and people we deal with is very different from you. Know how it was done just ten years ago right. I don't think of. I mean i i like to point a smartphones or the iphone in the history of automation as a very significant time and it changes a lot of teams and then the app store and you know and everything that followed in our lives are so different today than it was just any as ago and i think listening to be generation maybe the next nation will not even understand it from this in on this but today we also connected In a in a world. Where i'm more concerned about working at all time than material working today right so in these times of because we as human beings are dealing with things of end of the day. They're all connected. A my customers often engage directly with me on social networks. Even though in addition set they would right to customer support email address. Pick up the phone and call. These lines are so blurred today that ultimately a company for to b. b. two c. company you're dealing with people and Your marketing stanford your message your appeal You know all or what are you trying to sell them. Right are trying to be useful I would say has to be targeted towards individual or group of individuals or a sect of people depending on what your product or offering is. I think he's lines are blurred at a very broad level. I would say if you dive deeper into the mechanics of it are the the the vehicles of distribution on that definitely babies the channels that one would use Something think about something like a push notifications for that matter or you know. We've seen very different use cases and scenarios btc scenario auditor. Running an ecommerce business looking at selling it to consumers auditor see brands. That in if you're ready to see brand a lot of coming up now especially in india of your again talking to human beings but the channel that you choose the method that you use the all differed so i think at a broad level. They're all same You know in terms of the the intense the same. I would say but he has how you operate how you go about making that channel execute secure that that varies but i think these lines of in the last ten years so you know the way smartphones game the internet you know how day we are hyper connected. Right on. That has changed Things so my perspective is if if an idea comes in on rather than putting a to b was to see lens of trump in all. We try to evaluate the idea early on its merit. That's what i would say a word. You said it is interesting that also because the lord times have a lot of listeners. I didn't say primarily focused on dec. brands. Or if that space and might as i i'll feeding those lines and lord i'm glad to kind of Said pretty much. I've been kind of zooming in my mind is how things would work. I'm gonna take a couple

Elliott Vinci John Phoebe Zohar Bilbao Ella Molly IBM Todd App Store India
207 - The 2021 Outlook Episode

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

04:28 min | Last week

207 - The 2021 Outlook Episode

"Welcome to yeah. That's probably an ad. I'm cohen david. Greiner is off this week but we are going to talk about Some of his work and our colleagues were on twenty twenty one. So we have an outlet issue for. I start first issue of the year and basically we reached out to oliver editors reporters and got them to answer the question of okay. What's going to happen for each of your verticals or your industry so we have everyone from tv and streaming to programmatic. I'm david griner has a nice piece about What to expect in post pandemic production after year that altered almost everything and he dies further into that our agencies editor talks about What it looks like For the future of agencies after years of turmoil the hint here is that well. The future might look very bright. in addition to our editor's notes or essays. We also have Are trending pieces and with us today to talk about. Those pieces are are deputy editor of agencies mendez smiley and our cpt reporter. Paul hiebert to the podcast guys. Welcome back. I guess i wanna start off with how how the year in coverage has has gone so far for you. Let's start with manda. Henny the year in coverage i would say it. It's been a busy year already. It feels like on the agency's beat em things. Were sort of quiet the first few days then. It seems like everyone just sort of jump back in. We've already seen a ton of big moves happening this year. I think you know. Last week we saw riley go from cantu. Wpp which was a pretty big move for him. he's kind of held. He's been a part of mccann You know just really ramping up their creative chops over the past five or so years in i guess now we'll be taking his talent to wp as they sort of. Continue their their turnaround strategy So that's that. I know there's already been a few big Account changes bed bath and beyond is starting off the year with a new a bunch of new agencies. Their biggest probably is a matese cofer new creative agency and Phillips just put their account up for review that the media accounts. So i could go on and on really tried to make as yeah. It's it's been a busy year. And i think i'm working or definitely gonna see some of the trends. It started last year. You know kind of spurred by the pandemic kind of really play out even more this year. So yeah and that's really what all of are digging into what's was kind of here to stay what's going back to the dreadful quote unquote normal. That that is over used Paul what about you. Obviously we're all looking forward to super bowl. That's like a whole 'nother episode or two or three but what's going on and retail world. Is it fast changing as well. It's been an incredible year for the industry. There's just been so many changes in how people live their lives covering the consumer goods industry of course a lot of everyday products that people buy people use so the everyday has just been so It's just been so disrupted to every aspects of life essentially now happening at home so all most all industries have done quite well because people are just eating at home more that which means cleaning more at home which means more exercise at home or streaming at home working at home steadying at home just the whole universe is essentially collapsed to people's homes. I think which has automatically benefited the industry. I mean i was just talking to somebody yesterday. We were talking about sustainability and how that was such a big big topic but it's kind of given everything that's happened the past year any Anything beyond just getting those basic needs met and stuff have kind of gone in the wayside a bit. But i think we'll start to see more of those other trends that were happening a lot before. twenty twenty came around to start popping up again slowly as as things do start to resemble what they look like pre pandemic yeah and european is about how pandemic inspired behaviors have marketers betting on. What's gonna stick around What what are the top ones. And what are the ones that maybe also will. Just go away. It's the biggest question out there.

Cohen David David Griner Mendez Smiley Paul Hiebert Greiner Henny Manda Oliver WPP Cantu Mccann Riley Phillips Super Bowl Paul
The Rise of the Internet

The History of Advertising Podcast

02:41 min | Last week

The Rise of the Internet

"Try the internet. The last technology that had any real effect on the way people sat down on talk to each other was the table. So said klay shuki. Meanwhile steven reuters described the internet as being like the wild west because there are no rules on this industry inside episode of the history of advertising. Podcast we are looking at the rise of the internet and how it's affected land. Rory sutherland is vice. Chairman of ogilvy. Uk and a behavioral science expert. He recalls how atlanta's slow to see the potential of the internet. They were probably fifty percent of people in and land was skeptical so in the first year. First few years of the internet ninety four ninety five ninety six there are people who referred to it as text for the ninety s. Now it seems hard to imagine now. But i mean that was perfect. You know that this is one of those fads advertising. Basically it's it's always press cinema posters tv it will be for the foreseeable future every now and then a fad comes along and people go to a letter conferences. Called the future is teletext or but in truth. Nothing's gonna fucking happen in fact a lot of parallels between the rise at the internet in the nineteen ninety s and the mass introduction of electricity into people's homes in the nineteen twenty s. Spend a whole lot time working on microsoft compact working on various internet projects. And it was all about. Hey the great thing about this new thing that allows you to do this and of course half time completely right. That's exactly what people do. The new technology allows do this new thing and they do the new thing at halftime. You're kind of wing. There's a fascinating thing. Which i absolutely loved which i discovered in an and for i think the dublin corporation encouraging people to get addict christie. That's the first thing that fascinated me. Which is the idea that you'd ever have to market anna christie idea. Right if you or i or anybody else moved into a house which wasn't on the grade. The idea that we need a salesman to come round and go the great thing about having 'electricity as we day one you go get this bloody place connected to the electricity because otherwise i'll life's not worth living but for a pair about channel twenty years you actually had salesman who would go round and heaps a really great idea having 'electricity in your home right. There's some lovely things about this but which was fascinated me because being involved a lot in what is effectively innovation we can learn about innovation

Klay Shuki Steven Reuters Rory Sutherland Ogilvy Atlanta Anna Christie UK Microsoft Christie Dublin
247: Google Ads Strategies For Beginners

The Paid Search Podcast

03:40 min | Last week

247: Google Ads Strategies For Beginners

"Hey everybody yes. Welcome back to the podcast. My name is jason rothman as always. I'm joined by the green. The great chris safer. We're recording a little bit early today at cottam. A little too close to Post cross fit situation here that we're having to deal with very high energy of that's a good thing for our show Chris seemed to be a good spirits. Today how's it going. Yeah good you know It's nice to get your priorities straight. And feel good about your day not stress you know pumped jason came to me with the problem and i immediately solved it and i'm ready to just punch it out one two and then a good kick when it's down and the whole project's done so we're going to do today. We're going to punch you guys straight in the face and then when you're when you're surprised we're going to kick you and you're gonna love it and you're gonna think us for and welcome so ninety. Nine percent of our listeners are not top tier experts and we often forget that. Jason you and i work in a high level world where we're working with strategies and things in our heads are so far beyond what people are thinking about. We're thinking what type of keyword deep level strategy over long term stuff we're doing you know super manual bidding and then suddenly we forget the guy that's listening is like what do i choose. You know he. He's completely lost. So the idea today is we're going to address basic beginner types of things you know and we're going to go through ten different industries and we're going to give you answers to the most basic questions i. We're gonna tell you why we think google is your best way to advertise. We know there's competition out there and we're going to talk about that number two or we're gonna get into out of these ten industries if you're in one of these are close to them. What some initial experiences thoughts that we have in these industries you know what some ideas about strategies cautionary tales that we might share about them as if you know. We're starting to brainstorm building this for you. What's the first things on our head for these ten industry kind of It you said a made me think like potential hazards or something like. Hey we've seen this industry. This is where someone could go wrong to google ads a wrong way. Yeah good and bad things that we think work well and then tells of terror bat and we've learned in. We're going to avoid those potholes. So that's what it is. Good news is for those of you that our top tier and understand a lot of the deep stuff. You'll still learn something because we're going to address some stuff that will be in that google ads in baseball type of code stuff. And you'll be like oh hadn't thought of that before so all of you stick around. We have a great show. But before we jump into the show. I want to tell you about op. Te'o because for the one hundred percent of you that have twenty four hours in the day. You need to get more done in google ads. You're listening to this show because you work and google ads. You get a lot done in google ads but you wanna grow going to be more efficient. You want new ideas not push-button silly things that you know says hey click here in your campaign will be fifty percent better. No no. that's not true.

Jason Rothman Chris Safer Cottam Google Jason Chris Baseball
His site covering streaming TV attracts millions of visitors a month

The Business of Content

03:45 min | Last week

His site covering streaming TV attracts millions of visitors a month

"Rick thanks for joining us My pleasure so you have this. Great website focused on streaming tv. But you actually had pretty secure this path leading up to the launch through it right like back in the nineties. You did everything from stand up. Comedy to radio. Tell me a little bit about your career kind of bef- prior to launching the site. Yeah i had a vendor once described my. My resume is eclectic. Which i think is probably pretty accurate of spent most of my twenties. Doing stand up comedy. I was always writing on the side doing freelance pieces. But it one point after about ten or twelve years. I transitioned the talk radio. I did syndicate talk radio for three or four years and by the late nineties. I was in the bay. Area were a startup Financial new startup and it was all the own video. And i was still doing writing on the side of both four other online sites and i started one of my own. That was basically just a place to sort of archive things that either ones on myself or or things that Freelance pieces identify other people and That was sort of the start of this website. It's a and it really all through. The the odds was on and off for big media companies. And i would use. This website is is a place to archive stuff. And whenever get laid off. I would spend all of my attention on the website for the whatever six months or a year to like. Add another full time job and typically. When i got a fulltime job they would say you can't do your website more so it would kind of go back off to side and stand up comedy. That's from what i've heard is a pretty brutal career right in terms of travel and kind of late nights and stuff like that was the tradition. Talk radio like almost kind of taking your comedic personality and put it on the radio. Was that kind of thinking you know. Honestly i wish i could say it was more. It was that planned. The truth was that. I've been doing it for ten or eleven years and my mom was living in arizona. She got sick and went to take care of her. And so i took time off the road in. I didn't do stand up for about a year and a half and at that point the thought of going back out on the road was just more than i can deal with and i was lucky someone locally offered a job doing radio and that turned into an entirely different career. I mean it is sort of a lotta the same skill set but it. It wasn't nearly as planned as i wish i could claim it was. What was the focus of the radio as they were pitching it as a essentially howard stern without the rudeness Morning zoo throughout the day kind of thing and it was actually an interesting idea. We did pretty well. It they were. They were indicating the twelve hours. A day out of phoenix Unfortunately for them they were doing it just as the radio. Industry started consolidate so they were constantly in a situation of the it affiliates. Six months later the affiliates to be bought by. What was the clear channel. That all flipped or rush limbaugh and all this stuff than they have to find stations again at some point. They just realized this just wasn't going to be viable But the stations. That had really enjoyed it a lot of fun. And so then you went to media starved. He went to various like media companies. But you started this. You started this website and was it like a blog was it in the early day. We're using like blogging software. What was what was kind of the setup of it well. I started a long enough ago. That i was using blogger and jio cities actually the first website at stanford. So i'm really old. But i pretty early on.

Rick Arizona Howard Phoenix Rush Limbaugh Stanford
Trump, Deplatformed - E128

The Big Story

03:53 min | Last week

Trump, Deplatformed - E128

"From officially inaugurating a new president and mad at my looking forward to politics getting boring again. I'm looking forward to hearing the opening music of the new york times the daily podcast and not having this immediate pavlovian dread that the world is ending. But for now we've still got to face the final tantrum. Or i hope it's a final tantrum and last week it manifested at the us. Capitol as. i'm sure you all know. Goaded on by donald lame duck trump the consequences of this trump. Is that the major platforms that he used to amplify his voice. Facebook twitter and as of wednesday morning. Youtube have shut him down. Facebook and twitter have shut him off indefinitely and youtube for a week and they're not the only ones facebook and twitter. Actions created a domino effect where other platforms like the payment solutions. Stripe and pay pal also ended relationships with trump and his campaigns and of course the fallout didn't only impact trump parlor. The wing right wing. Social media app used by a lot of insurrectionists was kicked off the google app store and the apple app store as well as the amazon servers which parlor incidentally is currently suing so this week on the big story. we're going to talk about the d. Platforming of trump and his ilk and what it means for the future of messaging on social media. We don't really have the answers but you know we're just going to try to sort through our thought process here because i don't think there are any easy answers to to what happened what the future might bring. I'm ryan joe managing editor of ad exchanger and with me or alison schiff. Hello and anthony riff lotto to logan morning tony to his friends so have we Have have we reached collection point in what social media is willing to tolerate. Alison you kick it off. Well i mean the the platforms. Were they were resisting decisive action for a long time. But i guess when there's a riot on capitol hill the camel's back breaks. But if you're going to be cynical about it which know we like to do. A big tech platforms are acutely aware that they have to work with the incoming administration. And you could say that. They're making some moves that appeal to democrats also may be the only moves that they could make considering the mounting pressure. I think though that there is really a question. This isn't exactly what you were asking. But it's what i think of any time. I hear about a different platform. Taking some sort of action like this is weather weather. D platforming trump or Really anything to do with his You know. I don't know his his mindset actually robbed him of his voice or his supporters of their voice or not and in a weather his more vocal active supporters. Just go deeper underground and get more radicalized. Because they feel like they've really been maligned treated unfairly so we'll get into this but that dynamic creates a really tricky situation for the platforms as they decide what to do That's that's a. That's a really interesting point. Yeah that's i've. I've been wrestling with as well but you're right there. Is that cynicism about the social media's decision happening now because it's both safe to do so right because he's he's trump has literally no time left and also it's politically expedient to do so because you know at this point. They're

Twitter Facebook Youtube Ryan Joe Alison Schiff Anthony Riff The New York Times Donald Trump Amazon Logan Apple Alison Google Tony United States Wrestling
5 Types of Content That Creates Buyers and 'Assignment Selling' with Marcus Sheridan from They Ask You Answer

The Email Marketing Show

04:29 min | Last week

5 Types of Content That Creates Buyers and 'Assignment Selling' with Marcus Sheridan from They Ask You Answer

"Hey it's robin kennedy. Hello today on the market. And show talking to marcus. Sheridan already marcus as the author of the game changing content marketing book. They ask you answer. Is the top man at impact which is the inbound sales marketing agency. We're gonna be talking about whole bunch of stuff like how do you know exactly what it is. You should be saying in your emails going forward and a whole bunch of stuff from that but listen when this podcast comes to an end. We don't want to feel like you're all alone and you've got loads of questions since that common. Hang out with us in our free facebook group you can share whatever it is that you are working on with email marketing and get stuck into all of the training and the resources that we've got as well just go to facebook and search marketing show community not the best name in the world but it's logical the email marketing show community or to any web browser and just go to rob and kennedy dot group and it will forward you straight over that he stopped eating scampi when he found out. It's actually prawns. I'm talking about hypnotist rubber temple and he makes a mean bolognese. Mind rita kennedy. Born as the only thing i've ever cooked to you because i had a christmas dinner at your ones go dumped. That's why i got christmas now. Now got the ma. Welcome back in my marketing. Heroes wear here. Every single week helping creators coaches and membership site owners. Give you everything you need to be the email marketing hero of your own business using the psychology driven. Email marketing so rob this week on the show. We've got marcus. Sheridan very excited about this one being finally book for a long time but before. Bring them on one of these. Three things is true other two of them. Do you want lies. So did marcus used to work on a turkey farm. Did he wants fake his own death or does he have a dedicated fridge. The only has sauces and condiments in it. So i'm going to rule out of the middle one. Because i think that would have hit the press somewhere like people who faked death. Tend to like. Turn up in the media. So i'm gonna. I'm gonna rule that one out straightaway. So we're down to a turkey farm that booth food related the. When you like food you could have made them up Turkey farm all sources and condiments. I'm going to guess. But he has a dedicated fridge for sauces and condiments. Why not marcus. Which wants true that my friend is absolutely true. Very impressive very impressive on. Its second time in history. I've got that right so so the story behind this though is i was taking up so much room in the fridge with mustard ketchup. And you know and here in the us emerged crazy about just sauces in general and stuff like that right so eventually. My wife's like i'm getting another frigerator. And i'm gonna put a stupid sauces in there. That's what we're going to do sure enough now. I've got a fridge just sauces. People think it's the craziest thing right there my kitchen but it's awesome. Okay but the question. Is you only allowed to take one source with you for the rest of time. Which one sort can i mean. What would it be Such that is a man that's like talking to a chef's like what's the one ingredient you would want to take right. So here's the lame. Answer that i'm going to give. I'm probably going to have to say catch up. Not because it's the best sauce but it's the one that you can apply to the most things if you had to with mayonnaise being a second. Of course. I get very technical. I've got all types of mayonnaise all these types of things. I've got all those. But if i had to choose one catch up. It will be catching we. Just take

Marcus Robin Kennedy Sheridan Rita Kennedy Facebook Kennedy ROB Turkey United States
EP288: How 'Intentional Authenticity' Turned BiggerPockets Into The #1 Real Estate Investing Publisher on the Planet

Perpetual Traffic by DigitalMarketer

05:02 min | Last week

EP288: How 'Intentional Authenticity' Turned BiggerPockets Into The #1 Real Estate Investing Publisher on the Planet

"Two hundred eighty eight. I'm alongside virtually only about two thousand miles away. Amanda powell over at digital marketer manda basically right next to each other very close our guest for this week's show is pretty much next to us to probably half way around the world from where i am. We're really excited to have this guy on the show here and you're probably if you're listening to perpetual traffic and you're doing anything in the real estate investing world or real estate in general chances. Are you probably know who this guy is. Because any google search that you have to for investing term real estate related term his website and his business which he is the chief janitor at apparently just all he does is just create. content is the content janitor. And we're really excited to have brandon. Turner from bigger pockets on this week's show. Welcome to perpetual traffic brandon. Thank you this is like imagine like your whole life. You listened to like justin timberlake and sank. And you're like there's the best and then one day just shows up your house and you hanging out. That is exactly what i feel like right now. I am like in the house of jt right now to thank you for having me on the show. Now you're just making our heads big justin timberlake. So you the grant. Ralph should be lance this. I'll take that. I'll take that. No this is really cool. Like we've been. I think we've been following each other for the last five or so years at least and we actually met when i was doing my. Rv trip across country and met brandon when he was in back in washington always in a little bit nicer spot. A little bit sunnier. Less rain in allie b. s. p. b. brandon premed brand prepared brand. And that's right. He was Almost clean-shaven thirteen year. Old yeah exactly so we were like we got together. Because i actually had a partner at that point in time and i was doing. Seo content marketing which obviously amanda does for real now. I was faking it and we actually my partner. That point in time was michael. Kaba home still actually partners in a real estate investing business with we had some products that we really thought were pretty good. Mike was a real estate investor. And i reached out. I believe this to josh. And he like interviewed me to write for bigger pockets. I ended up writing for over like almost two years and it was amazing because it's supplied not only a created sort of a business for us and a lot of credibility for mike who is a partner at that time but also tons of traffic. Because like i choked in the intro. Pretty much any term that you koogle like guys come up like you are the authority. You're like the wikipedia real estate and it's because you've done such a great job yourself and josh of really having one goal is to help people and maybe even a strategy that we just sort of talked about the prerecord which is intentional. authenticity intentional authenticity. Yeah man that's good. Did you come up with brandon. Told me about it. I love it. I love the title of the show here. His next book. probably yep. so we're gonna we're gonna call right now i well. We'll just take the recording and then send it to tuck back. I've been wasting time writing books this year. Podcast with time. You wanna come back on six seven eight nine. You get all the books out for folks who aren't familiar with bigger pockets. If you're a real estate investor you are familiar with digger pockets and you have an internet connection as making sure that but tell us a little bit about what you guys do it bigger pockets and how it's grown into this just absolute authority just place that that you obviously have a tremendous amount of influence on to the content of the webinars. All the stuff. You guys do obviously tremendously successful podcast. Tell us a little bit about what bigger pockets does sure so to start with a little bit of a backstory on. Why why it was crazy. I didn't start it. Of course josh. Durkin was the founder and ceo. Back years ago almost twenty years ago now it was a long time ago and it started because he bought some like four plex saint louis and it was terrible and it kept like losing money and it was awful. And he's like what do i do. My tenants pay rent so he goes on the internet. And he's like what do i do. And the only sets that showed up the number gurus from the ninety s and south. They're like that care like infomercial until allegra. Yeah all right. Join my course for fifty thousand dollars. I'll teach you how to solve these problems. And and really it was a court and court. Nothing wrong with the chorus but courses are like this is very generic information. Like here's hotted. Whatever what do you do. When you're tenant has trash on their back porch and its license falling down from their trash into the neighbor's trash down but like what do you do with that stuff like you're not going to find out of course right. So josh is like all problems.

Brandon Amanda Powell Justin Timberlake Manda Koogle Josh Kaba Turner Lance Ralph Google Amanda Washington Michael Mike Durkin Allegra
Youve got to earn that: Mike Hume of The Washington Posts Launcher on covering gaming and esports inside a mainstream publication

The Digiday Podcast

02:32 min | Last week

Youve got to earn that: Mike Hume of The Washington Posts Launcher on covering gaming and esports inside a mainstream publication

"I'm tim peterson. Senior media editor at digital. Today i'm talking with mike. Mike is the editor of locher. Which is the washington post gaming. Any sports property that debuted in october. Twenty one thousand. Nine hundred for years gaming has been budgeted as a form of entertainment. But that's been changing over the better part of the past decade mainstream celebrities like drake streaming themselves playing for night on twitch and twitch streamers like tyler blevins better known as ninja our period on magazine covers gaming journalism has similarly expanded in addition to the longstanding gaming publications khattak and outlets including the washington post. Espn and wired have invested in covering gaming and east sports coverage beyond console reviews and gameplay tips launcher for example also covers the business and culture surrounding and inside video games from the sports competitions that formed around games like league of legends to people holding their weddings and animal crossing to the legal dispute between apple epic games which makes fortnight so. I'm excited talk with mike. About how gaming media has evolved. And how launcher fits in welcome mike. Thanks for taking the time. Thanks so kinda. Start with that. Last point like there's a lot of outlets covering gaming these days and covering it in different ways how does launch her fit into the mix so what we really tried to Get into conceptualize before we launched and then subsequently execute on after launch was finding the audience that sort of overlaps the mainstream general audience of. I've heard of gaming. I'm aware of it and then The hardcore were dedicated gaming audience. Who are really invested in gaming and try and identify some of the issues that they are passionate about Tell those stories in unique ways with like journalistic rigor accountability journalism. Find those stories in really bring them to light because we hadn't seen too much of investment from From mainstream establishments out of our our strategy sessions as you mentioned. Espn had done it and they were one of the big serve. Inspirations behind our strategy Into even conceding like is sports is a gaming as a whole something that we should be doing more about But a lot of the mainstream stuff that we would see From even from ourselves The washington post would sort of look at gaming as if it were this like they were foreign correspondent reporting on a tribe in the amazon.

Tim Peterson Locher Tyler Blevins The Washington Post Khattak Mike Espn Drake Apple Amazon
Ep. 107: The Science of Motherhood

Advertising Is Dead

07:45 min | Last week

Ep. 107: The Science of Motherhood

"This really helps us talk to advertisers about the kinds of people listening to shows really do appreciate your help. And we're going to be doing a random drawing and we'll be sending us and i hope you enjoy that mothers make the would go down or rather the support system that hold it together as the world is evolved decent uso as science of motherhood and the ecosystem for at on modern. Mothers is presented a unique case for cohort of consumers so focused yet so vast and their needs and use cases but in many ways we might scratch the surface intruding building an ecosystem strong enough to have rather be an app support system to mothers one company. That has its roots in this very need as a bushman. Use case is mom school. And it's this sheer focus on this category of consumers that has seen scale and expand both marcha as categories. And so when. I got the chance to speak to the founder and ceo of moms go. Mallika savini. I came under the discussion with a deep understanding of not. Just the modern muddle and hook. Zuma needs rosen to build a business with the level of clarity and scale it was keeping it scored focusing tact. I'm learning together and things. Dead right back with melissa. What are some of the radical changes. That are now shaping onwards. With physical distancing and heightened safety protocols being the norm with technology finally making lots skate entry to the west face will design as we know it change for the long tow. Is it possible for the indian commercial real estate space to adopt a three sixty degree approach to sustainability join hosts at the future of space podcast by rmc as deliberate with industry leaders analysts and bright young minds on the way forward for the workspace given the new quogue normal tune in to the ivy import costs app or wherever you stream your favorite artists. Welcome back there. I think he's dead with mallika. Thanks thanks for taking the time. Thank you for having me your. I've been meaning to get you on this podcast. I think for awhile now primarily because another product which have consumed and consumed as a parent. Especially i i think. I asked deported connections to those brands so and you'll brand has been one of those. Which kind of locked on without year-old article through certain period of time. So i'd actually jessica kick things off at. I'll ask you about what what you did before. You started home squatting. That's a good place to start. Because 'cause what if any is always feel the origins of all entrepreneurs and that can comes from. I love to hear that from. Yes so i think by education engineering. Mb i did not have overstated Doing night now I did my mba enjoined. Icici bank debt sales division. That foot about half years removed flooded came back in of course added walking on the idea for the mom. Score joined together to shape broadening. That was it And he was interesting. I think my entire life has been betting unexpectedly down whereas its basic by. My dad was in the army. And i grew up. Always being very sure that what i wanted to do wasn't in the no rare in the cards but in evident twelve this wanted to take up science because just allow for the subject and just happened to my dad got posted in kota door to know that we have our engineers and going to the school and went to was partially preparing people for their exams. And that just came back home on being twelve and this was in january backroom spoken about better than i am actually considering doing engineering. You know. badged was wasn't the next ten days but all the forms are filled. Everything was done and before you knew graduated as an engineer so yes night is supposed to be management and then being entrepreneur question. Do that decision. Of letting. I think about it but that was very happy to says he was that he out sandy. Somebody made it to engineering. So of talking about engineering is a view of mine across this entire podcast family because I did oh i. I'm a very valid engineer. Did a four year degree in six years. So you said one ex log into expires on that big but I always find it. Investing as to help people do engineering and they end up doing so many different things where some barn. my question has always been autism. some aspects. That help you as you go along. Because i know for a lot of people in this hasn't For some this eight has i. I love to which recitals that But both do i think it did had bouchon law and skills that you've developed at that point of time and more than that. It was just a really good off having nuclear university. I found the best universities graduate and this style of katie. That people have on it. Which is that. You're doing foster hewitt exams. i end up with. It was very hard. And i think it just start us to be more disciplined that it starts to be more olitical and move with the skills that we kind of developed in loan. The life skills. Adding bagwell's what i learned from an education perspective that i haven't used take like So yeah and so then. Going full fast forward voter read. I love the the origin story of moscow. 'cause i feel that it came from a you're trying to find a solution led to a company that is doing many people at solutions. I i i love for you to read. I'm sure you'll do taliban again so let you get by that. You said that you could leave out of april doug with I had my first daughter was born in london. And i moved to london when i was five months pregnant withdrawn so that my husband had from the office to the uk office. And don't you know we move to a completely different country. And we were the fourth set of people in offensive to has beatty's friends and family have baby And you know when he moved to london everybody. My family was when scared because every different country altogether five months pregnant with all of big audio doctor to how many facilities is working all of that but we decided to take a goal of kind of moving and london just starting a knocked on just searching for everything we didn't have fans in vietnam. We did not. We didn't have the norm that followed it in there because they obviously had to live to the way. The people were living out their medical facilities. Everything was so. I think patterns. We just got into this mortal researching a lot more before making any changes. There had to be very conscious. No decision and not just because i wanted. I commended kind of thing and I got introduced to organic foods. Organic skin care of leukemia. Liberal attack on a fireman. I'd never paid too much attention to that aspect because like What was happening. In india there are more embroiled in various conversations happening when i moved to india and mexican

Mallika Savini Zuma Mallika RMC Rosen Icici Bank Melissa Foster Hewitt Kota Jessica London Army Bagwell Autism Katie Moscow Taliban Beatty Doug
Facebook's Future with Mari Smith

Perpetual Traffic by DigitalMarketer

08:51 min | Last month

Facebook's Future with Mari Smith

"We're gonna be talking a little bit about facebook's future in some of the things that she seen going on there's a lot happening privacy's sort of a big thing right now which will touch upon but lives video groups all kinds of stuff. What's the biggest thing that you see right now. That's really changing. Facebook that marketers need to know and then maybe we can get into some of the specifics of those things that they need to know. Murray absolutely well you just mentioned privacy and it was just double checking the day and it was march of two thousand nineteen zuckerberg mark zuckerberg kind of like almost like out of the blue is a little unanticipated. He pandas mega manifesto his privacy manifest doom. And everybody's talking about always. The pivot to privacy am own kind of interpretations of why this came about. You know what's the longer term. Play here that sucker. Berg is up to in it was in essence of there was an aspect of it was in response to the potential antitrust is also just getting pushed into like Know all the regulation components of i think eventually the whole social media landscape. We'll get regulated. That's inevitable just like radio television newspapers. It's inevitable so that's coming at some point and this is Kind of anticipating that in. What's fascinating to watch okay. What is the pivot privacy. Meanwhile they're doubling down on focusing on the three main messaging products that what's out being the biggest one. And then messenger which is really the number one messenger gap into the us. What's up number outside the us. And though they compete with apple i messages is pretty popular around the world and then the third one is instagram dragged in so zuckerberg in that manifesto use this word interoperability numerous times. We're just talking off lying there. Baking together familiar with that. If you're headed by the way my dad was a professional. Baker starlight bake cakes cupcakes stuff. So here's basically baking together. These three main messaging apps are products in essence. So they can kind of like not be in big more difficult so he can stand up there in goal no but no all of our users and our businesses our business. You know advertisers and customers. They have to be able to have these three products together and then but he's not saying out of course what they're seeing public facing which really we can all buy into. It's like hey yeah pun. Intended customer goes to instagram. He's looking year. She's looking at your shop owner. Gosh this item the go they buy it and then they're like but they tend to use what's out for two chatting or managing people and businesses. So they can their customer service. Follow up there asking questions. They can choose which inbox going to land in. What's up is direct or messenger. That's the aspect of interoperability. What's coming to is the ability to actually make those purchases inside any of those three inboxes in get the kind of the follow up. And then you've got that whole aspect of the chat baugh automation continues to be developed. So yes that would be. The main one is really. We were also talking about ecommerce. You know ralph. I know that area you focus on your agency and its ecommerce mobile commerce. you know. it's taken a leaf out of the. The books are the apps of asia's doing predominantly china. There's huge huge apps that entire operating systems inside of one one app. Don't see each being the biggest one of them but i think marketers today really looking towards developing their twenty twenty one plan. If you are in remotely in the world of e-commerce you have something to sell. But my point is there's a distinction here between physical products because that's almost always what facebook instagram ten to differentiate. They bring it all these features and it's shutting up shop earlier this year. The they just call it facebook shop. But it's now kind of streamline so if you have facebook shop it also is sitting right there on instagram and you can integrate with their partners right like shop of finding one of the main ones and so but were they've come right out and said is hey we recognize there are service based businesses and there are digital product based businesses and they're quote unquote working on solutions for all types of businesses. So i'm excited about that. Those those of us do digital product services. Yeah and you kinda started answering the question. That i had mario in terms of you know based on facebook trying to start baking all of these programs together. Have you seen that kind of come together with the programs that they've started in twenty twenty four businesses that are needing help during the pandemic and businesses. Maybe that are not so product centric and maybe more service centric like would have you seen happening with those kind of being a pulled together through the programs that they've started this year. We'll some of the real easy ones that they slipped in earlier in the year was like adding sticker onto instagram stories. Were you could users could recommend their favorite shops. Our local stores stick her in tag. The instagram account. That's made it made a difference to small business. I would hope so also like really trending hashtags hashtag support small business. They also june july of this year really emphasized. Hash is on facebook now. It's a whole other topic. I wrote a blog post about it. Hashtag of thing on facebook since two thousand thirteen so after seven years like okay. Now it'd be a good time to make them relevant on facebook. So i'm recommending to all my clients and students not in audience members is to go ahead and include hashtag support small business singular and plural on practically every post. You do so just adds a real easy simple one but about your question about the baking together. What happened just a couple of months ago. Is that the initial component of that interoperability. Kim with messenger integrate thing with instagram direct. To the point that they changed the dang logo now his do my head and because there's like every logo is all the same kind. I don't know what's happening anywhere. Google did the same thing right. Real visit dead called click up. It's like the same colors. And then i'm like a messenger instagram. Say all these seem like rainbow colors confused a lot of people and so now okay. Now we're not just doing that. light blue on messenger. Instagram and messenger so lots of changes all at once. It definitely does seem like the focus or the push for new products in the last three years on. Facebook has been more geared towards ecommerce dynamic product as and obviously facebook shop. And now you've got this interoperability with shop. It's really interesting. Because the digital the info people service people like. Well wait a second i mean. Obviously small business storefronts. That's always been sort of a mainstay stan. Or you're really involved with a lot of the small business. push that they did for marketing. But it's interesting to hear that digital like these other businesses which we all know and love. Obviously that's like that's how they make their living is going to be a more of a push in the coming years. Which is which is really good news. I think for a lotta listeners. Well it's true because you know we've all been selling online for you know a decade two decades and so wonderful able to have all of these users on their mobile devices and by the way of course. Instagram is one hundred percent mobile. they have the desktop version. But everybody's mobile and then facebook. It's roughly about eighty percent. Eighty five percent that predominantly access facebook on their mobile devices. So the easier. You can make it for the customer whether bbc to just tap tap. Tap bob okay. You know whether impulse purchases or really more thoughtful ones or just even getting into your funnel. Obviously those are. Those are really great in jackson. Re targeting you mention dynamic ads ralph and so you know i think you know some companies are just really good at sitting in your car like amazon. And they're like oh you might like these other twenty. Things would work exceedingly well. I mean it's one of the greatest tools especially for ecommerce

Facebook Instagram Mark Zuckerberg Berg Zuckerberg Murray United States Ralph Apple Asia Mario China KIM Google Bob Okay BBC Jackson
The Best Ads of 2020

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

06:24 min | Last month

The Best Ads of 2020

"You're listening to yeah. That's probably and the ad we podcast. We've talked about marketing media technology in pop culture because in the end everything is an ad especially this week. Because it's our ads of the year episode. Look forward to this all year. We get to nerd out about which adds stunts activation chains weird random social media responses from brands. We really liked this year and joining me this year to talk about it. We've got enes alaya who covers Performance marketing experiential marketing for edwige. Ian it is always great to have you here. Hello thanks for having me. We've also got katie lindstrom katie as a reporter who covers up breaking news and quite often big creative campaigns that are coming out katie. It is always a pleasure to have you joining us from your in austin austin texas. Got to be here and We've also got jamison fleming senior editor for membership here at ad week. jamieson has He's involved in just about everything H- here dad wake. And so i can't think of someone better to have kind of a big picture over overview and opinions on a lot of the biggest work that came out of the year. Jameson thanks so much for making time for us. Yeah accent. it'd be here excited to really digest very weird here battle tossing. It really was and i have to say of all the years of doing this every year. The ads a determining the as years difficult just I'll go and give the the can alert in the sense that Add wigs twenty five ads of the year Including our number one pick are all on dot com as of monday So if you're listening to this Probably monday or later. You should be able to find that on advocate dot com this year. We also did a reader's choice Bracket for the first time where we let. We identified thirty two of the biggest campaigns of the year and again ads and weird social responses. And even some political fundraisers and people really went nuts with it Jamison unload by you. And i both been watching edwige stuff for a long time. The level of this readers choice voting online was bananas. Yeah i mean the the semi finals between oreos and stake of guts. Seventy two thousand votes just on twitter. And i don't think i've ever seen any twitter poll by any twitter user. Get seventy two thousand votes so kind of crazy. When two brands with loyal followings can do twitter to say at least yeah that one was a crazy match of oreo created a doomsday vault when among many other doomsday scenarios happening this year There was an asteroid supposedly headed toward earth and so oreo created an underground bunker to save its recipes and Other things so That was up against stay. Combs campaign on social media against misinformation which was a very different kind of form of marketing. But they're following turned out in force. Seventy two thousand votes later. Oreo was the winner. Only i will say by promising to follow back. People who voted thing and then and then had a real struggle to follow through on their campaign from us. So as we record this we are in the final round which is orioles doomsday vault versus The princess bride reunion which was a fundraiser for wisconsin. Democrats really brilliant idea. They brought together just almost every Living actor and a person behind the princess bride Fred savage couldn't make it because it was his brother's birthday and he was spent with him but Everyone else pretty much. He's alive was there and As a really fantastic idea. So we won't know the winner when we record this because those are being battled out over the weekend but we will be able to talk about our favorites. So with that katy. We're we're just gonna go round robin here we're gonna talk about. Each of us has individual favorites. We i am happy to talk about ad. Weeks official favorites. But let's start out just on individual katie tells about one or two that you really love this year. I was thinking about this and just kind of thinking back to the ones that i shared with my own friends and family this year. That are you know. There's some overlap in some that are just kind of silly oreos already shouted out orioles doomsday camp. But they're proud parent Short film they released a couple of months ago. One that i just thought was really powerful. And i ended up sharing with it with a bunch of different people just because i thought it was a beautiful little short film and the story behind it was at the two actors who play a gay couple are actually partners in real life and it really came through when i thought was just like a lovely example of storytelling and then to shut up the mid west. The canadian beer brand labatt made some ads in that came out in the summer but it was like they had to completely reshoot their campaign so many brands had to this year. After creating a summer campaign that was not pandemic friendly and then having to totally start from scratch and there's was one of the one of the first stories like this that i covered in more like in-depth way they literally got back from there shoot for their summer campaign on the same day. That trump announced a national emergency. And then they that these two creatives just like created these really funny ads from with it within their own homes using like a power washer to simulate tubing and using a spray bottle and a little treadmill dissimulate like wake boarding. So it's kind of a funny way to pretend like these midwesterners we're at the out at the lake having a good time when that wasn't actually possible this summer over the summer so those were a couple of them now. Did you see that one griner. No no i didn't catch that one. It's it was by the burns group in and it's a pretty small like regional brand. But i just thought it was such an interesting pivot to use the word of the year.

Enes Alaya Edwige Katie Lindstrom Katie Jamison Fleming Twitter Austin Jamieson Jameson Jamison IAN Fred Savage Oreo Combs Texas Katy Wisconsin Robin Labatt
Building and Branding a Real Business

AdLeaks

06:43 min | Last month

Building and Branding a Real Business

"We talk so much about the technical right the the bids and the scaly strategies and the rules and and so much that so important right. I'm not taking anything from that. It's critical and i talk a lot about it. But i think what's becoming more and more apparent Hokey agrees this hundred percent rate. So it's more and more apparent is that especially with mood to. Cbo there is becoming a less and less importance on those skills and more and more important on the quality of the product the quality of the offer the barandy the voice. The creativity of the copy like those elements are becoming so much more important. What happens post purchase. The post purchase experience. The customer satisfaction. The up sells lifetime value increases. All that is so important so critical and so you'll see brands and companies. That aren't necessarily great media buying in terms of they don't understand the nuances and they don't tell. The auction works algorithm works. And all this stuff but they have really great videos in really good brand and fun and their ads and humor and they've personality and a great products and they're killing right and so what i want to show tonight me. A quick video is like how we've kind of doubled down on that. With with at least with our info product business my personal grant how. I've kind of really doubled down on brand pattern eruption having fun like here's a i love what i do right i. I absolutely love. I've done a lot of things in my life that i haven't loved that i've done because it's been a way to make money but what i do every day. I absolutely love like i get to tell stories. Relevant essentially i mean that's that's what marketers do we tell stories right. I get to teach people get bring like my lessons to thousands tens of thousands of people on a regular basis And help those individuals achieve their dreams right. Like i'm living the dream. And i realized for a while like the way was marketing didn't reflect. Who was the person. And i wasn't. I wasn't fun with it when i first started doing my courses. You know two years ago. Like i look back at that ad copy and yeah i had some funds snark with it can start up drugs but a lot of it was very good cutter right. I was doing whatever else is doing. Because that's what i'm doing. And i think a lot of us fall into that trap especially when you're in various facebook groups and stuff like we're all looking to find the next big thing we're all following different people and we're trying see like what the person above us doing right because there's all of us have somebody look up to. There's always somebody doing bigger better things smarter than right. That's reality and so. I think a lot of times we neglect our own creativity and our own personality and our own uniqueness because we want to do at that bigger figures doing right so this per person x this is how they're advertising their drop ship product person wide south advertising. Their course they're doing a cookie cutter. Add to a webinar pushing fake scarcity and then they sell in the webinar and they have a retarding sequence where they push the cart clothes and all the copies very you know. Hey you have one day left by my course before the car close. Make sure you get it. Now here's what joe said like it's all so formulaic and listen. I'm not saying that you should never follow the crowd because a lot of times. There's a reason why everyone's doing something one way. Because it works right that being said i think there's varying degrees of that so i think what works for tyler. Open grand cartoon doesn't work for everybody right tyler has greg. Ode have a specific demographic ties demographic might not be the same demographic as years right so you following the same formula of showing off your rented lamborghini and your ended house and money and and things on that might not resonate at all with your target customer or by bringing the wrong customer right and so i think the gist of as i'm sure if you examples ads right now is that like writing ad. Copy should come natural right. I think the reason why people feel like they can't read copy in there. I'm not good writing copy. I'm not good writer and stuff is. I don't necessarily believe that. I think everybody can write ad copy. I think the challenge is when you start writing ad copy for somebody else. Essentially you're writing ad copy for who you think you should be instead of writing ad copy who you are and i think that's what leads a lot of challenges. It's very hard to write from somebody else's perspective right. That's why there's professional groceries out there. The chargers money. 'cause they're really good at that but most of us we can only think talk act like like we've done entire life who we are So if you're marketing your business if you're marketing your course your webinar. You should be authentic to who you are. Don't pretend to be somebody or not because it's very very hard to be successful that way it eventually things fall apart. It's very hard to keep that up at scale and with mass volume. It is very difficult unless you who you are. Changes to match who you are on camera. I've seen that happen but for me like i've realizes okay everybody is is on the guru train and it seems like every consumer personal industry like calls out gurus in has a negative connotation gurus so why as many sunk info products but i want to associate myself with same practices that most people consumers and industry don't like the makes no sense right. What does make sense. Is associating myself with that group in our mutual dislike for another group right. There's few things that bond people tighter than mutual dislike right. So you can bond over things you love and you can bind over things you hate and so by coming out against that lifestyle and that marketing message and the fake scale. All the bull-crap that that those people do people that hate that as well resonate with my message because that's what they think right so this guy thinks the same way that i'm thinking and if he's thinking the same way i'm thinking any addison for products there's no way he's also the bs like those people right so achieved so much by me doing that. It's also pattern erupt like interrupts patterns. And that's the other thing right if you're doing what everyone else is doing. If you're writing copy the same way into the same structure to same formulas the same creative the same video formats all the same stuff. The same cold traffic to webinar cart like it becomes routine becomes like people come blind to it because they see all day long. It's all they say right. So if you mix it up if you start saying the exact opposite surfing polarizing sure you're gonna ruffling feathers ensure you're gonna have people don't like it but that doesn't matter. I don't care if half the half the world hate me. I don't care i find with eighty percent world hating me because i usually means at eight in the world. Hates you twenty. Percent loves right. It's you're polarizing enough to be hated. You're also polarized enough to be loved.

CBO Tyler Facebook Greg JOE Chargers Addison
Follow This Simple Rule to Write Great Ad Copy

AdLeaks

04:57 min | Last month

Follow This Simple Rule to Write Great Ad Copy

"We. We talk so much about the technical right the the bids and the scaly strategies and the rules and and so much that so important right. I'm not taking anything from that. It's critical and i talk a lot about it. But i think what's becoming more and more apparent Hokey agrees this hundred percent rate. So it's more and more apparent is that especially with mood to. Cbo there is becoming a less and less importance on those skills and more and more important on the quality of the product the quality of the offer the barandy the voice. The creativity of the copy like those elements are becoming so much more important. What happens post purchase. The post purchase experience. The customer satisfaction. The up sells lifetime value increases. All that is so important so critical and so you'll see brands and companies. That aren't necessarily great media buying in terms of they don't understand the nuances and they don't tell. The auction works algorithm works. And all this stuff but they have really great videos in really good brand and fun and their ads and humor and they've personality and a great products and they're killing right and so what i want to show tonight me. A quick video is like how we've kind of doubled down on that. With with at least with our info product business my personal grant how. I've kind of really doubled down on brand pattern eruption having fun like here's a i love what i do right i. I absolutely love. I've done a lot of things in my life that i haven't loved that i've done because it's been a way to make money but what i do every day. I absolutely love like i get to tell stories. Relevant essentially i mean that's that's what marketers do we tell stories right. I get to teach people get bring like my lessons to thousands tens of thousands of people on a regular basis And help those individuals achieve their dreams right. Like i'm living the dream. And i realized for a while like the way was marketing didn't reflect. Who was the person. And i wasn't. I wasn't fun with it when i first started doing my courses. You know two years ago. Like i look back at that ad copy and yeah i had some funds snark with it can start up drugs but a lot of it was very good cutter right. I was doing whatever else is doing. what i'm doing. And i think a lot of us fall into that trap especially when you're in various facebook groups and stuff like we're all looking to find the next big thing we're all following different people and we're trying see like what the person above us doing right because there's all of us have somebody look up to. There's always somebody doing bigger better things smarter than right. That's reality and so. I think a lot of times we neglect our own creativity and our own personality and our own uniqueness because we want to do at that bigger figures doing right so this per person x this is how they're advertising their drop ship product person wide south advertising. Their course they're doing a cookie cutter. Add to a webinar pushing fake scarcity and then they sell in the webinar and they have a retarding sequence where they push the cart clothes and all the copies very you know. Hey you have one day left by my course before the car close. Make sure you get it. Now here's what joe said like it's all so formulaic and listen. I'm not saying that you should never follow the crowd because a lot of times. There's a reason why everyone's doing something one way. Because it works right that being said i think there's varying degrees of that so i think what works for tyler. Open grand cartoon doesn't work for everybody right tyler has greg. Ode have a specific demographic ties demographic might not be the same demographic as years right so you following the same formula of showing off your rented lamborghini and your ended house and money and and things on that might not resonate at all with your target customer or by bringing the wrong customer right and so i think the gist of as i'm sure if you examples ads right now is that like writing ad. Copy should come natural right. I think the reason why people feel like they can't read copy in there. I'm not good writing copy. I'm not good writer and stuff is. I don't necessarily believe that. I think everybody can write ad copy. I think the challenge is when you start writing ad copy for somebody else. Essentially you're writing ad copy for who you think you should be instead of writing ad copy who you are and i think that's what leads a lot of challenges. It's very hard to write from somebody else's perspective right. That's why there's professional groceries out there. The chargers money. 'cause they're really good at that but most of us we can only think talk act like like we've done entire life who we are So if you're marketing your business if you're marketing your course your webinar. You should be authentic to who you are. Don't pretend to be somebody or not because it's very very hard to be successful that way it eventually things fall apart. It's very hard to keep that up at scale and with mass volume. It is very difficult unless you who you are. Changes to match who you are on camera. I've seen that

CBO Tyler Facebook JOE Greg Chargers
PubMatic Founder and CEO Rajeev Goel on Taking His Company Public

AdExchanger Talks

05:17 min | Last month

PubMatic Founder and CEO Rajeev Goel on Taking His Company Public

"Hello everyone welcome. Back to the podcast. This is zach rogers. I'm the executive editor of ad exchanger. So pathetic went public today. I'm speaking to you on wednesday. December the ninth week for. Ipo's and it's not every day not every week lately. It's not every quarter you have an ad tech ipo. They've been scarce to to put it mildly in recent months and years. So i'm delighted to be talking with rajiv go l. The ceo palmach about his company going public. Welcome eve thank you. Act great to be here with you again absolutely so just to to sort of fill in some details for the audience before we jump in you filed last month to raise a what you hoped would be about seventy five million in public offering you. How did that. By a good margin you raised hundred nineteen million today. Congratulations thank you and I think that values you matt paramedic at about nine hundred and fifty million darn close to a billion dollar valuation. Is that right. Yeah that's right. That's exactly right super. So how are you feeling right now. While i'm feeling i'm feeling very good very proud. I would say of our entire team now. It's been just a huge effort over five hundred employees to help us achieve this milestone. You know we've been a private company for fourteen years and we really look at this as the opportunity for the next phase of the company. So we're incredibly proud of what we've achieved but we're also excited to get back to work and get back to our jobs of serving our customers and in growing our business. Yeah i have to admit. I'm i bet you're feeling that way. I'm a little stunned myself. Having observed pathetic over these fourteen years all of a sudden. You know you're going public and with the great outcome and So i i can only imagine how you must feel And indeed. I would love to hear a little more if you wouldn't mind developing that a bit on. What the last several months. Where like i mean first of all. You can't do a traditional roadshow what's it like doing. A virtual road roadshow and how much internal work was necessary to get ready for this moment while i call this the sweatpants ipo. Because i literally wore sweatpants to every banker and investor meeting and had a nice dress shirt and proper sweater on top. But i think it's a little bit of the sign of how the world is changing right. Which is an it feeds into into why we decided to go public now. Which is that. The world is very different now and i think into the future than it was back in january and we think the opportunity is much bigger for our business for customers because so much has changed around consumer behavior right so consumers are doing things on the internet that they've never done before things like seeing their doctor in an app fitness classes streaming online buying cars online not to mention work from home at school from home and then consumers also have a lot more time to spend on the internet. Because they're not commuting. They're not going out for other things and you know there will be a new normal. Maybe six nine twelve months from now but i don't think it will look like the old normal right. It'll be some some new state. Where i think the digital economy will be a much bigger share of the overall economy. And i think what we see is that digital. Advertising is really an essential lubricant of how the digital economy works okay. Great and so that speaks to kind of an accelerated Celebration of digital advertising. It was very bad cue to just from a business standpoint. however this year was Overall good news for any company in the digital ad space just just from the standpoint of people working remotely and doing everything remotely. It was a bad year in every other respect for all the reasons that we all know. Could you talk about when you decided. Oh now's the time to go public. Did it have to do with the acceleration. That came with the pandemic shutdown. Yeah you know we had this insight. I think pretty late in cute to where obviously every company pulled back significantly in late march. Early april right in terms of their whatever. Their plan was for the year. Right is obviously the world was going through this this cataclysmic event but what we found in the middle of q two is that because of our unique profitability. We were able to really think about the longterm opportunity in front of us so we never stop hiring or stopped investing even in the toughest parts of of late march and april. We shifted where we were investing in. What types of things. We were doing But we had an ability to continue to invest because even through that downturn able so as we extrapolated that into the future and we realized that the digital opportunity will be much bigger and we have a unique platform in terms of the innovation and the profitability. We we thought to ourselves that you know to be properly prepared for the opportunity in front of us. We needed to be public to have the most efficient access to capital.

Zach Rogers Matt Paramedic Rajiv IPO