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A highlight from Ep 170: The Top Nonprofit Sector Trends and Takeaways of 2022 (with Stacy Palmer)

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

01:26 min | 11 hrs ago

A highlight from Ep 170: The Top Nonprofit Sector Trends and Takeaways of 2022 (with Stacy Palmer)

"So it's that time of year again. The time when you look back at the top, this or the top that, and so I figured I should do my own version of that. I often encourage clients to take time in December to look back at the year that was and ask themselves, what are the lessons learned this year that will inform my goals in my strategies for the upcoming year? So I decided we should take that question and pose it looking at the nonprofit sector as a whole. I asked Stacy Palmer, the editor of the chronicle of philanthropy to join me in this endeavor. Chronicle lives up there at 35,000 feet and Stacy has a vantage point about this sector that few others have. It's also been an interesting year for Stacy and the folks at the chronicle as they shift from reporting about us to being one of us. Moving from a for profit publication to a nonprofit organization. And yes, she will tell you that she is learning that being a nonprofit CEO is no walk in the park. As you listen to the two of us chat about the big nonprofit takeaways of the year and listen to Stacy's keen insights, consider them in the context of your own leadership, your own organization, the your own sector within the sector. What have you learned this year? That will help you move in the direction of greater impact in 2023. Here's hoping that our conversation today ignites you to engage in one of your own. Greetings and welcome to nonprofits are

Stacy Palmer Stacy
A highlight from Mental Health in America: In Depth with Dr. Rahul Gupta

After The Fact

04:55 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Mental Health in America: In Depth with Dr. Rahul Gupta

"Treatment for it, from doctor Raoul Gupta, who leads the office of national drug control policy, the first physician in that role. Doctor Raoul Gupta, thank you so much for joining us today. Thanks for having me, Dan. You are the director of the office of national drug control policy. So tell us what that office is and what it does. Congress has given us statutory authority to look over all of the drug control budget, which is about $40 billion across 18 federal agencies. So our job basically is to make sure that we have a strategy which is the president's strategy. And it's implemented in a way that we can have an impact in reducing substance use, impacting lives, of course, and coordinating the spend of that money across the federal government as well as impacting resources at state or local levels. You are the first physician to serve in this office, which is been in existence now for what two or three decades. Your perspective as a physician, how does that aid you in your work? I have walked the talk as they say. I've been able to practice for the last 25 years in rural towns as little as 1800 people to large cities as much as 25 million people. It has allowed me to really understand addiction substance use disorder and whole host of public health challenges that informs my work every single day at a time when the need has never been more urgent or more important. I want to talk about that urgency. Let's talk about what's going on with substance use in America. For the first time, more than a 100,000 people died from an overdose in a 12 month period. What's gotten us to that point? Well, clearly there are several factors, one of those, of course, is that we've had a consistent rise which really began in early 2000s with prescription opioids and then transformed and transitioned into heroin ivy use and then fentanyl now we're seeing the transition from plant based or organics to synthetics, which far more dangerous little we're seeing the most dynamic drug supply environment in this nation's history. And we've had some situations beyond our control, which is the pandemic, of course, with the rising levels. It has escalated during that time. We've seen isolation within mental health challenges like never before. All of these things have combined together to create the perfect storm where an American is perishing every 5 minutes around the clock. We've been speaking this whole season about growing concern about mental health in the country. Let's talk about that connection between mental health and substance use disorders. You've been vocal about half the people, I guess, who suffer from substance use disorders, have some sort of co occurring mental health issue. It's really important for us to see the connections and understand the connections because we can not treat one and have success without understanding the other. Earlier this year in the State of the Union, President Biden mentioned the unity agenda and top of that was both beating the opioid crisis as he called it as well as the mental health crisis. These are, as you rightly point out, bidirectionally connected with each other. So it's really important for healthcare providers for the general public policymakers and others to understand that there is this link and we must work on all of these at the same time. There's a stigma that can be associated with both substance use disorder and with mental health issues. That's not just societal, but also plays out in the medical community. How do we get even the medical professionals to get beyond that as someone who has been practicing medicine for 25 years? I've seen that. I've seen this in practice myself. The medical community is not immune to stigma. In fact, if you go back a hundred years, we used to have very similar type of stigma with cancer. We have done a lot of work, especially in research and development and understanding stigma around cancer. I think we have hope. When it comes to mental health and addiction and substance use disorders. But we have to be clear about this. This is something that not only affects individual societies and communities but also infects healthcare the same way and there are ways to go forward. When we talk about the present strategy, one of the things we talk about is removing the stigma. It starts everything from language, the way we speak, the words we use, the agency's names, to all the way to curricula. We want to make sure that addiction medicine is something that is being taught as core curriculum and all health related professions. So it becomes intrinsically part of that. It does seem like we're making progress in that area in society. The fact that we're doing a series about this is just indicative of the broadening national conversation. And it's a positive sign. Yeah, it certainly is. And I'm thrilled about that. Obviously, we're not making progress as quickly as I would have liked to.

Raoul Gupta Office Of National Drug Contro President Biden DAN Federal Government Congress State Of The Union America Cancer
A highlight from How to tackle the stigma of living with HIV | Gareth Thomas

TED Talks Daily

07:49 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from How to tackle the stigma of living with HIV | Gareth Thomas

"You're listening to ted-talks daily. I'm Elise Hume. A lot of folks think that HIV doesn't affect them, but the truth is anyone can get the virus and a majority of cases are among women. It's such a stigmatized illness that it can keep people from testing for it or seeking care. So in his 2022 talk from Ted at BCG, former rugby player Gareth Thomas shares how he's leveraging the power of sports and celebrity to remove the punishing and sometimes dangerous stigmas around HIV. Hey everyone, it's Adam grant. Welcome to rethinking. My podcast on the science of what makes us tick. I'm an organizational psychologist, and I'm taking you inside the minds of fascinating people to explore how they think and what we should all rethink. Today's episode is on maintaining hope and crisis with surgeon and public health leader atul gawande. I'm lucky. I get to have some agency. What gets me down is feeling I have nothing I can do. When I'm just doing surgery and I see the way that the system around me breaks. How people can't get access to see me and other colleagues because they don't have insurance or they never had a primary care Doctor Who recognized that they had an illness that required surgical attention in time for me to be able to address it. Or the systems don't even exist for 5 billion of the people in the world. That's what gets me down. Find and follow rethinking with Adam grant, wherever you're listening. So my life is reflected in mi tattoos. And you're going to have to trust me when I say that I've got a lot of them. My body art tells a story. Now my HIV tattoo is on one of my kneecaps, which is the joint that through a career of playing professional rugby was shot to pieces. But somehow, managed to get me through one of the world's toughest iron men. And also, more recently, a half marathon. Now, I did these to show what live in with HIV is like now. And also to illustrate that HIV doesn't restrict what I'm capable of doing, physically, or mentally. The skull is dark, ghoulish, threatening, it represents the imminent death that I felt awaited me when I first had my diagnosis. The wings underneath the scale of my tattoo signify the freedom I felt when I finally found my voice. It was almost like the dead man coming back to life. The Crown that adorns the skull's head shows me as someone willing to lead from the front. Someone wanted to take the campaign against discrimination and misinformation forward. Someone wanted to celebrate and highlight people's truth. Never asking people to do something I wouldn't. Now, I've not always been like this. In 2019, I was blackmailed by somebody who wanted money for their silence. Also in that year, a journalist went to my parents house, knocked on the door. And asked my parents to make comment on my HIV status. Now, at this point, I hadn't even told my parents myself. That forced me into telling the world about my HIV diagnosis way before I was ready. I was still reeling from the stigma of the diagnosis. Now stigma is when people are seen in a negative way due to a certain characteristic, such as race, disability, sexuality, or health challenges. And it ends up with a make it a moral judgment about people and it affects the way they treat them. Now, I have spent my entire adult life in the public eye. I'm an ex professional rugby player. I played a hundred times for my country whales. And I capped in the British and Irish lands. I always felt like I had the crowds cheering me from the grandstands. Since then, I've presented and appeared on many TV shows. I've had an amazing life. I felt loved by those around me, and by my country. I was this strong tough rugby player who came from a simple working class background to be one of the very best at this sport. I was married to a woman, but I was living a lie. So in 2009, when I became the first openly gay male professional rugby union player, it was a defining moment for me for sport and for society. And even though it felt like a breakthrough moment, sadly very few followed my path since. I am now living with HIV. It took me a long while to process it at first, right? Because I had gone from a man who had won every trophy that he had ever dreamt of. To someone all of a sudden was living a lie, who was in ashamed, embarrassed, isolated. Afraid I was going to die, afraid to tell anyone, afraid to tell my family, afraid I was going to lose everything and everyone that I'd worked so hard for and I loved so much. I was afraid that from now on, I would be defined by a virus. Now, I felt the devastating impact of stigma and shame. And that is why I am determined to change the way people perceive HIV and other stigmatized conditions. And you as white. The stigma and shame that I felt with medically unfounded. Science and medicine has come such a long way in the last 20 years, especially around HIV that should be celebrated way more than it is. But people's attitudes lag way behind. The fact is, I take one tablet today. Modern medicine prevents my HIV progression into aids. It suppresses the virus in my body, which means it becomes undetectable, which means I can not transmit it to my husband. And I live a normal, happy, healthy life. I really do. Trust me, I have never been happier. Now, in the 1980s, HIV was positioned as a death sentence. It was reported as the gay plague. And those myths and misunderstandings still exist today. And levels of awareness of what it is to live with HIV remain way too low. Now I can tell you, I still experience stigma today. Where there's people moving away from me in a restaurant or people not wanting to shake my hand. Now people act like that are a sense of fear. Out of a sense of wanting to keep themselves safe. But what it does, it creates a sense of shame. And that share means more people acquire the virus and fewer people get early treatment. Because most people think that HIV doesn't affect them, that it only affects gay and bisexual men. When globally, 54% of the people living with HIV are female. And in England, in 2020, for the first time in a decade, there was more new cases of HIV among heterosexual people than there were amongst gay and bisexual men. The truth is anyone can get the virus. And the only way to know your status is to get tested, but stigma acts as a barrier to testing, so new cases continue. In the U.S., 8 out of ten new cases come from people who are undiagnosed or who are not on medication. Now, UNAIDS are set to go that by 2030 they will end this epidemic. But it's going to be really hard to reach if stigma continues to act as a barrier to test and then seeking care. Now, when I was pushed into a corner by the blackmailer and by the media, I was going to come out fight did. I wanted to take control of my life. I wanted to know what it was like to feel free. I wanted to know, and I had the right to be able to live again.

HIV Adam Grant Rugby Elise Hume Gareth Thomas Atul Gawande BCG TED Hiv Progression Aids England Unaids U.S.
A highlight from Why you feel anxious socializing (and what to do about it) | Fallon Goodman

TED Talks Daily

01:12 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Why you feel anxious socializing (and what to do about it) | Fallon Goodman

"You're listening to ted-talks daily, I'm Elise Hume. Humans are social, right? We're wired for belonging, and rejection, it's painful. We've all been there. In her 2021 talk at TEDx USF, psychology researcher Fallon Goodman, digs into what happens when fear of rejection becomes social anxiety disorder. One of the most common, but misunderstood mental illnesses in the world. After the break, she buffs the misconceptions to help us all develop more social courage. Hey everyone, it's Adam grant. Welcome to rethinking. My podcast on the science of what makes us tick. I'm an organizational psychologist, and I'm taking you inside the minds of fascinating people to explore how they think and what we should all rethink. This season, NFL linebacker turned bestselling author Emmanuel acho, tells us why he has a problem with goals. The goal by definition is an end towards which energy is a but why in the world would I start something with the end in mind? Find and follow rethinking with Adam grant, wherever you're listening. Each

Elise Hume Fallon Goodman Adam Grant USF TED Anxiety Disorder Emmanuel Acho NFL
A highlight from The bad math of the fossil fuel industry | Tzeporah Berman

TED Talks Daily

03:15 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from The bad math of the fossil fuel industry | Tzeporah Berman

"Of North America's songbirds. They're the traditional territories of hundreds of indigenous nations, and my climate journey started here as a forest activist a long time ago. I was horrified that Canada's old growth forests are being logged. They're burning. They're being destroyed by beetle infestations. But also because so much of the forest is under threat because of what lies under it. At the time, I thought that Canada's failure to reduce emissions was because we had a government that just didn't believe in climate change. But then in 2015, we elected a new government. And prime minister Trudeau came to Paris and with his hand on his heart, he said, Canada's back. And he went home to introduce some really good climate policy, carbon pricing. And our emissions didn't go down. And the government continued to greenlight and even subsidize new oil sands, pipelines and fracking. And that, for me, was the moment when I realized where one of the big problems lie. Our governments are regulating emissions. But not the production of fossil fuels. You see, climate policy and agreements, they're complicated. But what's simple is that the majority of emissions that are trapped in our atmosphere today well, they come from three products. Oil, gas, and coal. For decades, our countries have been negotiating targets. But behind our backs, the fossil fuel industry has been growing production and locking in further emissions. I started reaching out to climate policy experts from around the world. Because I wanted to understand what frameworks exist to negotiate who gets to produce what and how much. What policies help governments regulate, constrain the production side of fossil fuels. I found out that very few do. I will never forget the day that I sat with the Paris agreement, and I searched for the words, fossil fuels, oil, gas, coal, they didn't appear, In the world's climate agreement, the fossil fuel industry has been successful in making itself invisible. I started reaching out. And met with for several years, the CEOs of major oil companies. Because I wanted to understand what do these CEOs see when they read the science?

Prime Minister Trudeau Canada North America Paris Government
A highlight from The fight for freedom in Iran and Ukraine | Christiane Amanpour

TED Talks Daily

03:18 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from The fight for freedom in Iran and Ukraine | Christiane Amanpour

"You're listening to TED Talk daily, I'm Elise Hugh. Where in the world is Cristian almond poor? For nearly 40 years, CNN's chief international anchor has reported from across the globe. She's traveled everywhere and you've seen her speaking with political leaders, activists, and change makers of the moment. For today's episode, amen poor sits down with Whitney Pennington Rodgers, Ted's current affairs curator at a Ted membership event to talk about the women led revolution in Iran, insights from the war in Ukraine and more after a break. Hey everyone, it's Adam grant. Welcome to rethinking. My podcast on the science of what makes us tick. I'm an organizational psychologist, and I'm taking you inside the minds of fascinating people to explore how they think and what we should all rethink. This season we're rethinking democracy with leader of the governors, Sharon McMahon. Scratch the whole Congress install 535 American government teachers. In Congress, they will whip that thing into shape so fast. Every single one knows the three branches of government. Every single one. Find and follow rethinking with Adam grant, wherever you're listening. So there is so much happening in the world right now and our guest today spends her days and in fact her entire illustrious career tracking and reporting on the moments biggest stories. She is CNN's chief international anchor and host of the network's award winning flagship global affairs program. Amanpour on CNN international in London and amen for PBS in the United States. I'm so thrilled to have her here with us to offer context on some of the news stories that are impacting our world and our lives. And you can see her there right now, please welcome christiane and for the local Christian, how are you doing? Oh, Whitney, thank you so much for having me. I'm so glad to be with you for a few minutes and your Ted community on these really important issues. Yeah. And yes, I am the chief international anchor, but before that, I was the main international correspondent. So all my the way I work is always informed by me being on the ground in the field and having essentially walked the walk and talked the talk with the people who are at the coal phase. I love that. And I feel like that's going to give us so much perspective during this conversation. Well, so let's just dive right into it. I think one place we'd like to start with is in Iran. So for those of you who are on the call who have been tracking back in September and Iranian women, masa and mini died in the custody of Iranian morality police after being arrested for not wearing hijab, these death sparked protests and revolution around women's rights in Iran and beyond that is continuing into the very moment and Christiana I know that you've reported on Iran throughout your career career and have spent a lot of time covering this story very closely. So how historically significant would you say this moment is in Iran and just give us some context on that? Look, I think it is very significant exactly how and what will develop towards the end. I'm not sure. A little bit of my own history, I am half Iranian, and I grew up in Iran, and I spent essentially the first 20 years of my life in Iran with a little bit of going back and forth to the UK for boarding school, but that's where my home was.

Adam Grant Ted Talk Elise Hugh Cristian Almond Whitney Pennington Rodgers TED CNN Sharon Mcmahon Iran Congress American Government Ukraine Christiane PBS Whitney London United States Masa Christiana UK
A highlight from What a living whale is worth -- and why the economy should protect nature | Ralph Chami

TED Talks Daily

07:59 min | Last week

A highlight from What a living whale is worth -- and why the economy should protect nature | Ralph Chami

"I found myself with a bunch of researchers in the sea of Cortez studying the blue whales. We used to be in a boat 25 foot long. And next to us. Is this majestic creature feeding gracefully next to us. Now you have to understand at that point in time I knew nothing about blue whales or whales in general. I was just a financial economist. But I learned something from them, which was really incredible. It was already known in the science that whales capture so much carbon on their body. And indirectly, and that's, of course, very important for us because we're all fighting the climate calamity, and we're all talking about how to grab carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Well, it turns out that the whales grab so much carbon dioxide from the atmosphere by the way they eat. And they poop. It's all about food. So how does the whale system work? Well, start in the oceans, there's these microscopic organisms called phytoplankton. Those phytoplankton do something really incredible. They grab so much carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and they return oxygen to all of us. Now how much carbon dioxide do they grab from the atmosphere? About 37 gigatons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Truly, the lungs of the planet are in the ocean. Now, if you want to visualize what 37 gigatons mean, that's the equivalent of the carbon that is grabbed by four Amazon forests per year. That's how much is being sucked in by the these photosynthetic organisms. Now, larger creatures called krill love to eat phytoplankton. Directly or indirectly. And the whales love to feed on the krill. They feed so much on the crill that they grow bigger and bigger, and they store carbon in their body. How much carbon do they store in their body? Roughly about 7 to 9 tons of carbon on their body. If you want to convert that to carbon dioxide, that's about 33 tons of carbon dioxide being kept out of the atmosphere on the body of a single whale. If you want to visualize that, that's the work of 1500 trees. On the body of a single word. But those guys, because they eat a lot, what do you do next? You poop a lot. And their poop turns out to be incredibly important because it fertilizes the fatal. So you have this wonderful cycle, okay? The whale feeds on the krill, the krill seeds on the fighter, and the fighter needs the poop of the whales to get more active. And when the fighter gets more active, it grabs more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. So just imagine the whales that capture carbon on their body, unfortunately, at some point they die, and they're so heavy, they sink to the bottom of the ocean. And anything below a thousand meters is sequestered almost forever. And through their poop, they also fertilize fire to making fire to even more active grabbing more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. So in a sense, the whales are incredible allies in the fight against climate change. Now that's good news, right? Yeah. Except that whales are dying. They are dying from ship strikes. They're dying from pollution, then dying from entanglements. In fact, they're dying because our current economic system puts a zero value on a living wave. But chopper whale sell it for its meat, it acquires a value. In fact, the value of a living whale is zero, $0, zero and any currency. I'm a financial economist, and I'm listening to these scientists bemoaning what's happening to the ways. And I wanted to help. I didn't know how to help. And I thought, wait a minute. Maybe I can bring your message to the audiences around the world. Maybe I can translate all of that value, those services that you do for us in a language that we can all understand, unfortunately, it's a language of dollars and sense. So I set out with my team to value the services of a whale, but one service because the way of doing a whole host of things, but I just wanted to value one thing, which is, what is the value of their carbon sequestration service to us? Now, how would you do something like that? After all the whale is a living system, the whale captures carbon on her body, and she gives birth to baby whales who also grow up to capture carbon on their body and they give birth to two whales and so forth and indirectly through the fertilisation of fighters. So how would you do something like this? Well, to do that, I had to resort to my, what I do best, which is valuation, I looked at it, I said, wait a minute. This looks like a share of stock. That pays dividends. Except those dividends are live dividends. They give birth to more dividends. So if I were to track the whale over her lifetime and keep keep track of all these dividends into the future, and then multiply that by the price of carbon, and discount that all the way to the present, I can figure out what is the present value discounted present value of the lifetime earnings of a single whale. Would you like to know how much? Would you like to know how much? At least $3 million. At least, because I'm leaving so much out of this, but I just wanted to tell the good news that I heard on that boat. I didn't know what to do. I was starting to help them out. But there's more good news. Would you like to hear it? Their cousins on land, the elephants in the forests of Africa. In the Congo basin, they do the same thing. Turns out the way they walk and they eat and they poop. They increase carbon sequestration in the trees in the forest between 7% and 14%. Just imagine just by frolicking around they're helping us to grab carbon from the carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and fix it. So I thought, hey, maybe we can value their services too. Same thing. But again, use the same model of valuation. You follow the same methodology and you discount all of that to the present and you ask yourself, what is the value of a single elephant's carbon sequestration service? Would you like to know how much? Here we go. $2.6 million. Would you like to hear some more good news? Aside from forest, because we are land people. We just think of forests. Go a little bit

Cortez Amazon Congo Basin Africa
A highlight from Whose land are you on? What to know about the Indigenous Land Back movement | Lindsey Schneider

TED Talks Daily

07:57 min | Last week

A highlight from Whose land are you on? What to know about the Indigenous Land Back movement | Lindsey Schneider

"You're listening to ted-talks daily, I'm Elise Hugh. A movement is underway to return land to their rightful owners. The indigenous people who occupied and cared for the land for generations. In her 2022 talk from TEDx mile high, indigenous scholar Lindsay Schneider explains why indigenous people should be managing the areas they were forced by colonizers to give up. One major reason? It's way better for the land itself. Coming up after the break. Hey, I'm Stephen Johnson, host of the Ted interview podcast. On this show, we talked to some of the world's most interesting people. On the latest episode, journalist Linda villarosa discusses her decades long fascination with how the color of your skin dictates the kind of healthcare you receive. We were taught to, oh, you just have to take good care of yourself and then you will be healthy for life and certainly that is not true. Check out the Ted interview on Apple podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen. Support for ted-talks daily comes from Michigan technological university. One of the nation's premiere public technological universities and home to the state of Michigan's top ranked college of engineering. At Michigan tech, students work closely with faculty from day one, doing everything from building and testing autonomous vehicles in unstructured environments to devising innovative technology to harvest energy from The Dark Side of the Moon. Tomorrow needs Michigan tech. Tomorrow needs you. Learn more at MTU dot EDU slash tomorrow. I'm here today as a guest on land that was stolen from the Cheyenne and arapaho nations. Lynn, many other tribal nations thought of his home before those relationships were written over by settler colonialism. So land acknowledgments like this have become pretty commonplace at the beginning of events at universities, sometimes in our email signatures. But if I found them to be kind of confusing, like once you admit something is stolen, aren't you supposed to give it back? So if there's anyone listening who has a couple hundred spare acres that you're feeling guilty about, just contact your local tribal government, we would be happy to relieve you of that burden. That's probably not you, right? Maybe you've heard of this movement to return land to indigenous people, but you're thinking, I can barely afford rent. What is it? I'm supposed to be giving back. That's what I want to clarify today. Because not only is getting land back in indigenous hands in your best interests and the best interests of the land itself, there's ways anyone can help make it happen. I'm a descendant of the turtle mountain band of chippewa Indians, which is part of the initiative of the Great Lakes region. Home for me is also the Pacific Northwest. I grew up on kalapuya and Malala territory. And now I'm a Professor of indigenous studies at CSU. My ancestors worked very hard to navigate a complex and changing world that was ravaged by settler colonialism. My grandma and both of her parents survived the trauma and abuse of the Indian boarding school system. The generation before them, fought to keep our tribe from being terminated by the federal government. Going even further back, my 6 times great grandfather's signature is on the 1863 treaty of old crossing. Which forced the initial abbe to give up 11 million acres of what's now Minnesota, in exchange for a little over $400,000 and a 640 acre reservation. That works out to about 5 cents an acre, which has to be one of the worst land deals in U.S. history. Or maybe the best, depending on who you ask. This sort of thing happened all over the U.S. and Canada. The problem isn't just that settlers showed up and took the land, it's how they've treated it ever since. That land we lasted in Minnesota, the Enbridge line three pipeline goes right through the middle of it. That freaking pipeline is responsible for the largest inland oil spill ever recorded in the U.S.. And now, they're trying to expand it. Whether we're talking pipelines or some of their industry, the colonial mindset has been about extracting resources. Mostly what the goal of making the rich, richer. But that's why lay it back is not about indigenous people trying to run a real estate scam. We're doing this because the land itself is in crisis. Every indigenous culture is unique, but our shared philosophy is that we come from the land and the land is what sustains us. And therefore, we have a responsibility to care for it. Land back is about reasserting indigenous relationships with the land. Relationships that are based on tens of thousands of years of hands on experience, taking care of our homelands. If you've ever tried your hand at farming or gardening, you know that land management takes more than just showing up with good intentions. Globally, indigenous people are really good at managing for biodiversity and resilient ecosystems. That's because we've had generation upon generation to test out what works and what doesn't. There's tons of evidence and examples to back this up. One recent study showed that indigenous people make up just 5% of the global population, but we're managing nearly half the areas on earth that are protected for conservation or still support intact ecosystems. In the United States, tribal nations have reintroduced endangered species, even when the government said it wouldn't work. So in the northwest, where I grew up, most of the big rivers have been damned, which makes it super hard for salmon to survive, and many runs have gone extinct. So back in the 90s, the nimi poo people told the state of Idaho, hey, we'd like to bring co host salmon back to the snake river. A state fish and wildlife guys were like, I don't think so. But the tribe did it anyway. They got eggs that one of the hatcheries was going to throw away. Incubated them and basically snuck the fish back into the river. And now they're doing so well that the state has reopened the sport fishery. And the tribe is reintroducing Coho to a bunch of other rivers. Same thing with buffalo, back in the 1800s, when the railroads were going in, and native people were literally being kicked off of the land at gunpoint. Buffalo were nearly exterminated because they thought that would make it easier to subdue the tribes who depended on them. So get this. Most of the buffalo that you see today in zoos or wildlife reserves are actually descended from conservation herds that native people protected back then. And now the blackfeet nation is bringing free ranging buffalo back to their homeland in Montana. We're also pretty good at cleaning up the ecological messes caused by colonialism. The town of Eureka, California was like, okay, we're ready to give some land back. We know it's culturally, really important place to. Oh, and by the way, it's a super fun site. So it's hella polluted. Good luck with that. And the tribe said, great, we'll take it. And now they're in the process of successfully remediating the site. They've removed tons of trash and contaminated soil. They're working on erosion control and wildlife habitat and making it a place where they can hold ceremonies again. The land is better off in indigenous hands because we treat the land like it's a relative.

Michigan Tech Elise Hugh Lindsay Schneider Linda Villarosa TED Stephen Johnson United States College Of Engineering Minnesota Abbe Lynn CSU Pacific Northwest Great Lakes
A highlight from A Troubled Cup for the Beautiful Game

Why It Matters

08:15 min | Last week

A highlight from A Troubled Cup for the Beautiful Game

"One of the biggest sporting events on earth. It's a sporting occasion like no other. Dangerously it's South Korea have scored accordingly even qualifying for it is a cause for huge celebration. It was a moment that people were craving. It was as if a bottle of champagne finally exploded and it was indeed cathartic. Two thirds of the team are of immigrant origin. This is something that we should celebrate. France beat Croatia in the final in Moscow by four goals to Spain a world champions Italy are champions of it is a world Cup final the world will never forget. The 2022 World Cup has officially kicked off in Qatar with 32 nations competing for the championship title. You may have seen some of the big moments so far, like Saudi Arabia's crazy upset of Argentina in the first round. At the same time, you've probably seen some of the news coverage, too. This year's games have been embroiled in controversy from Qatar's human rights abuses to FIFA corruption to political conflicts happening along the sidelines. Soccer, AKA football is the most popular sport in the world. And every FIFA World Cup final is watched by billions of fans internationally. Think of it this way. If aliens studied earth, they would probably note in their report that all humans, regardless of where they live, are driven to fits of passion by 22 people, kicking a ball up and down a field. They're simply nothing else like it on the planet. But why? Why does this game Garner such universal attention? Why do countries spend billions in order to host? And what does the World Cup's power mean when it's wielded by a country like Qatar? I'm Gabrielle Sierra and this is why it matters. For today's episode, I sat down with Laurent Dubois. He's the academic director of the karsh institute of democracy, and a professor at the University of Virginia, where he teaches a course called soccer, politics. Enjoy. I thought it would be appropriate to open our chat by telling you that I was in fact the captain of my high school soccer team two years in a row. We were just truly terrible. We lost constantly, but I love soccer. And so in that spirit, we're an international relations think tank. We don't spend much time discussing sporting events. So why are we talking about the World Cup? The way I put it is that every World Cup final is watched by more human beings that have ever watched anything before in the history of the human race race. Just to kind of put it in context. So you do have the achievement of some kind of universal competition that is really shared and I think we all know that that if you want to start a conversation probably anywhere in the world, you can bring up soccer in the World Cup and most of the time you will have an interesting conversation and people who have opinions about it. And I think that's a certain kind of success for all the other issues with it. It's worth taking stock of that as something pretty remarkable in our world. So the origins of the World Cup, I think, are interesting in that this is a competition that emerges in the wake of World War I out of a certain sentiment. It post World War I sentiment that was very much linked to the rise of the rules based international order, the project of the League of Nations, the whole idea that effectively the world was seeing a serious violent breakdown of an international set of relationships. And for those who were boosters of soccer, they hoped that this kind of sport that was already well established in many parts of the world could be a kind of language. There's some people even described as like an esperanto at the time. And the idea would be that understanding that people were going to continue to be nationally focused on their nations and want to represent and be proud of their nations, but was there a way of doing that that was not a kind of warlike relationship, but an engagement in a set of rules. Flash forward, a century. The World Cup has not ended war, but it has become the most popular event on earth. For decades, it was dominated by two regions. Europe and Latin America. But in 2010, something unexpected happened. FIFA president Sepp Blatter announced that for the first time in history, the World Cup would be held in the Middle East. In the tiny Petro state of Qatar. The winner to organize the two 22 FIFA World Cup is Qatar. The news sent shockwaves through the world of soccer, and for many fans, it just didn't add up. The host country was not just small, it also had no sporting infrastructure or domestic soccer culture to speak of. Its desert climate reaches temperatures over 100°F in the summer, which is when the cop is usually held. And to top it all off, Qatar's politics were at odds with western democratic values. Allegations of bribery and corruption swirled in a long stream of protests began. At this point, it's probably worth mentioning a few things about Qatar itself. So for most of its modern history, it had a modest stature. At the beginning of the 20th century, its economy still relied on pearl diving in the gulf. But in 1939, it discovered more lucrative resources. Oil and natural gas. By the time Qatar became independent of British rule in 1971, it had the third largest oil reserves in the world. Now the country is fabulously wealthy, especially given its tiny population of 3 million. 88% of which consists of foreigners and foreign laborers. That's right, there are only about 300,000 native qataris. Qatar is a semi constitutional monarchy that has enshrined Sharia in its legal system. But it nonetheless seems liberal compared to its neighbors. After all, it does observe some elections, and it's the home of Al Jazeera, which is considered to be the most independent, large, media organization in the Muslim world. Let's talk about this year's World Cup. You know, I've been following along with the World Cup coverage and so much of it seems incredibly negative. You know, could you speak on this year's World Cup drama in particular? I mean, there are many things that are peculiar about the World Cup for one thing that's happening at a different time of year than the World Cup has ever happened before, so it's happening in the winter because of the heat conditions in Qatar. It is in a kind of small country with a very particular kind of social matrix and political matrix. It is well known that there have been a lot of human rights abuses and labor abuses in the construction of stadia. So there's a lot of concern specifically about the cost essentially of this World Cup. The human cost. And there have been a series of corruption scandals that kind of emerged from the awarding of the World Cup to Qatar. And the broader question of how FIFA makes these decisions. At the same time, it's the first World Cup held in a kind of Arab country in the Middle Eastern country. It comes in the wake of several other world cups that have themselves been controversial in terms of the politics. And so it feels like it's sort of crystallizing things that have been building actually for a while around the World Cup. And the fundamental thing, I think, is this kind of feeling of contradiction between what the World Cup is meant to be, which is a kind of celebration of human contact and of the joy of the sport and of people coming from all around. And then the kind of infrastructural economic, social dynamics of the World Cup. And I think we'll be seeing that a lot as it unfolds and people journalists and fans trying to navigate those contradictions in certain ways. Same sex marriage is illegal in Qatar and sex between men is technically punishable by prison sentence. This has led to widespread frustration among LGBTQ groups and their allies. Qatar for its part has noted that its laws are consistent with others across the Arab world. And that they are generally not strictly enforced. The other major issue has to do with migrant

World Cup Qatar Soccer Fifa Gabrielle Sierra Laurent Dubois Karsh Institute Of Democracy South Korea Croatia University Of Virginia Saudi Arabia Moscow Garner Argentina League Of Nations Spain Italy France Sepp Blatter
A highlight from How to turn around a city | Irma L. Olguin Jr.

TED Talks Daily

03:26 min | Last week

A highlight from How to turn around a city | Irma L. Olguin Jr.

"You're listening to ted-talks daily, I'm Elise Hugh. Today's speaker does a lot of thinking about cities and the way people in them interact with each other. In her archive talk from Ted Monterey in 2021, social entrepreneur Irma olgun junior shares the empowering ways she has found to uplift her city that can be applied to cities near you. It's coming after a short sponsor message. Fresno and the entire central valley of California is a place that's built by agriculture. Miles and miles of farmland for as far as the eye can see with a couple of large poor cities dotting the landscape. That's where I'm from, where I was born and where I live today. My family, like much of the local population, is a family of immigrant farm laborers. Those toiling away in the fields, hoping for a 25 cent an hour raise. I didn't see myself destined for the glamour of Silicon Valley. But I did find my way to college and something miraculous happened. I got a job in tech. And I remember the first time I didn't have to count the change when trying to figure out how much to tip for pizza delivery. When I realized that this industry, the technology industry was going to change my life forever. And I remember thinking to myself, if it can happen to me, a poor, queer, Brown woman from nowhere. Why can't it happen to entire cities of people like me? And so for the last 8 years, that's what I've been working on and Fresno. Building a business that could expose what it takes to cause an entire city and not just the select few people in it to thrive. It turns out we only need three pretty simple ingredients. Training, proof, and community. So the cornerstone of everything that we do is job training. The communities that we work with are often from very poor populations, maybe folks who are learning English as a second language, maybe they were on house, the formerly incarcerated veterans, folks who are very often from retail or factory work. These folks, their issue is not their ability to learn technical things. Their problems center on things that are a lot less obvious. Things like child care, those are the things that we focus on. Can be especially hard on families. How do you justify learning to do something like write code when there are bills to pay? Wouldn't it be better for the family if you just got a job at McDonald's and put in as many hours as you can because that's a check. And who's going to watch your little brother? That's what we do as a family. We pitch in. But how do you justify to the people around you when it looks to them? Like you're just playing around on the computer. We didn't invent a new way to teach JavaScript. We just focus a lot more on the things that actually prevent people from learning it. In addition to connecting our students to things like bus tokens and free regional transit options, we also just deploy a fleet of vehicles whose only job is to pick these folks up before their study groups and drop them back off after class. If they need food, we get them food. We work with food cupboards and pantries and making sure that boxes of food

Elise Hugh Ted Monterey Irma Olgun Fresno TED Silicon Valley California Brown Mcdonald
A highlight from 3 steps to build peace and create meaningful change | Georgette Bennett

TED Talks Daily

06:38 min | Last week

A highlight from 3 steps to build peace and create meaningful change | Georgette Bennett

"Daily, I'm Elise Hume. Today's talk is about the power of one person to make dynamic change. In her talk from Ted 2022, peacebuilder georgette Bennett shows us how the seed of her idea and a lot of gumption led to bringing humanitarian aid to war torn parts of the Middle East. That's after a short break. Hey everyone, it's Adam grant. Welcome to rethinking. My podcast on the science of what makes us tick. I'm an organizational psychologist, and I'm taking you inside the minds of fascinating people to explore how they think and what we should all rethink. This season we're rethinking democracy with leader of the governors, Sharon McMahon. Scratch the whole Congress install 535 American government teachers. In Congress, they will whip that thing into shape so fast. Every single one knows the three branches of government. Every single one. Find and follow rethinking with Adam grant, wherever you're listening. What happens when a Syrian refugee and Israeli aid worker and an American Jew walk into a room? No, this is not the start of a really bad joke, I promise. This actually happened to me. Starting in 2015, I found myself holding a series of secret meetings and various European capitals with a small group of Syrian and Israeli civilians. And we were there to try and figure out how we can get aid to the Syrian people who were enduring the worst humanitarian crisis since World War II. But how did we end up at this table together? After all, Syrians and Israelis are sworn enemies and technically they've been in a state of war since 1948. Yet here we were literally and figuratively trying to find a way in. And here's the punchline of that bad joke I promised not to tell. We found it. We figured out a way to get aid into Syria through Israel. Now, how did we do that? I applied a three step process that I've used in a bunch of other settings. And I'm hoping that those three steps will be useful to any of you who want to do some good in the face of any of the myriad overwhelming conflicts that we're facing today, including Ukraine. So what are my three steps? Find an entry point, identify a gap and then find something doable with which to fill that gap. It sounds pretty simple, right? So let me walk you through it. When I read a report on the Syrian war, it hit me very hard. And it felt very personal. I was stunned by the scale of the misery. And it echoed the suffering of my own family during the Holocaust. My parents survived concentration camps in Poland and in Hungary. And after the war, we had to flee, and we arrived in the U.S. as stateless refugees. So when I saw the destruction of Aleppo, I was put in mind of Budapest, the city of my birth, the bombed out city of my birth. And when I read about starvation by siege in Syria, I remembered my own mother, who lost a pregnancy, lugging a sack of rotten potatoes home because there was nothing else to eat. And when I saw the eviscerated and emaciated corpses of Syrians who had been tortured and Damascus prisons, I also saw the walking skeletons of Auschwitz, mauthausen, and Bergen belsen, where so many of my own family members literally went up in smoke. And when I saw Syrian refugees flooding across borders, I also recalled my own displacement as a refugee child. So as one person, as one person, what can you do next? When you're confronted with something that you know needs to be changed, you have to find an entry point. For me, that was mobilizing a Jewish response. And then scaling that up to the inter religious response in the U.S. focused exclusively on Syria. It's called the multi faith alliance for Syrian refugees. And today we have more than 100 partner organizations. I saw an opportunity to build bridges while also saving lives. And here is how. The southwest part of Syria was very difficult to access because it was surrounded by regime forces. That was a gap. Israel shares a border with that part of Syria. And guess what? It's easy to get aid into southwest Syria from the Israeli side of the Golan Heights. That gave us something doable with which to fill that gap. All we needed was the how. And that's why my colleagues and I found ourselves in clandestine meetings all over Europe. We were making the case that Israel should be used as a staging area for the outbound delivery of international humanitarian aid. We lobbied the UK parliament, the EU parliament, the Canadian parliament. We banged on doors in Congress. We met with every level of government in Israel. And we got nowhere.

Adam Grant Elise Hume Georgette Bennett Sharon Mcmahon Syria Congress American Government TED Middle East Mauthausen Bergen Belsen Israel Aleppo Ukraine Multi Faith Alliance For Syria Hungary Budapest Poland U.S. Damascus
A highlight from Meet the mysterious "monsters" of the deep sea | Alan Jamieson

TED Talks Daily

08:11 min | Last week

A highlight from Meet the mysterious "monsters" of the deep sea | Alan Jamieson

"You're listening to ted-talks daily. Marine researcher Alan Jameson leads dives, deep into the sea, down to the bottom of the Mariana trench, in fact, to explore a world most humans will never get to see for ourselves. In his 2021 talk from TEDx kings park salon. He paints a picture of the ocean scape and creatures he's explored, and reminds us of the crucial role played by the seafloor in promoting a healthy planet. Hey, I'm Steven Johnson, host of the Ted interview podcast. On this show, we talked to some of the world's most interesting people. On the latest episode, science writer Ed Yong shows us a universe we can't see, touch, feel, or hear. But animals can. These haunting, bizarre, sometimes ethereal noises. I'll just cascading throughout all the plants around us. Check out the Ted interview on Apple podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen. Support for TED Talk daily comes from Zelle. When anyone sends you money or if you need to get paid back, always ask for zell. With Zelle, the money goes straight into your bank account and it works even if the sender banks somewhere different than you in the U.S.. It's really useful whether it's asking other parents from school to split the cost of pizza or asking friends to chip in for a group gift for someone else. The money goes straight into your bank account, typically in minutes between enrolled users and those of y'all who use Zelle probably know that already. It's in more than 1600 banking apps. So you can look for zell in your banking app today. So if we think of the three ocean as being this dark, deep horrifying place at the bottom of the earth, it's easy to dismiss it as something which is out of sight and out of mind, but myself and colleagues have been there. And I think if we take some time to think about the deep ocean as part of our planet, we all may want to protect it as much as any other marine environment. Let your imagination tell you what a deep sea animal looks like. The one that immediately flashes into your head when you think deep sea. We are forever being told that there are monstrous of the deep and a low voice. And aliens of the abyss. But when you take a moment to think about the technicalities of being an alien abyss, the only aliens in the deep sea are occasional human. Because everything else belongs there. So I am proud to see it. I am an alien of the abyss. And I've been studying the deepest parts of the oceans for the 20 years, but more recently we've been diving in a submarine. One of the questions you quite often get asked when you tell someone I am Tuesday I went to 10,000 meters. They say, oh, it's not scary. And at that is an important point. It's fear. It's that thing that we have in our heads that doesn't like being underwater. So if you think about what the deep sea represents, it's a physical three dimensional manifestation of two of the things we hate the most. And we have a phrase for that. We call it the deepest darkest fears. Because we are air breathing mammals. So we don't really want to be on the water, especially not super deep. And we were visually orientated animals. We like light. So 11 kilometers underwater is something that everyone goes, that's really deep and horrible. That's just framing. The exciting 11 kilometers and turn it on its side. And the other thing that we don't like is the unknown. And this is where we just get into this whole relationship between reality and what we're told on the TV. So on the TV, we're quite regularly told that we know more about the surface of the moon than we know about the deep sea. For starters, that court goes back before the polo missions on a time where when you not very much about the moon or the deep sea. So if you're on the surface and you're looking out and you can see all these lovely whales and dolphins and squid and jellyfish and all that stuff has to die. All that material, all that lovely organic matter, sinks, and where does it sink, it sinks down to deeper debts. It ends up in a place we call the abyss and not very our best, like the C on TV. The bristles on technically is or are debts between 3006 thousand meters. Relatively shallow in my game, but all that lovely organic fatigue comes down and set off there. And it gets eaten by deep sea out of due to animals or eating at the recycling it, they're burning it. They're incorporating into the food chain. And they incorporate it into the sediments. So these animals are essentially gardening because if they didn't do that, these big vast official planes of the planet would become big stagnant horrible cesspits. So the deep sea animals are basically irrigating a big chunk of the planet. And I see a big chunk. The epistle zones account for about 70% of the planet. Let's take a bit of a journey and descent into the deep sea. How do we know where to dive? How do we know where we are ever? Because we're always being told, that's true. We always been told that we haven't mapped the oceans. I certainly amount of seafloor has been seen with the naked eye. And as the sound percentage, which is been mapped or surveyed by remote systems. And about 20% of the planet has been mapped to pretty high resolution using acoustics. Well, basically there have been mapped, it all depends on what resolution. So there are some places where we know we're absolutely every little nook and cranny might be. There are no more money on a fence to be found. Imagine if we're in a submarine. And as we descend down through the water column, we have always been told that the water is very, very cold, very, very icy cold water. And yeah, it's called, it's not anywhere near as cold as most, if not all of the winters I've ever endured until moving to Australia. But between one and 2° at deepest point, it's not overly cold. But those water masses deep down are still moving. It's still ventilating. There's still full of oxygen and they're moving heat, they're cooling heat down from the atmosphere and the surface waters and dissipating around the planet. As we go down at the bottom of the money in our tranche, we know how one ton per square centimeter of pressure squeezing down or not titanium ball or satin. Again, it takes a certain person of a certain disposition to do this stuff, but you can't feel it on the inside. It's fine. It's cool inside. And we're moving around. And if you look out the window, we're looking more at mud. I think, well, imagine all that stuff that's coming down from the surface, all that lovely organic matter. It's carbon. It's peaking carbon from the atmosphere that's been absorbed into the ocean. The surface of the ocean is basically comes down as things into the mud. What happens to the carbon? In the bottom of the trenches, the reason why the changes are so deep, the reason why they're living kilometers in some places is because two tectonic plates of hit each other. Sometimes they get pulled apart, something just laid side by side. But the trenches are formed and one tectonic plate hits another one and drives it down into the air's landfall. Hence you end up with something like Mariana trench. All that carbon trapped in the sediment is named being pushed back into the earth's maple. The deepest points of the time are one of the few places where we're actually disposing of carbon. So again, performing a service to the planet. So we're looking at the window. What does it look like? It looks like mine. You have a lot of places are very flat. Lovely luscious golden brown. That's a good healthy seafloor. Sometimes you see some rocks and some rocky outcrops. You see these cobbles and rocks and ballers and all the rest of it. So the actual visual landscape of the deepest places isn't that strange, either. It's certainly not something you should fear, so let's get back to the monsters of the deep. What do you reckon the deepest tentacled animal is in the world? Being the main, it's the tentacles that I've been putting the fear of God into sailors since I don't know when. Imagine this thing coming up from the deep sea. The rally of the Maris and I can probably say that I discovered the deepest octopus

Alan Jameson Tedx Kings Park Salon Zell Ed Yong Zelle Steven Johnson TED Apple U.S. Australia Mariana Trench
Ashley Peterson: An NFL Wife, Model, & Entrepreneur PT2 - burst 01

The BosBabes

01:11 min | 3 months ago

Ashley Peterson: An NFL Wife, Model, & Entrepreneur PT2 - burst 01

"Yes. So actually, so he proposed on the fourth and we were going to be there for like a few days because my dad's birthday is actually almost 6 of July. So we were there and I don't remember how long we stayed, but he proposed on the 4th of July. We did our whole family thing on the 4th of July. We were there for probably a few days. And then we went back to Houston where we were living and the season was about to start. And so I was like, okay, well, I'm not going into another football season unmarried, so we're choosing a date before training camp starts. This is not your typical sports show. It's real, it's wrong. There's a positive pop. You are now Robin with the ball phase. I was definitely more of a print model because I'm only like, I'm right at 5 8. So I wasn't super tall to do a lot of runway. I did do the wrong way. I love runway, but I was no Chanel mon. You know? So I did a lot of print work, though. I did like a lot of commercial work. I

NFL Golfers PGA Nascar NHL NBA MLB UFC Sportsfans Newyorksportsfans Healthandwellness Health Fitness Bostonsports Entertainmentpodcasts Charity Athletes Celebrities Sportspodcasts Lifestyle Sports Houston Football Robin
A highlight from Rewilding Earth Podcast Episode 78: Iowa Rewilding and Big River Connectivity With Mark Edwards

Rewilding Earth

03:23 min | 1 year ago

A highlight from Rewilding Earth Podcast Episode 78: Iowa Rewilding and Big River Connectivity With Mark Edwards

"I'm still Just in the throes realizing how wild it is where i live and yet where i live is the most biologically altered state north america. We've converted roughly ninety eight percent of the state for ume needs farming mostly roads highways and cultural kind of things like that. And so. I feel like i've been really lucky. I have a numerous france that i still maintain visiting one. Those main couvert island and so for example. And so i get to go to these places still. But i really like teasing him in particular like wait. You left i with this front on it. We don't figure out here where we're gonna figure it out. I mean he wanted to go over. There was something left a lot of friends in that but it became clear to me. I go visit those places like going to wilderness areas. But really the wildness is about more my relationship to my place wherever i am and so i've really come to love. I will bear very deeply and lake. I love it a lot. Because of what's been done to in a very short amount of time and yet i see potential there that i don see other places and i think that's really how i got into the reviled and so here. I am with the re wilding nut connecting with the people. I know and so i met roger. Ross give for this process and we kind of formed a partnership and Ross is extremely important in my life at that time because he's very challenged to me. We both agreed on. We were following rewinding We at read most all the same odd. We read most all the same books in southern deep understanding the language of each other but we came from past history a whole different way as was a local agricultural a business And here's mine trying to work with all the different environmental organizations trying to learn every plant species all that kind of level and between the two of us. I challenge each other tremendously and that's I think would really Catchers be wild Wild ethic that we're trying to do. We're both trying to learn how to be wilder and what rewinding me. And it's changed me tremendously. I just keep reading and reading a read most of this stuff before. How do i apply that to my own thing about. I don't have to wilderness anymore. I used to go a lot and well supposed to grow up. I still love places. I still find that interesting. But i have never been a wilder place in one sense of the word than i am where i live now on. I and i'm surrounded by corn beans. Two thirds of the statements covered into animal species. It's absolutely frightening how that green curtain and what's frightening is how people look at it and see that as a agreeing healthy thing on the national level what was being addressed was wilderness series or what we have stuff that's left. Where can we

Science Biology Wilderness Wildlife Environment Nature Rewilding Conservation Ross North America France Roger Wilder
Influential Educators: Abolitionist Prudence Crandall

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:23 min | 1 year ago

Influential Educators: Abolitionist Prudence Crandall

"Was born on september third. Eighteen three in rhode island booth of her parents. Pardon and esther were farmers. Imprudence was young. Her family relocated to canterbury connecticut. There prudence studied arithmetic. Latin and science topics not normally taught to girls at the time. But prudence is family was quaker. Quakers believe in equal opportunity for education in eighteen. Thirty one. prudence opened her own private school for girls. The canterbury female boarding school. The school served the wealthiest canterbury families and was a source of great pride in the community. It was ranked as one of the best schools in connecticut with the curriculum that rivaled even the most elite all boys schools but prudence is school was not entirely equal. All of her students were white to encourage prudence to take a more aggressive stance. Prudence is black housekeeper. Marsha davis began strategically leaving copies of the abolitionist newspaper. The liberator in places where she knew prudence would find them. The liberator promoted the need for immediate abolition as opposed to a gradual abolition. That was more commonly supported by the new england. Delete sarah harris who came from a prominent black family in the area was the first to actively approach prudence about integrating school. Sara was eager to continue her own education so that she could become a teacher for other black children and in eighteen thirty. Two prudence enrolled sarah in the canterbury boarding school. The decision was met with outrage white. Parents demanded that prudence expel sarah when she refused. They withdrew their daughters from the school realizing that she'd need to find new sources of tuition. Prudence went to speak with william lloyd garrison. The outspoken white abolitionist publisher of the liberator prudence and william discussed the possibility of converting the canterbury school into a school entirely for black girls. William connected prudence with money of the most prominent black families in new england and in eighteen thirty three the school reopened with a new mission to educate quote young ladies and little misses of color. The class consisted of twenty four students and the curriculum remained identical to that of the original. Can't school

Prudence Canterbury Female Boarding Sch Connecticut Marsha Davis Sarah Harris Quakers Esther Pardon Canterbury Rhode Island Canterbury Boarding School New England Sarah Sara Canterbury School William Lloyd Garrison William
Museum Activists Say Real Change Is Needed to Combat Racial Injustice

Solvable

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Museum Activists Say Real Change Is Needed to Combat Racial Injustice

"Last year after george floyd. We saw a lot of racial recommends happen across multiple fields. We saw happened in hollywood. We saw it happened in the food industry. Surprising we saw it happened in very many unexpected places did any fallout happen with these racial reckonings. End museum industry. You know there was call for greater racial equity racial justice within the museum fields as well there was a whole survey done by museum next which is an international organization. Asking people do they feel like museums are relevant and a lot of people said he thought museums was important but not necessarily relevant because they didn't feel like museums. We're talking about issues within our society and wasn't standing up for for anything and so that's incredibly important to know that our society wants to see museums become more involved. There were a lot of people asking for changes made within the leadership And within policies of museums as well. And so what i did was i created the very first map and directory of museums created by black indigenous and other people of color. The map now has over a hundred and fifty museums throughout the country. The list is still growing but it shows these community museums or also known as culturally specific museums. Their pedagogy is one that puts community before collections. These community museums or doing incredible work across the country by work right now. Looks like Supporting those institutions and in the meantime challenging the racial infrastructure of those larger Museums that we know by

George Floyd Hollywood
Do Police Make Us Safe?

The Breakdown with Shaun King

02:17 min | 1 year ago

Do Police Make Us Safe?

"Across the country particularly in some of america's largest cities. Some crime is up. I say some. Because i've studied these numbers in some cities. Some violent crimes are up in some cities. Violent crime has actually down during the pandemic in other cities Car break ins and carjackings are up but home break ins are down and so a lot of times people will say. Crime is up but they don't actually mean all crime they mean a particular type of crime. What i see is a ton ton of fear going on about how crime is out of control. And here's the thing. listen. I care about that. I want all of us my own family and your family and your friends in your hometown and all over the country. I want all of us to actually feel safe. What i see is a lot of. Americans defaulting back to the thing that they've been taught not just for a few months not just for a few years but defaulting back to something. They've been taught for generations that police more policing better-funded policing more police officers. That all things policing is what's going to make us more safe. That is not the answer. And i don't care what anybody says. Listen to me. Clearly this is the main idea. What i'm about to say. Listen the police department in your city and in your county do not absolutely do not need an increase to their budget period point blank. Dot com budgets are being slashed all over the country for education for public health for mental health for homelessness for housing for jobs. All types of budgets are being slashed and in most american cities. The only budget that has not been cut is the budget of the local police departments who've insisted that they and they alone have the power to keep us safe. But listen to me. If funding policing kept us safe today would be the safest day in american history.

America
How to Design the Life You Want

TED Talks Daily

01:51 min | 1 year ago

How to Design the Life You Want

"Help you design your life. We're gonna use the technique of design thinking innovation methodology works on products works on services. But i think the most interesting design problem is your life. So that's what we're going to talk about. I want to just make sure. Everybody knows my buddy dave evans dave and i are the co authors of the book and he's the guy who helped me co find the life design lab at stanford. So what are we doing. The life design lab while we teach the class. That helps you figure out what you wanna be when you grow up. There's a meta narrative in the culture in my when when i was growing up. Twenty five. you're supposed to have you know. Maybe a relationship maybe have gotten married starting to get the family together in the in the book or in the class. We don't believe in. Should we just think all right you wherever you are. Let's start from where you are. You're not late for anything. So i'm gonna give you three ideas from design thinking the first one is this notion of connecting the dots so we looked in in the positive psychology literature and the design literature and it turns out that those who you are. There's what you believe. And that's what you do in the world if you can make a connection between b-street things if you can make that a coherent story you will expe- experience your life as meaningful the increase in meaning making comes from connecting the dots. So we do two things. We asked people write a work view. What's your theory of work. Not the job you want. Why do you work. what's it for. What's working service of what you have that. Two hundred fifty words then. This one's a little harder to get short. What's the meaning of life. What's the big picture by you. Here what is your faith or your your view of the world when you can connect your life you and your work together a coherent way you start to experience your life as meaningful

Dave Evans Stanford Dave
Seminole Activist Worries About Threat of Rising Seas to Her Native Land

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Seminole Activist Worries About Threat of Rising Seas to Her Native Land

"The eighteen. Hundreds the us army forcibly moved the majority of florida's seminal indians to oklahoma but a few hundred avoided capture and remained deep in the wetlands and wilderness of south florida. Today their descendants are federally recognized as the seminole tribe of florida. We're still known as the uncomforter- tribe because we never signed treaty with the us back then but eighteen year old. Val holly frank where he's climate change could finally push them out. She's concerned about increasingly dangerous. Storms and how sea level rise will affect big cypress reservation where she lived as a young child she's has salt water creeping inland from the ocean threatens wildlife and water supplies there. She says maintaining their communities and ceremonial grounds is very important to the tribe because historically atlanta is where simos originally survived. Frank is one of eight news plaintiffs in a lawsuit against the state of florida. The suit aims to hold the government accountable for its contribution to climate change and force the state to take action to limit future warming. She says it's time for the government to take steps to preserve her communities past and ensure its

Val Holly Frank Florida Us Army South Florida Oklahoma Simos United States Atlanta Frank
How to Attract, Develop, and Retain Top Nonprofit Talent

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

02:05 min | 1 year ago

How to Attract, Develop, and Retain Top Nonprofit Talent

"Great to have you and thank you so much for all the work. you do. Thanks so much for having me here. I'm a huge fan of your leadership in this field john. Well thank you The feeling is mutual so galley. Clearly you get the challenge in the sector and this is what your organization is about. Why don't you tell folks a little bit about leading edge and its origin story. And i'm also curious about the thinking about your organization being focused specifically on jewish organizations. Sure let me take this in two parts. The first is genesis origin story. So it was a dark and stormy night noticed. it was Twenty thirteen Toward the end in two thousand thirteen when an informal group of ceo's of foundations and major jewish organizations have been meeting informally for some time and The purpose of these meetings was talking about some of the major issues of major challenges facing the community in thinking about collaborative approach or shared warnings. Those types of almost like informal networking kind of conversations and at that time in sort of building up to that time the conversation was all about the leadership pipeline right. There were a lot of folks in those rooms. A lot of leaders who admitted. I'm not sure he's taking over for me when i retire in. Fill in the blank years and joan. You've talked about this gap and so in two thousand thirteen. Just like in the general nonprofit non see jared say general society jewish nonprofit sector was talking about a turnover in the c. suite of seventy five percents ninety percent by some estimates and fuelled by generational. You know what the demographics and and so this group of of really investors in the jewish ecosystem understood that there was essentially exposure to our organizations because we know that the marker of a great organization starts with a leader that that transition was going to be precarious so they wanted to do something about it and what

General Society John Joan
You Can Grow New Brain Cells. Here's How

TED Talks Daily

01:56 min | 1 year ago

You Can Grow New Brain Cells. Here's How

"Can we as adults grew new nerve. Sounds these still some confusion about that question. As this is a fairly new field of research for example are sticking to one of my colleague robert with an oncologist and he was sitting me cendrine. This is puzzling. Some of my patients. That have been told there are queued. Are cancer still develop symptom of depression. And i responded to him from my point of view that make sense so drug you give to your patients that stops a cells multiplying also stop the newborn neurons being generated in your brain and then robert looked at me like i was crazy and said but sundering visa adult patients either do not grow new nurse and much street surprise. I say well actually we do. And we sees a phenomenon that we call muroo genie's so now roburt is not a neuroscientist and when you went to medical school it was not to what we know. Now that the other brain can generate new nurse airs so roburt being a doctor. He's wanted to come to my lab to understand a little bit better topic. And i took him for two of one of the most exciting parts of the brain when it comes to new jersey's the compass so vis vis gray structure in the center of the brain and what we know seems already very long is that this is important for learning and memory and mood and emotion however what we have learned more recently. Is that this is one of the unique structure of the other brain where new neurons can be generated

Robert Confusion Roburt Depression Cancer New Jersey
How to Pave a New Career Path

TED Talks Daily

02:23 min | 1 year ago

How to Pave a New Career Path

"Today we're gonna be exploring stepping into the unknown head to talk about it. I am joined by debbie. Millman that hosted one of our first podcasts. Ever or one of the first time ever. Hi debbie hang lease. Great ac- air. It's great to see you If you haven't tuned in before debbie's cast is called design matters. And i have been listening while i go on runs and Really enjoy your conversation. Thank you thank you so much. We'll to frame this talk Why don't we start by talking. About how stepping into the unknown applies in your own life in in your own career. Well i was really influenced. Several years ago. I interviewed the great writer danny shapiro and we were talking after the interview. She came into my office at the school of visual arts and saw that i had stacked on my task. Three books had just come out a barrel confidence. I i really had felt at the time. That confidence is by holy grail. But this is what. I was looking for to find my whole life if i could find the confidence to step into any without fear that that would be like my life likely be made and she and i started talking about that and she said oh i think. Confidence is really overrated. What what like ed explodes. And i pressed her for more information. And she said that she felt the confidence overrated that most people that just head oodles oodles of confidence were jerky thought was more important than confidence was actually courage and that courage to step into that unknown was was far more important to being able to reach any kind of call in so it set me on a pass of a research to really find our What confidence actually meant. What does it mean to have. What have you have you get confidence. You're not good with supermarket in like polls confidence shelves

Debbie Hang Debbie Danny Shapiro Millman School Of Visual Arts ED
Interview With Model, Actress, Dancer, Activist, Leyna Bloom

Asian Enough

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Model, Actress, Dancer, Activist, Leyna Bloom

"So you're a dancer. A model an actor an activist. You were the cover model on. The sports illustrated swimsuit cover It's a famous pop cultural institution. But it's one that's historically been seen. I think in the mainstream through a straight male gaze and in this year's edition there was like an intentional effort to celebrate an inclusive spectrum of women. And i think i understand you shot it before you learn. You made the cover along with tennis player. Naomi osaka and rapper meghan stallion. But what were your hopes going into the shoot and what did you want to convey images. Well anything that i do sense. Being in these spaces of representation is fairly new to argos system. All around the world. I think for me. It has to be some type of cultural shift. Has the part of something that is not just based around vanity orc gluttony. It has to be something that has a message in yes. I have beaten suit on. Yes i'm in. My muslim informed bites what i stand for. And why i was chosen to be part of the issue and then be on the cover was because of what i wanna do with everything i do in the bible being In the past a lot of the models are beautiful. Yes what is a story what is fighting for. What are they really rooted and makes them who they are. And the reason why. I've gotten up to this. Point is not because meek just being beautiful. It's me fighting the system it's me. I'm being blacklisted. It's me saying no. I don't wanna do. This is saying it's not what you say. Yes you is what you say no to that builds character. So what we doing. And what i do with this issue is to invite people who think differently. And that's why i was session for a moment winning a transient on the cover. Because are every single. Day being brutalized murdered sexualize. Harass already has been thirty three on some of cases of trans women especially of color being murdered in america so when that is happening society is imperative in his responsibilities to have moments like

Naomi Osaka Meghan Stallion Tennis America
How Canada and the Western World Failed Afghanistan

The Big Story

02:17 min | 1 year ago

How Canada and the Western World Failed Afghanistan

"I'm jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Stephen save holds the patterson chair and international affairs at carleton university. Among the books he's written is adapting in the dust. Lessons learned from canada's war in afghanistan. And he also co hosts a podcast about canada's national security called the battle rhythm hasty. Hello i'm doing all right like many canadians. I kind of spent the weekend. seeing progressively more and more disturbing images coming out of afghanistan especially kabul and. I'm i'm wondering if you could maybe describe what we're actually seeing and hearing about in afghanistan right now. Well it's the collapse of the government that we've been trying to build for the past twenty years The taliban were kicked out of the country by american forces and then in two thousand and two There developed a un effort that became a nato effort called isaf the international security assistance force along with a variety of other international partners to try to build a self sustaining afghan government. And then two thousand fourteen. Nato largely pulled out three years. After canada pulled out of combat and for the past seven years there was a nato effort to train the afghan army and last year. Donald trump Negotiated deal the taliban that would vote the remaining few americans that were left in afghanistan out before this summer there about two thousand five hundred americans soldiers mostly doing training and doing coordination type stuff and So that was Trump's decision last year and then when it became president there was a question about whether he would live by the deal which had a deadline of may fifth at all. Americans are supposed to be out by may fifth and the by racial thought. That would be too fast. That that we would be able to get our stuff in our people out in his In his mind and so they sent the data september eleventh and over the course of the summer The taliban made a series of deals with a variety of actors within afghanistan that led to the collapse of the afghan national army forces that were guarding a variety of places around the country until the only thing that was left was couple which fell this weekend.

Afghanistan Jordan Heath Rawlings Patterson Chair And Internatio International Security Assista Nato Canada Carleton University Taliban Kabul Stephen Afghan National Army UN Donald Trump
Walk With Little Amal, a Theatrical Journey Celebrating the Refugee Experience

TED Talks Daily

02:08 min | 1 year ago

Walk With Little Amal, a Theatrical Journey Celebrating the Refugee Experience

"Among muniz. Irby i was born in east jerusalem and a tough part of town between between the neighborhood and the shafat refugee camp. I'll mix child that means. My mother is jewish and my father's palestinian so the refugee experience runs very deep in the dna of the family. When my jewish grandparents were fleeing europe because of world war two. They came to palestine and drove the other part of my family into exile. When i was fourteen. I stumbled by accident into a theater show and this rough part of town and i fell in love. I fell in love with a reality that was being created in front of me reality. That was full of possibilities. That was wilder was free. A reality that was an opposite contrast of the harsh reality we were living in and i became a theatre. Practitioner becoming a theatre. Practitioner and palestine is like conjuring water in the desert. We don't have the infrastructure. We don't have the big artistic institutions. What we do have is a need and something to say about the world. We live in taking my shows to communities in refugee camps in palestine. I was always struck by the immediacy of the encounter and that became a very powerful experience for me in two thousand fifteen at the height of the refugee crisis when hundreds of thousands of people were walking across europe with all the pain and the anguish that we saw. I started thinking that maybe we need to create a new model of theater. Maybe we need to take our theater out of the theaters and into the streets. The streets where these people were walking. And i started working with good sean theater company Company that creates theater about the refugee experience together. We created the walk. The walk is a rolling arts festival. That will cross eight thousand kilometers sixty five cities towns and villages in its way and we will create one hundred twenty events of welcome.

Shafat Refugee Camp Palestine Irby Muniz East Jerusalem Europe Wilder Sean Theater
Life's Tapestry With Florence Taylor

Stitch Please

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Life's Tapestry With Florence Taylor

"Hello y'all lawrence. Taylor is a delight. She does so much in. Continues is so much in the sewing community. She is one of those reliable trustworthy voices that i turned to she works with so many different companies in different capacities supporting so many small business owners so many small black business owners so many small black women business owners through the fabric industry. And i'm so grateful for it. So i welcome in. I want get started with a channel brought umbrella of a question. It you're writing lawrence taylor. The play on broad wish and part of her character description was a sewing philosophy. What would it be. I look at sowing as my love. Language to myself to my family to my friends. So it's wearable of wearable ma. That is so beautiful because sewing. Came from a place of love for me. When i didn't think i I was worthy of it and when he was missing in terms of avoid of my mom. passing away so when anybody that i love where something that i think. They have to know that little whisper into the sewing. That's why so with an old machine. I whisper thoughts. And i say things. Like if i'm making something for my son i in this climate when i make him something a mike i hope this is bright in someone sees him. I hope that this doesn't attract too much attention but yet big him stand out. I hope that when he's walking invest. Someone sees it he. He's somebody that is worthy to still make it home. I'm not even kidding. I literally whispered these incantations for him for my husband and even for my daughter. Sometimes i just want them to be noticed in the sense that they're remembered they don't have to be more.

Lawrence Taylor Lawrence Taylor Mike
How the IPCC Report Is About More Than Just Climate Change

The Big Story

01:51 min | 1 year ago

How the IPCC Report Is About More Than Just Climate Change

"I'm fatma fitting in for jordan heath. rawlings this is the big story. Brick smith is the president of the canadian institute for climate choice. Herrick thanks for being here. It's pleasure so what was your first reaction when you read the report while i mean. Let's let's just acknowledge that this thing is massive minutes thousands of pages. Hundreds of scientists around the world have been working on this thing for the last many months of fourteen. Thousand studies were incorporated and summarized and synthesized in this reports enormous amount of information. This is the most significant update to what we know about climate in in many years over half a decade. There's a lot of stuff now does not surprising me for anybody. That's been keeping track of climate change science and the the notion that warming is getting is happening more quickly than expected. would not be news. I think one of the more significant aspects of the report is the unequivocal linkage. Based on the best available science that recent extreme weather events are being driven by climate change in the idc has never been that explicit before. And of course there's this whole new discipline called attribution science that's That's quite new. This new kind of science is makes it possible for us to say yeah. This particular heatwave is being driven by climate change that is a. That's a very new Development in the climate change debate. And i think very powerful because long story short what this report does is. It brings climate change home for people. Climate change is a health concern.

Fatma Jordan Heath Brick Smith Canadian Institute For Climate Herrick IDC
An Interactive Map to Track (and End) Pollution in China

TED Talks Daily

02:12 min | 1 year ago

An Interactive Map to Track (and End) Pollution in China

"Choking smog polluted waters climate change. This has been the environmental cost of the tremendous wells in china of the past forty years at the same time. Hundreds of millions of people have put themselves out of poverty as environmentalists in china. I have witnessed all of this first. Hand the challenge we're phasing is. Can we clean up as fast. And as broadly as the massive development degrading our air water and climate china has one point four billion people a steel fast growing economy and is responsible for the biggest share of the current greenhouse gas emission. china knows it's global responsibility and has pledged to be carbon neutral by twenty sixty. It means more than ten billion metric. Tons of carbon emission must be stopped abi neutralized. How can we possibly do it. The pressing global climate situation requires each of us. Not just to do it but to do it faster. I believe there's a chance for us to succeed. As i know a tool that i've work to help reduce the enormous environmental pollution. It is the power of transparency. Pollution information made public using mobile internet and other. It technologies many empowers millions of citizens to speed. Change by holding corporations and government agencies accountable. I personally got involved in the transparency drive for or pollution control years ago. Besides lake tied the third largest freshwater lake in china. I saw a group of fishermen using loan lados to scoop out the one fisherman said to me when i was young on a holiday like this i would jump into the lake for a bath but now he said the fish are gone. And we're paid to scoop out the algae pointing to those factories not far from the shoreline. He said the lake would not be clean onto. They stop dumping years of research. Made me understand how hard it is to check the dumping

China Besides Lake
Interpersonal Skills Are Hard Work (With Carole Robin)

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Interpersonal Skills Are Hard Work (With Carole Robin)

"Carol i am so pleased to have you join me to get all touchy feely today. Well i'm delighted to be here. Thank you so much john. So let's start by getting on the same page about vocabulary stanford calls this transformational class. Interpersonal dynamics i also hear a ton of people use the acronym e q. I mean i even use it. If i'm talking about someone who reads others. Well who seems quite authentic in their relationships. I might say i think this person has really high q. Help us with definition of terms. Are they similar. Different of a cloth. Talk to me. Yeah so the termi emot- e. q. Was coined by daniel goldin and in a in a now Very famous book and Came out actually. We just celebrated the twenty fifth anniversary of his of his seminal work and emotional intelligence or e. q. Is he defines. It is about a set of competencies that essentially Include self awareness. self-regulation Embassy the ability to motivate others and and social skills now one of the reasons that his work was. So seminal was that he legitimized the need for social for what we call the soft skills right in business and in fact what his research showed was that the people who were the best at the soft skills actually were the ones who created the highest performing organizations and were the most successful

Daniel Goldin Carol Stanford John
Don't Call People out -- Call Them In

TED Talks Daily

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Don't Call People out -- Call Them In

"First of all thank you all for listening to me. I come to y'all because most black women don't go the klu klux klan rallies on purpose. I did because it was my job. I've monitored hate groups. But i really wanted to find out how people could hate strangers so much. Mostly i wanted to work for peace and justice but fortunately for me my mentor at the time was the legendary civil rights leader. Reverend ct period. Who'd been an aide to dr martin luther king and see ts to say when you ask people to give up hate the you need to be there for them when they do now the time. Ct set those words. I started muttering under my breath. Because you can't curse out a preacher you know. But if i didn't make any sistemi to me because if the clan hated black folks al's all right with hating them back sounded okay to me but then something happened. It became my job to help people who were leaving hate groups and then once i got the norm i couldn't hate him anymore and then i got confused. I'm a survivor. A racial violence rape and incest. And i needed to find another moral compass for my life's work and the conference had this schiff from hate to love and so that improbable journey is why i'm here to talk to you today. Because i really really want to build a culture and a world that invites people in instead of pushing them out is called a calling in culture

KLU Dr Martin Luther King AL Schiff
Fathi Terbil, a Champion for Human Rights, Takes on Gaddafi

Real Dictators

01:40 min | 1 year ago

Fathi Terbil, a Champion for Human Rights, Takes on Gaddafi

"February fifteenth two thousand eleven in the middle of a quiet thursday afternoon a succession of 'cause pulls up outside a modest suburban home out kyle twenty agents but the city's general security directorate folks by the name not gentlemen to stand on ceremony. They forced they leeann ransacked. The place smashing things of the who lives here is not exactly surprised by their appearance. He's been arrested seven times before thrown in jail and been tortured at length. Never with regard to a specific charge visitations from gadhafi's goons aren't occupational hazard in his line of work. His name is fatty. to- bill and he's a lawyer rather fields one a champion for human rights in june nineteen ninety-six over twelve hundred prisoners in libya's notorious abu salim jail massacred for years. The relatives of those murdered have been seeking justice. Baby face thirty nine year old always dressed in a baseball cap and checked. Kefalas gov the recognizable. Tabio there's become something of a celebrity lightning rod for those aggrieved. He takes great personal risk in seeking answers from the authorities to be ozone brother. Cousin and brother-in-law all died in selling him so he has a personal stake in uncovering the truth.

Leeann Abu Salim Kyle Gadhafi Kefalas Tabio Libya Bill Baseball Cousin
Equity Is About More Than Just Hiring Diverse Employees

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

02:31 min | 1 year ago

Equity Is About More Than Just Hiring Diverse Employees

"Renee welcome to washington post live. Hi jonathan. I'm so happy to be here with you. Well i'm happy to have you here. You have consulted for some of the biggest companies in the country and every big company is focused on diversity inclusion and equity or at least. They say they are so. How do you measure the inclusion health of company. What are you look for when you look at well. of course. Most people think demographics in the numbers. And certainly that is very important to look at so you can see sort of where the gaps are but what it's harder to measure is the sense of belonging and inclusion and the ability for people to share their perspectives and have opportunity and to move up and to be compensated so the entire kind of employee life cycle has to be evaluated for you to really know. Is their health. One thing at netflix to that we think about is who speaks and who doesn't in who gets descent and who doesn't those are all aspects of health. That's a really interesting that this focus on sense sense of belonging so to that point of as particularly at netflix who speaks. And and who doesn't who was the was it you. Were you the person who said that. It means something and it might mean something more than you think when you're in a meeting and there's that one person or two people who don't speak ashore and i'm sure i'm not the only person who said who said that the voices so much of the work which to do around inclusion is to remember that their voices we have never heard there are perspectives. That have never been really given air. And if any company wants to move into the future and be resilient incompetent incapable in and relevant right and to serve their constituencies in customers. They've got to be on this journey of inclusion because it's where the innovation is is where the creativity is. It's where the excitement is in so for us as a company. Amine it's easy were trying to entertain the world. We dare not try to do that without getting many more voices than both the entertainment and the tech industries have had over since their inception wife. Frankly

Netflix Renee Washington Post Jonathan