Activism

Join the cause and listen to the latest in activism, social change and the fight for justice. Broadcast on premium podcasts.

A highlight from The value of kindness at work | James Rhee

TED Talks Daily

04:04 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from The value of kindness at work | James Rhee

"Of that company's net assets. So this unexplained differential is named goodwill. And with it, accountants actually can make balance sheets balance. Now, of course, this isn't how most of us think of goodwill. We experience the more human definition of goodwill. And I remember very clearly when that definition first entered my life. It was 1976, and I was 5 years old. And I was sitting there one morning in kindergarten class when in walk the father and older siblings, one of my friends. And they handed me a present. They gave me a little toy, red helicopter. And in the moment, I didn't really understand why they were giving it to me. I just remember sensing that they were happy and sad at the same time. And it wasn't only until much later that I had my aha moment. That my friend had lost his mom recently, and that this gift, it was a thank you. Because I would often share my lunch with my friend on the many days that he would come to school without anyone of his own. In an over time, as things happen, I lost the toy. But I never forgot the lesson, especially how it made me feel. My friend's father had rewarded kindness without cheapening it. And he made it tangible with an object, and he made it human in that exchange. And he made it shareable with the story. And in doing all of this, he created real value out of thin air. By turning kindness into a scalable, collectively owned asset called goodwill. You know, and then for us for many of us, my life, the years just passed at a dizzying pace. And I collected a couple of fancy degrees. I became a dad myself three times over. And I found myself wheeling and dealing as an investment banker and a private equity investor for many years. And the lessons from that red helicopter, they seemed incredibly childish. And weirdly misguided in the world of business and finance. Because let's face it, non revenue generating investments in people that generally not measured, let alone rewarded. But something happened in the summer of 2013 that would forever change the way I thought about kindness. Goodwill. And their roles in reshaping business. I was on a series of just deflating board calls. Involving a failed investment in a company called Ashley Stewart. Ashley Stewart is a clothing retail that has served and employed primarily plus sized moderate income, black women, in neighborhoods across America since 1991. And I felt accountable to my former employer to my former investors to the 1000 plus employees at Ashley Stewart and frankly to myself because I had saved this company from a near death bankruptcy filing. Just three years prior and so this time I did something I took an action. I made a choice. I resigned as chairman of the board. And I agreed to serve as a first time CEO of this broken company. But I agreed to do it just for 6 months. I just wanted to avert a nasty liquidation. And then I wanted to come home and get on with my life. I had immediate pains of regret during those first few weeks that actually Stuart. The corporate headquarters was a converted warehouse. I just remember there being a lot of bugs. There was no Wi-Fi at the headquarters. And the stores didn't have computers. And because there was a lack of trust, there were vendors in the lobby demanding to be paid in cash upfront. And because of them, a lot of my employees were scared. And so I ended up having to hire an armed security guard to protect them. And I felt alone, like on every dimension you can think of.

Ashley Stewart America Stuart
A highlight from adrienne maree brown: Cancel Culture is Solvable

Solvable

07:00 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from adrienne maree brown: Cancel Culture is Solvable

"This is solvable. I'm Ronald young junior. The way cancellation makes it seem like one person is responsible for an entire system of behavior. We never get at the system, and it allows us to be off the hook that we are all participating in the same systems. You may have heard the term cancel culture, a few or many, many times before. According to urban dictionary, cancel culture is defined as a modern Internet phenomenon, where a person is ejected from influence or fame due to questionable actions. It's seen by some as a way to hold public figures with power accountable for their actions. While others see it as the new mob mentality. But people have been canceling other people through the ages. Think back to the 1950s with senator Joseph McCarthy blacklisting folks he deemed un American. And even further back to the Salem witch trials. These days, comedians, politicians, authors, and actors, have been canceled for unacceptable and problematic behavior, such as racist tweets, inappropriate comments, jokes, allegations of sexual misconduct or violence, transphobic and homophobic opinions, and more. While the reasons for canceling vary, the quick and indignant anger and the mob's desire for swift action hasn't changed. But is it right to cancel people? Actually, we don't want to cancel people. We want to cancel ways of thinking. Adrienne Marie Brown is the author of we will not cancel us and other dreams of transformative justice. The culture of disposability is a solvable problem. Adrian, you first major thoughts public on cancel culture through a post on your website. And that post was entitled, unthinkable thoughts call out culture in the age of COVID-19. What made you decide to write that then? Well, I had been away, I was on sabbatical and I've been doing movement related work organizing for social change, environmental change, economic justice for like 25 years. And when I came back, I was inundated with all these messages from people calling for the cancellation or D platforming or something else of all these people. And none of them were people that I necessarily knew. None of them were people that I was like, oh, I understand how to hold this person accountable. They want people of massive power. And so I got concerned about that. You know, I was like, well, what's happening inside of movement that we are not engaging in healthy, conflict with each other and figuring out what these differences are about. And just having the conversations we have, what's happening that our main way of engaging with each other when we do disagree or when harm happens is to do a public call out. I was worried about that on a lot of levels. So I started writing about it. And the very idea that I felt nervous to write about it even though felt intriguing to me as someone who, you know, I'm like, we're trying to fight against people who don't want us to live. And in that scenario, I should never feel worried about trying to be in any conversation. I'm like, we've got to figure this out because we have to survive. I posted the initial blog, which was quite long. And the feedback made me convinced that it would be well served as a book. The book is we will not cancel us. Who is us? The us that I was really thinking of was people who are in social justice movements. People who are in space or they've said, we are abolitionists. We are feminists. We are post capitalists. We're trying to figure out a different way of being in relationship to this planet that is respectful that will sustain us particularly inside of that pocket. The abolitionist space. You know, those of us who believe that there is a way that we can be on this planet as a human species that doesn't involve prisons and policing, which is in the lineage of slavery, right? There's this body of us who believe that. And we're trying to hold down movement and create movement to be a space where that the practice, but we're still actually doing these highly punitive measures with each other. And so that was the call. We have to figure out how to do this some other way so that we can break this pattern of disposability. Talk a little bit about how you envision transformative and restorative justice being a way to replace punitive justice. When someone does something wrong, we punish them in any number of ways, Corporal punishment. We take away their freedom. We take away their right to vote. We sometimes physically injure them, the death penalty. And it is a binary where people are good or bad, meaning that they are deserving or not deserving a punishment. If that worked, if that worldview worked, then, especially with the amount that we have in particular in the U.S. invested in the prison system, we should be crime free without harm because we punish so professionally. And so thoroughly. It doesn't work. It doesn't actually stop harm from happening. And if you focus on how would we stop the harm from happening, then these models of restorative justice and transformative justice emerge or can be remembered. A lot of these are ways that people long before capitalism and colonialism took over the way the world functioned. There have been cultures that had other ways of dealing with harm when it happened dealing with conflict when it came up. And those ways are both old and ones that we need to relearn, and they involve mediation, being able to sit and be held in a conversation that you can't handle one to one, have someone else there to help move it along and find the places where there's an opening when it feels like it's all a wall. There's community circles, community accountability processes where an entire body or community can sit and hold both are all members of a conflict or harm. And find out what is the right move forward. What would actually bring some closure and allow healing to begin in the circumstance, being able to truly hear each other being able to truly listen? And the idea that people can change. People are always changing. Everything that you're saying, it makes sense when you talk about end movement. When you talk about marginalized folks when you're talking about folks fighting for justice within the community. But cancel culture is something that it's been coming up a lot recently. And there's been a prominent comedian. There's been a prominent rapper. There's been prominent films. It's just a prominence. Yeah, there's been some prominent out there. How do we reconcile the members people who are members of marginalized community, but in some ways are not necessarily fighting on our team? I mean, the teams are folks that are fighting

Ronald Young Senator Joseph Mccarthy Adrienne Marie Brown Adrian UN U.S.
A highlight from The powerful women on the front lines of climate action | Farwiza Farhan

TED Talks Daily

04:08 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from The powerful women on the front lines of climate action | Farwiza Farhan

"When it comes to big problems like climate change, we tend to be solutions. New technologies, global policies, but many of the most important solutions are rooted on the ground. By actors that don't walk the corridors of power. But actors that might not speak the scientific language of climate change, but who are dealing with its impact every day. I am a forced conservationist from the lawyer ecosystem in Sumatra Indonesia. You might never heard of this landscape. But it's the last place on earth where the critically endangered modern rhino Tiger elephant and orangutan still run together in the world. So meaning is the leader of Indonesia first woman let ranger team and a mother. A conservationist whose action is rooted in her community on the edge of the leisure ecosystem. In a patriarchal society where she operates, a woman is expected to be quiet and subservient. During a village meeting, the ladies tend to congregate in the kitchen while the men discuss village policies and budget. And oftentimes, even if she is present in a meeting room, he is expected to not voice her opinion. Rather letting a male relative to answer a question addressed to her. Without consulting her first. When I asked so many why she used to protect and conserve the forest, she said, we am rather angry mothers. We are responsible for everything. From the moment we wake up, we have to wash clothes, cook, and make coffee for our family. More than anything, we need water and every aspect of our life. And the only thing that protects our water source is the forest of the mountain. The path for some meaning to lead this rangers is anything but straightforward. She become familiar with the forest when she began accompanying her husband tracking. During these trips, they witnessed encroachment and logging. They saw people picking up timber and encroaching into the forest. When they would try one of the loggers, they were met with a challenge. Who are you and what are your authorities to tell us off? Go away. Logging and encroachment that happened upstream soon turned into disasters downstream. A heavy rainfall that lasted for a few days, turned into flash floods and landslides. Destroying the village and its essential infrastructure. After the disaster, so many and other villagers had to take refuge in a shelter for a while. Being a refugee is hard. You don't have privacy and security. You don't even have the access to clean flowing water. It's hard to even keep yourself safe and clean. I don't want that kind of disaster to happen again. She said to me. For so many and her theme, the first part of becoming a ranger was not putting on a uniform, but creating a map of the forest. You see, in Indonesia, access to land and forests are often contested. And one couldn't simply walk into a pasture forest and declared that they will protect dispatch. No, no. The government needs to acknowledge that you are the legal guardian of the particular force. And then they will give you the paperwork to affirm your role. In order to obtain this permit, the community needs to create a proposal with a map. So to get the work. Of course, they know what things are in the forest. Water and waterfall, where the orchid is and where the bear sleeps.

Indonesia Sumatra
A highlight from Ancient wisdom for healing the planet | Shweta Narayan

TED Talks Daily

06:26 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from Ancient wisdom for healing the planet | Shweta Narayan

"One of my fondest memories as a child was to stare in the evenings at the beautiful orange skies and flaring chimneys of the steel plant. Little did I know at that time that these were all classic signs of severe air pollution. Cities like bukhara were dubbed as the temples of modern India that propelled the country into the 21st century. I now work at the intersection of environment health and justice. I've been in this space for nearly two decades. And my experience tells that the negative impacts of industrialization have outweighed the good. I've also in my work come across several individuals and groups who despite all odds, go beyond their Call of Duty to serve their communities. I find healthcare professionals working in polluted places as one such group who strive to do everything they can to protect their patients and communities from risk. For example, Mina a health worker from korba district in central India. Her job is to provide maternal care to pregnant women. However, mean, lives in a region that is surrounded by coal and power plants and is considered among the top 5 critically polluted places in India. So Mina also gives advice on how to protect the newborn children from the dangers of air pollution. Mina and thousands of other health workers in India and across the world apply a concept that has been with us since at least the 5th century BC. When hippocrates, the Greek physician also considered as the father of modern medicine, wrote about the role of physicians in his book of the epidemics. He said, and I caught the physician must be able to tell the antecedents. Nor the present and foretell the future. Must mitigate these things with two special objects in view with regard to disease. Namely, to do good or to do no harm. The doctrine of do no harm forms the basis of the Hippocratic oath, one of the oldest and most widely known codes of ethics. Now, the resident of the Hippocratic oath may be symbolic today, but most health professionals adhere to a daily as we have witnessed in the last two years of the COVID-19 crisis. I'm here to make a case for two things. Placing health at the heart of climate solutions. And placing the philosophy of first do no harm at the heart of all decisions beyond health, including those taken by our CEOs and politicians. Now let me be clear about one fact. The climate crisis is a health crisis. It threatens our air, water, food, shelter, security, all the basics on which the human life depends. Burning of fossil fuels for electricity heat or transport is a major driver for climate change and a main contributor to air pollution. Globally, air pollution causes 7 million premature deaths each year. That's 13 deaths every minute. Way more than the death toll of COVID by the end of summer of 2021. And the poor and the marginalized are more severely impacted. Now, extreme climate events not only threaten people's health, but healthcare's own infrastructure and capacity to respond. The deadly floods of 2018 in Kerala in India, the state that I live in, forced hospitals to evacuate patients, suspense surgeries and critical care. Others faced power outages, many reported destruction of the entire stocks of vaccines and medical supplies. And similar experiences have been documented in other parts of the world. Now there's also a paradox here. And with it, an opportunity arises. While the health sector plays a central role in responding to the climate crisis, the sector itself contributes to nearly 5% of the net global greenhouse gas emissions and growing. Healthcare professionals understand the seriousness of their own climate footprint. In the last couple of years, we have seen an enormous momentum within the sector in charting a course towards transformative healthcare that starts with climate solutions. This momentum is guided by zero emissions, climate resilience and health equity road map. For example, the state of Chhattisgarh in India has solarized over 900 community health centers and pledge to attain hundred person solarization to provide energy access. Thus anchoring the resilience of the community and protecting the most vulnerable. Last year, England's national health service began charting a cost to zero emissions by 2045. This year, 40 institutions representing 3000 hospitals in 18 countries followed suit and worked with healthcare without harm to decarbonize healthcare. Its buildings, its operations and supply chains in a race to zero. Doctors for clean air and climate action is mobilizing thousands of doctors across India on the issue of air pollution and health to advocate for better policies. Time has come that we measure the advancement of our civilization through the metric of health rather than metric of wealth. But here also lies one of our biggest roadblocks. It is impossible to have healthy people on a sick planet. The blatant disregard for environment, which is entrenched in our current economic and social models, has pushed the natural world to its limits. Failure to ask basic questions like who is this business decision going to harm? Or what is the impact of the current policy choice on the most marginalized or on the future generations?

India Mina Korba Covid Bukhara Kerala Chhattisgarh National Health Service England
A highlight from 3 steps to getting what you want in a negotiation | Ruchi Sinha

TED Talks Daily

06:21 min | Last week

A highlight from 3 steps to getting what you want in a negotiation | Ruchi Sinha

"It's TED Talk daily. I'm Elyse Hugh. Negotiations. Ugh. They stress me out. But they don't have to be contentious, says organizational psychologist ruchi Sinha. In her talk from our video series the way we work, she reminds us that we negotiate regularly in our daily lives, and she offers some great tips for the next time we go into a negotiation at work. Support for PRX comes from WGL energy's public sector department, providing natural gas, electricity, and renewable energy solutions for cities state and federal agencies. Meet your agency sustainability mission at WGL energy dot com slash public sector. Now what's next, a podcast from Morgan Stanley helps make sense of life during and after the pandemic. With nearly two decades of experience reporting on culture and the economy, hosts inari glinton meets people who are looking for solutions to the cracks exposed by the pandemic. From how we care for our children and the elderly to what we do with shopping malls, these are stories of everyday people trying to figure things out and where they're finding hope. Search for now what's next wherever you listen to podcasts. When we think about negotiations, we think about being tough, we're charging like it's a battle. Brandishing our influence and our power moves. But a negotiation doesn't have to be a fight. And loses. Think of it more like a dance. Two or more people moving fluidly in sync. We constantly negotiated with. We negotiate for higher pay, promotions, vacations, and even greater autonomy. In fact, every day, we negotiate just to get our job done. And to secure resources for ourselves and our teams. And yet, when we go in with the wrong mindset with our fists up ready to fight, we aren't as successful. You know why? Because negotiation is not about dominating. It's about crafting a relationship and relationships thrive. When we find ways to give and to take and move together in unison, and to do that, you have to be well prepared. First, do your research. Figure out whether what you're asking for is realistic. What is your aspiration? What do you want? And what will make you walk away from the table? This might seem obvious, but too many people don't think it through. Let's say you negotiating for a salary in a new job. Some people, they determine their ask based on their past salary. That isn't a good yard stick. You may end up asking for too much or too little. Instead, find out the range of what is possible. Look at industry reports, websites. Talk to people in your professional network to find out the lowest average and the highest salary for a similar role and then make your ass closer to that upper limit. Build a solid rationale for why you are above average and thus deserving of that ask. Let's say you're negotiating for something less black and white, like the ability to work from home to care for an aging parent, you need to study your company's policies on remote work. Ask yourself when and why were these policies developed in the first place? Doctor trusted mentors. To understand how working from home might affect issues that aren't on your radar and think about how changing to working from home might actually affect others in your team. In fact, make a table, summarizing the parts of your job that can be done remotely, and the parts that require face to face interaction. This may sound like a lot to do, but when the person you negotiating with sees that you've done all this homework, you're more likely to get that yes. It also helps you avoid being lied to, while building the person's respect. Second, prepare mentally for the negotiation. Asking for things can get emotional. They're real and complex feeling at play. Fear, anxiety, anger, even hurt. It's essential to have strategies in place to manage those feelings. One strategy is to adopt a mindset of defensive pessimism. That just means that you accept obstacles and failures are likely in a negotiation. So it's better to put your energy in imagining the ways to overcome those obstacles. That way, you're ready to respond when you face it. Another strategy is emotional distancing. That is the idea of being less attached to any specific outcome. I know it's easier said than done. We all feel emotions like anger and hurt. When a core identities are being threatened. When your manager may be challenging a truth that you hold dear about yourself, like you're a hard worker and you deserve this. Try and avoid thinking of negotiations as the ultimate test of your worth. Go in knowing that your requests might be met that it might be denied. And that none of this is a measure of your wealth. Also know that if you feel yourself getting upset, hurt during a negotiation, it's okay to step back. You can leave the dance floor and move up to the balcony. Just say, let me think about this a little more. Could we press balls and continue this tomorrow? The third and the final way you can prepare for negotiations is by putting yourself in the other person's shoes, taking the time to anticipate the other's needs and challenges. What pressures May they be under? What risks would they be taking? Do they even have the power to give you what you're asking for? What ripple effects might yes mean. When you make that request, look to balance assertiveness about your own needs with a concern for the other. As you lay out your case, use phrases like I'm asking for this because I know it's good for my team that I want to achieve X and Y goals and I know this is what will enable it. Arguments like that show that you are ambitious, you know what you want, but you're also care for others. So many of our negotiation missteps, they don't actually come from disagreements, but misunderstanding the other person. So it's important to listen well. To ask why? And why not? And you will surely find unexpected opportunities for win win solutions.

Ted Talk Elyse Hugh Ruchi Sinha Wgl Energy's Public Sector Dep Inari Glinton Morgan Stanley
A highlight from The forest is our teacher. It's time to respect it | Nemonte Nenquimo

TED Talks Daily

05:46 min | Last week

A highlight from The forest is our teacher. It's time to respect it | Nemonte Nenquimo

"Nobody is my name is nimon and kimo. I am a wild running woman, a mother, and a leader of my people. When I was young, I first went to the city to a missionary school so that I could learn Spanish. I never had the opportunity to go to university, but I have to begin nannies. The wise elders who have taught me how to respect how to love the forest. And from all of that, I have grown into a leader. The forest is our teachers that began our knees, the wise, both women and men are our scientists, our teachers, who have taught us to value what we have and that knowledge that love we have. We say as indigenous peoples, that value has been lost on outsiders. The forest is our home. The forest gives us life, food, nourishment, water, spiritual connection, but the arrival of roads, the arrival of colonization, the arrival of evangelical missionaries, the arrival of oil companies has destroyed our forest. I have met other indigenous peoples who live in the north and who are first contacted by colonization, invasions and roads. It is very sad. To the people who are listening, I would like to say that the forests in our Amazon continue to burn. The oil continues to spill. And the miners continue to enter our territory, stealing our gold. And the colonization continues to invade to cut down and feed societies from abroad. I want to let it be known that this is directly harming us that they are risking the lives of our Amazonian peoples throughout the whole country. We, as indigenous peoples have been fighting for our land for thousands of years, because we have a lot of love and respect for it. That is why it is important that you listen to our voices, our cries so that the destruction of our forest stops. That you stop harming our forest because you are not listening. More than 25% of the earth's surface is protected by indigenous peoples. This includes nearly half of the world's forests. I think people from the outside who we call Quora are people who know less about the forest, and therefore they do not care about life in the forest. They do not care about the spiritual life. They do not care about the life as we have lived it, connected for thousands of years, respecting mother earth. That's why I think it's important for me as a woman but as a young woman, I have learned that quota think that technology and development are better, but they have no awareness that at the same time they are destroying the planet. And if they continue acting blind, we say that the people who know least about the forest are blind, we as indigenous peoples are the ones whose eyes are open. We know what is happening. Corey is quota is for us a stranger who does not value who has no knowledge about the forest. What is the forest mean to us? For the wild Rani people, the forest is our home. It is our life. It is full of life full of knowledge. I can walk and see plants around me that we can eat. Leaves, we can use to heal vines to make our baskets with to carry things. Wood to build our homes, good wood. Leaves to cure a headache. But if I bring a good edge the forest. Pure is not going to see the way I am seeing. Coordinate does not have that knowledge. He thinks this is all a gift. A place full of resources that he can keep extracting. The word quote does not have to be bad. You are capable of having the same values as us. The knowledge that we have as Amazonian peoples, you can learn, you can respect, you can become our allies. We as indigenous peoples do not need satellite images, because we live in the forest, and we know what is happening in the forest. The Amazon is burning. The oil companies come to our territory to say that they will develop our country. That they will support our communities. They say yes it will not harm them. They come with beautiful words and say that it will not affect the environment. Or the water, or the surrounding forests but it is a lie. We see it with our own eyes, alongside other people's, the oil spills, how for months, they haven't been able to clean them up. How they have contaminated our fish are rivers, our spirits, our people. Our people have been made sick. If, as indigenous peoples, we say that we don't want to participate that we don't want exploitation, the government must respect our decision and withdraw. It can't circumvent us. Although the communities, the grassroots say no and no, they pretend they are not listening.

Nimon Kimo Quora Amazon Corey Headache Wood
A highlight from What working parents really need from workplaces | Angela Garbes

TED Talks Daily

04:47 min | Last week

A highlight from What working parents really need from workplaces | Angela Garbes

"When Angela shows up at the office, know that Angela has been up for at least three hours. Had her hand covered in human excrement on wedge, a small person who has become lodged in between the washing machine and the wall, gotten down on her hands and knees and picked up oatmeal off the garbet. Domestic labor, which is what parenting is and everything that goes along with parenting. It's not just taking care of a child, you know, it's keeping a household running, it's washing dishes, it's doing laundry. It's keeping the schedule tight, you know. We, again, assume that that work will be done by a wife who's at home. The reality is has progressed beyond where we're at policy wise. Most people need multiple sources of income. Women want to work outside of the home, we're still expected to do all of the same things. And so now we outsource a lot of that parenting work to other women and mainly women of color. We don't give it a financial cultural value. And so we don't see it as real work. Care is really the backbone of our society. That work is what makes all other work possible. So how should we support parents in the workplace? There are only two industrialized countries in the entire world that don't guarantee some paid family leave and the United States is one of them. We should be envying Ghana, Brazil, Turkey, Serbia, Japan, the United Kingdom, Norway, the Netherlands, Sweden, we are lagging behind the world on this. When I say paid family leave, I'm not talking about necessarily just newborn maternity leave. That includes paternity leave all genders, families that are adopting and welcoming a new child into their home that way, people who are bringing foster children into their home. You know, taking care of aging parents. You know at some point in your life, someone that you love and care about is going to need help. You should have the right to take that time to take care of them. People do their best work when they feel seen and supported by the people that they work for. It's pretty simple. Being a parent is often seen as a weakness. In the workplace, you come back and people make a lot of assumptions about you. You're not invited to go on work trips because assumptions are made that maybe you don't want to do that or you can't. And that can be really disempowering to people and it's really discouraging and it makes them in a period of time that's already stressful can make you feel even worse. Asking a coworker about how things are going at home or with their kid, making people feel like they don't have to hide that. What's up with your tutorial? Ask to see a picture of their child. For parents, the hours between 5 and 8 p.m. are really crucial. It's sometimes the only time you really have with your kids, you're often running to pick them up somewhere to relieve someone from doing child care. I would much rather send a few emails at 8 30 p.m. than be on a call at 5 p.m.. And so I think emphasizing and creating a culture of work where it's the work that gets done, the work is what matters. The end result is what matters as opposed to tracking time in a traditional way. And opening up the lines of communication around that can be really beneficial. Letting a coworker know that you have their back. If they want to say that four 45 doesn't work for them as a meeting time that you'll step in and say that you can't do it either. Right? Just something to show solidarity. One other thing as a former breastfeeding mother in an office place in a pumping mother, I should say that if you want to clean out your office fridge every now and then, that is a really beautiful thing to do for a pumping mother because I used to do that in my office because I would put my little cooler that had breast milk and a midline. Year old bottles of salad dressing, like pad Thai that had become petrified, just gross stuff. And no one should have to do that, right? Again, a very, very small thing that makes a big difference in someone's life. In striving to be as efficient as possible as achieving as productive as possible. We've drifted away from this notion of care and parenting being important work. But we need to talk about these things and bring parenting and family life out into the open. Because we can't fix problems that we don't see. We can't fix problems that we don't talk about. It really doesn't have to be this hard, and we can do much more to support people. PRX.

Angela Serbia Ghana Norway The Netherlands Sweden Brazil United Kingdom Turkey Japan United States
A highlight from Mary Aiken: Cybercrime is Solvable

Solvable

08:06 min | Last week

A highlight from Mary Aiken: Cybercrime is Solvable

"They're in college, they're pirating crack software. So for that cohort, the line between, right and wrong becomes a little blurred. I went to college in 2002. Back then, we were still on black planet using live journal, exchanging AOL screen names, and leaving up pointed emo song lyrics as a subliminal away message for the crush, who broke our hearts. And I was also a virtual shoplifter. Before we had music streamers before Apple music and Spotify, we downloaded everything from what were called peer to peer networks. Music, movies, that new Warcraft game we wanted to play. And for poor college students, this was just the exciting new way of experiencing a world. We didn't say anything wrong with what we were doing. It was predicted that this year, cybercrime would cost the global economy just over 1 trillion U.S. dollars. To put that in perspective, that's like over 6 million teslas being stolen. A $150,000 each, or approximately three hope diamonds valued at 350 million. It's just about equal to the entire infrastructure Bill, President Biden just signed into law. Some estimate that if cybercrime is not addressed, it could cost the global economy over $10 trillion by 2025. It would seem that with every advancement in technology, criminals, and opportunists find a new way to exploit it. The pace of technological innovation seems to move too fast for regulations to keep up. And not everyone is on board with all the ways we could bring order to the madness right now. When I talk to people about surveillance, they get really upset about this and they were like, I don't want any governments or any law enforcement agency practicing surveillance because I don't want to be surveilled. But you are being surveilled by social technology companies. You are offering everything up they can practically predict what colored socks you're going to wear tomorrow. It's just surveillance by a different entity. Doctor Mary Aiken is an expert in forensic cyberpsychology, which is the study of criminal deviant and abnormal behavior online. So that means, unfortunately, she's kept pretty busy. In addition, she's a researcher and teacher and an academic adviser to europol, their cybercrime center, the EC3, and she's a member of the inner pole global cybercrime expert group. She's doing a lot. I'm not overwhelmed. I maintain my sense of humor, I remain optimistic. Cybercrime and online harms are solvable. Since 2016 NATO ratified cyberspace as an environment, acknowledging that the wars of the future would take place on land, sea air and on computer networks. This is a space. And this space comes with incredible opportunities, but also risks. And I would argue that cybercrime and online harms are solvable problems. If we understand the cyber behavioral dynamics in this space. So let's think about it like an iceberg. Whatever search engine they're using like Google or safari or Yahoo. That's what we call the surface web. And that's between one and 3% of the Internet. It's the tip of the iceberg. And then you have the whole part of the Internet, which is what we call what lies beneath. And that's the deep web. And certainly despite helps to facilitate cybercriminal behavior. And what happens is that human behavior mutates or changes in this environment. So anonymity is a powerful psychological driver. In other words, it's a superhuman power. It is the age old mythical power of invisibility. And that comes with tremendous responsibility. So let's take anonymity. Okay. And often I debate on this topic. People will push back and say, oh no, no, no. We can't do anything to change anonymity online, because anonymity is a basic fundamental human right. No, it is not. And yes, we want people in oppressed regimes to be able to post or blog or do whatever they want. But at what cost? And if the cost of that is cyber fraud and cybercrime and exploitation and coercion and extortion and what is described as revenge porn and all the things that we see that are going wrong online, then maybe the cost is too high. Now before you get too far into that, let me back up for a second. I like what you said about anonymity. As being one of the vulnerabilities of the pitfalls between the human technology relationship, what are some other big vulnerabilities of the human technology relationship besides anonymity? Well, you have the online disinhibition effect. And it dictates where people will do things online that they will not do in the real world. So it's like a form of inebriation or being drunk online. So what you see is that human behavior changes. You can also see more vulnerability expressed online. Hypochondria is excessive concerns about your symptoms. Cyberchondria is you have a headache, which could be from too much coffee or it could be a hangover and you start Googling symptoms about your headache and you end up reading it by brain tumor. And you start feeling anxiety as a result. That sounds familiar. So you might be perfectly well, but end up with a nasty case of health anxiety as a result of careless search escalation during search. So with the pandemic, we had the infodemic. This information overload, which actually increased people's anxiety in the general population. And what we saw was that cybercriminals are incredibly adaptable and agile. They tapped into that anxiety by creating malicious URLs or malicious links offering you discount personal protection equipment. Offering you a vaccine, click here before vaccines were even readily available. Offering you all sorts of cures. So people are anxious, they want to protect themselves and their families. So therefore the more likely to click on a link and compromise their tech and that's how the cybercriminals moved in. This doesn't feel different or that different from how crime and scams happen even when they were analog. Before they went digital, because we're talking about things like, you know, snake oil. And what you're talking about in opportunism and people using vulnerable periods of time in which to actually enact a crime or to make someone a victim. In this case, it feels like the existence of this sort of technology, the existence of the Internet creates a space for constant vulnerability. It makes it much easier. It opens up the range of victims from you are going to fly halfway across the world to

President Biden Mary Aiken Europol Inner Pole Global Cybercrime E AOL EC Apple Nato U.S. Headache Yahoo Google Brain Tumor
A highlight from An action plan for solving the climate crisis | John Doerr and Ryan Panchadsaram

TED Talks Daily

06:36 min | Last week

A highlight from An action plan for solving the climate crisis | John Doerr and Ryan Panchadsaram

"5th, we're going to clean up our materials, how we make things like cement and steel. And then 6th, we're going to have to figure out ways to remove the carbon that remains. That stubborn residual effects of emissions that can not be eliminated. Every one of these 6 things is a major challenge. We've got to attack them all at once. And how do we do that on time, Ryan? How are we going to get this done? So we've got to tackle more at once, but we've got to move quickly. And so the plan has four accelerants. Think of these as the levers that we can pull on equally. We've got to win the politics and policy. So the commitments that are being made actually have follow through. And then we've got to turn movements into real action at the ballot box as well as in the corporate board rooms. And then we've got to innovate, innovate to drive down the cost of clean technologies, and then we have to invest. We have to invest in research and deployment and philanthropy. We do all those things, Lindsay would get to move faster. So that's the plan in a nutshell, but what makes it different? What's different about the speed and scale plan is it's based on objectives and key results or OKRs. If you're not familiar with them, what OKRs are is a proven system to set goals for success that's been used by large and small organizations alike. And the benefit of using them is they help you focus, get alignment commitment and track your progress over time so that we get everything done. Objectives are what you want to have accomplished. Key results are how I get that done in time. Really good key results are concrete and measurable. And so they're what turn a set of goals into a real action plan. Can you give us an example? Ryan? Yeah, of course. So let's pick on that first objective to electrify transportation, which cuts 6 gigatons. So every set of these objectives have a handful of key results. And so for this first one, there are 6. An example of one is the price of electric vehicles have to be cheaper than the fossil fuel equivalent by 2024. Or another one by 2025, all new buses have to be electric. All the new purchased ones. And so these key results tell us if we're making progress and if we're getting there on time. And so if electric cars are still expensive or we're still seeing diesel buses sold after 2025, we know we're off track and we have to course correct. So what I hear you saying is that we need to be accountable. We need to be super ambitious. We need to be very practical because of the scale of change needed. Now, John, you have helped grow some of the most successful companies in the world. And when I think about the conversations that go on in boardrooms, I can't help but think that some of the leaders there will be frankly daunted, maybe a gas, even horrified at the scale and speed and breadth and depth of the transformation that you're talking about. What is your message to your business peers? My message to them is simple. It's that climate change has been under hiked. We are underestimating the economic opportunity. And the risk in this transition, the human cost, the economic toll that can come if we don't seize this opportunity, which could create 25 million jobs, new jobs in the next decade alone or wreck our communities. I want to ask you Friends, how much more damage do we have to endure before we realize that it's cheaper to save this planet than to ruin it? Now one of one of the things that people often say about climate change is that we already have all of the solutions that we need. And the real issue is to be just got to get on and implement them. And I believe, and I read in the book that you're saying that's not enough right. Talk to us about that. Why do we need something more than what we already have? Yeah, I think of it as a yes and, right? We have 85% of the solutions that we need. Record lows of solar and wind prices means deployments around the world, the dropping cost of lithium ion batteries means we're seeing more electric vehicles. But those solutions alone won't get us to net zero. And so we're going to have to both deploy and invest in the now, as well as invent the new. So we need the now and the new we need to scale up what we have, as well as invest in the future. And there are two pretty tangible examples, right? When you think of solar and wind as it gets deployed, you can't turn that on and off when you need it, right? So a grid needs to find a way to fill its gaps. Hence next level battery technologies or even safer nuclear. One of those could fill the gaps. Or think about how much we fly, carbon neutral fuels need to be developed and the cost needs to be driven down. The goal of all of this, at the end of the day is to try to take these green premiums. And if they can become green discounts, we'll see this technology everywhere. One of the things in the book is carbon removals, which you believe it imperative to us solving this problem. And when people think about carbon removals, they get understandably suspicious. Because historically, it's been an excuse for an action we can continue polluting and we'll clean up later. You're telling us in your view that carbon removals are an imperative piece of the plan. Can you describe why and what do you mean by that? Of course, I mean, people should be suspicious. Carbon removal needs to be the last piece. So as an organization, if you're trying to get to net zero, the first thing you have to do is cut. Pick the alternative, pick the electric alternative, then you've got to be more efficient. So you've got to cut, become more efficient, and then Lindsay then people can rely on carbon removal. But when you look at all the models from IPCC or even R rough modeling, you're still going to have ten gigatons left over. Right. And so we've got to invest in carbon removal technologies that are both nature based, as well as engineered, because we're going to need it in the future. Climate justice, let's talk about climate justice. It's a big theme in the book. John, you are an affluent white American. White male American. Exactly. Tell us from your viewpoint. How do you think about this question of climate justice? You know, when you think about it, climate justice climate change amplifies inequities. Those who suffer

Ryan Lindsay John Ipcc
A highlight from The science of preserving sight | Joshua Chu-Tan

TED Talks Daily

08:12 min | Last week

A highlight from The science of preserving sight | Joshua Chu-Tan

"Now open your eyes. When I ask people what the one sense that they couldn't live without is, most will immediately say their sight. And you can understand why that is. I mean, our vision and what we see play such an integral role and how we perceive the world around us. Just look at how much we spend on buildings on parks on architecture on things just to please our visual sense. But what if we can't see? What if we lose this gift? Well, this is exactly what happens. And age related macular degeneration or AMD. This disease is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. This disease affects one in 7 New Zealanders over the age of 50 and yet the most common form of this disease has no cure. AMD is a serious problem. But we think we have something that may just be the solution. These tiny molecules called microRNA that are incredibly powerful, gene regulators. But first, let's talk a little bit about how we actually see. This is a retina. This is a thing that allows us to absorb light, bouncing off of objects. This is the thing that allows us to define shapes to find edges. This is what allows us to see. It lines the back of the eye, and it's multi layered with each layer containing cells with its own respective role. Now the cell type I want you to know about today are photoreceptors. And if you break down the word, you can figure out what they mean photo meaning light and receptors was something that receives. So they receive the light. So when the light comes into our eye, it's received by these cells and through a series of processes begins to convert it into an electrical signal that is incent to the brain. Eventually, this will form an image. This is the first step to our vision to everything we see. Now, there's a specialized region within the red cell known as the macula. It's approximately 5 millimeters in diameter, and house is another even more specialized region known as the fovea. Now, in the light comes into our eye, it's concentrated to focus on this region of the retina. It's responsible for pretty much all of our useful day to today vision from our color perception to our high visual detail to our central vision. All of this mediated by this tiny region. This is also the region where your photoreceptors begin to die if you have AMD. In fact, a 1.5 millimeter lesion in this area, which is approximately the thickness of a credit card or render you legally blind. Unfortunately, AMD is an incredibly complex disease. And what this means is if you try and block a single thing leading to the disease, it's very likely that something else would just come and take its place. Whether that be well established causes such as inflammation or oxidative stress or things we just don't even know about yet. It's the same issue that faces researchers looking into treatments for all kinds of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's. But what if we could find one therapy that could treat multiple causes? You know, what if we could get to the root of the disease? Maybe we can, but to get there, we need to understand just a little bit about genetics. Now, some of you may be familiar with famous Watson crick and Wilkins. In many ways, with a pioneers of DNA as we know it. I'm sure a lot of you will also be familiar with Steven Spielberg's epic movie, Jurassic Park. Remember that scene? They have a preserved mosquito with dinosaurs blood in it, and they use that to create new dinosaurs and probably the coolest yet most dangerous theme park of all time. Well, a lot of you probably scoffed at that idea, but in some ways, genetically speaking, it's actually true. As Francis crick said, DNA makes RNA, RNA makes protein and protein makes us. This is the central dogma of genetics. You can think of DNA as the code. Coding for just about everything about us. So it makes us human and not a monkey, a rat or a dog. So it makes this unique individuals. It's what makes us who we are, but it is just the code. So without the other components of the central dogma, it's just going to sit there like a book, waiting to be read. Knowledge from this book, just waiting to be implemented. Now your RNA are your messengers, responsible for bringing some of that code and telling ourselves, okay, this is what needs to be produced right now. Then the protein that's made is your functional component. Or your workers, if you will. You can actually think of this central dogma as Swedish flat pack furniture giant Ikea. Think of the Ikea warehouse as your DNA, containing all the code, all the instructions for how these pieces of furniture will be made, but nothing. It's actually assembled yet. Did you choose what you need? And you come out of the warehouse with a set of instructions for your furniture. This set of instructions is your RNA. Copies and copies of these instructions, leaving the warehouse telling us of exactly how we assemble these pieces of furniture. Then the fully functional furniture, whether it be a wardrobe or a couch, that's your protein. All assembled, ready to do what they need to do. DNA makes RNA, RNA makes protein and protein makes us. Now when we talk about a standard gene therapy, you're often looking at a single target. So gene therapies are fantastic for diseases that can be attributed to a single gene mutation or single root cause. But for disease like AMD, where there's multiple possible causes, it's just not as useful at this point in time. But there's another type of RNA called microRNA. Instead of coding for the creation of protein, these microRNA can actually control which RNA are being read. They are incredibly powerful molecules with a single microRNA having the ability to control up to 200 different targets and what is known as negative regulation. What this means is that when it binds to an RNA, it stops it from being read and the protein from being produced. So let's go back to Ikea. Imagine my RNA as an officer. Roaming the car park of Ikea checking everything that's coming out of the warehouse for particular type of furniture. Now notice I say type. This is what I mean by a pathway. So let's say we're suffering from a coffee table epidemic, where people are just cluttering their living rooms with coffee tables upon coffee tables, one coffee tables for no apparent reason. Now Ikea will sell hundreds of different kinds of coffee tables, but they're all still cough tables, serving the same general function. A microRNA office will recognize this and specifically get rid of all coffee table instructions. It doesn't matter the shape, the size, or the color. If it's a coffee table, the instructions were no longer be read, and it will no longer be assembled. This is how microRNA work. They can regulate multiple genes from the same pathway. And this is why they are so powerful. Because we now have the ability to control an entire pathway rather than a single gene on it. Micro I have only really been discovered since the turn of the century and yet, there are already multiple microRNA based Therapeutics in clinical trials for complex diseases such as cancer. This shows their potential. This shows their rapidness in going from the lab bench to the clinical bedside. So let's recap. We have an incredibly complex disease known as age related and macular degeneration, or AMD. The disease that affects your central vision with the most common form, having no known cure or treatment. We have DNA, code that makes us. We have RNA, messengers for the creation of protein, and then we have my RNA controllers of this process.

AMD Alzheimer's Parkinson's Watson Crick Ikea Blindness Ikea Warehouse Francis Crick Jurassic Park Steven Spielberg Wilkins Cancer Macular Degeneration
A highlight from Chris Griffin: HALIO Athletica Founder & Veteran

The BosBabes

01:15 min | Last week

A highlight from Chris Griffin: HALIO Athletica Founder & Veteran

"Now guys, back to the episode, baby. To me, it's a great deal. And I feel like a majority of veterans, I think have a very similar, emotional attachment to the opportunity to be able to serve in the armed forces. Yes, it's an all volunteer force, but again, it's not everyone has the opportunity to be able to serve. And it's very unfortunate for those. It could be a medical condition that could be a variety of things that keep them from serving. But there are a lot of other ways that you can serve and be a civil servant and be in work for the air force. And a lot of what the military does now not to go off on a tangent to where if you are a civil servant and you still are part of the air force, you're still a part of the Marine Corps, you still are in airmen to end the way that we recognize it as a whole. It might not necessarily be how society defines it, but again, if you're a part of the team, you're part of the mission you are in airmen. For me, the ability to be a part of a legacy and a history where all these incredible airmen that came before me and accomplished these amazing things. And to be a part of that legacy and history is great for me as wanted to be able to add the kinds of

Air Force Marine Corps
A highlight from Ann Marie Leitao: EmpowerHER

The BosBabes

01:49 min | Last week

A highlight from Ann Marie Leitao: EmpowerHER

"Living in Boston. I mean, the Boston Marathon is non biased opinion is the most coveted marathon in the world. And so I had some friends in my aunt did it. And so I I'll never forget, I think it was 2016 watching from the sidelines and this was after the marathon bombing had happened and it was just so courageous. You're watching these people fighting to cross the finish line. I had run some half marathons in 5 ks and things like that. And I just thought to myself, you know what, it's time is as much as this is pushing me out of the comfort zone. Usually that's where the best things happen. I applied to run for another charity I empower her wasn't quite as established at the time. So I ran for a charity called dream big, which is also near and dear to me. Dream big supports young girls to have access to sports. This is not your type of book for show. It's real, it's wrong. There's been positive pop. You are now rocking with the Boston. Hey guys, how's it going? Welcome to a brand new episode of boss babes. I'm your host Brittany baldy. And we are back at it again with a brand new. Lifestyle sports podcast episode. And I could not be more thrilled. We have with me, my friend, miss and Marie Leto. And she was a former Boston Bruins ice girl. She is also one of the founders of a nonprofit called empower her. I can not wait for you guys to learn all about her nonprofit, growing up right in attleboro, Massachusetts and so much more. Before we get into that, you guys know that I am obsessed with manscaped products. I have

Boston Brittany Baldy Marie Leto Boston Bruins Miss Attleboro Massachusetts
A highlight from Rewilding Earth Podcast Episode 78: Iowa Rewilding and Big River Connectivity With Mark Edwards

Rewilding Earth

03:23 min | Last month

A highlight from Rewilding Earth Podcast Episode 78: Iowa Rewilding and Big River Connectivity With Mark Edwards

"I'm still Just in the throes realizing how wild it is where i live and yet where i live is the most biologically altered state north america. We've converted roughly ninety eight percent of the state for ume needs farming mostly roads highways and cultural kind of things like that. And so. I feel like i've been really lucky. I have a numerous france that i still maintain visiting one. Those main couvert island and so for example. And so i get to go to these places still. But i really like teasing him in particular like wait. You left i with this front on it. We don't figure out here where we're gonna figure it out. I mean he wanted to go over. There was something left a lot of friends in that but it became clear to me. I go visit those places like going to wilderness areas. But really the wildness is about more my relationship to my place wherever i am and so i've really come to love. I will bear very deeply and lake. I love it a lot. Because of what's been done to in a very short amount of time and yet i see potential there that i don see other places and i think that's really how i got into the reviled and so here. I am with the re wilding nut connecting with the people. I know and so i met roger. Ross give for this process and we kind of formed a partnership and Ross is extremely important in my life at that time because he's very challenged to me. We both agreed on. We were following rewinding We at read most all the same odd. We read most all the same books in southern deep understanding the language of each other but we came from past history a whole different way as was a local agricultural a business And here's mine trying to work with all the different environmental organizations trying to learn every plant species all that kind of level and between the two of us. I challenge each other tremendously and that's I think would really Catchers be wild Wild ethic that we're trying to do. We're both trying to learn how to be wilder and what rewinding me. And it's changed me tremendously. I just keep reading and reading a read most of this stuff before. How do i apply that to my own thing about. I don't have to wilderness anymore. I used to go a lot and well supposed to grow up. I still love places. I still find that interesting. But i have never been a wilder place in one sense of the word than i am where i live now on. I and i'm surrounded by corn beans. Two thirds of the statements covered into animal species. It's absolutely frightening how that green curtain and what's frightening is how people look at it and see that as a agreeing healthy thing on the national level what was being addressed was wilderness series or what we have stuff that's left. Where can we

Science Biology Wilderness Wildlife Environment Nature Rewilding Conservation Ross North America France Roger Wilder
Influential Educators: Abolitionist Prudence Crandall

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:23 min | 3 months ago

Influential Educators: Abolitionist Prudence Crandall

"Was born on september third. Eighteen three in rhode island booth of her parents. Pardon and esther were farmers. Imprudence was young. Her family relocated to canterbury connecticut. There prudence studied arithmetic. Latin and science topics not normally taught to girls at the time. But prudence is family was quaker. Quakers believe in equal opportunity for education in eighteen. Thirty one. prudence opened her own private school for girls. The canterbury female boarding school. The school served the wealthiest canterbury families and was a source of great pride in the community. It was ranked as one of the best schools in connecticut with the curriculum that rivaled even the most elite all boys schools but prudence is school was not entirely equal. All of her students were white to encourage prudence to take a more aggressive stance. Prudence is black housekeeper. Marsha davis began strategically leaving copies of the abolitionist newspaper. The liberator in places where she knew prudence would find them. The liberator promoted the need for immediate abolition as opposed to a gradual abolition. That was more commonly supported by the new england. Delete sarah harris who came from a prominent black family in the area was the first to actively approach prudence about integrating school. Sara was eager to continue her own education so that she could become a teacher for other black children and in eighteen thirty. Two prudence enrolled sarah in the canterbury boarding school. The decision was met with outrage white. Parents demanded that prudence expel sarah when she refused. They withdrew their daughters from the school realizing that she'd need to find new sources of tuition. Prudence went to speak with william lloyd garrison. The outspoken white abolitionist publisher of the liberator prudence and william discussed the possibility of converting the canterbury school into a school entirely for black girls. William connected prudence with money of the most prominent black families in new england and in eighteen thirty three the school reopened with a new mission to educate quote young ladies and little misses of color. The class consisted of twenty four students and the curriculum remained identical to that of the original. Can't school

Prudence Canterbury Female Boarding Sch Connecticut Marsha Davis Sarah Harris Quakers Esther Pardon Canterbury Rhode Island Canterbury Boarding School New England Sarah Sara Canterbury School William Lloyd Garrison William
Equal Too: How We Change the Law for Disabled People

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

01:37 min | 3 months ago

Equal Too: How We Change the Law for Disabled People

"Today over one point two billion people around the world are living with a disability. We make up fifteen percent of the global population and yet despite many countries establishing laws to protect our rights. No disabled person is immune to discrimination. Last year across thirty six police forces in england and wales more than seven thousand three hundred disability hate crimes were reported but only one point six percent resulted in perpetrators being charged disability. Discrimination often called abe limb comes in many forms from not providing a wheelchair ramp or an interpreter. At a press briefing point six million spent on the new pressroom still no interpreter to more extreme breaches in human rights such as the practice of shackling or forced sterilization all around the world disabled people depend on laws to safeguard our rights in the uk. We have the equality act in the us as the ada in columbia. There's law sixteen eighteen and in australia. There's the disability discrimination act in some countries. These acts took disabled activists years of blood. Sweating tears to bring in. I highly recommend watching the oscar-nominated documentary creek camp to get an idea of how hard fought the. Ada was in the us but even when there are laws in place when researching for this podcast we came to find that more often than not it falls upon disabled people themselves to enforce those laws or in some cases outright change them

Wales England Columbia UK Australia United States Oscar ADA
Museum Activists Say Real Change Is Needed to Combat Racial Injustice

Solvable

01:51 min | 3 months ago

Museum Activists Say Real Change Is Needed to Combat Racial Injustice

"Last year after george floyd. We saw a lot of racial recommends happen across multiple fields. We saw happened in hollywood. We saw it happened in the food industry. Surprising we saw it happened in very many unexpected places did any fallout happen with these racial reckonings. End museum industry. You know there was call for greater racial equity racial justice within the museum fields as well there was a whole survey done by museum next which is an international organization. Asking people do they feel like museums are relevant and a lot of people said he thought museums was important but not necessarily relevant because they didn't feel like museums. We're talking about issues within our society and wasn't standing up for for anything and so that's incredibly important to know that our society wants to see museums become more involved. There were a lot of people asking for changes made within the leadership And within policies of museums as well. And so what i did was i created the very first map and directory of museums created by black indigenous and other people of color. The map now has over a hundred and fifty museums throughout the country. The list is still growing but it shows these community museums or also known as culturally specific museums. Their pedagogy is one that puts community before collections. These community museums or doing incredible work across the country by work right now. Looks like Supporting those institutions and in the meantime challenging the racial infrastructure of those larger Museums that we know by

George Floyd Hollywood
Brianna Widen on the Benefits of Farming

Real Food Real People

02:12 min | 3 months ago

Brianna Widen on the Benefits of Farming

"When did you. How did you decide to like be full on farmers. Because what i'm seeing here is you guys are living the real legit like farm family life right. Yeah so we made the choice. We actually Moved here in two thousand seventeen and originally our plan had been just to raise our own food we wanted in our big goal was just to reconnect with where our food came from and Prior to that we always bought food from local as much as we possibly could But we realized that there there was a gap between consumers and farmers and my husband just kind of fell in love with what he was doing and one day he came home from his day job and just said hey. I'd like to do this. I'd like to actually do this for a living. And i'm the kind of person that if he makes the like if he's decided that that's what he wanted to do. I don't wanna be the one that hold him back from it. So i was like all right. You drove him all sell it. So that was like one of these. Classic stories of hobby turned into yes career. Yes and you know. We haven't been doing this for very long but we definitely we brought business since into it so we knew that this wasn't we definitely took it and ran with it from the beginning. Yeah what kind of work could you both been doing. Prior and so i had built a business prior to this. And so i knew the ins and outs of what it took to build something that had a great volume of sales and i was willing to. Social media was something that was willing to tackle. My husband is he. He works for bp so he's great. He has a lot of skills and he welds and he can build and he. He's just very skillful. So i knew that he you know. We weren't lacking in in the effort. We had the desire so yeah. And what was it like. Then when you made that decision. He made that call. You're going to go for talk about what you've been through to realize you know everything that you have accomplished so far. Yeah so we. We really tackled this as as much as we possibly. Can you know we didn't want to put a toe in in In new you. You really can't make a living off just a little.

Do Police Make Us Safe?

The Breakdown with Shaun King

02:17 min | 3 months ago

Do Police Make Us Safe?

"Across the country particularly in some of america's largest cities. Some crime is up. I say some. Because i've studied these numbers in some cities. Some violent crimes are up in some cities. Violent crime has actually down during the pandemic in other cities Car break ins and carjackings are up but home break ins are down and so a lot of times people will say. Crime is up but they don't actually mean all crime they mean a particular type of crime. What i see is a ton ton of fear going on about how crime is out of control. And here's the thing. listen. I care about that. I want all of us my own family and your family and your friends in your hometown and all over the country. I want all of us to actually feel safe. What i see is a lot of. Americans defaulting back to the thing that they've been taught not just for a few months not just for a few years but defaulting back to something. They've been taught for generations that police more policing better-funded policing more police officers. That all things policing is what's going to make us more safe. That is not the answer. And i don't care what anybody says. Listen to me. Clearly this is the main idea. What i'm about to say. Listen the police department in your city and in your county do not absolutely do not need an increase to their budget period point blank. Dot com budgets are being slashed all over the country for education for public health for mental health for homelessness for housing for jobs. All types of budgets are being slashed and in most american cities. The only budget that has not been cut is the budget of the local police departments who've insisted that they and they alone have the power to keep us safe. But listen to me. If funding policing kept us safe today would be the safest day in american history.

America
How to Design the Life You Want

TED Talks Daily

01:51 min | 3 months ago

How to Design the Life You Want

"Help you design your life. We're gonna use the technique of design thinking innovation methodology works on products works on services. But i think the most interesting design problem is your life. So that's what we're going to talk about. I want to just make sure. Everybody knows my buddy dave evans dave and i are the co authors of the book and he's the guy who helped me co find the life design lab at stanford. So what are we doing. The life design lab while we teach the class. That helps you figure out what you wanna be when you grow up. There's a meta narrative in the culture in my when when i was growing up. Twenty five. you're supposed to have you know. Maybe a relationship maybe have gotten married starting to get the family together in the in the book or in the class. We don't believe in. Should we just think all right you wherever you are. Let's start from where you are. You're not late for anything. So i'm gonna give you three ideas from design thinking the first one is this notion of connecting the dots so we looked in in the positive psychology literature and the design literature and it turns out that those who you are. There's what you believe. And that's what you do in the world if you can make a connection between b-street things if you can make that a coherent story you will expe- experience your life as meaningful the increase in meaning making comes from connecting the dots. So we do two things. We asked people write a work view. What's your theory of work. Not the job you want. Why do you work. what's it for. What's working service of what you have that. Two hundred fifty words then. This one's a little harder to get short. What's the meaning of life. What's the big picture by you. Here what is your faith or your your view of the world when you can connect your life you and your work together a coherent way you start to experience your life as meaningful

Dave Evans Stanford Dave
Seminole Activist Worries About Threat of Rising Seas to Her Native Land

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 3 months ago

Seminole Activist Worries About Threat of Rising Seas to Her Native Land

"The eighteen. Hundreds the us army forcibly moved the majority of florida's seminal indians to oklahoma but a few hundred avoided capture and remained deep in the wetlands and wilderness of south florida. Today their descendants are federally recognized as the seminole tribe of florida. We're still known as the uncomforter- tribe because we never signed treaty with the us back then but eighteen year old. Val holly frank where he's climate change could finally push them out. She's concerned about increasingly dangerous. Storms and how sea level rise will affect big cypress reservation where she lived as a young child she's has salt water creeping inland from the ocean threatens wildlife and water supplies there. She says maintaining their communities and ceremonial grounds is very important to the tribe because historically atlanta is where simos originally survived. Frank is one of eight news plaintiffs in a lawsuit against the state of florida. The suit aims to hold the government accountable for its contribution to climate change and force the state to take action to limit future warming. She says it's time for the government to take steps to preserve her communities past and ensure its

Val Holly Frank Florida Us Army South Florida Oklahoma Simos United States Atlanta Frank
How to Attract, Develop, and Retain Top Nonprofit Talent

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

02:05 min | 3 months ago

How to Attract, Develop, and Retain Top Nonprofit Talent

"Great to have you and thank you so much for all the work. you do. Thanks so much for having me here. I'm a huge fan of your leadership in this field john. Well thank you The feeling is mutual so galley. Clearly you get the challenge in the sector and this is what your organization is about. Why don't you tell folks a little bit about leading edge and its origin story. And i'm also curious about the thinking about your organization being focused specifically on jewish organizations. Sure let me take this in two parts. The first is genesis origin story. So it was a dark and stormy night noticed. it was Twenty thirteen Toward the end in two thousand thirteen when an informal group of ceo's of foundations and major jewish organizations have been meeting informally for some time and The purpose of these meetings was talking about some of the major issues of major challenges facing the community in thinking about collaborative approach or shared warnings. Those types of almost like informal networking kind of conversations and at that time in sort of building up to that time the conversation was all about the leadership pipeline right. There were a lot of folks in those rooms. A lot of leaders who admitted. I'm not sure he's taking over for me when i retire in. Fill in the blank years and joan. You've talked about this gap and so in two thousand thirteen. Just like in the general nonprofit non see jared say general society jewish nonprofit sector was talking about a turnover in the c. suite of seventy five percents ninety percent by some estimates and fuelled by generational. You know what the demographics and and so this group of of really investors in the jewish ecosystem understood that there was essentially exposure to our organizations because we know that the marker of a great organization starts with a leader that that transition was going to be precarious so they wanted to do something about it and what

General Society John Joan
You Can Grow New Brain Cells. Here's How

TED Talks Daily

01:56 min | 3 months ago

You Can Grow New Brain Cells. Here's How

"Can we as adults grew new nerve. Sounds these still some confusion about that question. As this is a fairly new field of research for example are sticking to one of my colleague robert with an oncologist and he was sitting me cendrine. This is puzzling. Some of my patients. That have been told there are queued. Are cancer still develop symptom of depression. And i responded to him from my point of view that make sense so drug you give to your patients that stops a cells multiplying also stop the newborn neurons being generated in your brain and then robert looked at me like i was crazy and said but sundering visa adult patients either do not grow new nurse and much street surprise. I say well actually we do. And we sees a phenomenon that we call muroo genie's so now roburt is not a neuroscientist and when you went to medical school it was not to what we know. Now that the other brain can generate new nurse airs so roburt being a doctor. He's wanted to come to my lab to understand a little bit better topic. And i took him for two of one of the most exciting parts of the brain when it comes to new jersey's the compass so vis vis gray structure in the center of the brain and what we know seems already very long is that this is important for learning and memory and mood and emotion however what we have learned more recently. Is that this is one of the unique structure of the other brain where new neurons can be generated

Robert Confusion Roburt Depression Cancer New Jersey
How to Pave a New Career Path

TED Talks Daily

02:23 min | 3 months ago

How to Pave a New Career Path

"Today we're gonna be exploring stepping into the unknown head to talk about it. I am joined by debbie. Millman that hosted one of our first podcasts. Ever or one of the first time ever. Hi debbie hang lease. Great ac- air. It's great to see you If you haven't tuned in before debbie's cast is called design matters. And i have been listening while i go on runs and Really enjoy your conversation. Thank you thank you so much. We'll to frame this talk Why don't we start by talking. About how stepping into the unknown applies in your own life in in your own career. Well i was really influenced. Several years ago. I interviewed the great writer danny shapiro and we were talking after the interview. She came into my office at the school of visual arts and saw that i had stacked on my task. Three books had just come out a barrel confidence. I i really had felt at the time. That confidence is by holy grail. But this is what. I was looking for to find my whole life if i could find the confidence to step into any without fear that that would be like my life likely be made and she and i started talking about that and she said oh i think. Confidence is really overrated. What what like ed explodes. And i pressed her for more information. And she said that she felt the confidence overrated that most people that just head oodles oodles of confidence were jerky thought was more important than confidence was actually courage and that courage to step into that unknown was was far more important to being able to reach any kind of call in so it set me on a pass of a research to really find our What confidence actually meant. What does it mean to have. What have you have you get confidence. You're not good with supermarket in like polls confidence shelves

Debbie Hang Debbie Danny Shapiro Millman School Of Visual Arts ED
Interview With Model, Actress, Dancer, Activist, Leyna Bloom

Asian Enough

02:03 min | 3 months ago

Interview With Model, Actress, Dancer, Activist, Leyna Bloom

"So you're a dancer. A model an actor an activist. You were the cover model on. The sports illustrated swimsuit cover It's a famous pop cultural institution. But it's one that's historically been seen. I think in the mainstream through a straight male gaze and in this year's edition there was like an intentional effort to celebrate an inclusive spectrum of women. And i think i understand you shot it before you learn. You made the cover along with tennis player. Naomi osaka and rapper meghan stallion. But what were your hopes going into the shoot and what did you want to convey images. Well anything that i do sense. Being in these spaces of representation is fairly new to argos system. All around the world. I think for me. It has to be some type of cultural shift. Has the part of something that is not just based around vanity orc gluttony. It has to be something that has a message in yes. I have beaten suit on. Yes i'm in. My muslim informed bites what i stand for. And why i was chosen to be part of the issue and then be on the cover was because of what i wanna do with everything i do in the bible being In the past a lot of the models are beautiful. Yes what is a story what is fighting for. What are they really rooted and makes them who they are. And the reason why. I've gotten up to this. Point is not because meek just being beautiful. It's me fighting the system it's me. I'm being blacklisted. It's me saying no. I don't wanna do. This is saying it's not what you say. Yes you is what you say no to that builds character. So what we doing. And what i do with this issue is to invite people who think differently. And that's why i was session for a moment winning a transient on the cover. Because are every single. Day being brutalized murdered sexualize. Harass already has been thirty three on some of cases of trans women especially of color being murdered in america so when that is happening society is imperative in his responsibilities to have moments like

Naomi Osaka Meghan Stallion Tennis America
How Canada and the Western World Failed Afghanistan

The Big Story

02:17 min | 3 months ago

How Canada and the Western World Failed Afghanistan

"I'm jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Stephen save holds the patterson chair and international affairs at carleton university. Among the books he's written is adapting in the dust. Lessons learned from canada's war in afghanistan. And he also co hosts a podcast about canada's national security called the battle rhythm hasty. Hello i'm doing all right like many canadians. I kind of spent the weekend. seeing progressively more and more disturbing images coming out of afghanistan especially kabul and. I'm i'm wondering if you could maybe describe what we're actually seeing and hearing about in afghanistan right now. Well it's the collapse of the government that we've been trying to build for the past twenty years The taliban were kicked out of the country by american forces and then in two thousand and two There developed a un effort that became a nato effort called isaf the international security assistance force along with a variety of other international partners to try to build a self sustaining afghan government. And then two thousand fourteen. Nato largely pulled out three years. After canada pulled out of combat and for the past seven years there was a nato effort to train the afghan army and last year. Donald trump Negotiated deal the taliban that would vote the remaining few americans that were left in afghanistan out before this summer there about two thousand five hundred americans soldiers mostly doing training and doing coordination type stuff and So that was Trump's decision last year and then when it became president there was a question about whether he would live by the deal which had a deadline of may fifth at all. Americans are supposed to be out by may fifth and the by racial thought. That would be too fast. That that we would be able to get our stuff in our people out in his In his mind and so they sent the data september eleventh and over the course of the summer The taliban made a series of deals with a variety of actors within afghanistan that led to the collapse of the afghan national army forces that were guarding a variety of places around the country until the only thing that was left was couple which fell this weekend.

Afghanistan Jordan Heath Rawlings Patterson Chair And Internatio International Security Assista Nato Canada Carleton University Taliban Kabul Stephen Afghan National Army UN Donald Trump
Walk With Little Amal, a Theatrical Journey Celebrating the Refugee Experience

TED Talks Daily

02:08 min | 4 months ago

Walk With Little Amal, a Theatrical Journey Celebrating the Refugee Experience

"Among muniz. Irby i was born in east jerusalem and a tough part of town between between the neighborhood and the shafat refugee camp. I'll mix child that means. My mother is jewish and my father's palestinian so the refugee experience runs very deep in the dna of the family. When my jewish grandparents were fleeing europe because of world war two. They came to palestine and drove the other part of my family into exile. When i was fourteen. I stumbled by accident into a theater show and this rough part of town and i fell in love. I fell in love with a reality that was being created in front of me reality. That was full of possibilities. That was wilder was free. A reality that was an opposite contrast of the harsh reality we were living in and i became a theatre. Practitioner becoming a theatre. Practitioner and palestine is like conjuring water in the desert. We don't have the infrastructure. We don't have the big artistic institutions. What we do have is a need and something to say about the world. We live in taking my shows to communities in refugee camps in palestine. I was always struck by the immediacy of the encounter and that became a very powerful experience for me in two thousand fifteen at the height of the refugee crisis when hundreds of thousands of people were walking across europe with all the pain and the anguish that we saw. I started thinking that maybe we need to create a new model of theater. Maybe we need to take our theater out of the theaters and into the streets. The streets where these people were walking. And i started working with good sean theater company Company that creates theater about the refugee experience together. We created the walk. The walk is a rolling arts festival. That will cross eight thousand kilometers sixty five cities towns and villages in its way and we will create one hundred twenty events of welcome.

Shafat Refugee Camp Palestine Irby Muniz East Jerusalem Europe Wilder Sean Theater
Life's Tapestry With Florence Taylor

Stitch Please

02:09 min | 4 months ago

Life's Tapestry With Florence Taylor

"Hello y'all lawrence. Taylor is a delight. She does so much in. Continues is so much in the sewing community. She is one of those reliable trustworthy voices that i turned to she works with so many different companies in different capacities supporting so many small business owners so many small black business owners so many small black women business owners through the fabric industry. And i'm so grateful for it. So i welcome in. I want get started with a channel brought umbrella of a question. It you're writing lawrence taylor. The play on broad wish and part of her character description was a sewing philosophy. What would it be. I look at sowing as my love. Language to myself to my family to my friends. So it's wearable of wearable ma. That is so beautiful because sewing. Came from a place of love for me. When i didn't think i I was worthy of it and when he was missing in terms of avoid of my mom. passing away so when anybody that i love where something that i think. They have to know that little whisper into the sewing. That's why so with an old machine. I whisper thoughts. And i say things. Like if i'm making something for my son i in this climate when i make him something a mike i hope this is bright in someone sees him. I hope that this doesn't attract too much attention but yet big him stand out. I hope that when he's walking invest. Someone sees it he. He's somebody that is worthy to still make it home. I'm not even kidding. I literally whispered these incantations for him for my husband and even for my daughter. Sometimes i just want them to be noticed in the sense that they're remembered they don't have to be more.

Lawrence Taylor Lawrence Taylor Mike
How the IPCC Report Is About More Than Just Climate Change

The Big Story

01:51 min | 4 months ago

How the IPCC Report Is About More Than Just Climate Change

"I'm fatma fitting in for jordan heath. rawlings this is the big story. Brick smith is the president of the canadian institute for climate choice. Herrick thanks for being here. It's pleasure so what was your first reaction when you read the report while i mean. Let's let's just acknowledge that this thing is massive minutes thousands of pages. Hundreds of scientists around the world have been working on this thing for the last many months of fourteen. Thousand studies were incorporated and summarized and synthesized in this reports enormous amount of information. This is the most significant update to what we know about climate in in many years over half a decade. There's a lot of stuff now does not surprising me for anybody. That's been keeping track of climate change science and the the notion that warming is getting is happening more quickly than expected. would not be news. I think one of the more significant aspects of the report is the unequivocal linkage. Based on the best available science that recent extreme weather events are being driven by climate change in the idc has never been that explicit before. And of course there's this whole new discipline called attribution science that's That's quite new. This new kind of science is makes it possible for us to say yeah. This particular heatwave is being driven by climate change that is a. That's a very new Development in the climate change debate. And i think very powerful because long story short what this report does is. It brings climate change home for people. Climate change is a health concern.

Fatma Jordan Heath Brick Smith Canadian Institute For Climate Herrick IDC
An Interactive Map to Track (and End) Pollution in China

TED Talks Daily

02:12 min | 4 months ago

An Interactive Map to Track (and End) Pollution in China

"Choking smog polluted waters climate change. This has been the environmental cost of the tremendous wells in china of the past forty years at the same time. Hundreds of millions of people have put themselves out of poverty as environmentalists in china. I have witnessed all of this first. Hand the challenge we're phasing is. Can we clean up as fast. And as broadly as the massive development degrading our air water and climate china has one point four billion people a steel fast growing economy and is responsible for the biggest share of the current greenhouse gas emission. china knows it's global responsibility and has pledged to be carbon neutral by twenty sixty. It means more than ten billion metric. Tons of carbon emission must be stopped abi neutralized. How can we possibly do it. The pressing global climate situation requires each of us. Not just to do it but to do it faster. I believe there's a chance for us to succeed. As i know a tool that i've work to help reduce the enormous environmental pollution. It is the power of transparency. Pollution information made public using mobile internet and other. It technologies many empowers millions of citizens to speed. Change by holding corporations and government agencies accountable. I personally got involved in the transparency drive for or pollution control years ago. Besides lake tied the third largest freshwater lake in china. I saw a group of fishermen using loan lados to scoop out the one fisherman said to me when i was young on a holiday like this i would jump into the lake for a bath but now he said the fish are gone. And we're paid to scoop out the algae pointing to those factories not far from the shoreline. He said the lake would not be clean onto. They stop dumping years of research. Made me understand how hard it is to check the dumping

China Besides Lake
Natalie Baszile on Why We Are Each Others Harvest

Good Life Project

02:10 min | 4 months ago

Natalie Baszile on Why We Are Each Others Harvest

"Your work is fascinating to me The fundamental idea that farming in the united states has been such a rich and profound part of the tradition of black people in this country but it is woefully neglected if not outright excluded and sort of the broader telling of the story of our national. History is incredibly heartbreaking. It's i opening but can you share a bit. About what brought you to wanna dive lot deeper into this question. Sure well you know. I think it really goes back to my own experience of the narrative right the narrative that i grew up with this idea that you know when i was a kid and i would watch television. You know. i was kind of aware of this idea of farming and the american farmer and it was this very heroic romantic story. And i can't say that as a kid. I was aware of the absence of black people. But i remember kind of being swept up in that idea right about this is something. This is a noble endeavour. This is something. That's kind of part of the american identity. For whatever reason i have always enjoyed. You know my own personal fantasy about farming and and having land and being on the land and so as i kind of held that appreciation for just the story of farmers in general when i started to notice especially as i was working on my first novel queen sugar and would go to louisiana and Look around at. Who was farming sugarcane. I was struck by how few black farmers there were. And i thought how can this be you know how can this be in in a nation where farming is an integral part of the narrative right. It's this integral part of how americans think about themselves. This connection to the land and yet black people are not part of that picture.

United States Louisiana
Interpersonal Skills Are Hard Work (With Carole Robin)

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

01:50 min | 4 months ago

Interpersonal Skills Are Hard Work (With Carole Robin)

"Carol i am so pleased to have you join me to get all touchy feely today. Well i'm delighted to be here. Thank you so much john. So let's start by getting on the same page about vocabulary stanford calls this transformational class. Interpersonal dynamics i also hear a ton of people use the acronym e q. I mean i even use it. If i'm talking about someone who reads others. Well who seems quite authentic in their relationships. I might say i think this person has really high q. Help us with definition of terms. Are they similar. Different of a cloth. Talk to me. Yeah so the termi emot- e. q. Was coined by daniel goldin and in a in a now Very famous book and Came out actually. We just celebrated the twenty fifth anniversary of his of his seminal work and emotional intelligence or e. q. Is he defines. It is about a set of competencies that essentially Include self awareness. self-regulation Embassy the ability to motivate others and and social skills now one of the reasons that his work was. So seminal was that he legitimized the need for social for what we call the soft skills right in business and in fact what his research showed was that the people who were the best at the soft skills actually were the ones who created the highest performing organizations and were the most successful

Daniel Goldin Carol Stanford John
Don't Call People out -- Call Them In

TED Talks Daily

02:00 min | 4 months ago

Don't Call People out -- Call Them In

"First of all thank you all for listening to me. I come to y'all because most black women don't go the klu klux klan rallies on purpose. I did because it was my job. I've monitored hate groups. But i really wanted to find out how people could hate strangers so much. Mostly i wanted to work for peace and justice but fortunately for me my mentor at the time was the legendary civil rights leader. Reverend ct period. Who'd been an aide to dr martin luther king and see ts to say when you ask people to give up hate the you need to be there for them when they do now the time. Ct set those words. I started muttering under my breath. Because you can't curse out a preacher you know. But if i didn't make any sistemi to me because if the clan hated black folks al's all right with hating them back sounded okay to me but then something happened. It became my job to help people who were leaving hate groups and then once i got the norm i couldn't hate him anymore and then i got confused. I'm a survivor. A racial violence rape and incest. And i needed to find another moral compass for my life's work and the conference had this schiff from hate to love and so that improbable journey is why i'm here to talk to you today. Because i really really want to build a culture and a world that invites people in instead of pushing them out is called a calling in culture

KLU Dr Martin Luther King AL Schiff
Fathi Terbil, a Champion for Human Rights, Takes on Gaddafi

Real Dictators

01:40 min | 4 months ago

Fathi Terbil, a Champion for Human Rights, Takes on Gaddafi

"February fifteenth two thousand eleven in the middle of a quiet thursday afternoon a succession of 'cause pulls up outside a modest suburban home out kyle twenty agents but the city's general security directorate folks by the name not gentlemen to stand on ceremony. They forced they leeann ransacked. The place smashing things of the who lives here is not exactly surprised by their appearance. He's been arrested seven times before thrown in jail and been tortured at length. Never with regard to a specific charge visitations from gadhafi's goons aren't occupational hazard in his line of work. His name is fatty. to- bill and he's a lawyer rather fields one a champion for human rights in june nineteen ninety-six over twelve hundred prisoners in libya's notorious abu salim jail massacred for years. The relatives of those murdered have been seeking justice. Baby face thirty nine year old always dressed in a baseball cap and checked. Kefalas gov the recognizable. Tabio there's become something of a celebrity lightning rod for those aggrieved. He takes great personal risk in seeking answers from the authorities to be ozone brother. Cousin and brother-in-law all died in selling him so he has a personal stake in uncovering the truth.

Leeann Abu Salim Kyle Gadhafi Kefalas Tabio Libya Bill Baseball Cousin
Equity Is About More Than Just Hiring Diverse Employees

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

02:31 min | 4 months ago

Equity Is About More Than Just Hiring Diverse Employees

"Renee welcome to washington post live. Hi jonathan. I'm so happy to be here with you. Well i'm happy to have you here. You have consulted for some of the biggest companies in the country and every big company is focused on diversity inclusion and equity or at least. They say they are so. How do you measure the inclusion health of company. What are you look for when you look at well. of course. Most people think demographics in the numbers. And certainly that is very important to look at so you can see sort of where the gaps are but what it's harder to measure is the sense of belonging and inclusion and the ability for people to share their perspectives and have opportunity and to move up and to be compensated so the entire kind of employee life cycle has to be evaluated for you to really know. Is their health. One thing at netflix to that we think about is who speaks and who doesn't in who gets descent and who doesn't those are all aspects of health. That's a really interesting that this focus on sense sense of belonging so to that point of as particularly at netflix who speaks. And and who doesn't who was the was it you. Were you the person who said that. It means something and it might mean something more than you think when you're in a meeting and there's that one person or two people who don't speak ashore and i'm sure i'm not the only person who said who said that the voices so much of the work which to do around inclusion is to remember that their voices we have never heard there are perspectives. That have never been really given air. And if any company wants to move into the future and be resilient incompetent incapable in and relevant right and to serve their constituencies in customers. They've got to be on this journey of inclusion because it's where the innovation is is where the creativity is. It's where the excitement is in so for us as a company. Amine it's easy were trying to entertain the world. We dare not try to do that without getting many more voices than both the entertainment and the tech industries have had over since their inception wife. Frankly

Netflix Renee Washington Post Jonathan
Mildred and Richard Loving's Love Created Lasting Change for Interracial Couples

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:34 min | 4 months ago

Mildred and Richard Loving's Love Created Lasting Change for Interracial Couples

"Military. Dolores jeeter was born on july twenty second nineteen thirty nine in central point virginia. Her family was of african american european and native american descent. Unlike most southern cities in the height of jim crow central point was integrated black and white people mixed freely with relatively little racial tension. It was there that a teenage mildred met and fell in love with a young white man named richard. Loving mildred and richard began quietly dating when military became pregnant at eighteen. The couple decided to get married. But in nineteen fifty eight interracial marriage was illegal in the state of virginia barred from marrying in their home state. Mildred and richard drove to washington. Dc to tie the not. The young couple had only been married a few short weeks when in the early hours of one july morning. Sheriff garnett brooks and two deputies stormed into the couple's bedroom and central point acting on an anonymous tip that the couple was living in violation of virginia law. The police demanded to know. Mildew its relationship to richard. Mildred said plainly. I'm his wife and gestured at their marriage certificate on the wall. This did little to persuade the police. Even though they had not married within state lines the virginia law still forbade black and white citizens for marrying outside of virginia and then returning to live in the state as a result both richard and a pregnant mildred spent nights in jail. They eventually pleaded guilty to violating virginia law. Mildred ann richards plea bargain spared them from a one year prison sentence but ordered them to leave the state and not returned together for twenty five years. The loving somewhat followed orders after settling their court fees. They moved to washington dc where they raised. Three children occasionally making independent trips into virginia to visit family at great risk of imprisonment. Mildred richard made clandestine trips into virginia together and secretly lived there for a short period of time but by nineteen sixty three. The couple had had enough mildred. Who was already unhappy with city. Life decided she was done for good after her son was hit by a car on the advice of her cousin. Mildred wrote to then attorney general robert kennedy to ask for his assistance kennedy wrote back and referred mildred and her husband the american civil liberties union or the aclu. The aclu took their case four years later on april tenth nineteen sixty seven following legal challenge after legal challenge. The case of loving. Virginia made its way to the supreme

Virginia Richard Dolores Jeeter Mildred Sheriff Garnett Brooks Jim Crow Mildred Ann Richards Mildred Richard Washington Washington Dc Aclu Robert Kennedy Kennedy